Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 48 Issue 6

January 26, 2009

Volume 48, Issue 6

Pages 993–1167

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Nickel α-Keto-β-Diimine Initiators for Olefin Polymerization (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 6/2009) (page 993)

      Jason D. Azoulay, Rene S. Rojas, Abigail V. Serrano, Hisashi Ohtaki, Griselda B. Galland, Guang Wu and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Modification of a ligand framework by the introduction of an exocyclic carbonyl group (highlighted in red) results in a remarkable increase in the activity of a nickel olefin polymerization catalyst. As described by G. C. Bazan and co-workers in the Communication on page 1089 ff., the oxygen lone pairs allow Lewis acids to withdraw electron density from the cationic active site. Such modulation of electronic effects allows the reactivity of electrophilic transition-metal active sites to be tuned.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Enantioselective Desymmetrization of meso-Aziridines with TMSN3 or TMSCN Catalyzed by Discrete Yttrium Complexes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 6/2009) (page 994)

      Bin Wu, Judith C. Gallucci, Jon R. Parquette and T. V. RajanBabu

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The highly enantioselective ring-opening of aziridines with TMSCN and TMSN3 catalyzed by dimeric yttrium–salen complexes is described by J. R. Parquette, T. V. RajanBabu, and co-workers in their Communication on page 1126 ff. A solid-state structure of the dimer was elucidated to help gain insight into the asymmetric induction process—-a dimetallic mechanism has been proposed to explain the selectivity between mono- and dimeric catalysts. (The graphic was designed by Shao Hui, Ohio State University.)

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  4. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nd2K2IrO7 and Sm2K2IrO7: Iridium(VI) Oxides Prepared under Ambient Pressure (page 1005)

      Samuel J. Mugavero III, Mark D. Smith, Won-Sub Yoon and Hans-Conrad zur Loye

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990012

      This article corrects:

      Nd2K2IrO7 and Sm2K2IrO7: Iridium(VI) Oxides Prepared under Ambient Pressure1

      Vol. 48, Issue 1, 215–218, Article first published online: 28 NOV 2008

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Jun-ichi Yoshida (page 1011)

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Olefin Isomerization

      Ruthenium-Catalyzed Isomerization of Terminal Olefins: Applications to Synthesis (pages 1014–1017)

      Timothy J. Donohoe, Timothy J. C. O'Riordan and Carla P. Rosa

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804617

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In, out, olefin about: A ruthenium hydride complex derived from the Grubbs second-generation metathesis catalyst has proven to be an efficient catalyst for the selective isomerization of terminal olefins to the corresponding propenyl derivatives (see scheme). This methodology has been applied in a number of syntheses to enable access to complex natural products. Cy=cyclohexyl, Mes=mesityl, MOM=methoxymethyl.

    2. Bromine Reagents

      Hypervalent Bromine Compounds: Smaller, More Reactive Analogues of Hypervalent Iodine Compounds (pages 1018–1020)

      Umar Farooq, Azhar-ul-Haq Ali Shah and Thomas Wirth

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Moving up a row in the Periodic Table leads from hypervalent iodine compounds to hypervalent bromine compounds, which are now readily available (see scheme). These compounds are more reactive than the well-known heavier analogues and undergo new reactions.

  8. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Medicinal Chemistry

      Traveling the Vitamin B12 Pathway: Oral Delivery of Protein and Peptide Drugs (pages 1022–1028)

      Amanda K. Petrus, Timothy J. Fairchild and Robert P. Doyle

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800865

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two major obstacles hinder the oral administration of therapeutic peptides and proteins: proteolytic degradation in the stomach and an inadequate mechanism for the absorption of polypeptides within the intestinal lumen. This Minireview focuses on the efficacy of oral peptide/protein delivery by the existing pathway for the dietary uptake of vitamin B12 (see picture; common sites of conjugation are highlighted at the top).

  9. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. 2D Polymers

      Two-Dimensional Polymers: Just a Dream of Synthetic Chemists? (pages 1030–1069)

      Junji Sakamoto, Jeroen van Heijst, Oleg Lukin and A. Dieter Schlüter

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801863

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A “molecular carpet” is a good description for a two-dimensional polymer. True 2D polymers have a thickness of one monomer unit and a regular structure. This Review describes attempts to synthesize such polymers (see scheme, M3: monomer with three functional groups). The focus of this Review is on the factors that must be considered if a truly 2D polymer is to be prepared.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Asymmetric Synthesis

      A Synthesis of Tamiflu by Using a Barium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Diels–Alder-Type Reaction (pages 1070–1076)

      Kenzo Yamatsugu, Liang Yin, Shin Kamijo, Yasuaki Kimura, Motomu Kanai and Masakatsu Shibasaki

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804777

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In pursuit of a better route: A new catalytic asymmetric synthesis of Tamiflu was developed. The key transformation was an asymmetric Diels–Alder-type reaction of 1 and 2 catalyzed by a barium/F2-FujiCAPO complex in the presence of a CsF co-catalyst to construct the core of Tamiflu (see scheme; TMS=trimethylsilyl). The product was converted into Tamiflu in 11 steps on a gram scale.

    2. Uranium[BOND]Metal Bonds

      σ and π Donation in an Unsupported Uranium–Gallium Bond (pages 1077–1080)

      Stephen T. Liddle, Jonathan McMaster, David P. Mills, Alexander J. Blake, Cameron Jones and William D. Woodul

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805481

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A charitable donation: The gallium center contributes to both π donation and σ donation in a uranium–gallium bond (see picture for results from calculations). The gallium center is isolobal to CO and N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and indicates that NHC π-donor behavior might be more widespread than previously recognized. The uranium–gallium bond may be regarded as a model for the as yet unreported UIV[BOND]CO−. unit.

    3. DNA Structures

      Discrete Self-Assembly of Iron(III) Ions inside Triple-Stranded Artificial DNA (pages 1081–1084)

      Yusuke Takezawa, Wakana Maeda, Kentaro Tanaka and Mitsuhiko Shionoya

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804654

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Triplex-rated: Discrete self-assembly of FeIII ions with octahedral coordination geometry occurs within triple-stranded artificial DNA with hydroxypyridone nucleobases as metal ligands through the formation of nonplanar base triplets. Such a novel structural motif in DNA could lead to programmable alignment of six-coordinate transition metals.

    4. Nanoparticle Catalysts

      Preparation of Rhodium Nanoparticles in Carbon Dioxide Induced Ionic Liquids and their Application to Selective Hydrogenation (pages 1085–1088)

      Valentin Cimpeanu, Marijan Kočevar, Vasile I. Parvulescu and Walter Leitner

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803773

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the trap: Catalytically active nanoparticles can be generated and stabilized in solid ionic matrices with the aid of supercritical CO2. The method allows the use of simple ammonium salts that would not be classified as ionic liquids, and results in solid and easily handled catalyst materials. These materials can selectively catalyze the hydrogenation of highly sterically encumbered aromatic olefins.

    5. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Nickel α-Keto-β-Diimine Initiators for Olefin Polymerization (pages 1089–1092)

      Jason D. Azoulay, Rene S. Rojas, Abigail V. Serrano, Hisashi Ohtaki, Griselda B. Galland, Guang Wu and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804661

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new ligand–metal combination (see picture, Ni green, Br brown, N blue, O red, C gray) was designed to be cationic and to benefit from removal of electron density by the action of a Lewis acid on the ligand framework. In the presence of various activators, the resulting catalytic site is highly active for ethylene polymerization and capable of polymerizing α-olefins to high molecular weights.

    6. Combinatorial Chemistry

      Dynamic Combinatorial Evolution within Self-Replicating Supramolecular Assemblies (pages 1093–1096)

      Rémi Nguyen, Lionel Allouche, Eric Buhler and Nicolas Giuseppone

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804602

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Survival of the fittest: Self-assemblies made of dynamic block copolymers (dynablocks) can self-replicate by catalyzing the formation of their own building blocks. Moreover, in competition experiments, the differential thermodynamic stabilities and autocatalytic efficiencies of these self-assemblies lead to sigmoid growth of the most efficient self-replicator and to depletion of its competitors.

    7. Cycloaddition Polymerization

      Cycloaddition-Promoted Self-Assembly of a Polymer into Well-Defined β Sheets and Hierarchical Nanofibrils (pages 1097–1101)

      Ting-Bin Yu, Jane Z. Bai and Zhibin Guan

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “Click” to fold: CuI-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition polymerization of a peptide monomer induced folding of the resultant polymer into well-defined β sheets, which further self-assemble into hierarchical nanofibrils. The antiparallel β-sheet structure was confirmed by several techniques. Scanning probe micrographs confirm the formation of hierarchical amyloid-like nanofibrils.

    8. Adducts of Ammonia

      Adducts of NH3 with the Conformers of Glycidol: A Rotational Spectroscopy Study (pages 1102–1105)

      Barbara M. Giuliano, Sonia Melandri, Assimo Maris, Laura B. Favero and Walther Caminati

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805104

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two locks accept the same master key: Two different complexes of ammonia with two different conformers of glycidol have been characterized by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (see picture; gray C, blue N, red O, white H). In both complexes NH3 is linked to the alcohol molecule through an O[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅N (stronger) and an N[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅O (weaker) hydrogen bond. Structural and energetic features of the hydrogen bonds are given.

    9. Hydrostannylation

      Reactions of Tin(II) Hydride Species with Unsaturated Molecules (pages 1106–1109)

      Anukul Jana, Herbert W. Roesky, Carola Schulzke and Alexander Döring

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805595

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      If anything can, tin can: The tin(II) hydride species [LSnH] (L=HC{CMeN(2,6-iPr2C6H3)}2) reacts with various compounds containing unsaturated C[BOND]O, C[BOND]C, or C[BOND]N bonds, which results in simultaneous transfer of hydrogen and {LSn} to the organic substrates and elegantly generates new tin(II) compounds. These unique stannylene compounds incorporate a lone pair of electrons that is suitable for complexation with transition-metal species.

    10. Natural Products

      Total Synthesis of a Protected Aglycon of the Kedarcidin Chromophore (pages 1110–1113)

      Kouki Ogawa, Yasuhito Koyama, Isao Ohashi, Itaru Sato and Masahiro Hirama

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805518

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Strong support for the recently proposed structure of the kedarcidin chromophore has been obtained through the convergent synthesis of the aglycon. The key features of the synthesis are an efficient assembly of the four fragments, a novel strategy involving an alkynyl epoxide, a cerium amide promoted nine-membered diyne ring cyclization, and a SmI2-mediated reductive 1,2-elimination. TBS=tert-butyldimethylsilyl, MOM=methoxymethyl.

    11. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Easy Copper-Catalyzed Synthesis of Primary Aromatic Amines by Couplings Aromatic Boronic Acids with Aqueous Ammonia at Room Temperature (pages 1114–1116)

      Honghua Rao, Hua Fu, Yuyang Jiang and Yufen Zhao

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805424

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A reaction without the added extras: Aromatic boronic acids have been coupled using inexpensive aqueous ammonia to give primary aromatic amines under copper catalysis. This simple and highly efficient approach can be carried out in air at room temperature and, importantly, no base, ligand, or additive are required (see scheme).

    12. Lanthanide Complexes

      Dinitrogen Reduction and C[BOND]H Activation by the Divalent Organoneodymium Complex [(C5H2tBu3)2Nd(μ-I)K([18]crown-6)] (pages 1117–1121)

      Florian Jaroschik, Aurélien Momin, François Nief, Xavier-Frédéric Le Goff, Glen B. Deacon and Peter C. Junk

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804934

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly reactive: The first divalent organoneodymium complex has been isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography. It reacts immediately with all common aromatic and ethereal solvents, reduces dinitrogen to form an isolable dinitrogen complex, and undergoes C[BOND]H activation of a ligand tert-butyl group to form a crystallizable “tuck-in” complex (see scheme).

    13. Oligonucleotide Labels

      A Photoreactive Ruthenium(II) Complex Tethered to a Guanine-Containing Oligonucleotide: A Biomolecular Tool that Behaves as a “Seppuku Molecule” (pages 1122–1125)

      Stéphane Le Gac, Stéphane Rickling, Pascal Gerbaux, Eric Defrancq, Cécile Moucheron and Andrée Kirsch-De Mesmaeker

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804503

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-destruction: Attachment of a photoreactive RuII complex to a guanine-containing oligonucleotide has led to an innovative biomolecular tool for gene silencing studies. This conjugate can be selectively photo-cross-linked with its complementary strand but undergoes a self-inhibition (or “seppuku”) process in the presence of a noncomplementary target (see picture), which is an attractive strategy to avoid undesired secondary photoeffects.

    14. Enantioselective Ring-Opening

      Enantioselective Desymmetrization of meso-Aziridines with TMSN3 or TMSCN Catalyzed by Discrete Yttrium Complexes (pages 1126–1129)

      Bin Wu, Judith C. Gallucci, Jon R. Parquette and T. V. RajanBabu

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804415

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Y is it so? Dimeric yttrium–salen complexes (see structure; N blue, O red, Y magenta) catalyze the highly enantioselective ring-opening of meso-aziridines by TMSCN and TMSN3. To explain the dramatic differences in the selectivity between mono- and dimeric catalysts, a dimetallic mechanism based on the solid-state structure of the dimer is proposed.

    15. Self-Assembly

      Size-Selective Helical Stacking and Template Polymerization of Oligosaccharides around a Linear Polymeric Guest Molecule (pages 1130–1132)

      Takanobu Sanji, Nobu Kato and Masato Tanaka

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803848

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Clip and lock: Linear oligosaccharide host molecules are stacked in a helical manner around a polymeric guest molecule that acts as an axis (see picture). Molecular information such as substrate size and chirality is exchanged between the host and the guest to build up a supramolecular architecture, in which the template polymerization of the stacked oligosaccharide proceeds efficiently.

    16. Cyclosulfur Ligands

      Cyclododecasulfur as a Ligand: From Gas-Phase Experiments to the Crystal Structures of [Cu(S12)(S8)]+ and [Cu(S12)(CH2Cl2)]+ (pages 1133–1137)

      Gustavo Santiso-Quiñones, Robin Brückner, Carsten Knapp, Isabelle Dionne, Jack Passmore and Ingo Krossing

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Just say S: Although gas-phase mass spectrometry experiments suggested the existence of CuI complexes with cyclosulfur ligands, such complexes had never been detected in the condensed phase. The use of “naked” CuI sources with weakly coordinating anions enables the preparation of the first cyclododecasulfur complexes of any metal.

    17. Heterocycles

      A Copper-Catalyzed Tandem Synthesis of Indolo- and Pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinolines (pages 1138–1143)

      Akhilesh Kumar Verma, Tanay Kesharwani, Jaspal Singh, Vibha Tandon and Richard C. Larock

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804427

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Isoquinoline ring the changes: A novel strategy for the title reaction involves ortho-haloarylalkynes which undergo sequential intermolecular addition of N heterocycles onto alkynes and subsequent intramolecular ring closure by arylation. The process involves the use of hydroxymethyl benzotriazole as an efficient and inexpensive ligand for the C[BOND]N and C[BOND]C coupling reactions.

    18. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of Bacilosarcins A and B (pages 1144–1148)

      Masaru Enomoto and Shigefumi Kuwahara

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804571

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      I want to ride my bicycle: The thermodynamic stability of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic ring systems is exploited in the first enantioselective total synthesis of bacilosarcins A and B, which has been achieved in simple two-step sequences from amicoumacin C. Bacilosarcin A incorporates a totally unprecedented heterobicyclic ring system and exhibits a remarkably potent herbicidal activity.

    19. Amino Alcohols

      Stereocontrolled Synthesis of β-Amino Alcohols from Lithiated Aziridines and Boronic Esters (pages 1149–1152)

      Frank Schmidt, Florian Keller, Emeline Vedrenne and Varinder K. Aggarwal

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805272

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      β-Amino alcohols have been prepared with high selectivity by the addition of lithiated aziridines to boronic esters. The regioselectivity of lithiation for aryl aziridines is sensitive to the reaction conditions and to the base employed. This response was exploited to give either class of β-amino alcohols (see scheme; Boc=tert-butoxycarbonyl, Bus=tert-butylsulfonyl, LTMP=lithium 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide, pin=pinacolato).

    20. C[BOND]H Activation

      Titanium-Catalyzed Hydroaminoalkylation of Alkenes by C[BOND]H Bond Activation at sp3 Centers in the α-Position to a Nitrogen Atom (pages 1153–1156)

      Raphael Kubiak, Insa Prochnow and Sven Doye

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Good for primary and secondary amines: Hydroaminoalkylations of alkenes, which take place by C[BOND]H bond activation in the α-position to nitrogen atoms, are catalyzed by various neutral titanium complexes (see scheme). Primary as well as secondary amines can be used as substrates, and the reactions can be achieved intra- and intermolecularly.

    21. Diterpenes

      Enantioselective Synthesis of 4-Desmethyl-3α-hydroxy-15-rippertene (pages 1157–1159)

      Rabea Hennig and Peter Metz

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804640

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let it rip: An intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction and two intramolecular aldol condensations allow the efficient preparation of the title compound 2, a close analogue of the diterpene 1 which was isolated from the defense secretion of termite soldiers. The synthesis commenced with cyclohexanone 3, which is rapidly available from (−)-isopulegol.

    22. Aspirin Derivatives

      Modulation of the Biological Properties of Aspirin by Formation of a Bioorganometallic Derivative (pages 1160–1163)

      Ingo Ott, Brigitte Kircher, Christoph P. Bagowski, Danielle H. W. Vlecken, Elisabeth B. Ott, Joanna Will, Kerstin Bensdorf, William S. Sheldrick and Ronald Gust

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803347

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Beyond treating headaches: The derivatization of biologically active compounds by organometallic units modulates their pharmacological properties. In studies of antitumor-related biochemical properties, the Co2(CO)6 derivative of aspirin 1 shows significantly modified influence on several relevant pathways, which might be based on an altered interaction with the target enzyme COX-2.

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2009 (page 1167)

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990015

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION