Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 48 Issue 11

March 2, 2009

Volume 48, Issue 11

Pages 1867–2053

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: SERS Labels for Red Laser Excitation: Silica-Encapsulated SAMs on Tunable Gold/Silver Nanoshells (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 11/2009) (page 1867)

      Bernd Küstner, Magdalena Gellner, Max Schütz, Friedrich Schöppler, Alexander Marx, Philipp Ströbel, Patrick Adam, Carsten Schmuck and Sebastian Schlücker

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990049

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      Silica-encapsulated SAMs … (self-assembled monolayers) on tunable Au/Ag nanoshells are described by S. Schlücker et al. in their Communication on page 1950 ff. These systems show great potential as labels for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in bioanalytical and biomedical applications with red laser excitation, for example, in assays and microscopy. This method combines the spectroscopic advantages of SAMs with the stability of glass shells.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Cognitive-Performance Recovery of Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice by Modulation of Early Soluble Amyloidal Assemblies (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 11/2009) (page 1868)

      Anat Frydman-Marom, Meirav Rechter, Irit Shefler, Yaron Bram, Deborah E. Shalev and Ehud Gazit

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990050

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      The accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) as amyloid fibril deposits may play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, which is among the most common diseases of the 21st century. E. Gazit and co-workers describe in their Communication on page 1981 ff. a novel Aβ fibrilization inhibitor, whose mechanism of action is based on targeting aromatic recognition modules together with a unique Cα-methylation β-breakage strategy. We thank Tal Mazor for the graphical assistance with the cover.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Christian Serre (page 1887)

      Version of Record online: 23 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806215

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      “My biggest motivation is facing a new challenge. My favorite subject at school was geography…!” These facts and more information about Christian Serre can be found on page 1887.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Catalysis

      Bridging the Materials Gap in Catalysis: Entrapment of Molecular Catalysts in Functional Supports and Beyond (pages 1890–1892)

      Arne Thomas and Matthias Driess

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805136

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      Rising sun of the materials world: Tremendous efforts are being made to combine the potential of molecular catalysts with that of functional supports. An approach towards unifying homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is the entrapment of organometallic catalysts in a metal matrix, which leads to well-defined composites that are suitable as heterogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation of styrene and diphenylacetylene.

    2. Borylene Complexes

      Reversible σ-Borane-to-Borylene Transformation: A Little Something For Everyone (pages 1893–1895)

      Holger Braunschweig and Rian D. Dewhurst

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805248

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      A reaction with many facets: The facile dehydrogenative synthesis of a borylene complex (left in scheme) from a dihydroborane (right), proceeds reversibly at room-temperature. The implications of this reaction for the fields of inorganic, main-group, and hydrogen-storage chemistry are covered in this Highlight.

    3. Hydroboration

      Asymmetric Hydroboration of 1,1-Disubstituted Alkenes (pages 1896–1898)

      Stephen P. Thomas and Varinder K. Aggarwal

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805604

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      A breakthrough in the asymmetric hydroboration of notoriously difficult 1,1-disubstituted alkenes using a new family of highly effective hydroboration reagents is described (see scheme). The intermediate boranes can be oxidized to alcohols or used in Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reactions.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Glycosidation

      New Principles for Glycoside-Bond Formation (pages 1900–1934)

      Xiangming Zhu and Richard R. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802036

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      Meeting the demand for sugars: The importance of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates in biological systems has stimulated a need to access significant amounts of these compounds. Much effort has been devoted to the stereoselective generation of the key glycosidic bond, both between carbohydrate residues (see scheme) and to the aglycone. Various methodologies are now available for the efficient synthesis of structurally defined complex oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Glycosylation (1)

      Semisynthesis of a Homogeneous Glycoprotein Enzyme: Ribonuclease C: Part 1 (pages 1936–1940)

      Christian Piontek, Petra Ring, Olaf Harjes, Christian Heinlein, Stefano Mezzato, Nelson Lombana, Claudia Pöhner, Markus Püttner, Daniel Varón Silva, Andreas Martin, Franz Xaver Schmid and Carlo Unverzagt

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804734

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      Seven in one blow: The efficient formation of mixed disulfides on the thiol-rich fusion protein A followed by subsequent intein cleavage gave the fragment B with all seven cysteines protected against oxidation. The native chemical ligation of B with synthetic glycopeptide thioesters provides glycoproteins.

    2. Glycosylation (2)

      Semisynthesis of a Homogeneous Glycoprotein Enzyme: Ribonuclease C: Part 2 (pages 1941–1945)

      Christian Piontek, Daniel Varón Silva, Christian Heinlein, Claudia Pöhner, Stefano Mezzato, Petra Ring, Andreas Martin, Franz Xaver Schmid and Carlo Unverzagt

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804735

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      Active RNase glycoprotein from three pieces: The glycoprotein enzyme ribonuclease C, which contains a complex saccharide N-glycan, was synthesized by sequential native chemical ligation. An optimized ligation and isolation protocol allowed the efficient assembly and refolding of the 124 amino acid enzyme.

    3. Protein–Polymer Hybrids

      Azurin–Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Conjugates by Site-Directed Mutagenesis and their Thermosensitive Behavior in Electron-Transfer Processes (pages 1946–1949)

      Nadine Rosenberger, Armido Studer, Nobuyuki Takatani, Hiroshi Nakajima and Yoshihito Watanabe

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804440

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      Searching for “intelligence”: Azurin–PNIPAM conjugates were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis followed by protein reconstitution by using imidazole-conjugated poly(N-isopropylacrylamides). The polymer-bound imidazole acts as a ligand in the active site of the blue copper protein azurin. The bioconjugates showed thermosensitive behavior in electron-transfer processes with reduced cytochrome c.

    4. Bioanalytical Methods

      SERS Labels for Red Laser Excitation: Silica-Encapsulated SAMs on Tunable Gold/Silver Nanoshells (pages 1950–1953)

      Bernd Küstner, Magdalena Gellner, Max Schütz, Friedrich Schöppler, Alexander Marx, Philipp Ströbel, Patrick Adam, Carsten Schmuck and Sebastian Schlücker

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804518

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      In a glass house: Silica-encapsulated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on tunable gold/silver nanoshells were used as labels for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This concept combines the spectroscopic advantages arising from maximum surface coverage and uniform molecular orientation of the Raman reporter molecules within the complete monolayer together with the high chemical and mechanical stability of the glass shell.

    5. Charge-Transfer Complexes

      Trapping of a Thiolate[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]Dibromine Charge-Transfer Adduct by a Macrocyclic Dinickel Complex and Its Conversion into an Arenesulfenyl Bromide Derivative (pages 1954–1957)

      Gunther Steinfeld, Vasile Lozan, Hans-Jörg Krüger and Berthold Kersting

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805028

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      Stuck on sulfur: The first transition-metal complexes with S[BOND]Br units are surprisingly stable. Solid 3 is stable for at least six months and under vacuum solid 2 does not lose Br2. The formation of the first structurally characterized transition-metal arenesulfenyl bromide complex 3 occurs with a change of the spin ground state from S=2 to S=0.

    6. Organocatalysis

      Hydride-Donor Abilities of 1,4-Dihydropyridines: A Comparison with π Nucleophiles and Borohydride Anions (pages 1958–1961)

      Dorothea Richter and Herbert Mayr

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804263

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      How are dihydropyridines like indoles? Both groups of compounds have similar nucleophilicity parameters N and are therefore suitable substrates for iminium-catalyzed reactions of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. The N parameters of 1,4-dihydropyridines were derived from the rates of hydride transfer reactions to benzhydrylium ions (see scheme).

    7. Stable Germanium Radicals

      A Stable and Crystalline Triarylgermyl Radical: Structure and EPR Spectra (pages 1962–1965)

      Christian Drost, Jan Griebel, Reinhard Kirmse, Peter Lönnecke and Joachim Reinhold

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805328

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      A radical thing: After being obtained unexpectedly in low yields, the synthesis of the first stable triarylgermyl radical .Ge[3,5-tBu2-2,6-(EtO)2C6H]3 (1; C gray, O blue) was considerably optimized, and the product was investigated by X-ray analysis and EPR spectroscopy. The results were compared with DFT-MO studies for the model compound .Ge[2,6-(MeO)2C6H3].

    8. Polymorphism

      Reversible Phase Transitions in a Buckybowl Monolayer (pages 1966–1969)

      Leo Merz, Manfred Parschau, Laura Zoppi, Kim K. Baldridge, Jay S. Siegel and Karl-Heinz Ernst

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804563

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      Like penguins on ice, buckybowl molecules move closer together when cooled on a copper surface (see model of a corannulene molecule adsorbed on Cu(111)). Upon heating, the molecules spread out into the original crystal phase again. The lower density at room temperature can be explained by the increase in entropy owing to the excitation of bowl vibrations at the surface.

    9. Corannulene Derivatives

      Self-Assembly of Fivefold-Symmetric Molecules on a Threefold-Symmetric Surface (pages 1970–1973)

      Olivier Guillermet, Eeva Niemi, Samuthira Nagarajan, Xavier Bouju, David Martrou, André Gourdon and Sébastien Gauthier

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805689

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      Buckybowls: The adsorption of penta-tert-butylcorannulene, a molecule with fivefold symmetry, on Cu(111), a surface with threefold symmetry, is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy complemented by structure calculations. The symmetry mismatch is resolved by the formation of threefold-symmetric subunits consisting of three molecules, which combine with single molecules to form a nearly perfect filling of the plane (see picture).

    10. DNA Structures

      Duplex Stabilization and Energy Transfer in Zipper Porphyrin–DNA (pages 1974–1977)

      ThaoNguyen Nguyen, Ashley Brewer and Eugen Stulz

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805657

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      Zip it up: Attachment of porphyrins onto complementary DNA strands leads to zipper-porphyrin arrays and, in the presence of eleven modifications, an increase in the melting temperature of the duplex. Mixed zinc and free-base porphyrin arrays undergo energy transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the free-base porphyrin in the annealed duplex but not in the denatured form (see scheme), giving access to reversible formation of potential photonic wires.

    11. Organocatalysis

      The Proline-Catalyzed Double Mannich Reaction of Acetaldehyde with N-Boc Imines (pages 1978–1980)

      Carley Chandler, Patrizia Galzerano, Anna Michrowska and Benjamin List

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806049

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      Double-cross: Proline catalyzes the double Mannich reaction of acetaldehyde with N-Boc imines in excellent yields (up to 99 %; Boc=tert-butoxycarbonyl) and close to perfect diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Depending on the choice of catalysts, both the chiral, pseudo-C2-symmetric diastereomer and the corresponding meso compound can be prepared. Cross double Mannich reactions of acetaldehyde with two different imines are also demonstrated.

    12. Peptide–Peptide Interactions

      Cognitive-Performance Recovery of Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice by Modulation of Early Soluble Amyloidal Assemblies (pages 1981–1986)

      Anat Frydman-Marom, Meirav Rechter, Irit Shefler, Yaron Bram, Deborah E. Shalev and Ehud Gazit

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802123

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      A rationally designed oligomerization inhibitor interacts with early intermediate assemblies of amyloid-β polypeptide (Aβ) through the aromatic elements and inhibits their assembly into the toxic oligomers that cause Alzheimer's disease by a unique Cα-methylation β-breakage strategy. The electrostatic potential of the low-energy conformation of the dipeptide inhibitor bound to Aβ is shown.

    13. Metallamacrocycles

      Reaction of a Metallamacrocycle Leading to a Mercury(II)⋅⋅⋅Palladium(II)⋅⋅⋅Mercury(II) Interaction (pages 1987–1990)

      Sagar Sharma, Rajesh S. Baligar, Harkesh B. Singh and Ray J. Butcher

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805121

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      All wrapped up: The reaction of a 22-membered macrocycle derived from bis(o-formylphenyl)mercury and 1,2-phenylenediamine with palladium(II) results in cleavage of the macrocycle and concomitant formation of a trimetallic complex (see picture; phenyl rings truncated for clarity). The nature of the HgII⋅⋅⋅PdII⋅⋅⋅HgII interaction was investigated by theoretical studies.

    14. Polymerization

      Stereogradient Polymers Formed by Controlled/Living Radical Polymerization of Bulky Methacrylate Monomers (pages 1991–1994)

      Kenji Ishitake, Kotaro Satoh, Masami Kamigaito and Yoshio Okamoto

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805168

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      Life RAFT: A bulky methacrylate monomer, triphenylmethyl methacrylate (TrMA), was polymerized with reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agents. Stereogradient polymers in which the isospecificity increased spontaneously as the monomer concentration decreased were formed by a polymerization–depolymerization equilibrium that can convert a less stable growing polymer terminal into a more stable form (see picture).

    15. Supramolecular Probes

      Pattern-Based Recognition of Heparin Contaminants by an Array of Self-Assembling Fluorescent Receptors (pages 1995–1997)

      Richard B. C. Jagt, Rodolfo F. Gómez-Biagi and Mark Nitz

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805238

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      Tracking down potential killers: Strong host–guest interactions enable the facile combination of polycationic cyclodextrin binding motifs (blue) with fluorescent reporters (orange) tethered to a hydrophobic guest molecule (dark green). An array of supramolecular fluorescent receptors prepared by this modular approach was used for the pattern-based recognition of negatively charged contaminants in the anticoagulant drug heparin.

    16. Cluster Compounds

      [Co@Ge10]3−: An Intermetalloid Cluster with Archimedean Pentagonal Prismatic Structure (pages 1998–2002)

      Jian-Qiang Wang, Saskia Stegmaier and Thomas F. Fässler

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805511

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      Inorganic pentaprismane: The unusual structure of the anion [Co@Ge10]3−, which was obtained by the reaction of K4Ge9 with [Co(C8H12)(C8H13)] in ethylenediamine, raises questions about chemical bonding in the anion. The Zintl ion cluster has virtual D5h symmetry and is a unique example of a ligand-free cluster that is not a deltahedron. The delocalized chemical bonding is represented in the picture by one of the bonding orbitals of the anion.

    17. Chiral Polymers

      Tuning the Supramolecular Chirality of Polyaniline by Methyl Substitution (pages 2003–2006)

      Yong Yan, Ke Deng, Zai Yu and Zhixiang Wei

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805824

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      A game of Twister: The induced helicity of polyaniline and its supramolecular structures could be tuned by the methyl substitution of one of the monomers. By copolymerization of aniline with m-toluidine, the helicity of copolymer (PMANI) nanofibers was totally inverted compared to that of polyaniline (PANI), while copolymer nanofibers with o-toluidine (POANI) had the same helicity as that of polyaniline (see picture).

    18. Cyclization

      Rhodium(I)-Catalyzed Intramolecular Carbonylative [2+2+1] Cycloaddition of Bis(allene)s: Bicyclo[6.3.0]undecadienones and Bicyclo[5.3.0]decadienones (pages 2007–2011)

      Fuyuhiko Inagaki, Syu Narita, Takuma Hasegawa, Shinji Kitagaki and Chisato Mukai

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806029

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      No templates needed: The title reaction makes it easy to construct the bicyclo[6.3.0]undecadienone framework in high yields (see scheme). A template effect is not required to achieve this ring-closing reaction efficiently. The present method can be applied to the construction of bicyclo[5.3.0] and bicyclo[4.3.0] ring systems. Ts=p-toluenesulfonyl.

    19. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Magnesium Borohydride Confined in a Metal–Organic Framework: A Preorganized System for Facile Arene Hydroboration (pages 2012–2016)

      Michael J. Ingleson, Jorge Perez Barrio, John Bacsa, Alexander Steiner, George R. Darling, James T. A. Jones, Yaroslav Z. Khimyak and Matthew J. Rosseinsky

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804196

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      In close quarters: When confined in a metal–organic framework, magnesium borohydride reacts with arenes by a hydroboration pathway (see scheme), in contrast to its reactivity under analogous homogeneous solution-phase conditions. Framework-imposed organization of the reactive groups is required, which is achieved by a combination of the metal coordination and two hydrogen bonds.

    20. Surface Reactions

      Birch Reduction of Benzene in a Low-Temperature Plasma (pages 2017–2019)

      Na Na, Yu Xia, Zhenli Zhu, Xinrong Zhang and R. Graham Cooks

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805256

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      Selective and specific dihydrogenation of benzene and other arenes has been observed in a low-temperature helium plasma. A surface Birch reduction mechanism has been proposed in which benzene molecules adsorbed on the discharge surface capture low-energy surface-adsorbed electrons and subsequently undergo protonation (see picture). Gas-phase oxidation processes accompany the reduction reaction.

    21. Enzyme Design

      Incorporation of Tellurocysteine into Glutathione Transferase Generates High Glutathione Peroxidase Efficiency (pages 2020–2023)

      Xiaoman Liu, Louis A. Silks, Cuiping Liu, Morgane Ollivault-Shiflett, Xin Huang, Jing Li, Guimin Luo, Ya-Ming Hou, Junqiu Liu and Jiacong Shen

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805365

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      A rival to native peroxidase! An existing binding site for glutathione was combined with the catalytic residue tellurocysteine by using an auxotrophic expression system to create an engineered enzyme that functions as a glutathione peroxidase from the scaffold of a glutathione transferase (see picture). The catalytic activity of the telluroenzyme in the reduction of hydroperoxides by glutathione is comparable to that of native glutathione peroxidase.

    22. Peptide Synthesis

      Efficient Solid-Phase Synthesis of Sulfotyrosine Peptides using a Sulfate Protecting-Group Strategy (pages 2024–2026)

      Ahmed M. Ali and Scott D. Taylor

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805642

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      Double protection: Efficient Fmoc-based solid-phase synthesis (SPPS) of sulfotyrosine (sY) peptides is achieved by incorporating the sY residue(s) as a dichlorovinyl-protected (DCV) sulfodiester(s) and using 2-methylpiperidine for Fmoc removal. After removal of the other protecting groups, the DCV group could be cleaved by mild hydrogenolysis giving the sY peptides in good yield.

    23. Gallium Chemistry (1)

      Synthesis and Characterization of [Ar′GaC(Ph)CH]2 and K2[Ar′GaC(Ph)CH]2⋅OEt2: From Digallene to Digallacyclohexadiene to Digallatabenzene (pages 2027–2030)

      Zhongliang Zhu, Xinping Wang, Marilyn M. Olmstead and Philip P. Power

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805718

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      On a plane: Addition of PhCCH to Ar′GaGaAr′ (Ar′=2,6-(2,6-iPr2C6H3)2C6H3) yielded the 1,4-digallacyclohexadiene [{Ar′GaC(Ph)CH}2] (1), which afforded the 1,4-digallatabenzene dianion [Ar′GaC(Ph)CH]22− (2) upon reduction with potassium (see scheme; C gray, Ga green, K blue). Structural parameters, DFT calculations, and 1H NMR spectroscopy support aromatic character of 2.

    24. Gallium Chemistry (2)

      Addition of Hydrogen or Ammonia to a Low-Valent Group 13 Metal Species at 25 °C and 1 Atmosphere (pages 2031–2034)

      Zhongliang Zhu, Xinping Wang, Yang Peng, Hao Lei, James C. Fettinger, Eric Rivard and Philip P. Power

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805982

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      Mild-mannered: The low-valent aryl gallium(I) species :GaAr′ (Ar′=2,6-(2,6-iPr2C6H3)2C6H3) undergoes addition to H2 or NH3 at room temperature and one atmosphere of pressure to afford 1 or 2 (see scheme), which were characterized by X-ray crystallography and NMR and IR spectroscopy.

    25. Hybrid Polyoxometalates

      Insertion of Amides into a Polyoxometalate (pages 2035–2038)

      Joaquim Li, Inga Huth, Lise-Marie Chamoreau, Bernold Hasenknopf, Emmanuel Lacôte, Serge Thorimbert and Max Malacria

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805964

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      POM alert: The incorporation of an amide oxygen atom into the framework of the Dawson-type polyoxometalate (POM) cluster [P2V3W15O62]9− (see picture) allows the communication of electronic effects between the organic and the inorganic parts of the molecule, including fine-tuning of the redox properties of the entire hybrid POM by the organic components, and transmission of the POM's electron-attracting properties to the organic moiety.

    26. Supramolecular Polymers

      STM Insight into Hydrogen-Bonded Bicomponent 1 D Supramolecular Polymers with Controlled Geometries at the Liquid–Solid Interface (pages 2039–2043)

      Artur Ciesielski, Gaël Schaeffer, Anne Petitjean, Jean-Marie Lehn and Paolo Samorì

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805680

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      Bicomponent supramolecular polymers, consisting of two alternating molecules bridged through six H-bonds, are observed by STM at the solid–liquid interface. Control of the geometry of the 1D architecture was obtained by using two different connecting molecules with different conformational rigidity, affording either linear (see picture, left) or zigzag (right) motifs.

    27. Single-Cell Analysis

      Electrochemical Gene-Function Analysis for Single Cells with Addressable Microelectrode/Microwell Arrays (pages 2044–2046)

      Zhenyu Lin, Yasufumi Takahashi, Tatsuya Murata, Michiaki Takeda, Kosuke Ino, Hitoshi Shiku and Tomokazu Matsue

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805743

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      To each his own: An addressable electrochemical device consisting of orthogonally arranged rows and columns of electrodes has been constructed to monitor protein expression in genetically engineered cells at the single-cell level. The response based on redox cycling reflected the different expression levels of the enzyme from individual HeLa cells transfected with a plasmid vector including secreted alkaline phosphatase.

    28. C[BOND]H Activation

      Iridium-Catalyzed Reactions of Trifluoromethylated Compounds with Alkenes: A Cmath image[BOND]H Bond Activation α to the Trifluoromethyl Group (pages 2047–2049)

      Yong Guo, Xiaming Zhao, Dazhi Zhang and Shun-Ichi Murahashi

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805852

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      Catalytic convenience: The use of iridium or ruthenium catalysts for Cmath image[BOND]H bond activation has led to the addition reaction of trifluoromethylated compounds to alkenes (see scheme). This atom-economical reaction occurs under neutral reaction conditions and without the formation of undesired defluorinated by-products, even at high temperature.

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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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