Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 48 Issue 8

February 9, 2009

Volume 48, Issue 8

Pages 1337–1509

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: A Spin-Crossover Cluster of Iron(II) Exhibiting a Mixed-Spin Structure and Synergy between Spin Transition and Magnetic Interaction (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2009) (page 1337)

      Da-Yu Wu, Osamu Sato, Yasuaki Einaga and Chun-Ying Duan

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A spin-crossover cluster with the {FeII4O4} core structure is presented by D. Y. Wu, O. Sato et al. in their Communication on page 1475 ff. The cluster is synthesized by self-assembly and shows an abrupt spin transition, giving two high-spin and two low-spin states. It exhibits complete light-induced excited spin-state trapping effects. Importantly, synergy effects between the magnetic interaction and spin transition operate in the cluster.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Self-Template-Directed Formation of Coordination-Polymer Hexagonal Tubes and Rings, and their Calcination to ZnO Rings (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2009) (page 1338)

      Soyoung Jung, Won Cho, Hee Jung Lee and Moonhyun Oh

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hexagonal tubes and rings with unusual shapes were generated through a unique self-template-directed growth mechanism. As described by M. Oh and co-workers in the Communication on page 1459 ff., initially formed solid coordination polymer particles (CPPs) act as templates for the growth of the final hexagonal tubes and rings. Simple calcination of these unusually shaped CPPs results in the spontaneous formation of ZnO particles while the unique shape is maintained.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  4. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cross-Coupling of Aryl/Alkenyl Pivalates with Organozinc Reagents through Nickel-Catalyzed C[BOND]O Bond Activation under Mild Reaction Conditions (page 1351)

      Bi-Jie Li, Yi-Zhou Li, Xing-Yu Lu, Jia Liu, Bing-Tao Guan and Zhang-Jie Shi

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990027

    2. You have free access to this content
      Reversible “Chiral Memory” in Ruthenium Tris(phenanthroline)–Anionic Porphyrin Complexes (page 1351)

      Rosalba Randazzo, Angela Mammana, Alessandro D'Urso, Rosaria Lauceri and Roberto Purrello

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990031

      This article corrects:

      Reversible “Chiral Memory” in Ruthenium Tris(phenanthroline)–Anionic Porphyrin Complexes1

      Vol. 47, Issue 51, 9879–9882, Version of Record online: 17 NOV 2008

    3. You have free access to this content
      Asymmetric Alkaloid Synthesis: A One-Pot Organocatalytic Reaction to Quinolizidine Derivatives (page 1351)

      Johan Franzén and Andreas Fisher

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990032

      This article corrects:

      Asymmetric Alkaloid Synthesis: A One-Pot Organocatalytic Reaction to Quinolizidine Derivatives1

      Vol. 48, Issue 4, 787–791, Version of Record online: 17 DEC 2008

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. M. G. Finn (page 1355)

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200990029

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Asymmetric Organocatalysis

      Light in Aminocatalysis: The Asymmetric Intermolecular α-Alkylation of Aldehydes (pages 1360–1363)

      Paolo Melchiorre

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804995

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Following the light: Photoredox catalysis along with aminocatalysis have proved to be the right combination for one of the most challenging asymmetric transformation in organic synthesis: the direct intermolecular α-alkylation of aldehydes.

    2. Domino Reactions

      From Oblivion into the Limelight: Iron (Domino) Catalysis (pages 1364–1367)

      Alois Fürstner

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805728

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sleeping beauty? Is the scientific community about to kiss awake iron catalysis, a topic that has been dormant for decades? A recent study on a user-friendly direct cross-coupling reaction of alkyl and aryl halides constitutes an important step toward this end through the integration of two different iron-catalyzed elementary steps into a practical one-pot procedure.

  9. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Synthetic Methods

      Formation and Reactivity of Phosphorus–Selenium Rings (pages 1368–1377)

      Guoxiong Hua and J. Derek Woollins

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200800572

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lawesson reagent for selenium fans: Phosphorus selenium heterocycles and, in particular, [PhPSe2]2 (known as Woollins' reagent) are proving valuable in the synthesis of new heterocycles and for the insertion of selenium into organic substrates. Incorporation of phosphorus and selenium atoms into the products leads to a surprising variety of structures.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Molecular Medicine

      RNA Interference: From Basic Research to Therapeutic Applications (pages 1378–1398)

      Jens Kurreck

      Version of Record online: 19 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802092

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An efficient mechanism for the sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression is RNA interference. In this process, double-stranded RNA molecules induce cleavage of a selected target RNA (see picture). This technique has in recent years developed into a standard method of molecular biology. Successful applications in animal models have already led to the initiation of RNAi-based clinical trials as a new therapeutic option.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Natural Products Synthesis (1)

      Synthetic Study of (−)-Norzoanthamine: Construction of the ABC Ring Moiety (pages 1400–1403)

      Yoshihisa Murata, Daisuke Yamashita, Katsushi Kitahara, Yohei Minasako, Atsuo Nakazaki and Susumu Kobayashi

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804544

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Throw your hat in the ring: A highly diastereoselective synthesis of the ABC rings of (−)-norzoanthamine has been achieved starting from the (−)-Hajos–Parrish ketone (see scheme). Three asymmetric quaternary carbon centers on the C ring were constructed by a 1,4-addition, and an intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction provided a trans-decalin scaffold on the AB rings.

    2. Natural Products Synthesis (2)

      Total Synthesis of (−)-Norzoanthamine (pages 1404–1406)

      Daisuke Yamashita, Yoshihisa Murata, Naotsuka Hikage, Ken-ichi Takao, Atsuo Nakazaki and Susumu Kobayashi

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804546

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No bones about it: (−)-Norzoanthamine, a promising candidate for an anti-osteoporotic drug, was the target of a total synthesis (see scheme). The final bisaminal formation with AcOH/H2O gave the DEFG ring, while the cyclization precursor was prepared by installing the remaining bisaminal unit after oxidative cleavage of the cyclopentanol moiety.

    3. Bond Theory

      You have free access to this content
      The Inverted Bond in [1.1.1]Propellane is a Charge-Shift Bond (pages 1407–1410)

      Wei Wu, Junjing Gu, Jinshuai Song, Sason Shaik and Philippe C. Hiberty

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804965

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bonded or not bonded? An ab initio valence bond study of [1.1.1]propellane shows that the two bridgehead carbons are linked by a strong and direct σ bond that is neither classically covalent nor classically ionic, but rather a charge-shift bond, in which the covalent–ionic resonance energy plays the major role. As such, the central bond of [1.1.1]propellane closely resembles the single bond of difluorine.

    4. Metallapropellanes

      Pentagerma[1.1.1]propellane: A Combined Experimental and Quantum Chemical Study on the Nature of the Interactions between the Bridgehead Atoms (pages 1411–1416)

      Dominik Nied, Wim Klopper and Frank Breher

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ge, whiz! A detailed study of the synthesis, structure, redox chemistry, and bonding properties of pentagerma[1.1.1]propellane (1, see picture) examines fundamental aspects of the interactions between the bridgehead germanium atoms. DFT and CASSCF calculations unravel the biradicaloid characteristics of 1, and preliminary reactivity studies indicate that 1 features some radical-type behavior.

    5. Synthetic Methods

      A Copper-Catalyzed, pH-Neutral Construction of High-Enantiopurity Peptidyl Ketones from Peptidic S-Acylthiosalicylamides in Air at Room Temperature (pages 1417–1421)

      Lanny S. Liebeskind, Hao Yang and Hao Li

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804524

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A copper-catalyzed transformation of peptidic thiol esters and boronic acids gives peptidyl ketones and takes place in DMF or DMF/H2O at room temperature in air (see scheme). This aerobic reaction only occurs at a thiol ester group capable of coordinating to Cu through its appendage on the sulfur center and is not hampered by racemization of the reactants or products.

    6. Radical Coupling

      Isoprene-Assisted Radical Coupling of (Co)polymers Prepared by Cobalt-Mediated Radical Polymerization (pages 1422–1424)

      Antoine Debuigne, Christine Jérôme and Christophe Detrembleur

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804880

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tackling blocks: The isoprene-assisted radical coupling (I-ARC) of polymers prepared by cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (see picture) is the first efficient radical coupling method that is not restricted to short chains. When applied to AB diblock copolymers, I-ARC constitutes a straightforward approach to the preparation of novel symmetrical ABA triblock copolymers.

    7. Metallofullerenes

      Trimetallic Nitride Endohedral Fullerenes: Experimental and Theoretical Evidence for the M3N6+@C2n6− model (pages 1425–1428)

      Manuel N. Chaur, Ramón Valencia, Antonio Rodríguez-Fortea, Josep M. Poblet and Luis Echegoyen

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802777

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Size doesn't matter: Metallic nitride endohedral fullerenes (MNEFs) exhibit redox properties that are not dependent on the size of the carbon cage, but on its electronic properties. These findings support the ionic model of MNEFs.

    8. Metallocene Fusion

      Fusion of a 1,3-Diboraruthenocene to Form a Slipped μ-Hexahydrotetraboranaphthalene Triple-Decker Complex with Two Axial C[BOND]H Bonds (pages 1429–1431)

      Elena V. Mutseneck, Hubert Wadepohl, Markus Enders, Alexander R. Kudinov and Walter Siebert

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200802945

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colliding double deckers: Addition of zinc to a reaction mixture of [{Cp*RuCl}4]/pentamethyl-2,3-dihydro-1,3-diborole (C3B2Me5H) in THF leads to three known double- and triple-decker complexes of [C3B2Me5], and unexpectedly to the slipped triple-decker (see picture) with two fused diborole rings. The endo C[BOND]H bonds of two MeC[BOND]H groups donate two additional electrons to achieve the stable 34 VE configuration.

    9. Noble Gas Compounds

      XeF4 as a Ligand for a Metal Ion (pages 1432–1434)

      Gašper Tavčar and Boris Žemva

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803365

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Noble molecule: [Mg(XeF2)(XeF4)](AsF6)2 is the first coordination compound in which XeF4 acts as a ligand to a metal center. It is also the first known compound, in which XeF2 and XeF4 are simultaneously coordinated to the same metal center (see structure; purple Xe, green F, gray Mg, yellow As).

    10. Expanded Metals

      Structure and Phase Behavior of the Expanded-Metal Compound 7Li(ND3)4 (pages 1435–1438)

      Richard M. Ibberson, Amelia J. Fowkes, Matthew J. Rosseinsky, William I. F. David and Peter P. Edwards

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804339

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal lite: High-resolution neutron powder diffraction data reveals that the body-centered cubic crystal structure of lithium(0)tetraamine transforms to a simple cubic structure below 22 K. The detailed structure determinations will allow new insights into the coupled structural and electronic properties of the lightest metal.

    11. Synthetic Methods

      Ruthenium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Functionalized Dienes from Propargylic Esters: Formal Cross-Coupling of Two Carbenes (pages 1439–1442)

      Chloé Vovard-Le Bray, Sylvie Dérien and Pierre H. Dixneuf

      Version of Record online: 19 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cross-coupling carbenes: The coupling of a propargylic ester with a diazoalkane in the presence of [RuCl(cod)Cp*] catalyst leads to the formation of functionalized conjugated dienes with high stereoselectivity. The reaction involves the cross-coupling of a vinylcarbene fragment, arising from a ruthenium-catalyzed propargylic ester rearrangement, with a diazoalkane carbene.

    12. Nanoparticles

      Formate as a Surface Probe for Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Solution 13C NMR Spectroscopy (pages 1443–1446)

      Karaked Tedsree, Adam T. S. Kong and Shik Chi Tsang

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805240

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Formic acid adsorption on ruthenium nanoparticles of different sizes allows differentiation of differently bound formate species by solution 13C NMR spectroscopy (see picture). The chemical shifts are comparable to those of organometallic analogues, thus indicating that formate can act as a probe to distinguish surface features of metallic nanoparticles in solution with good quantification and resolution.

    13. C[BOND]H Functionalization

      The Norbornene Shuttle: Multicomponent Domino Synthesis of Tetrasubstituted Helical Alkenes through Multiple C[BOND]H Functionalization (pages 1447–1451)

      Kersten M. Gericke, David I. Chai, Nikolas Bieler and Mark Lautens

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805512

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shall we dance? Within the proposed mechanism for the palladium-catalyzed title reaction, the strained alkene norbornene (or norbornadiene) enters and exits the catalytic cycle in a catalytic “square dance”, acting as both a promoter and a coupling partner in the formation of four carbon–carbon bonds, two of them by challenging C[BOND]H activation processes.

    14. Enzyme Catalysis

      Barrier Compression Enhances an Enzymatic Hydrogen-Transfer Reaction (pages 1452–1454)

      Sam Hay, Christopher R. Pudney, Tom A. McGrory, Jiayun Pang, Michael J. Sutcliffe and Nigel S. Scrutton

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805502

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Putting the squeeze on: Hydrostatic pressure causes a shortening of the charge-transfer bond in the binary complex of morphinone reductase and NADH4 (see diagram). Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that pressure reduces the average reaction barrier width by restricting the conformational space available to the flavin mononucleotide and NADH within the active site. The apparent rate of catalysis increases with pressure.

    15. Drug Design

      Molecular Modeling, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Macrocyclic Calpain Inhibitors (pages 1455–1458)

      Andrew D. Abell, Matthew A. Jones, James M. Coxon, James D. Morton, Steven G. Aitken, Stephen B. McNabb, Hannah Y.-Y. Lee, Janna M. Mehrtens, Nathan A. Alexander, Blair G. Stuart, Axel T. Neffe and Roy Bickerstaffe

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The design and elaboration of a series of macrocyclic templates that exhibit a propensity to adopt a β-strand-like peptide-backbone conformation led to potent and selective inhibitors of calpain 2. Macrocycle 1 retarded calcium-induced opacification in an ovine-lens culture assay and is a lead compound for the development of a drug for cataract treatment. Cbz=carbobenzyloxy.

    16. Template Synthesis

      Self-Template-Directed Formation of Coordination-Polymer Hexagonal Tubes and Rings, and their Calcination to ZnO Rings (pages 1459–1462)

      Soyoung Jung, Won Cho, Hee Jung Lee and Moonhyun Oh

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804816

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This template will self-destruct: A unique particle-growth mechanism involves growth of new coordination polymers on the surface of initially formed hexagonal blocks and concomitant dissolution of the blocks to form hexagonal tubes (see scheme and scanning electron, optical, and fluorescence microscopy images). Calcination of the tubes yields ZnO particles of the same shape.

    17. Mass Spectrometry

      Characterization of Key Intermediates in a Complex Organocatalytic Cascade Reaction Using Mass Spectrometry (pages 1463–1466)

      Wolfgang Schrader, Peni Purwa Handayani, Jian Zhou and Benjamin List

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804353

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chemical scrabble: Mechanistic studies of complex organocatalytic cascade reactions are challenging owing to the presence of many species involved. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry provides details about a one-pot quadruple organocatalytic cascade reaction, and allows detailed characterization of the reaction and its key intermediates.

    18. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Selective Propene Epoxidation on Immobilized Au6–10 Clusters: The Effect of Hydrogen and Water on Activity and Selectivity (pages 1467–1471)

      Sungsik Lee, Luis M. Molina, María J. López, Julio A. Alonso, Bjørk Hammer, Byeongdu Lee, Sönke Seifert, Randall E. Winans, Jeffrey W. Elam, Michael J. Pellin and Stefan Vajda

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804154

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Epoxidation made easy: Subnanometer gold clusters immobilized on amorphous alumina result in a highly active and selective catalyst for propene epoxidation. The highest selectivity is found for gas mixtures involving oxygen and water, thus avoiding the use of hydrogen. Ab initio DFT calculations are used to identify key reaction intermediates and reaction pathways. The results confirm the high catalyst activity owing to the formation of propene oxide metallacycles. Al green, Au yellow, O red, and C gray.

    19. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Carbon Dioxide Induced Phase Switching for Homogeneous-Catalyst Recycling (pages 1472–1474)

      Simon. L. Desset and David J. Cole-Hamilton

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804729

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      SwitchPhos: Rhodium complexes formed from PPh3 ligands functionalized with weakly basic amidine groups are highly active catalysts for the hydroformylation of alkenes. On bubbling with CO2 in the presence of water, the yellow rhodium complexes move into the water phase, whereas bubbling with N2 at 60 °C causes them to switch back into the organic phase. The catalysts can be used for reactions in water or an organic phase.

    20. Spin Crossover

      A Spin-Crossover Cluster of Iron(II) Exhibiting a Mixed-Spin Structure and Synergy between Spin Transition and Magnetic Interaction (pages 1475–1478)

      Da-Yu Wu, Osamu Sato, Yasuaki Einaga and Chun-Ying Duan

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804529

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      How low can you go? An FeII4 square was prepared by self-assembly and exhibits both thermally induced and photoinduced spin crossover from a system with four high-spin (HS) centers to one with two high-spin and two low-spin (LS) centers. The spin-crossover sites are located on the same side of the square, and the spin transition and magnetic interactions (see picture) are synergistically coupled.

    21. NMR Spectroscopy

      Clean Absorption-Mode NMR Data Acquisition (pages 1479–1483)

      Yibing Wu, Arindam Ghosh and Thomas Szyperski

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804927

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new acquisition: Based on “phase-shifted mirrored sampling” (PMS) of indirect evolution periods of multi-dimensional experiments, new acquisition schemes eliminate, without application of a phase correction, dispersive signal components that exacerbate peak identification and shift peak maxima. The resulting enhanced resolution is of particular value for systems with high chemical shift degeneracy.

    22. Photoswitches

      Spectral Tuning of Azobenzene Photoswitches for Biological Applications (pages 1484–1486)

      Oleg Sadovski, Andrew A. Beharry, Fuzhong Zhang and G. Andrew Woolley

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Longer switching wavelengths and good photochemical yields and stabilities of the cis isomers in reducing aqueous environments are achieved by introducing 2,2′-aminoalkyl substituents into 4,4′-diamido-substituted azobenzenes. The products are thus suitable for photocontrol of biomolecular structures in intracellular environments, such as switching between two peptide configurations (see picture).

    23. Microfluidics

      Plug-Based Microfluidics with Defined Surface Chemistry to Miniaturize and Control Aggregation of Amyloidogenic Peptides (pages 1487–1489)

      Matthias Meier, Julia Kennedy-Darling, Se Hoon Choi, Eric M. Norstrom, Sangram S. Sisodia and Rustem F. Ismagilov

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805225

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small with control: For miniaturization of protein aggregation experiments the interfacial chemistry must be controlled to avoid protein aggregation caused by interfacial adsorption. Plug-based microfluidics with defined surface chemistry (see schematic picture) can then be used to perform hundreds of aggregation experiments with volume-limited samples, such as cerebrospinal fluid from mice.

    24. Ternary Nitrides

      Highly Conductive Films of Layered Ternary Transition-Metal Nitrides (pages 1490–1493)

      Hongmei Luo, Haiyan Wang, Zhengxing Bi, Guifu Zou, T. Mark McCleskey, Anthony K. Burrell, Eve Bauer, Marilyn E. Hawley, Yongqiang Wang and Quanxi Jia

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805394

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Film studies: Epitaxial films of BaZrN2 (see TEM image) and BaHfN2 are grown by polymer-assisted deposition on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The films are phase-pure, allowing the intrinsic physical properties of the ternary nitrides to be studied. From 5 to 300 K, the films exhibit metallic-like resistivity–temperature behavior, with large residual resistivity ratios.

    25. Natural Product Synthesis

      Enantioselective Synthesis of (+)-Chamaecypanone C: A Novel Microtubule Inhibitor (pages 1494–1497)

      Suwei Dong, Ernest Hamel, Ruoli Bai, David G. Covell, John A. Beutler and John A. Porco Jr.

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805486

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bicycle built for tubulin: The total synthesis of (+)-chamaecypanone C has been achieved by using a tandem retro-Diels–Alder/Diels–Alder cascade reaction (see scheme). Initial biological studies demonstrate that (+)-chamaecypanone C is an inhibitor of tubulin assembly and binds at the colchicine site.

    26. Live-Cell Imaging

      Selective Fluorescence Labeling of Lipids in Living Cells (pages 1498–1500)

      Anne B. Neef and Carsten Schultz

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200805507

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Click chemistry in vivo: Three phosphatidic acid derivatives with alkyne groups in their fatty acid chains were synthesized and incorporated into mammalian cell membranes. Copper(I)-catalyzed and strain-promoted azide–alkyne cycloaddition reactions were used for their visualization (see schematic representation and fluorescence microscopic image).

    27. Directed Alumination

      Aluminum Bases for the Highly Chemoselective Preparation of Aryl and Heteroaryl Aluminum Compounds (pages 1501–1504)

      Stefan H. Wunderlich and Paul Knochel

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200804966

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Selective C[BOND]H activation with a series of neutral aluminum trisamide bases led to a wide range of polyfunctional aryl and heteroaryl aluminum reagents. Ester and cyano groups are stable under the reaction conditions for this direct alumination, and donor oxygen substituents are efficient directing groups. High metalation regioselectivities were observed with O,S and N,S heterocycles (see example).

  12. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigenda
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION