Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 48 Issue 26

June 15, 2009

Volume 48, Issue 26

Pages 4651–4867

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: On the Function and Structure of Synthetically Modified Porins (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 26/2009) (page 4651)

      Simon Reitz, Menekse Cebi, Philipp Reiß, Gregor Studnik, Uwe Linne, Ulrich Koert and Lars-Oliver Essen

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990133

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      Synthetic Modulators are introduced into the trimeric porin OmpF by protein semisynthesis/click chemistry or by S-alkylation, as U. Koert, L.-O. Essen et al. report in their Communication on page 4853 ff. The choice of synthetic modulator and the type of covalent attachment significantly affect the blockage efficiency. A model for the functional properties is postulated on the basis of an X-ray structure analysis of a crown ether/OmpF hybrid.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Bidirectional Chemo-Switching of Spin State in a Microporous Framework (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 26/2009) (page 4652)

      Masaaki Ohba, Ko Yoneda, Gloria Agustí, M. Carmen Muñoz, Ana B. Gaspar, José A. Real, Mikio Yamasaki, Hideo Ando, Yoshihide Nakao, Shigeyoshi Sakaki and Susumu Kitagawa

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990134

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      Bidirectional chemo-switching of magnetism occurs in a microporous coordination polymer containing spin-crossover subunits, as described by M. Ohba, J. A. Real, S. Kitagawa, and co-workers in their Communication on page 4767 ff. In situ magnetic measurements reveal that most guest molecules transform the framework spin state from diamagnetic low spin (red) to paramagnetic high spin (yellow), whereas the guest CS2 stabilizes the low-spin state. These induced spin states are retained as a memory effect after the release of the guest.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Koop Lammertsma (page 4670)

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901803

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      “The most exciting thing about my research is to create new molecules and new concepts. When I was eighteen I wanted to be an industrial chemist. …” This and more about Koop Lammertsma can be found on page 4670.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Photochemistry of Organic Compounds.From Concepts to Practice. Postgraduate Chemistry Series. By Petr Klán and Jakob Wirz. (pages 4671–4672)

      Axel G. Griesbeck

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902169

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      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2009. 582 pp., softcover € 49.90.—ISBN 978-1405161732

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Glycoproteins

      The Linear Assembly of a Pure Glycoenzyme (pages 4674–4678)

      Benjamin G. Davis

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806246

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      A labor of love: The synthesis of an active pure enzyme (RNase) glycoform by the native chemical ligation of a (glyco)peptide and peptide thioester fragments required numerous painstaking steps: the strategy was optimized, active inteins accessed, redox conditions fine-tuned, and glycoamino acid building blocks synthesized.

    2. Synthetic Methods

      All Kinds of Reactivity: Recent Breakthroughs in Metal-Catalyzed Alkyne Chemistry (pages 4679–4682)

      Cecilia Anaya de Parrodi and Patrick J. Walsh

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900900

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      Alkynes of reactions: Recent breakthroughs in metal-catalyzed alkyne reactions, which expand the synthetic utility of alkynes, have been achieved. These approaches broaden the range of alkynes that are accessible by C[BOND]N and C[BOND]C bond-forming reactions and demonstrate that the use of bifunctional heterobimetallic catalysts can lead to new reactivity and excellent enantioselectivity (see scheme).

    3. Genomics

      Sequencing Single DNA Molecules in Real Time (pages 4683–4685)

      Jenny Ibach and Susanne Brakmann

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900722

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      One's enough: The direct observation of a DNA-polymerase-based “sequencing engine” using single-molecule detection recently allowed single-molecule sequencing by synthesis in real time. Nucleotides with a fluorescent marker at the 5′-phosphate unit and zero-mode waveguides are crucial components of this approach, which at last promises low-cost genome-scale sequencing.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Polyketide Biosynthesis

      The Biosynthetic Logic of Polyketide Diversity (pages 4688–4716)

      Christian Hertweck

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806121

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      Molecular Lego: Polyketides represent a highly diverse group of natural products with structurally intriguing carbon skeletons (see picture) which are assembled from simple acyl building blocks. A combination of chemical, biochemical, and genetics studies have provided exciting new insights into the programming of polyketide assembly and the sophisticated enzymatic machineries involved. This review highlights recent developments in the field.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Enzyme Inhibitors

      Probing the Bioactive Conformation of an Archetypal Natural Product HDAC Inhibitor with Conformationally Homogeneous Triazole-Modified Cyclic Tetrapeptides (pages 4718–4724)

      W. Seth Horne, Christian A. Olsen, John M. Beierle, Ana Montero and M. Reza Ghadiri

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805900

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      Fooling enzymes with mock amides: Analogues of apicidin, a cyclic-tetrapeptide inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC), were designed with a 1,4- or 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole in place of a backbone amide bond to fix the bond in question in either a trans-like or a cis-like configuration. Thus, the binding affinity of distinct peptide conformations (see picture) could be probed. One analogue proved in some cases to be superior to apicidin as an HDAC inhibitor.

    2. Drug Design

      Conformationally Homogeneous Heterocyclic Pseudotetrapeptides as Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Rational Drug Design: Receptor-Selective Somatostatin Analogues (pages 4725–4729)

      John M. Beierle, W. Seth Horne, Jan H. van Maarseveen, Beatrice Waser, Jean Claude Reubi and M. Reza Ghadiri

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805901

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      A would-be amide: A 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole was used as a surrogate for a trans amide bond to create a library of 16 diastereomeric pseudotetrapeptides as β-turn mimetics. High-resolution structural analysis indicated that these scaffolds adopt distinct, rigid, conformationally homogeneous β-turn-like structures (see example), some of which bind somatostatin receptor subtypes selectively, and some of which show broad-spectrum activity.

    3. Hydrogen Storage

      Lithium-Doped 3D Covalent Organic Frameworks: High-Capacity Hydrogen Storage Materials (pages 4730–4733)

      Dapeng Cao, Jianhui Lan, Wenchuan Wang and Berend Smit

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900960

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      Quick on the uptake: A multiscale theoretical method predicts that the gravimetric adsorption capacities of H2 in Li-doped covalent organic frameworks based on the building blocks shown (Li violet, H white, B pink, C green, O red, Si yellow) can reach nearly 7 % at T=298 K and p=100 bar, suggesting that these Li-doped materials are promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

    4. Ir[TRIPLE BOND]N Hydrogenation

      Isolation and Hydrogenation of a Complex with a Terminal Iridium–Nitrido Bond (pages 4734–4738)

      Julia Schöffel, Andrey Yu. Rogachev, Serena DeBeer George and Peter Burger

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901494

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      An N for Ir: The synthesis and X-ray crystal structure of a late-transition-metal complex with a terminal nitrido ligand and its hydrogenation to the related amido complex are reported (see scheme).

    5. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Nanoporous Nanorods Fabricated by Coordination Modulation and Oriented Attachment Growth (pages 4739–4743)

      Takaaki Tsuruoka, Shuhei Furukawa, Yohei Takashima, Kaname Yoshida, Seiji Isoda and Susumu Kitagawa

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901177

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      A growing attachment: Porous coordination polymer (PCP) nanorods are synthesized by modulation of the coordination equilibria between framework components, which regulates the rate of framework extension and crystal growth. Investigation of the crystal growth mechanism by TEM indicates that face-selective modulation on the surfaces of PCP crystals enhances the anisotropic crystal growth of nanorods by an oriented attachment mechanism.

    6. Microreactors

      A Gold-Immobilized Microchannel Flow Reactor for Oxidation of Alcohols with Molecular Oxygen (pages 4744–4746)

      Naiwei Wang, Tsutomu Matsumoto, Masaharu Ueno, Hiroyuki Miyamura and Shū Kobayashi

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900565

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      Golden capillaries: A gold-immobilized capillary column reactor allows oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen. These capillary columns (see picture) can be used for at least four days without loss of activity.

    7. Organic Nanotubes

      Metal-Ion-Coated Graphitic Nanotubes: Controlled Self-Assembly of a Pyridyl-Appended Gemini-Shaped Hexabenzocoronene Amphiphile (pages 4747–4750)

      Wei Zhang, Wusong Jin, Takanori Fukushima, Noriyuki Ishii and Takuzo Aida

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900756

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      The assembly line: Hexabenzocoronene amphiphiles appended with pyridyl-terminated triethylene glycol side chains, in combination with trans-[Pt(PhCN)2Cl2], lead to the formation of graphitic nanotubes. The structural features and dimensions of the nanotubes depend on the assembly conditions. A platinum(II)-bridged cyclic dimer having two HBC units self-assembles into a nanotubular structure.

    8. Electrochemistry

      Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes by an Ionic-Liquid Polymer: Dispersion of Pt and PtRu Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes and Their Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Methanol (pages 4751–4754)

      Bohua Wu, Dan Hu, Yinjie Kuang, Bo Liu, Xiaohua Zhang and Jinhua Chen

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900899

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      Small beginnings: Metal nanoparticle/CNT nanohybrids are synthesized from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with an ionic-liquid polymer. The Pt and PtRu nanoparticles with narrow size distribution (average diameter: (1.3±0.4) nm for PtRu, (1.9±0.5) nm for Pt) are dispersed uniformly on the CNTs (see images) and show good performance in methanol electrooxidation.

    9. Imaging Agents

      Symmetry-Guided Design and Fluorous Synthesis of a Stable and Rapidly Excreted Imaging Tracer for 19F MRI (pages 4755–4758)

      Zhong-Xing Jiang, Xin Liu, Eun-Kee Jeong and Yihua Bruce Yu

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901005

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      Getting FIT: A bispherical 19F imaging tracer, 19FIT, was designed and synthesized. 19FIT is advantageous over perfluorocarbon-based 19F imaging agents, as it is not retained in the organs and does not require complex formulation procedures. Imaging agents such as 19FIT can lead to 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) playing an important role in drug therapy, analogous to the role played by 1H MRI in disease diagnosis.

    10. Responsive Materials

      Mirror-Image Photoswitching of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors Coated with Titanium Dioxide (pages 4759–4762)

      Song Liu, Jianming Li, Qian Shen, Yang Cao, Xuefeng Guo, Guoming Zhang, Chaoqun Feng, Jin Zhang, Zhongfan Liu, Michael L. Steigerwald, Dongsheng Xu and Colin Nuckolls

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901018

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      Dotting the i's: Stimuli-responsive optoelectronic devices are formed from the title transistors functionalized with photoactive quantum dots. The p-type semiconducting tubes show a fast current decrease under UV irradiation and reversibility when the UV irradiation is switched off. In contrast, ambipolar tubes show mirror-image photoswitching effects when negative and positive gate bias voltages are applied.

    11. C1 Chemistry

      Aerobic, Copper-Mediated Oxidation of Alkaline Formaldehyde to Fuel-Cell Grade Hydrogen and Formate: Mechanism and Applications (pages 4763–4766)

      Debora Preti, Sergio Squarcialupi and Giuseppe Fachinetti

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805860

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      Beyond nanopowders: Hydrogen and formate are produced through the oxidation of alkaline HCHO by CuO microparticles. The Cu microparticles formed in the purely electrochemical reduction of CuO preserve the morphology of CuO (left-hand image: CuO; right-hand image: Cu formed in the reduction of CuO by alkaline HCHO) and can be permeated by a gas. They react more efficiently than Cu nanoparticles with air to restore CuO.

    12. Functional Porous Materials

      Bidirectional Chemo-Switching of Spin State in a Microporous Framework (pages 4767–4771)

      Masaaki Ohba, Ko Yoneda, Gloria Agustí, M. Carmen Muñoz, Ana B. Gaspar, José A. Real, Mikio Yamasaki, Hideo Ando, Yoshihide Nakao, Shigeyoshi Sakaki and Susumu Kitagawa

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806039

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      The ins and outs of spin: Using the microporous coordination polymer {Fe(pz)[Pt(CN)4]} (1, pz=pyrazine), incorporating spin-crossover subunits, two-directional magnetic chemo-switching is achieved at room temperature. In situ magnetic measurements following guest vapor injection show that most guest molecules transform 1 from the low-spin (LS) state to the high-spin (HS) state, whereas CS2 uniquely causes the reverse HS-to-LS transition.

    13. Biomimetic Synthesis

      From Metal Binding to Nanoparticle Formation: Monitoring Biomimetic Iron Oxide Synthesis within Protein Cages using Mass Spectrometry (pages 4772–4776)

      Sebyung Kang, Craig C. Jolley, Lars O. Liepold, Mark Young and Trevor Douglas

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900437

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      Mass measurements of metal-mineralized protein cages allowed quantitative examination of the effects of metal-ion concentration on the final nanoparticle size. Modeling using a kinetic master equation suggests that particle growth involves both a binding phase and a growth phase (see picture; I: relative abundance; LiDps: a DNA binding protein; nFe: number of Fe atoms).

    14. Thin Films

      On-Wafer Crystallization of Ultralow-κ Pure Silica Zeolite Films (pages 4777–4780)

      Yan Liu, Christopher M. Lew, Minwei Sun, Rui Cai, Junlan Wang, Grant Kloster, Boyan Boyanov and Yushan Yan

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900461

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      A higher goal: An on-wafer crystallization process to prepare pure silica zeolite (PSZ) MEL-type films that is superior to the previously used hydrothermal process is reported. These striation-free MEL-type films (right, see picture) outperform the traditional spin-on films (left) in terms of the κ value, mechanical properties, surface roughness, mesopore size, and size distribution.

    15. Anion Templation

      Exploiting the 1,2,3-Triazolium Motif in Anion-Templated Formation of a Bromide-Selective Rotaxane Host Assembly (pages 4781–4784)

      Kathleen M. Mullen, James Mercurio, Christopher J. Serpell and Paul D. Beer

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901313

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      Bromide is best: The first [2]rotaxane incorporating the triazolium anion-binding motif is prepared using bromide anion templation. Preliminary anion-binding investigations reveal that the rotaxane exhibits the rare selectivity preference for bromide over chloride ions.

    16. Biosensors

      A Graphene Platform for Sensing Biomolecules (pages 4785–4787)

      Chun-Hua Lu, Huang-Hao Yang, Chun-Ling Zhu, Xi Chen and Guo-Nan Chen

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901479

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      Sensitive platform: The use of graphene oxide (GO) as a platform for the sensitive and selective detection of DNA and proteins is presented. The interaction of GO and dye-labeled single-stranded DNA leads to quenching of the dye fluorescence. Conversely, the presence of a target DNA or protein leads to the binding of the dye-labeled DNA and target, releasing the DNA from GO, thereby restoring the dye fluorescence (see picture).

    17. Nanoparticles

      Time-Resolved In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study and Large-Scale Production of Magnetite Nanoparticles in Supercritical Water (pages 4788–4791)

      Martin Bremholm, Marcella Felicissimo and Bo B. Iversen

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901048

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      A general solution: In situ synchrotron X-ray scattering in a high-pressure pulsed injection reactor (see picture) shows that magnetite nucleation and growth are temporally separated. Gram-scale crystalline, pure phase, superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized without surfactants in supercritical water in less than one hour using a laboratory-scale continuous-flow reactor.

    18. Bent Allenes

      Synthesis and Ligand Properties of a Persistent, All-Carbon Four-Membered-Ring Allene (pages 4792–4795)

      Mohand Melaimi, Pattiyil Parameswaran, Bruno Donnadieu, Gernot Frenking and Guy Bertrand

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901117

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      A single donor substituent at each terminus is sufficient to make the CCC skeleton of allenes very flexible and give carbon(0) character to the central carbon atom. This allows the synthesis of a four-membered carbocyclic allene, which can be doubly protonated and behaves as a very strong η1-donor ligand for transition metals (see scheme).

    19. Unsaturated Carbenes

      Synthesis of Allenylidene Lithium and Silver Complexes, and Subsequent Transmetalation Reactions (pages 4796–4799)

      Matt Asay, Bruno Donnadieu, Wolfgang W. Schoeller and Guy Bertrand

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901319

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      Alpha, beta, gamma! Amino substituents in alpha and beta positions allow the isolation of free carbenes, but even in the gamma position, their strong π-electron-donating properties permit the synthesis of allenylidene lithium adducts and silver complexes (see picture), which are ideal precursors for the preparation of various transition-metal–allenylidene complexes.

    20. HCOOH Dehydrogenation on Au

      Formic Acid Dehydrogenation on Au-Based Catalysts at Near-Ambient Temperatures (pages 4800–4803)

      Manuel Ojeda and Enrique Iglesia

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805723

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      Selective HCOOH decomposition to H2/CO2on Au: Au species catalyze HCOOH dehydrogenation at higher rates than on Pt, previously considered the most active metal. Dehydrogenation occurs through formate decomposition limited by H2 desorption on Au species undetectable by TEM. CO did not form (<10 ppm), making products suitable for low-temperature fuel cells.

    21. Radicals

      Interaction and Reaction of the Phenyl Radical with Water: A Source of OH Radicals (pages 4804–4807)

      Artur Mardyukov, Elsa Sanchez-Garcia, Rachel Crespo-Otero and Wolfram Sander

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806268

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      That's radical! A photochemical reaction between the phenyl radical and water results in the abstraction of a hydrogen atom from water and the formation of a hydroxyl radical. The hydroxyl radical forms an OH⋅⋅⋅π hydrogen bond with benzene (see picture) and does not react with benzene thermally under the conditions of matrix isolation.

    22. Nanostructures

      Simplifying the Creation of Hollow Metallic Nanostructures: One-Pot Synthesis of Hollow Palladium/Platinum Single-Crystalline Nanocubes (pages 4808–4812)

      Xiaoqing Huang, Huihui Zhang, Changyou Guo, Zhiyou Zhou and Nanfeng Zheng

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900199

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      Efficiency simplified: A synthetic strategy has been developed to prepare single-crystalline hollow Pd/Pt nanocubes (right, see picture; left: nanocubes). Compared to the solid Pd/Pt nanocubes of similar sizes, the hollow Pd/Pt nanocubes increase accessible surface area and therefore improve electrocatalytic activity in formic acid oxidation.

    23. Carbonylation

      Vapor-Phase Carbonylation of Dimethoxymethane over H-Faujasite (pages 4813–4815)

      Fuat E. Celik, Tae-Jin Kim and Alexis T. Bell

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900464

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      Carbonylation gets a phase lift: The usual liquid-phase, high-pressure processes for carbonylating formaldehydes are avoided in a novel vapor-phase reaction. Using an acid zeolite (Faujasite) at near-atmospheric pressure dimethoxymethane (DMM; the dimethyl acetal of formaldehyde; see scheme) is carbonylated to produce methyl methoxyacetate (MMAc). This approach provides a new route to ethylene glycol under mild conditions.

    24. Self-Assembly

      Transition-Metal Phosphate Colloidal Spheres (pages 4816–4819)

      Chen Chen, Wei Chen, Jun Lu, Deren Chu, Ziyang Huo, Qing Peng and Yadong Li

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900639

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      The music of the spheres: Transition-metal phosphate colloidal spheres with one metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu; see picture) or more than one metal (such as Fe–Ni, Co–Cu, Fe–Co–Cu, Fe–Co–Ni–Cu, Mn–Fe–Co–Ni–Cu, and Mn–Fe–Co–Ni–Cu–Zn) were synthesized in solution at low temperature. Porous and hollow iron phosphate spheres were prepared by adjusting the pH value of the reaction.

    25. Nanotechnology

      Synthesis of Diphenylalanine/Polyaniline Core/Shell Conducting Nanowires by Peptide Self-Assembly (pages 4820–4823)

      Jungki Ryu and Chan Beum Park

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900668

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      Breaking the mold: Self-assembled peptide nanowires were used as a template for the synthesis of hollow polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes (see scanning electron microscopy images). The thickness and the morphology of the PANI nanostructures could be controlled readily either by varying the reaction time or by applying multiple PANI coatings.

    26. Nanostructures

      Etching and Growth: An Intertwined Pathway to Silver Nanocrystals with Exotic Shapes (pages 4824–4827)

      Claire M. Cobley, Matthew Rycenga, Fei Zhou, Zhi-Yuan Li and Younan Xia

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901447

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      Two-faced nanocrystals: Rapid addition of a second aliquot of silver nitrate during a polyol synthesis led to the formation of anisotropically truncated octahedrons as a result of oxidative etching and overgrowth of silver nanocubes. Three adjacent faces of the nanocube grew more rapidly than the three other faces, generating a non-centrosymmetric structure (see picture).

    27. Monomeric Phosphazenes

      Difluoro-λ5-Phosphinonitrile F2P[TRIPLE BOND]N: Matrix Isolation and Photoisomerization into FP[DOUBLE BOND]NF (pages 4828–4831)

      Xiaoqing Zeng, Helmut Beckers and Helge Willner

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901380

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      Splendid isolation: Monomeric phosphazene F2PN (1A1) was prepared for the first time through irradiation of F2PN3 in an argon matrix with an ArF excimer laser (λ=193 nm). Upon subsequent irradiation with a high-pressure mercury arc lamp (λ=255 nm), F2PN undergoes a 1,2-fluorine shift to give iminophosphane cis-FP[DOUBLE BOND]NF.

    28. Reactive Intermediates

      2,7-Di-tert-butylnaphtho[1,8-cd][1,2]dithiole 1,2-dioxides: Thermally Stable, Photochemically Active vic-Disulfoxides (pages 4832–4835)

      Richard S. Grainger, Bhaven Patel and Benson M. Kariuki

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901788

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      Bulking up: The thermal barrier to rearrangement of a vic-disulfoxide is significantly increased through steric buttressing about the (O)S[BOND]S(O) bond. Whereas the title compounds represent the most thermally stable vic-disulfoxides known to date, they also undergo a novel photomediated epimerization at room temperature (see scheme).

    29. Hydrocarbon Chemistry

      Practical Synthesis of the Dendralene Family Reveals Alternation in Behavior (pages 4836–4839)

      Alan D. Payne, Gomotsang Bojase, Michael N. Paddon-Row and Michael S. Sherburn

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901733

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      Back from obscurity: The practical synthesis of the first six members of the fundamental class of acyclic branched oligoalkenes has been achieved. The syntheses allow access to the target compounds on multigram scales in good yields. Members of the family with even numbers of double bonds are significantly more stable than those with odd numbers (see picture), and exhibit different chemical reactivities in Diels–Alder reactions.

    30. Synthetic Methods

      Ketone Hydrosilylation with Sugar Silanes Followed by Intramolecular Aglycone Delivery: An Orthogonal Glycosylation Strategy (pages 4840–4844)

      Zachary A. Buchan, Scott J. Bader and John Montgomery

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901666

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      Gettin' a little sugar—no alcohol required: A procedure for the direct glycosylation of ketones without a hydroxy intermediate enables the site-selective glycosylation of hydroxyketones at the ketone or the alcohol functionality without the use of protecting groups on the aglycone (see scheme). Site selectivity is controlled by the catalyst structure in hydrosilylation and dehydrogenative silylation reactions with sugar silanes. Bn=benzyl.

    31. Chemisorption

      Selective Production of Reactive and Nonreactive Oxygen Atoms on Pd(001) by Rotationally Aligned Oxygen Molecules (pages 4845–4848)

      Luca Vattuone, Andrea Gerbi, David Cappelletti, Fernando Pirani, Roberto Gunnella, Letizia Savio and Mario Rocca

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900870

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      Sticking together: The occupation of different sites by oxygen atoms that are produced by the dissociation of O2 on Pd(100) is determined by the initial rotational alignment of the parent molecules. The atom locations are characterized by different chemical reactivities in the reaction with CO to form CO2 (see picture), which are followed by synchrotron radiation (SR) experiments with a supersonic molecular beam (SMB).

    32. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Titanium Binolate Catalyzed Aminolysis of meso Aziridines: A Highly Enantioselective and Direct Access to 1,2-Diamines (pages 4849–4852)

      Saravanan Peruncheralathan, Henrik Teller and Christoph Schneider

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It's as simple as that: An in situ prepared chiral catalyst from the commercially available compounds Ti(OiPr)4 and (R)-binol catalyzes the highly enantioselective ring-opening of meso-aziridines 1 with anilines 2 and furnishes valuable chiral 1,2-diamines 3 in high yields and up to 99 % ee.(R)-binol=(R)-2,2′-dihydroxy-1,1′-binaphthyl.

    33. Ion Channels

      On the Function and Structure of Synthetically Modified Porins (pages 4853–4857)

      Simon Reitz, Menekse Cebi, Philipp Reiß, Gregor Studnik, Uwe Linne, Ulrich Koert and Lars-Oliver Essen

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200900457

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The attachment of modulators to a trimeric porin ion channel was investigated (see picture of the trimer with a crown ether modulator (orange)). The interplay of modulator and protein is essential for the conformational heterogeneity of the hybrid channel. Single-site attachment in large pores is not sufficient to change the electrophysiological characteristics of the pores—such change requires additional noncovalent interactions or second-site attachments.

    34. Inclusion Bodies

      Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Reveals that E. coli Inclusion Bodies of HET-s(218289) are Amyloids (pages 4858–4860)

      Christian Wasmer, Laura Benkemoun, Raimon Sabaté, Michel O. Steinmetz, Bénédicte Coulary-Salin, Lei Wang, Roland Riek, Sven J. Saupe and Beat H. Meier

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200806100

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Protein deposition frequently occurs as inclusion bodies (IBs) during heterologous protein expression in E. coli. The structure of these E. coli IBs of the prion-forming domain from the fungal prion HET-s is the same as that previously determined for fibrils assembled in vitro, and show prion infectivity. These results demonstrate that the IBs of HET-s(218–289) are amyloids.

    35. Oxygen-Centered Radicals

      Room-Temperature C[BOND]H Bond Activation of Methane by Bare [P4O10].+ (pages 4861–4863)

      Nicolas Dietl, Marianne Engeser and Helmut Schwarz

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901596

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No need for a metal: A combination of mass spectrometry and computational studies (density functional theory and coupled-cluster methods) shows that [P4O10].+ is the first polynuclear nonmetal oxide cation that is capable of activating the C[BOND]H bond of methane at room temperature (see picture). This process represents a further example in the reactivity of oxygen-centered radicals.

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