Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 47 Issue 47

November 10, 2008

Volume 47, Issue 47

Pages 8969–9159

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Molecular Cut-Outs of Mo/Zn Hume–Rothery Phases: Synthesis and Structure of [{Mo(CO)4}4(Zn)6(μ-ZnCp*)4] / Twelve One-Electron Ligands Coordinating One Metal Center: Structure and Bonding of [Mo(ZnCH3)9(ZnCp*)3] (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 47/2008) (page 8969)

      Thomas Cadenbach, Timo Bollermann, Christian Gemel, Israel Fernandez, Moritz von Hopffgarten, Gernot Frenking and Roland A. Fischer

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890238

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two Zinc(I) to one Gallium(I) is the exchange rate for the synthesis of [Mo(ZnCp*)3(ZnMe3)9] from [Mo(GaCp*)6] and ZnMe2 (Cp*=C5Me5). The equally unusual complex [{Mo(CO)4}4(Zn)6(μ-ZnCp*)4] is formed analogously. As molecular cut-outs of a Mo/Zn alloy phase wrapped into tender ligand shells (depicted as bubbles), these are prototypes of a new class of compounds at the borderline of complexes and clusters, as R. A. Fischer, G. Frenking, and co-workers describe in the Communications on pages 9146 ff. and 9150 ff.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Nanoscale Reactor Engineering: Hydrothermal Synthesis of Uniform Zeolite Particles in Massively Parallel Reaction Chambers (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 47/2008) (page 8970)

      Won Cheol Yoo, Sandeep Kumar, Zhiyong Wang, Nicholas S. Ergang, Wei Fan, Georgios N. Karanikolos, Alon V. McCormick, R. Lee Penn, Michael Tsapatsis and Andreas Stein

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890239

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Geodes are hollow, globular rocks with crystals lining their internal surface. The production of such structures in the submicrometer regime is described by A. Stein et al. in the Communication on page 9096 ff. Silicalite-1 crystallizes in a geode-like manner within the confinements of porous carbon reactors with an inverse opal structure. The zeolite morphology can be engineered by adjusting the shape and size of the reactor pores, interfacial interactions, transport phenomena, and precursor conditions.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  4. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      An Immobilization Method of Chiral Quaternary Ammonium Salts onto Polymer Supports (page 8983)

      Yukihiro Arakawa, Naoki Haraguchi and Shinichi Itsuno

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890241

      This article corrects:

      An Immobilization Method of Chiral Quaternary Ammonium Salts onto Polymer Supports1

      Vol. 47, Issue 43, 8232–8235, Version of Record online: 22 SEP 2008

    2. You have free access to this content
      Specific Fluorescent Probe for 8-Oxoguanosine (page 8983)

      Osamu Nakagawa, Sayaka Ono, Zhichun Li, Akira Tsujimoto and Shigeki Sasaki

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200890244

      This article corrects:

      Specific Fluorescent Probe for 8-Oxoguanosine1

      Vol. 46, Issue 24, 4500–4503, Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2007

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008

      The Green Fluorescent Protein: A Key Tool to Study Chemical Processes in Living Cells (pages 8992–8994)

      G. Ulrich Nienhaus

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804998

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Strike a light! The discovery, isolation, and development of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related proteins has revolutionalized the specific fluorescence labeling of proteins in cells. GFPs, the subject of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, even facilitate the imaging of various parts of cells in different colors (see picture).

    2. Click Thiol–Ene Chemistry

      The Emergence of Thiol–Ene Coupling as a Click Process for Materials and Bioorganic Chemistry (pages 8995–8997)

      Alessandro Dondoni

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802516

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The century-old thiol–ene radical reaction is now being recognized among the ranks of other click-type reactions (see scheme). Recent applications in dendrimer and glycopeptide syntheses demonstrate the efficiency of this process for the assembly of complex molecular systems.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Imaging Methods

      Synthesis of 11C, 18F, 15O, and 13N Radiolabels for Positron Emission Tomography (pages 8998–9033)

      Philip W. Miller, Nicholas J. Long, Ramon Vilar and Antony D. Gee

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800222

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On the fast track: Positron emission tomography relies on the incorporation of a positron-emitting isotope such as 11C, 18F, 15O, or 13N into biologically active compounds. The extremely short half-lives of the isotopes necessitates that the synthesis of the radioactive label is fast and based on simple prepartive methods (see picture).

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Telomerase

      Regulation of Telomerase Activity by the Thermodynamic Stability of a DNA⋅RNA Hybrid (pages 9034–9038)

      Hai-Qing Yu, Dong-Hao Zhang, Xiao-Bo Gu, Daisuke Miyoshi and Naoki Sugimoto

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803577

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Slide or stick: The thermodynamic stability of a hybrid composed of substrate DNA and template RNA derived from telomerase was investigated under dilute and molecular-crowding conditions. Destabilization of the hybrid by cosolutes of low molecular weight (MW) leads to an easier sliding of telomerase along the telomeric DNA (see picture). In contrast, telomerase tends to stick to the telomeric DNA when the hybrid is stabilized by high-MW cosolutes.

    2. Polymer Gels

      Photoregulated Wormlike Motion of a Gel (pages 9039–9043)

      Shu-ichi Shinohara, Takahiro Seki, Takamasa Sakai, Ryo Yoshida and Yukikazu Takeoka

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Global worming: A periodically ordered mesoporous gel demonstrates photoregulated peristaltic motion induced by a nonlinear oscillating Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction. The amplitude and period of the motion can be controlled by adjusting the intensity of visible light irradiation (see picture). Peristaltic motion of the gel surface can be observed by the change in structural color based on the reflection from the photonic bandgap of the gel.

    3. Bimolecular Electron Transfer

      Direct Femtosecond Observation of Tight and Loose Ion Pairs upon Photoinduced Bimolecular Electron Transfer (pages 9044–9048)

      Omar F. Mohammed, Katrin Adamczyk, Natalie Banerji, Jens Dreyer, Bernhard Lang, Erik T. J. Nibbering and Eric Vauthey

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polarization-sensitive ultrafast infrared measurements on photoinduced electron transfer in donor–acceptor pairs in polar acetonitrile show distinct contributions from loose and tight ion pairs. Highly anisotropic signals from tight ion pairs reveal the importance of mutual orientation of the reactants (see picture) and thus the need to refine theoretical models based on spherical species that solely involve reaction distances.

    4. Controlled Self-Assembly

      Controlled Self-Assembly Manipulated by Charge-Transfer Interactions: From Tubes to Vesicles (pages 9049–9052)

      Chao Wang, Shouchun Yin, Senlin Chen, Huaping Xu, Zhiqiang Wang and Xi Zhang

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803361

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transfer request: A self-assembled supramolecular charge-transfer complex of 1-(11-oxo-11-pyren-1-ylmethoxy)undecyl)pyridinium bromide (PYR) and ethane-1,2-diyl bis(3,5-dinitrobenzoate) (DNB) is shown to form vesicular aggregates in aqueous solution, in contrast to the tubular aggregates of pure PYR (see picture). A curvature-dependent mechanism for this change is proposed.

    5. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Direct Organocatalytic Mannich Reaction of Acetaldehyde: An Improved Catalyst and Mechanistic Insight from a Computational Study (pages 9053–9058)

      Yujiro Hayashi, Tsubasa Okano, Takahiko Itoh, Tatsuya Urushima, Hayato Ishikawa and Tadafumi Uchimaru

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802073

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A chiral diaryl prolinol silyl ether organocatalyst with an acid is used for the direct catalytic asymmetric Mannich reaction of acetaldehyde and imines. N-Benzoyl-, N-tert-butoxycarbonyl-, and N-toluene-4-sulfonylimines can be employed to produce synthetically useful β-amino aldehydes in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivity (see scheme). The reaction mechanism was investigated quantum-mechanically.

    6. Peptide Clusters

      Charge-Based Interactions between Peptides Observed as the Dominant Force for Association in Aqueous Solution (pages 9059–9062)

      Sylvia E. McLain, Alan K. Soper, Isabella Daidone, Jeremy C. Smith and Anthony Watts

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802679

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      What's the attraction? The structures of three dipeptides in aqueous solutions were investigated by using a combination of neutron diffraction and computer simulation. In each solution, peptide association was dominated by charge–charge rather than hydrophobic interactions (see the representative snapshot of the peptide/water box for glycyl-L-alanine; the water molecules are depicted by red crosses.)

    7. Liquid Crystals

      Liquid-Crystalline Kagome (pages 9063–9066)

      Benjamin Glettner, Feng Liu, Xiangbing Zeng, Marko Prehm, Ute Baumeister, Martin Walker, Martin A. Bates, Peter Boesecke, Goran Ungar and Carsten Tschierske

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802957

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No place like kagome: A quaternary amphiphile displays a novel complex liquid-crystalline phase formed by a periodic array combining triangular and hexagonal cylinders, filled with hydrocarbon and fluorinated chains, respectively. This leads to a fluid nanoscale multicompartment structure with kagome geometry. The thickness of the intercompartment walls is equal to the width of the π-conjugated rods (shown as black lines).

    8. Electron Transfer in DNA

      Ping-Pong Electron Transfer through DNA (pages 9067–9070)

      Benjamin Elias, Joseph C. Genereux and Jacqueline K. Barton

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803556

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Either way: An IrIII complex strongly coupled to a DNA base stack can inject a hole or an electron in DNA upon irradiation (see picture). With strands containing the modified bases CPA and CPC/BrU, which serve as oxidative and reductive probes, respectively, photolysis of Ir–DNA conjugates leads to a “ping-pong” electron transfer, with both hole and electron migration.

    9. Bioinorganic Chemistry

      A Combined NRVS and DFT Study of FeIV[DOUBLE BOND]O Model Complexes: A Diagnostic Method for the Elucidation of Non-Heme Iron Enzyme Intermediates (pages 9071–9074)

      Caleb B. Bell III, Shaun D. Wong, Yuming Xiao, Eric J. Klinker, Adam L. Tenderholt, Matt C. Smith, Jan-Uwe Rohde, Lawrence Que Jr., Stephen P. Cramer and Edward I. Solomon

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803740

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the swing of things: FeIV[DOUBLE BOND]O biomimetic model complexes (see picture, Fe green, O red, N blue, C black) have been characterized using nuclear vibrational resonance spectroscopy. Systematic trends in the low-energy region reflect equatorial and axial bonding differences that relate to differences in reactivity. These trends have been computationally extended to predict the spectra of putative FeIV[DOUBLE BOND]O intermediates in non-heme iron enzymes.

    10. Nanostructures

      Cobalt Nanocubes in Ionic Liquids: Synthesis and Properties (pages 9075–9078)

      Morgana Scariot, Dagoberto O. Silva, Jackson D. Scholten, Giovanna Machado, Sérgio R. Teixeira, Miguel A. Novak, Günter Ebeling and Jairton Dupont

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804200

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cubes and spheres: The simple thermal decomposition of [Co2(CO)8] dispersed in 1-alkyl-3-methyl imidazolium ionic liquids can preferentially generate either ligand-free cobalt nanocubes or spherical nanoparticles, depending on the type of ionic liquid and the decomposition time. These nanostructures can act as selective catalysts in the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis.

    11. Mg[BOND]Mg Bonds

      Stable Adducts of a Dimeric Magnesium(I) Compound (pages 9079–9083)

      Shaun P. Green, Cameron Jones and Andreas Stasch

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803960

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bit of a stretch! A series of stable Lewis base adducts of a dimeric magnesium(I) complex has been prepared and shown to possess exceptionally long Mg[BOND]Mg bonds. Theoretical studies on model compounds suggest the elongations of these bonds are low-energy processes. The structures of the magnesium(I) adducts are compared with those of related magnesium(II) hydride complexes (see picture; Mg pink, N blue, O red, H green).

    12. Peptide Chemistry

      Structural Studies of Copper(I) Complexes of Amyloid-β Peptide Fragments: Formation of Two-Coordinate Bis(histidine) Complexes (pages 9084–9087)

      Richard A. Himes, Ga Young Park, Gnana Sutha Siluvai, Ninian J. Blackburn and Kenneth D. Karlin

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803908

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The beta bind: Copper(I) binds to amyloid β-peptide fragments (see structure) as a stable bis(histidine), two-coordinate, near-linear complex, even in the presence of potential additional ligands. As has been proposed or assumed in other studies, the copper(I)–peptide complexes react with dioxygen to form the reactive oxygen species H2O2, without the need for a third histidine ligand to promote the chemistry.

    13. Stereocontrolled Polymerization

      Effect of the Configuration of the Active Center on Comonomer Reactivities: The Case of ε-Caprolactone/ l,l-Lactide Copolymerization (pages 9088–9091)

      Marcin Florczak and Andrzej Duda

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803540

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pick your polymer: The reactivity ratios, r, of the comonomers can be controlled by the configuration of the active species in the copolymerization of ε-caprolactone (CL) and l,l-lactide (LA; see scheme). Thus, by varying the configuration of the initiator, a broad spectrum of copolymers with different microstructures, from gradient to more random, can be prepared in a controlled way.

    14. Zeolites

      Detection of Structural Elements of Different Zeolites in Nucleating Solutions by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (pages 9092–9095)

      Bernd Bastian Schaack, Wolfgang Schrader and Ferdi Schüth

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Building blocks in solution: Characteristic structural elements of the germanium-containing zeolites ZSM-5, polymorph C of zeolite Beta, and zeolite A (see picture) are identified in solution immediately before nucleation. The conditions of the reaction direct the polycondensation of silicate towards specific structures at the solution stage.

    15. Nanoscale Reactor Engineering: Hydrothermal Synthesis of Uniform Zeolite Particles in Massively Parallel Reaction Chambers (pages 9096–9099)

      Won Cheol Yoo, Sandeep Kumar, Zhiyong Wang, Nicholas S. Ergang, Wei Fan, Georgios N. Karanikolos, Alon V. McCormick, R. Lee Penn, Michael Tsapatsis and Andreas Stein

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803103

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cooking in a small pot: Uniform zeolite particles (see picture) can be prepared in high yield by hydrothermal syntheses within the confinement of inverse-opal carbon reactors. The product morphology depends on interfacial interactions at the reactor walls and on other parameters that can be engineered into the reactor process.

    16. Nanostructures

      Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles in Deep Eutectic Solvents for Studies of Structure–Functionality Relationships in Electrocatalysis (pages 9100–9103)

      Hong-Gang Liao, Yan-Xia Jiang, Zhi-You Zhou, Sheng-Pei Chen and Shi-Gang Sun

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803202

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Star performance: The shape and surface structure of star-shaped gold nanoparticles (NPs) bounded by (331) and vicinal high-index facets, now synthesized for the first time, can be tuned by varying the water content in the deep eutetic solvent. The results confirm that star-shaped Au NPs exhibit superior activity for electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2. The ability to tune the shape offers insight into structure–functionality relationships.

    17. Ring-Closing Metathesis

      Bismacrocyclic Inhibitors of Hepatitis C NS3/4a Protease (pages 9104–9107)

      John A. McCauley, Michael T. Rudd, Kevin T. Nguyen, Charles J. McIntyre, Joseph J. Romano, Kimberly J. Bush, Sandor L. Varga, Charles W. Ross III, Steven S. Carroll, Jillian DiMuzio, Mark W. Stahlhut, David B. Olsen, Terry A. Lyle, Joseph P. Vacca and Nigel J. Liverton

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803298

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Double time: The bismacrocycle 2 was prepared from 1 by a selective double ring-closing metathesis (RCM) reaction to form the 18- and 15-membered rings simultaneously. Derivative 3 shows excellent potency against NS3/4a protease.

    18. Inclusion Compounds

      Electrospinning of Cyclodextrin–Pseudopolyrotaxane Nanofibers (pages 9108–9111)

      Tamer Uyar, Peter Kingshott and Flemming Besenbacher

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803352

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spinning a web: The electrospinning of cyclodextrin (CD) pseudopolyrotaxane, α-CD–PEG-IC (PEG=poly(ethylene glycol), IC=inclusion complex), nanofibers using poly(ethylene oxide) as a carrier polymer matrix has been achieved (see picture) without destruction of the pseudopolyrotaxane structure. This opens up a variety of possibilities for the development of multifunctional nanofibers containing CD pseudopolyrotaxanes and/or CD inclusion complexes.

    19. Nickel(II) Complexes

      [Ni{N(SiMe2CH2PtBu2)2}]+: Direct Observation of Transannular Si[BOND]C(sp3) Bond Coordination (pages 9112–9114)

      Hongjun Fan, Benjamin C. Fullmer, Maren Pink and Kenneth G. Caulton

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802654

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      How low can you go? The title [(PNP)Ni]+ complex is not a T-shaped d8 cation. Rather, it has an electrophilic NiII center bound to one of the Si[BOND]C bonds, stretching it by nearly 0.2 Å. This example shows that there are limits to how unsaturated NiII centers can be.

    20. Metal–Metal Interactions

      Synthesis and Characterization of the Metal(I) Dimers [Ar′MMAr′]: Comparisons with Quintuple-Bonded [Ar′CrCrAr′] (pages 9115–9117)

      Tailuan Nguyen, W. Alexander Merrill, Chengbao Ni, Hao Lei, James C. Fettinger, Bobby D. Ellis, Gary J. Long, Marcin Brynda and Philip P. Power

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802657

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cobalt together: The iron and cobalt analogues of the quintuple-bonded chromium species [Ar′CrCrAr′] (Ar′=C6H3-2,6-(2,6-iPr2C6H3)2) are described and their structures investigated by crystallography, magnetic studies, and density functional calculations. Metal-η6-aryl interactions in [Ar′FeFeAr′] and [Ar′CoCoAr′] are stronger than those detected in [Ar′CrCrAr′], whereas metal–metal bonding is much weaker.

    21. Coordinated Ketyl Radicals

      Gas-Phase Formation of the Gomberg–Bachmann Magnesium Ketyl (pages 9118–9121)

      Charlene C. L. Thum, George N. Khairallah and Richard A. J. O'Hair

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803463

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      MgCl2., synthesized in the gas phase, reacts with ketones to produce the corresponding Gomberg–Bachmann magnesium ketyl radical anion, which further leads to a magnesium enolate through β scission. DFT calculations support the reactions observed and reveal that the singly occupied molecular orbital changes from metal-based in the reactant to ligand-based in the product (see picture).

    22. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Regiodivergent 1,4 versus 1,6 Asymmetric Copper-Catalyzed Conjugate Addition (pages 9122–9124)

      Hélène Hénon, Marc Mauduit and Alexandre Alexakis

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803735

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal matters: A highly regiodivergent copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition to α,β and γ,δ Michael acceptors is described. Zinc and aluminum reagents afford the 1,6 adduct with good to moderate enantioselectivity in the presence of ligand 1 (see scheme). In contrast, Grignard reagents used with hydroxy imidazolium ligand 2 afforded the 1,4 adduct with excellent ee values.

    23. Synthetic Methods

      Lewis Base Assisted Brønsted Base Catalysis: Bidentate Phosphine Oxides as Activators and Modulators of Brønsted Basic Lanthanum–Aryloxides (pages 9125–9129)

      Hiroyuki Morimoto, Tatsuhiko Yoshino, Takafumi Yukawa, Gang Lu, Shigeki Matsunaga and Masakatsu Shibasaki

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803682

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dynamic Duo: A Lewis basic bidentate phosphine oxide was effective for activating and modulating the properties of Brønsted basic lanthanum aryl oxides. The Lewis base 1/lanthanum aryl oxide system was suitable for anti-selective Mannich-type reactions of trichloromethyl ketones (see scheme), affording unique building blocks for azetidine-2-carboxylic acids as well as β-amino acids.

    24. Biaryls

      Synthesis of Amino- and Hydroxybiphenyls by Radical Chain Reaction of Arenediazonium Salts (pages 9130–9133)

      Alexander Wetzel, Varinia Ehrhardt and Markus R. Heinrich

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803785

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Radically shortened: In the propagation step of the title reaction, the cyclohexadienyl radical intermediate is oxidized by an arenediazonium ion to give the biaryl product (see scheme) while simultaneously a new aryl radical and nitrogen are formed.

    25. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of Thuggacin B (pages 9134–9137)

      Martin Bock, Richard Dehn and Andreas Kirschning

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803271

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Final proof of the complete structures of thuggacins A–C was gained by a highly convergent and flexible total synthesis. Notable features include a substrate-controlled, titanium-mediated aldol reaction, a cross-metathesis approach for converting terminal alkenes into the corresponding vinyl iodides, and the cross-coupling of a complex vinyl iodide and terminal alkyne in the Sonogashira reaction.

    26. Tissue Engineering

      Monolithic Polymers for Cell Cultivation, Differentiation, and Tissue Engineering (pages 9138–9141)

      Andrea Löber, Andreas Verch, Bettina Schlemmer, Sandra Höfer, Bernhard Frerich and Michael R. Buchmeiser

      Version of Record online: 16 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801872

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Need a new nose? Biocompatible, highly porous monolithic scaffolds have been prepared by electron-beam-initiated free-radical polymerization and ring-opening metathesis polymerization. These scaffolds can be used for the in vitro construction of equivalents to bone and fatty tissue. Thus, autologous stem cells have been differentiated into both lipoblasts and osteocytes.

    27. Reversible CO Coordination

      Stereospecific and Reversible CO Binding at Iron Pincer Complexes (pages 9142–9145)

      David Benito-Garagorri, Michael Puchberger, Kurt Mereiter and Karl Kirchner

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803665

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An opening for CO: An iron PNP pincer complex self-assembles in the solid state through intermolecular Fe[BOND]Cl⋅⋅⋅H[BOND]N hydrogen bonds to form a 3D supramolecular network. This compound reacts readily with gaseous CO in the solid state and in solution to stereospecifically give the octahedral complexes cis- and trans-[Fe(PNP-iPr)(CO)(Cl)2], respectively. In the solid-state process the supramolecular connectivities between individual molecules are maintained without loss of crystallinity.

    28. Cluster Compounds

      Molecular Cut-Outs of Mo/Zn Hume–Rothery Phases: Synthesis and Structure of [{Mo(CO)4}4(Zn)6(μ-ZnCp*)4] (pages 9146–9149)

      Thomas Cadenbach, Christian Gemel and Roland A. Fischer

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803449

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zinc in the middle: The reaction of [Mo(GaCp*)2(CO)4] and Zn(CH3)2 results in the cluster [{Mo(CO)4}4(Zn)6(μ-ZnCp*)4] (see picture), the first metalloid cluster with naked zinc atoms as cluster elements. This complex indeed represents a molecular cut-out of a Mo/Zn alloy, which is not only substantiated by similar interatomic distances but by direct comparison of coordination environments of the metal atoms.

    29. Twelve One-Electron Ligands Coordinating One Metal Center: Structure and Bonding of [Mo(ZnCH3)9(ZnCp*)3] (pages 9150–9154)

      Thomas Cadenbach, Timo Bollermann, Christian Gemel, Israel Fernandez, Moritz von Hopffgarten, Gernot Frenking and Roland A. Fischer

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802811

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surrounded by zinc: The reaction of [Mo(GaCp*)6] and Zn(CH3)2 zinc yields the exceptionally high-coordinate title compound (see picture; Mo red, Zn green, C gray). Quantum chemical analysis reveals a unique bonding situation best described as a perfectly sd5 hybridized molybdenum atom with 12 valence electrons engaged in Mo[BOND]Zn bonding. Another six electrons are delocalized over the Zn cage, evoking only weak Zn[BOND]Zn interactions.

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION