Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 48 Issue 13

March 16, 2009

Volume 48, Issue 13

Pages 2245–2425

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Metal–Organic Spheres as Functional Systems for Guest Encapsulation (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 13/2009) (page 2245)

      Inhar Imaz, Jordi Hernando, Daniel Ruiz-Molina and Daniel Maspoch

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990060

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      The infinite coordination polymerization… of metal ions and multitopic organic ligands is explored to fabricate metal–organic micro- and nanospheres that can be used as functional matrices. In their Communication on page 2325 ff., D. Maspoch and co-workers show how this simple process affords spheres that encapsulate active substances, such as magnetic nanoparticles, organic dyes, and quantum dots, to result in multifunctional spheres. Marianne Verdoux is thanked for the cover graphic design.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: A Phosphine-Mediated Conversion of Azides into Diazo Compounds (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 13/2009) (page 2246)

      Eddie L. Myers and Ronald T. Raines

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990061

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      In 1919 H. Staudinger and J. Meyer reported the reductive fragmentation of an azide to an amine. In their Communication on page 2359 ff., E. L. Myers and R. T. Raines report the complementary reaction—cleavage of the other N[BOND]N bond in an azide to yield a diazo compound. Both transformations rely on a reagent that contains PIII. The painting, The Alchymist, in Search of the Philosopher's Stone, Discovers Phosphorus, by J. Wright (1771), depicts the discovery of phosphorus by H. Brandt in 1669 (cover art by H. A. Steinberg).

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 13/2009 (pages 2249–2259)

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990062

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Roberta Sessoli (page 2265)

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900389

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      “My most exciting discovery to date has been that molecules can have a magnetic memory. The biggest challenge facing scientists is to find renewable and sustainable energy sources…” This and more about Roberta Sessoli can be found on page 2265.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Drug Detection

      Nanoparticle-Enhanced Fluorescence Imaging of Latent Fingerprints Reveals Drug Abuse (pages 2268–2269)

      Otto S. Wolfbeis

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805765

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      No sweat! The sweat in a latent fingerprint (LFP) can contain orally ingested drugs and their metabolites. In a new method for drug detection, primary antibodies(Abs) against drug metabolites are conjugated to magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). The LFP is incubated with the NPs, excess particles removed, and the LFP treated with a fluorescently labeled secondary antibody. Fluorescence imaging then allows characterization.

    2. Platinum Oxo Complexes

      What Does it Really Take to Stabilize Complexes of Late Transition Metals with Terminal Oxo Ligands? (pages 2270–2273)

      Christian Limberg

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805977

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      Surprisingly stable: Noble-metal complexes with terminal oxo ligands are frequently postulated as intermediates, but they are generally considered elusive, as their d electrons destabilize the M[DOUBLE BOND]O units. Until recently, the isolation of such compounds was thought to require strong acceptor ligands, but now a remarkably stable Pt[DOUBLE BOND]O complex has been obtained employing a simple pincer ligand.

    3. Coordination Polymers

      Coordination Polymers: From Metal–Organic Frameworks to Spheres (pages 2274–2275)

      Neil R. Champness

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806069

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      Sphere of destiny: Metal–organic spheres with remarkable encapsulation properties are readily prepared and their ability to host a wide range of guest species, including nanoparticles, fluorescent dyes, and quantum dots, is demonstrated. Both the metal–organic spheres and the encapsulated species maintain their fluorescent or magnetic properties, highlighting the importance of these systems as new multifunctional materials.

  8. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. C[BOND]C Coupling

      The Liebeskind–Srogl C[BOND]C Cross-Coupling Reaction (pages 2276–2286)

      Hana Prokopcová and C. Oliver Kappe

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802842

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      New kid on the block: The cross-coupling of thioorganic compounds with boronic acids under neutral conditions in the presence of catalytic palladium(0) and a stoichiometric amount of a copper(I) oxygenate has emerged as a very useful method for the construction of C[BOND]C bonds (see scheme). This intriguing and mechanistically unprecedented base-free coupling has distinct advantages, in particular when traditional Pd0-catalyzed cross-coupling is not possible.

  9. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Covalent Capture

      Covalent Capture: Merging Covalent and Noncovalent Synthesis (pages 2288–2306)

      Leonard J. Prins and Paolo Scrimin

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803583

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      Coming together: The act of bringing the right molecules together is enough to induce irreversible or reversible formation of a covalent bond. The covalent capture strategy, in which a supramolecular interaction leads to the formation of a covalent bond (see scheme), can be utilized in very different biological and synthetic systems and can be used for numerous applications.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Nanoparticles

      Oxidase-Like Activity of Polymer-Coated Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles (pages 2308–2312)

      Atul Asati, Santimukul Santra, Charalambos Kaittanis, Sudip Nath and J. Manuel Perez

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805279

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      Inorganic enzyme? Ceria nanoparticles exhibit unique oxidase-like activity at acidic pH values. These redox catalysts can be used in immunoassays (ELISA) when modified with targeting ligands (see picture; light blue and yellow structures are nanoparticles with attached ligands). This modification allows both for binding and for detection by the catalytic oxidation of sensitive colorimetric dyes (e.g. TMB).

    2. Organoborane Polymers

      Universal Scaffold for Fluorescent Conjugated Organoborane Polymers (pages 2313–2316)

      Haiyan Li and Frieder Jäkle

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805863

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      Pimp my polymer: A new versatile and strongly emissive conjugated polymer scaffold results when nucleophiles replace the labile bromine atoms on the fluorenylborane polymer backbone (see picture). Such modification allows facile tuning of the stability, thermal characteristics, and photophysical behavior of a diverse range of luminescent polymers with interesting optoelectronic properties and anion-binding behavior.

    3. β-Sheet Self-Assembly

      Helical-Ribbon Formation by a β-Amino Acid Modified Amyloid β-Peptide Fragment (pages 2317–2320)

      Valeria Castelletto, Ian W. Hamley, Rohan A. Hule and Darrin Pochan

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805500

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      An addition to the family: The introduction of β-amino acid residues into a modified amyloid β peptide fragment resulted in well-defined helical nanoribbons (see cryo-TEM image) comprising β strands mainly oriented perpendicular to the ribbon axis. The nanoribbons order into a flow-aligning nematic phase at higher concentration. The β-strand nanoribbon structure is an addition to the known set of secondary structures adopted by β-peptides.

    4. Cell Signaling

      The Imidazopyridine Derivative JK184 Reveals Dual Roles for Microtubules in Hedgehog Signaling (pages 2321–2324)

      Tommaso Cupido, Paul G. Rack, Ari J. Firestone, Joel M. Hyman, Kyuho Han, Surajit Sinha, Cory A. Ocasio and James K. Chen

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805666

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      Eradicating hedgehogs: The title molecule has been previously identified as a potent inhibitor of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, which gives embryonic cells information needed to develop properly. This molecule is shown to modulate Hedgehog target gene expression by depolymerizing microtubules, thus revealing dual roles of the cytoskeleton in pathway regulation (see figure).

    5. Metal–Organic Capsules

      Metal–Organic Spheres as Functional Systems for Guest Encapsulation (pages 2325–2329)

      Inhar Imaz, Jordi Hernando, Daniel Ruiz-Molina and Daniel Maspoch

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804255

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      Music of the spheres: Infinite coordination polymerization of Zn2+ ions and a multitopic ligand produces metal–organic micro- and nanospheres that can be used as functional matrices. The spheres can encapsulate combinations of active substances, such as organic dyes, magnetic nanoparticles, or luminescent quantum dots (see image), which results in spheres that are luminescent in the blue, green, and red regions of the spectrum.

    6. Synthetic Biology

      A Reduced SNARE Model for Membrane Fusion (pages 2330–2333)

      Hana Robson Marsden, Nina A. Elbers, Paul H. H. Bomans, Nico A. J. M. Sommerdijk and Alexander Kros

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804493

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      Let's get together: A minimal model system was developed to mimic the SNARE-protein-mediated fusion of biological membranes (see picture). Fusion between two populations of liposomes is controlled by a pair of complementary lipidated oligopeptides that form noncovalent coiled-coil complexes and thereby force the membranes into close proximity to promote fusion. The model system displays the key characteristics of in vivo fusion events.

    7. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      A Luminescent Microporous Metal–Organic Framework for the Fast and Reversible Detection of High Explosives (pages 2334–2338)

      Anjian Lan, Kunhao Li, Haohan Wu, David H. Olson, Thomas J. Emge, Woosoek Ki, Maochun Hong and Jing Li

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804853

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      Sensors and sensitivity: A highly luminescent microporous metal–organic framework, [Zn2(bpdc)2(bpee)] (bpdc=4,4′-biphenyldicarboxylate; bpee=1,2-bipyridylethene), is capable of very fast and reversible detection of the vapors of the nitroaromatic explosive 2,4-dinitrotoluene and the plastic explosive taggant 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane, through redox fluorescence quenching with unprecedented sensitivity (see spectra).

    8. Metalloprotein Engineering

      Engineering A Uranyl-Specific Binding Protein from NikR (pages 2339–2341)

      Seraphine V. Wegner, Hande Boyaci, Hao Chen, Mark P. Jensen and Chuan He

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805262

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      A new pick-up line: The first uranyl-selective DNA-binding protein is designed using the E. coli nickel(II)-responsive protein NikR as the template. The resulting NikR′ protein binds uranyl (see picture) with a dissociation constant Kd=53 nM and selectively binds to DNA in the presence of uranyl.

    9. Microreactors

      Synthesis of Goethite by Separation of the Nucleation and Growth Processes of Ferrihydrite Nanoparticles Using Microfluidics (pages 2342–2345)

      Ali Abou-Hassan, Olivier Sandre, Sophie Neveu and Valérie Cabuil

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805933

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      Microfluidic synthesis is used to form nanoparticles by separate nucleation and growth processes using two microreactors (see picture) operating under different temperature and flow conditions. Ferrihydrite nanoparticles precipitated in the first microreactor are aged under continuous flow in a second microtubular reactor, leading to goethite nanoparticles. TMAOH=tetramethylammonium hydroxide.

    10. Natural Products

      A Total Synthesis of Norhalichondrin B (pages 2346–2350)

      Katrina L. Jackson, James A. Henderson, Hajime Motoyoshi and Andrew J. Phillips

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806111

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      Four corners: The syntheses of four key building blocks for the total synthesis of norhalichondrin B (see structure) are described. The assembly of these subunits into the natural product is also reported. Key features of the synthesis are the use of the Achmatowicz oxidation/ionic hydrogenation for the synthesis of pyrans and pyranopyrans, and the application of tandem metathesis for the synthesis of pyranopyrans.

    11. Biomimetic Total Synthesis of (±)-Pallavicinolide A (pages 2351–2354)

      Jia-Qiang Dong and Henry N. C. Wong

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806335

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      Piecing it together: The first total synthesis of naturally occurring diterpene pallavicinolide A was achieved. Notable features are highlighted by three key biomimetic transformations: a base-promoted Grob fragmentation, a singlet oxygen oxidation, and an intramolecular Diels–Alder cycloaddition.

    12. Chemical Ligation

      Epimerization-Free Block Synthesis of Peptides from Thioacids and Amines with the Sanger and Mukaiyama Reagents (pages 2355–2358)

      David Crich and Indrajeet Sharma

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805782

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      Highly activated thioesters formed by the rapid reaction of C-terminal thioacids derived from protected amino acids and peptides with the Sanger reagent and other electron-deficient aryl halides in the presence of a free amine immediately form a peptide bond with the amine. This essentially epimerization-free method was used for the 4+4 block synthesis of a hindered octapeptide (see scheme; Boc, Pbf, and Trt are protecting groups).

    13. Diazo Compounds

      A Phosphine-Mediated Conversion of Azides into Diazo Compounds (pages 2359–2363)

      Eddie L. Myers and Ronald T. Raines

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804689

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      N2 the mild: Diazo compounds are extremely versatile intermediates for synthetic organic chemistry, but their synthesis can be challenging in the presence of delicate functional groups. The Staudinger ligation has inspired a mild method for the conversion of a broad range of azides into their diazo compound derivatives through an acyl triazene intermediate.

    14. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of (−)-Amphidinolide K (pages 2364–2366)

      Haye Min Ko, Chung Whan Lee, Hyung Kyoo Kwon, Hea Seung Chung, Soo Young Choi, Young Keun Chung and Eun Lee

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805266

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      Macrolide magic: An enyne cross-metathesis reaction of an alkynyl boronate with an alkene derivative as well as a radical cyclization reaction of a homopropargylic β-alkoxyacrylate are the key transformations in the total synthesis of the cytotoxic macrolide (−)-amphidinolide K.

    15. Synthetic Methods

      Highly Efficient and Regioselective Platinum(II)-Catalyzed Tandem Synthesis of Multiply Substituted Indolines and Tetrahydroquinolines (pages 2367–2371)

      Xin-Yuan Liu and Chi-Ming Che

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805383

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      A special advantage: The platinum(II)-catalyzed tandem cyclization of aminoalkynes with 1,3-diketones offers a new and highly efficient method for the synthesis of indolines and tetrahydroquinolines (see scheme; M.S.=molecular sieves). This transformation affords good to excellent product yields with high regio- and chemoselectivity under mild reaction conditions.

    16. C[BOND]H Functionalization

      Stereoselective Synthesis of cis-β-Methyl- and Phenyl-Substituted Alkenylboronates by Platinum-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Borylation (pages 2372–2375)

      Toshimichi Ohmura, Yuta Takasaki, Hideki Furukawa and Michinori Suginome

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805406

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      Changing places: Intramolecular B(pin)/H exchange took place in the presence of a platinum–phosphane catalyst, giving synthetically useful cis-β-methyl-substituted alkenylboronates stereoselectively (see scheme; B(pin)=4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl).

    17. Electrochemistry

      A Method for the Positioning and Tracking of Small Moving Particles (pages 2376–2378)

      Neil V. Rees, Sinéad M. Matthews, Kamran Yunus, Adrian C. Fisher and Richard G. Compton

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805428

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      On the move: Electrochemistry has been used to detect and monitor the motion of a single 330 μm sphere in both time and space (see picture). The motion was recorded simultaneously by video and chronoamperometry, which showed an excellent correlation. The ability to fabricate electrode arrays capable of spatial resolution at the sub-micrometer scale opens the possibility of using this technique to monitor considerably smaller particles.

    18. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Total Synthesis of Indolizidine Alkaloid (−)-209D: Overriding Substrate Bias in the Asymmetric Rhodium-Catalyzed [2+2+2] Cycloaddition (pages 2379–2382)

      Robert T. Yu, Ernest E. Lee, Guillaume Malik and Tomislav Rovis

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805455

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      CO! You had me at hello: The use of chiral biphenyl-based phosphoramidite ligands on rhodium provides an efficient [2+2+2] cycloaddition between terminal alkyl alkynes and alkenyl isocyanates (see scheme). The cycloaddition proceeds through a CO migration pathway, and facilitates a rapid four-step asymmetric synthesis of indolizidine (−)-209D.

    19. Synthetic Methods

      Pd-PEPPSI-IPent: An Active, Sterically Demanding Cross-Coupling Catalyst and Its Application in the Synthesis of Tetra-Ortho-Substituted Biaryls (pages 2383–2387)

      Michael G. Organ, Selçuk Çalimsiz, Mahmoud Sayah, Ka Hou Hoi and Alan J. Lough

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805661

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      Incredible Bulk: A series of N-heterocyclic carbene catalysts (see picture) were prepared and evaluated in the Suzuki–Miyaura reaction. A variety of sterically encumbered tetra-ortho-substituted biaryl products were formed from unreactive aryl chlorides using the isopentyl-substituted catalyst at temperatures ranging from 65 °C to room temperature. The cyclopentyl-substituted catalyst was virtually inactive, demonstrating that “flexible bulk” is essential to promote these transformations.

    20. π-Conjugated Systems

      Zwitterionic Corroles: Regioselective Nucleophilic Pyridination of a Doubly Linked Biscorrole (pages 2388–2390)

      Satoru Hiroto, Naoki Aratani, Naoki Shibata, Yoshiki Higuchi, Takahiro Sasamori, Norihiro Tokitoh, Hiroshi Shinokubo and Atsuhiro Osuka

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805674

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      Pyridine attacks: Nucleophilic addition of pyridine derivatives to a doubly linked corrole, which is a stable singlet biradical species, occurs at the bay area with high regioselectivity to provide zwitterionic dimers (see picture; Ar=C6F5). Charge transfer between the anionic corrole and the pyridinium groups induces effective fluorescence quenching of the corrole dimer, which can be utilized for selective fluoride ion recognition.

    21. Asymmetric Cycloadditions

      Catalytic Asymmetric Cycloaddition of Ketenes and Nitroso Compounds: Enantioselective Synthesis of α-Hydroxycarboxylic Acid Derivatives (pages 2391–2393)

      Maximilian Dochnahl and Gregory C. Fu

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805805

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      The appropriate choice of chiral catalyst and starting materials leads to the synthesis of 1,2-oxazetidin-3-ones by cycloadditions of ketenes with nitroso compounds with very good regioselectivity and enantioselectivity. In addition to serving as potentially bioactive target molecules, the products can be transformed into other important classes of compounds, such as α-hydroxycarboxylic acid derivatives.

    22. Telluride Ligands

      Tellus in, Tellus out: The Chemistry of the Vanadium Bis(telluride) Functionality (pages 2394–2397)

      Uriah J. Kilgore, Jonathan A. Karty, Maren Pink, Xinfeng Gao and Daniel J. Mindiola

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806022

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      The vanadium–bis(telluride) complex, [(PNP)V(Te)2] (see picture), in which the terminal telluride units can act as leaving groups or protecting groups, is prepared by activation of elemental Te by V. The complex masks {(PNP)VI} or {(PNP)VIII} sources when exposed to oxidants such as azides and diphenyldiazomethane. Isocyanides promote elimination of one Te ligand to furnish a VIII complex with a terminal telluride ligand.

    23. Natural Products

      Parallel Kinetic Resolution Approach to the Cyathane and Cyanthiwigin Diterpenes Using a Cyclopropanation/Cope Rearrangement (pages 2398–2402)

      Laura C. Miller, J. Maina Ndungu and Richmond Sarpong

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806154

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      Parallel effort: Stereodivergent parallel kinetic resolution of a racemic mixture of dienes using Davies' [Rh2{(S)-dosp}4] or [Rh2{(R)-dosp}4] catalysts promotes a tandem vinyl diazoacetate cyclopropanation/Cope rearrangement sequence to afford two diastereomeric, enantioenriched cycloheptadienes, which correspond to the natural antipodes of the title diterpenoids (see scheme).

    24. Synthetic Methods

      Highly Enantioselective Pictet–Spengler Reactions with α-Ketoamide-Derived Ketimines: Access to an Unusual Class of Quaternary α-Amino Amides (pages 2403–2406)

      Farhan R. Bou-Hamdan and James L. Leighton

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806110

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      Quat's” the story?N-Aryl amides are effective directing/activating groups for chlorosilane Lewis acids. This aspect has been exploited for the development of the first simple and general method for the highly enantioselective Pictet–Spengler reaction of ketimines derived from α-ketoamides leading to quaternary α-amino acid derivatives (see scheme).

    25. Applications of Nanoparticles

      Wireless Activation of Neurons in Brain Slices Using Nanostructured Semiconductor Photoelectrodes (pages 2407–2410)

      Yixin Zhao, Philip Larimer, Richard T. Pressler, Ben W. Strowbridge and Clemens Burda

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806093

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      Light rather than electrical current: The inner or outer surfaces of glass micropipettes can be coated with nanoparticles of a narrow-band-gap semiconductor. When visible or near-infrared light is used for excitation, these micropipettes (labeled PE Stim in the image) can activate nearby neurons (labeled *) in brain tissue without the damage associated with electrical stimulation.

    26. Click Conjugations

      Ultrafast Click Conjugation of Macromolecular Building Blocks at Ambient Temperature (pages 2411–2414)

      Andrew J. Inglis, Sebastian Sinnwell, Martina H. Stenzel and Christopher Barner-Kowollik

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805993

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      Block copolymers in seconds: Catalyst-free, ambient-temperature click conjugation of individual polymer strands becomes possible using novel ATRP-derived cyclopentadienyl-capped polymers in an extremely rapid hetero-Diels–Alder cycloaddition with macromolecules equipped with electron-deficient dithioester end groups prepared by the RAFT process.

    27. Complex Suboxides

      Suboxides with Complex Anions: The Suboxoindate Cs9InO4 (pages 2415–2417)

      Constantin Hoch, Johannes Bender and Arndt Simon

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805736

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      Salty metal: In the suboxometallate Cs9InO4, metallic cesium columns (see picture; blue) lie next to ionic oxoindate(III) columns. The chemistry of the suboxides is thus expanded to structures containing complex anions.

    28. Fluorescent DNA

      Fluorescent Color Readout of DNA Hybridization with Thiazole Orange as an Artificial DNA Base (pages 2418–2421)

      Sina Berndl and Hans-Achim Wagenknecht

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805981

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      A fluorescent chameleon: A single thiazole orange (TO) dye, when used as an artificial DNA base shows the typical green emission, whereas the interstrand TO dimer exhibits an orange excimer-type emission inside duplex DNA (see picture).

  11. Preview

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
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      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 14/2009 (page 2425)

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990064

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