Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 48 Issue 51

December 14, 2009

Volume 48, Issue 51

Pages 9567–9755

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Two-Dimensional Triangular and Square Heterometallic Clusters: Influence of the Closed-Shell d10 Electronic Configuration (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51/2009) (page 9567)

      Sabrina Sculfort, Pierre Croizat, Abdelatif Messaoudi, Marc Bénard, Marie-Madeleine Rohmer, Richard Welter and Pierre Braunstein

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905603

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      Guilded Rafts … can be formed by heterometallic clusters. In their Communication on page 9663 ff., P. Braunstein, M. Bénard et al. describe the synthesis, structure, and theoretical analysis of a unique series of 2D raft mixed-metal clusters of the type {M[m]}n (M=Cu, n=3; M=Ag, Au, n=4; the bridging metalloligand [m] is {MoCp(CO)3}). Intramolecular, metallophilic d10⋅⋅⋅d10 interactions occur in the ν2-triangular (M=Cu) or ν2-square (M=Ag, Au) structures of the metal cores.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Far-Field Nanodiagnostics of Solids with Visible Light by Spectrally Selective Imaging (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51/2009) (page 9568)

      Andrei V. Naumov, Alexey A. Gorshelev, Yury G. Vainer, Lothar Kador and Jürgen Köhler

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905919

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      The spatial resolution of a microscope based on focusing optics is restricted by the Abbe diffraction limit. In their Communication on page 9747 ff., A. V. Naumov, J. Köhler, and co-workers show that far-field imaging and spectroscopy of a giant ensemble of single fluorescent molecules provides structural information about the polycrystalline sample on a nanometer length scale, which is well below the Abbe limit. The obtained image reveals clear correlations between the locations of the chromophores and their spectral properties.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Guy C. Lloyd-Jones (page 9588)

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905581

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      “The secret of being a successful scientist is common sense, curiosity, and following one's nose … The part of my job which I enjoy the most is the occasional “eureka!” moment. …” This and more about Guy C. Lloyd-Jones can be found on page 9588.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
  7. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Asymmetric Synthesis of Nitrogen Heterocycles. Edited by Jacques Royer. (page 9590)

      Antoni Riera

      Version of Record online: 8 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904917

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2009. 409 pp., hardcover € 139.00.—ISBN 978-3527320363

    2. Elements of Synthesis Planning. By R. W. Hoffmann. (pages 9590–9591)

      Uwe Rinner and Johann Mulzer

      Version of Record online: 8 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905457

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      Springer Verlag, Heidelberg 2009. 227 pp., softcover € 32.05.—ISBN 978-3540792192

  8. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
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    1. Transition-Metal Catalysis

      Stereoselective Synthesis of β-Chlorovinyl Ketones and Arenes by the Catalytic Addition of Acid Chlorides to Alkynes (pages 9592–9594)

      Lukas J. Gooßen, Nuria Rodríguez and Käthe Gooßen

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904615

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      New cats, new tricks: Complementary iridium catalysts enable the Z-selective catalytic addition of acid chlorides to alkynes. Depending on the ligand, the reaction proceeds with or without decarbonylation to give β-chlorovinyl-substituted arenes or ketones: useful intermediates for the synthesis of heterocycles. cod=cyclooctadiene, IPr=1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene), RuPhos=2-dicyclohexylphosphanyl-2′,6′-diisopropoxy-1,1′-biphenyl.

  9. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Chemistry Databases

      Polymer Backbone Conformation—A Challenging Task for Database Information Retrieval (pages 9596–9598)

      Dieter Seebach, Engelbert Zass, W. Bernd Schweizer, Amber J. Thompson, Alister French, Benjamin G. Davis, Gwenda Kyd and Ian J. Bruno

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904422

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      Look again: The X-ray single crystals structure determination of polyethylene glycol chains reported at the beginning of 2009 was not the first X-ray structure. The fact that old fiber and freeze-dried structure reports from the 1960s were overlooked points out weak spots in searches of chemical and crystallographic databases.

  10. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Chiral Resolution

      From Ostwald Ripening to Single Chirality (pages 9600–9606)

      Wim L. Noorduin, Elias Vlieg, Richard M. Kellogg and Bernard Kaptein

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905215

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      The rich get richer and the poor get poorer: More than 100 years ago the 1909 Nobel laureate Wilhelm Ostwald explained how large crystals grow at the expense of small crystals. This principle forms the basis for the recently discovered method for the conversion of racemic crystal mixtures into homochiral crystals by grinding-induced attrition.

  11. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Indole Chemistry

      Catalytic Functionalization of Indoles in a New Dimension (pages 9608–9644)

      Marco Bandini and Astrid Eichholzer

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200901843

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      The “Lord of the Rings”: The direct chemical manipulation of the indole system is a long-standing synthetic shortcut to challenging molecular architectures which recently entered a new dimension through the introduction of innovative catalytic systems and techniques. This Review highlights the new aspects that have had made a deep impact on this topic over the last few years: efficiency, selectivity, and environmental friendliness.

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Fullerene Nanostructures

      Controlled Fabrication of Fullerene C60 into Microspheres of Nanoplates through Porphyrin-Polymer-Assisted Self-Assembly (pages 9646–9651)

      Xuan Zhang and Masayuki Takeuchi

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904985

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      Holey balls! Novel microspheres made up of nanoplates have been fabricated by porphyrin-polymer-assisted supramolecular self-assembly of C60. The obtained C60 microspheres are single-crystalline and exhibit pure fcc structure. This is a rare example of a hierarchical supramolecular architecture fabricated by the self-assembly of unmodified C60.

    2. Asymmetric Synthesis

      Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Desymmetrization of meso-1,3-Diones: Asymmetric Synthesis of Chiral Cyclohexenones (pages 9652–9654)

      Keiji Mori, Takuya Katoh, Tohru Suzuki, Takuya Noji, Masahiro Yamanaka and Takahiko Akiyama

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905271

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      Chiral effectiveness: The title transformation is applicable to a wide variety of substrates to give chiral cyclohexenones in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivity (see scheme). To clarify the origin of the enantioselectivity ONIOM calculations were carried out

    3. Nanoparticle Superlattices

      Observation of a Ternary Nanocrystal Superlattice and Its Structural Characterization by Electron Tomography (pages 9655–9657)

      Wiel H. Evers, Heiner Friedrich, Laura Filion, Marjolein Dijkstra and Daniel Vanmaekelbergh

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904821

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      Three's company: The first genuine ternary colloidal crystal (see picture) is composed of PbSe nanocrystals of two different diameters (blue and green) and of CdSe nanocrystals (red). Electron tomography shows that the superlattice is isostructural with the atomic lattice AlMgB4.

    4. Protein Labeling

      A Biocompatible Condensation Reaction for the Labeling of Terminal Cysteine Residues on Proteins (pages 9658–9662)

      Hongjun Ren, Fei Xiao, Ke Zhan, Young-Pil Kim, Hexin Xie, Zuyong Xia and Jianghong Rao

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903627

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      Going live: A protein-labeling method based on the use of a single amino acid tag—an N-terminal cysteine residue—and small-molecule probes containing a cyanobenzothiazole (CBT) unit has been used for the specific fluorescence labeling of proteins in vitro and at the surface of live cells (see scheme). This simple ligation reaction proceeds with a high degree of specificity under physiological conditions. Rd: a rhodamine dye; TEV: tobacco etch virus.

    5. Metal–Metal Interactions

      Two-Dimensional Triangular and Square Heterometallic Clusters: Influence of the Closed-Shell d10 Electronic Configuration (pages 9663–9667)

      Sabrina Sculfort, Pierre Croizat, Abdelatif Messaoudi, Marc Bénard, Marie-Madeleine Rohmer, Richard Welter and Pierre Braunstein

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903895

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      Gilded rafts: Oligomeric 2D raft clusters {M[m]}n (M=Cu, n=3; M=Ag or Au, n=4; see picture) with the same bridging metalloligand [m]={CpMo(CO)3} were prepared and structurally characterized. The ν2-triangular (M=Cu) or ν2-square (M=Ag, Au) structures of their metal–metal-bonded cores allow comparative evaluation of the d10⋅⋅⋅d10 interactions, and theoretical calculations point to a favorable contribution of diagonal Au⋅⋅⋅Au or Ag⋅⋅⋅Ag interactions.

    6. Arsenic Detection

      Use of Gold Nanoparticles in a Simple Colorimetric and Ultrasensitive Dynamic Light Scattering Assay: Selective Detection of Arsenic in Groundwater (pages 9668–9671)

      Jhansi Rani Kalluri, Tahir Arbneshi, Sadia Afrin Khan, Adria Neely, Perry Candice, Birsen Varisli, Marla Washington, Shardae McAfee, Britinia Robinson, Santanu Banerjee, Anant Kumar Singh, Dulal Senapati and Paresh Chandra Ray

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903958

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      Low level: The amount of arsenic in Bangladeshi well water and in bottled drinking water and Mississippi tap water are indicated by a dynamic light scattering (DLS) assay. Label-free gold nanoparticles are used in a selective colorimetric assay (see picture) and in a highly sensitive DLS assay for the recognition of arsenic in concentrations as low as 3 ppt.

    7. Oxidation Photocatalysis

      Homogeneous Photocatalytic Oxidation of Alcohols by a Chromophore–Catalyst Dyad of Ruthenium Complexes (pages 9672–9675)

      Weizhong Chen, Francisca N. Rein and Reginaldo C. Rocha

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904756

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      A chromophore–catalyst dyad assembly of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes has been prepared, structurally and electronically characterized, and its proton-coupled multielectron photooxidation reactivity demonstrated by the visible sunlight-driven catalytic oxidation of aliphatic and benzyl alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes or ketones with high selectivities and over 100 turnover cycles in water, at ambient conditions.

    8. Membrane-Binding Peptides

      RE Coil: An Antimicrobial Peptide Regulator (pages 9676–9679)

      Maxim G. Ryadnov, Galina V. Mukamolova, Ayman S. Hawrani, James Spencer and Roscoe Platt

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904780

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      Peptides that make bacteria RE coil: A peptide system designed to regulate antimicrobial intervention switches between antimicrobial and inactive forms. The regulator comprises two α-helical sequences. One of them, R coil, binds to microbial membranes and acts as an antimicrobial component, and is inactivated by the other, E coil, a membrane-inactive peptide (see picture).

    9. Photovoltaic Devices

      Synthesis and Photoelectrochemical Study of Vertically Aligned Silicon Nanowire Arrays (pages 9680–9684)

      Guangbi Yuan, Huaizhou Zhao, Xiaohua Liu, Zainul S. Hasanali, Yan Zou, Andrew Levine and Dunwei Wang

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902861

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      Wiring photoelectrodes: Vertically aligned silicon nanowires were chemically synthesized and tested for solar-energy harnessing. Growth experiments reveal that such nanowire arrays can be obtained when the growth is slow. Photoelectrochemical studies validate that silicon nanowires are promising candidates for efficient solar cells.

    10. Protein–Protein Interactions

      Design and Synthesis of Highly Potent and Plasma-Stable Dimeric Inhibitors of the PSD-95–NMDA Receptor Interaction (pages 9685–9689)

      Anders Bach, Celestine N. Chi, Gar F. Pang, Lars Olsen, Anders S. Kristensen, Per Jemth and Kristian Strømgaard

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904741

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      On the double: Dimerization of monomeric peptide ligands towards the PDZ domains of the protein PSD-95 (postsynaptic density 95) leads to potent inhibitors of protein–protein interactions with stability in blood plasma. Optimization of the length of the polyethylene glycol linker results in unprecedented affinity for inhibitors of the PDZ1-2 domain (see picture).

    11. Cascade Reactions

      Palladium-Catalyzed Intramolecular Carboesterification of Olefins (pages 9690–9692)

      Yang Li, Katherine J. Jardine, Runyu Tan, Datong Song and Vy M. Dong

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905478

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      One catalyst, three bonds: The title reaction between propiolic acids and unactivated olefins (see scheme; O red, Cl green) results in vicinal functionalization of the olefin, with the formation of new C[BOND]C and C[BOND]O bonds. Structurally complex 6,7,5-tricyclic ring systems are formed in a single step by this cascade chloropalladation and formal [3+2] cycloaddition.

    12. Tandem Reactions

      Concise One-Pot Tandem Synthesis of Indoles and Isoquinolines from Amides (pages 9693–9696)

      Noriko Okamoto, Yoshihisa Miwa, Hideki Minami, Kei Takeda and Reiko Yanada

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904960

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      Heterocyclic hot pot: Platinum(II)-catalyzed syntheses of indoles and isoquinolines from isocyanates, which are derived from a Hofmann-type rearrangement of amides using a hypervalent iodine reagent, are described. C2-symmetric macrocyclic bis(indole)s can also be synthesized from transannulation of C2-symmetric macrocyclic bis(alkyne carbamate) intermediates.

    13. Cluster Formation

      Spectroscopic Elucidation of First Steps of Supported Bimetallic Cluster Formation (pages 9697–9700)

      Apoorva Kulkarni and Bruce C. Gates

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904877

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      Initial steps of bimetallic Ru–Os cluster formation on MgO in the presence of H2 are analyzed by EXAFS and IR spectroscopy. Ru[BOND]Os bond formation takes place after decarbonylation of Ru3 clusters and subsequently, at higher temperatures, of Os3 clusters to generate coordinative unsaturation (see scheme).

    14. Main-Group Chemistry

      N-Heterocyclic Carbene Stabilized Digermanium(0) (pages 9701–9704)

      Anastas Sidiropoulos, Cameron Jones, Andreas Stasch, Susanne Klein and Gernot Frenking

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905495

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      Zero Ge! Reductions of an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) adduct of GeCl2 with magnesium(I) dimers afford a dimeric compound (see picture), which structural and theoretical studies show to contain a singlet digermanium(0) fragment :Ge[DOUBLE BOND]Ge: datively coordinated by two NHC ligands.

    15. Synthetic Methods

      Strain Release in C[BOND]H Bond Activation? (pages 9705–9708)

      Ke Chen, Albert Eschenmoser and Phil S. Baran

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904474

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      What a relief! In 1955, strain release was put forward as a reactivity factor to explain the differing reactivity of axial and equitorial alcohols during oxidation. The same rationale may account for the differing rates of activation between axial and equitorial C[BOND]H bonds in C[BOND]H activation processes (see scheme).

    16. Zinc Complexes

      Bridging Binding Modes of Phosphine-Stabilized Nitrous Oxide to Zn(C6F5)2 (pages 9709–9712)

      Rebecca C. Neu, Edwin Otten and Douglas W. Stephan

      Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905650

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      Just say NNO: Reaction of [tBu3PN2O(B(C6H4F)3)] with 1, 1.5, or 2 equivalents of Zn(C6F5)2 affords the species [{tBu3PN2OZn(C6F5)2}2], [{tBu3PN2OZn(C6F5)2}2Zn(C6F5)2], and [tBu3PN2O{Zn(C6F5)2}2] (see structure; red Zn (large sphere), O (small sphere), green N, yellow P) displaying unique binding modes of Zn to the phosphine-stabilized N2O fragment.

    17. Tandem Reactions

      Tertiary Amine Mediated Tandem Cross-Rauhut–Currier/Acetalization Reactions: Access to Functionalized Spiro-3,4-Dihydropyrans (pages 9713–9716)

      Weijun Yao, Yihua Wu, Gang Wang, Yiping Zhang and Cheng Ma

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905091

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      γ-Proton transfer furnished the highly selective title reaction in which cyclic β-haloenals 1 react with β,γ-unsaturated α-ketoesters 2 to generate functionalized spiro-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrans 3 having an α-quaternary carbon center and an adjacent vinyl halide group in skeleton. DBU=1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene, Tos=4-toluenesulfonyl.

    18. Directed Ferration

      Preparation of Functionalized Aryl Iron(II) Compounds and a Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling with Alkyl Halides (pages 9717–9720)

      Stefan H. Wunderlich and Paul Knochel

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905196

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      Theortho-ferration of functionalized arenes using tmp2Fe⋅2 MgCl2⋅4 LiCl furnishes the corresponding diorgano FeII reagents at 25 °C in high yields. These reagents undergo cross-coupling reactions in the presence of 4-fluorostyrene to give various alkylated arenes. It turned out that NiII impurities present in commercial FeCl2 (98 % pure) catalyzed this alkyl–aryl cross-coupling reaction.

    19. Host–Guest Chemistry

      A Facile and Efficient Preparation of Pillararenes and a Pillarquinone (pages 9721–9723)

      Derong Cao, Yuhui Kou, Jianquan Liang, Zhizhao Chen, Lingyun Wang and Herbert Meier

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904765

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      Ring around the roses: The ipso substitution of benzene rings makes a simple and efficient synthesis of pillar[n]arenes (n=5, 6) possible. Pillar[6]arenes (see picture) and pillar[5]quinone, an oxidation product of pillar[5]arene, are novel, highly promising host systems for host–guest chemistry.

    20. Chitin in Biosilica

      Chitin-Based Organic Networks: An Integral Part of Cell Wall Biosilica in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana (pages 9724–9727)

      Eike Brunner, Patrick Richthammer, Hermann Ehrlich, Silvia Paasch, Paul Simon, Susanne Ueberlein and Karl-Heinz van Pée

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905028

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      Inner workings: Diatom cell walls are outstanding examples of natural hybrid materials and exhibit interesting mechanical and optical properties. Removal of the biosilicates in the cell walls of T. pseudonana with NH4F proves that the cell walls contain an internal, organic network consisting of crosslinked chitin fibers as well as other organic components (see picture).

    21. DNA Quadruplexes

      Human Telomeric Quadruplex Conformations Studied by Pulsed EPR (pages 9728–9730)

      Vijay Singh, Mykhailo Azarkh, Thomas E. Exner, Jörg S. Hartig and Malte Drescher

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902146

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      Distance learning: Under physiological conditions telomeric sequences adopt different quadruplex topologies, although the exact nature of these species is currently debated. Double spin-labeled oligonucleotides consisting of guanosine-rich telomeric repeats are synthesized and characterized by pulsed EPR techniques. In solution in the presence of K+ ions the propeller and basket quadruplex conformations co-exist as a 1:1 mixture.

    22. Metal Aerogels

      Hydrogels and Aerogels from Noble Metal Nanoparticles (pages 9731–9734)

      Nadja C. Bigall, Anne-Kristin Herrmann, Maria Vogel, Marcus Rose, Paul Simon, Wilder Carrillo-Cabrera, Dirk Dorfs, Stefan Kaskel, Nikolai Gaponik and Alexander Eychmüller

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902543

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      Look, no hands! Non-supported macroscopic aerogels are fabricated from platinum, gold, and silver, and from bimetallic mixtures of gold/silver and platinum/silver. The hydrogels and aerogels consist of voluminous porous networks of particles or wires that are only a few nanometers thick. These entirely new structures have tremendous potential for applications in catalysis and nanophotonics.

    23. Gold–Boron Interactions

      A Trimetallic Gold Boride Complex with a Fluxional Gold–Boron Bond (pages 9735–9738)

      Holger Braunschweig, Peter Brenner, Rian D. Dewhurst, Martin Kaupp, Robert Müller and Sebastian Östreicher

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904774

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      Gold–boron (con)fusion: Addition of an anionic metalloborylene to an [AuCl(N-heterocyclic carbene)] complex results in attack of the boron atom at the gold center and formation of a trimetallic Mn2AuB framework (see scheme, middle). X-ray structural analysis and DFT calculations show that the bonding situation of this complex cannot be described by the “boryl” (pure boron donor) or “borane” (pure boron acceptor) descriptions.

    24. RNA Folding

      Ca2+ Induces the Formation of Two Distinct Subpopulations of Group II Intron Molecules (pages 9739–9742)

      Miriam Steiner, David Rueda and Roland K. O. Sigel

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903809

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      New wrinkles in folding: In the folding of the D135 ribozyme derived from the group II intron Sc.ai5γ, partial replacement of Mg2+ with Ca2+ leads to a division into two distinct subpopulations that are not interchangeable. The picture shows the splitting into the two types together with the single-molecule FRET states.

    25. Sulfur Oxidation

      Sulfur Oxidation on Pt(355): It Is the Steps! (pages 9743–9746)

      Regine Streber, Christian Papp, Michael P. A. Lorenz, Andreas Bayer, Reinhard Denecke and Hans-Peter Steinrück

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904488

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      Steps in the right direction: The role of steps in the removal of sulfur from a Pt model catalyst, via metastable SO3 and SO4 species, was demonstrated by in situ high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. From isothermal experiments the activation energy of the rate-determining step was deduced to be 34 kJ mol−1.

    26. Single-Molecule Imaging

      Far-Field Nanodiagnostics of Solids with Visible Light by Spectrally Selective Imaging (pages 9747–9750)

      Andrei V. Naumov, Alexey A. Gorshelev, Yury G. Vainer, Lothar Kador and Jürgen Köhler

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905101

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      Cracking up: Use of conventional microscopy allows the width of a crack in a crystal to be determined with an accuracy that is limited by classical diffraction (see picture, left-hand image). Single-molecule imaging methods enable the determination of the crack profile with an accuracy beyond the diffraction limit (right-hand image).

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Reviews
    9. Highlight
    10. Correspondence
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
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