Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 50

December 10, 2010

Volume 49, Issue 50

Pages 9539–9785

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: High-Surface-Area Silica Nanospheres (KCC-1) with a Fibrous Morphology (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50/2010) (page 9539)

      Dr. Vivek Polshettiwar, Dr. Dongkyu Cha, Prof. Dr. Xixiang Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jean Marie Basset

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005443

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      The chemist's first choice for heterogeneous catalysts is often porous silica because of its high surface area. However, these surface areas are mostly due to the pores and are thus not always accessible. V. Polshettiwar, J. M. Basset, and co-workers describe in their Communication on page 9652 ff. how they synthesized fibrous silica nanospheres with a high surface area. Such a fibrous morphology observed in these nanospheres has not been seen before in silica materials.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: “Illusionary” Polymerase Activity Triggered by Metal Ions: Use for Molecular Logic-Gate Operations (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50/2010) (page 9540)

      Ki Soo Park, Cheulhee Jung and Prof. Hyun Gyu Park

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006534

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      “Illusionary” polymerase activity was proved to be intentionally triggered by Hg2+ and Ag+ ions through their interaction with the mismatched base pairs T–T and C–C to result in a nonnatural amplification reaction. In their Communication on page 9757 ff., H. G. Park and co-workers describe how rational design of the primers and selection of the type of DNA polymerase was used to construct molecular-scale logic gates.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  4. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Tandem Catalytic Asymmetric Friedel–Crafts/Henry Reaction: Control of Three Contiguous Acyclic Stereocenters (page 9555)

      Prof. Dr. Takayoshi Arai and Naota Yokoyama

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090157

      This article corrects:

      Tandem Catalytic Asymmetric Friedel–Crafts/Henry Reaction: Control of Three Contiguous Acyclic Stereocenters1

      Vol. 47, Issue 27, 4989–4992, Article first published online: 2 JUN 2008

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Laurent Maron (page 9562)

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005565

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      “When I was eighteen I wanted to be an engineer. When I wake up I wake up my son and my daughter …” This and more about Laurent Maron can be found on page 9562.

  7. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Bert L. Vallee 1919–2010 (pages 9563–9564)

      Wolfgang Maret

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006236

  8. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Metal–Organic Frameworks. Design and Application. Edited by Leonard R. MacGillivray. (page 9565)

      Stefan Kaskel

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006516

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      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2010. 349 pp., hardcover € 109.00.—ISBN 978-0470195567

  9. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Cross-Coupling

      Metal-Mediated Oxidative Cross-Coupling of Terminal Alkynes: A Promising Strategy for Alkyne Synthesis (pages 9566–9568)

      Prof. Dr. Zhihui Shao and Fangzhi Peng

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003081

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      Oxidative heterocoupling of terminal alkynes mediated by metal complexes has emerged as a promising new strategy for the incorporation of alkynyl functionality into organic molecules (see scheme). Recent key developments in the construction of Csp[BOND]Cmath image, Csp[BOND]Cmath image, Csp[BOND]Csp, and Csp[BOND]heteroatom bonds are highlighted.

    2. Electron Tomography

      Electron Tomography: From 3D Statics to 4D Dynamics (pages 9569–9571)

      Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004614

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      Time and motion studies: 4D electron tomography enables the direct investigation of transient states of materials, structural dynamics of large molecular objects (for example the motion of a spiral carbon nanotube), and biological systems under controlled conditions.

    3. Diphosphorus

      P[TRIPLE BOND]P, a Laboratory Reagent? (pages 9572–9573)

      Prof. Christopher A. Russell

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006243

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      Two P or not two P? This bastardization of a well-known Shakespearean phrase is used to highlight recent work that shows that irradiation of white phosphorus produces diphosphorus, P2 (see scheme), which may be reacted in situ in a double Diels–Alder reaction to give cage diphosphines.

  10. Essays

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. van der Waals

      Johannes Diderik van der Waals: A Pioneer in the Molecular Sciences and Nobel Prize Winner in 1910 (pages 9574–9579)

      Prof. Dr. Kwong-Tin Tang and Prof. Dr. Jan Peter Toennies

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002332

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      Evergreen: The work of Johannes Diderik van der Waals continues to have an impact in the sciences even 100 years after he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for “his work on the equation of state for gases and liquids”. His name is associated with many modern physical concepts in the molecular sciences, as the adjecent plot, referring to articles in which “van der Waals” is mentioned in the title, abstract, or keywords shows.

    2. Terpenes

      Otto Wallach: Founder of Terpene Chemistry and Nobel Laureate 1910 (pages 9580–9586)

      Prof. Dr. Mathias Christmann

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003155

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      A blast from the past: Through his contributions on derivatization and structural elucidation Otto Wallach revolutionized terpene chemistry. His research in this area, begun in 1884, earned him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry a hundred years ago.

  11. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Normalizing Photocatalysis

      On the Problem of Comparing Rates or Apparent Quantum Yields in Heterogeneous Photocatalysis (pages 9588–9589)

      Prof. Dr. Horst Kisch

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002653

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      Breaking the impasse: Earlier this year Maschmeyer and Che outlined an approach for normalizing and comparing the apparent quantum yields (AQY) for hydrogen photogeneration catalyzed by semiconductor powders. In the plot of photocatalyst concentration versus AQY they proposed that the linear region was the most appropriate region for comparison. In his Correspondence Kisch refutes this proposal and states that the area at the onset of the plateau region (B) in a plot of catalyst concentration versus reaction rate is relevant. Maschmeyer and Che explain their rationale and conclude that the discussion has arisen because of different emphases in studying photocatalysis.

    2. Intrinsic Catalytic Activity versus Effective Light Usage—A Reply to Professor Kisch’s Comments (pages 9590–9591)

      Prof. Dr. Thomas Maschmeyer and Prof. Dr. Michel Che

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004872

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      Breaking the impasse: Earlier this year Maschmeyer and Che outlined an approach for normalizing and comparing the apparent quantum yields (AQY) for hydrogen photogeneration catalyzed by semiconductor powders. In the plot of photocatalyst concentration versus AQY they proposed that the linear region was the most appropriate region for comparison. In his Correspondence Kisch refutes this proposal and states that the area at the onset of the plateau region (B) in a plot of catalyst concentration versus reaction rate is relevant. Maschmeyer and Che explain their rationale and conclude that the discussion has arisen because of different emphases in studying photocatalysis.

  12. Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Molecular Editing

      Probing the Biology of Natural Products: Molecular Editing by Diverted Total Synthesis (pages 9592–9628)

      Dr. Alex M. Szpilman and Prof. Dr. Erick M. Carreira

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904761

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      Editor′s choice: Molecular editing of natural products through diverted total synthesis(DTS) is a powerful approach that offers far-reaching opportunities for discovery at the interface of biology and chemistry. This Review assembles a collection of classic and new cases that illustrate and underscore the scientific possibilities for practitioners of chemical synthesis.

  13. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Enzyme Assays

      cat-ELCCA: A Robust Method To Monitor the Fatty Acid Acyltransferase Activity of Ghrelin O-Acyltransferase (GOAT) (pages 9630–9634)

      Dr. Amanda L. Garner and Prof. Kim D. Janda

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003387

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      Assays armed with catalytic signal amplification have arisen as superior systems for ultrasensitive detection of analytes. A conceptually new enzyme assay called cat-ELCCA (catalytic assay using enzyme-linked click-chemistry) is described, in which an enzyme-linked azide is utilized to arm the assay with catalytic fluorescence signal amplification. By using this assay technology, the first high-throughput screen for recently disclosed ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) was developed.

    2. Functional Nanocolloids

      Computed Tomography in Color: NanoK-Enhanced Spectral CT Molecular Imaging (pages 9635–9639)

      Prof. Dipanjan Pan, Dr. Ewald Roessl, Dr. Jens-Peter Schlomka, Prof. Shelton D. Caruthers, Dr. Angana Senpan, Mike J. Scott, John S. Allen, Huiying Zhang, Grace Hu, Prof. Patrick J. Gaffney, Prof. Eric T. Choi, Prof. Volker Rasche, Prof. Samuel A. Wickline, Roland Proksa and Prof. Gregory M. Lanza

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005657

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      Multicolored imaging: A new class of molecular imaging agent has been developed based on low-molecular-weight organically soluble bismuth to detect and quantify intraluminal fibrin presented by ruptured plaque in the context of computed tomography angiograms without calcium interference.

    3. Mechanosynthesis

      Rapid Room-Temperature Synthesis of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks by Using Mechanochemistry (pages 9640–9643)

      Patrick J. Beldon, Dr. László Fábián, Dr. Robin S. Stein, Dr. A. Thirumurugan, Prof. Anthony K. Cheetham and Dr. Tomislav Friščić

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005547

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      Freshly ground: Improved mechanochemical methodologies, such as liquid-assisted grinding and ion- and liquid-assisted grinding enable the rapid and topologically selective synthesis of porous and nonporous zeolitic imidazolate frameworks with diverse topologies, at room temperature and directly from zinc oxide (see scheme).

    4. Smart Polymers

      Thermally Induced Structural Transformation of Bisphenol-1,2,3-triazole Polymers: Smart, Self-Extinguishing Materials (pages 9644–9647)

      Dr. Beom-Young Ryu and Prof. Dr. Todd Emrick

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005456

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      Safer plastics: A novel class of polymers, termed bisphenol-1,2,3-triazole (BPT) polyarylates, was prepared by polycondensation chemistry. They exhibit high-performance and self-extinguishing properties as a result of their heterocyclic nature and a thermally induced structural transformation (see picture).

    5. Catalytic Virus-like Particles

      RNA-Directed Packaging of Enzymes within Virus-like Particles (pages 9648–9651)

      Jason D. Fiedler, Steven D. Brown, Jolene L. Lau and Prof. M. G. Finn

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005243

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      Packaged molecular machines are available using dual expression vectors that guide the preparation of Qβ virus-like particles encapsulating multiple enzymes. Packaging is promoted by RNA aptamer sequences that bridge between the coat protein and a peptide tag fused to the desired cargo (see scheme). Peptidase E and luciferase were thus encapsulated and shown to be catalytically active inside the particle.

    6. Fibrous Nanomaterials

      High-Surface-Area Silica Nanospheres (KCC-1) with a Fibrous Morphology (pages 9652–9656)

      Dr. Vivek Polshettiwar, Dr. Dongkyu Cha, Prof. Dr. Xixiang Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jean Marie Basset

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003451

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      Fibrous nanosilica: A new family of high-surface-area silica nanospheres (KCC-1) have been prepared (see picture). KCC-1 features excellent physical properties, including high surface area, unprecedented fibrous surface morphology, high thermal (up to 950 °C) and hydrothermal stabilities, and high mechanical stability.

    7. Photochemistry

      Reduction of Nitroaromatic Compounds on Supported Gold Nanoparticles by Visible and Ultraviolet Light (pages 9657–9661)

      Prof. Dr. Huaiyong Zhu, Dr. Xuebin Ke, Prof. Dr. Xuzhuang Yang, Sarina Sarina and Dr. Hongwei Liu

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003908

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      Shedding light: Nitroaromatic compounds on gold nanoparticles (3 wt %) supported on ZrO2 can be reduced directly to the corresponding azo compounds when illuminated with visible light or ultraviolet light at 40 °C (see picture). The process occurs with high selectivity and at ambient temperature and pressure, and enables the selection of intermediates that are unstable in thermal reactions.

    8. Viral Capsids

      Self-Assembled Synthetic Viral Capsids from a 24-mer Viral Peptide Fragment (pages 9662–9665)

      Prof. Dr. Kazunori Matsuura, Kenta Watanabe, Tsubasa Matsuzaki, Prof. Dr. Kazuo Sakurai and Prof. Dr. Nobuo Kimizuka

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004606

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      Assemble a virus: A chemical strategy to de novo design “tailor-made” viruslike nanocapsules was developed (see picture). 24-mer β-annulus peptides of the tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) spontaneously self-assemble into hollow nanocapsules with a size of 30–50 nm. The hollow structure of the assemblies was clearly revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS).

    9. Fibril Formation

      Two-Dimensional Ultraviolet (2DUV) Spectroscopic Tools for Identifying Fibrillation Propensity of Protein Residue Sequences (pages 9666–9669)

      Dr. Jun Jiang and Prof. Dr. Shaul Mukamel

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005093

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      Distinctive feature: Two-dimensional ultraviolet (2DUV) spectroscopy can be utilized to identify protein sequences capable of forming fibrils. The Rosetta free energy of proteins, which is a good indicator of fibrillation propensity, has distinct 2DUV signatures. An additional positive diagonal peak at 54 000–58 000 cm−1 in chiral xxxy spectra serves as a indicator of the ability of protein sequences to form amyloid-like fibrils.

    10. Fullerene Crystals

      Self-Crystallization of C70 Cubes and Remarkable Enhancement of Photoluminescence (pages 9670–9675)

      Chibeom Park, Eunjin Yoon, Prof. Dr. Masaki Kawano, Prof. Dr. Taiha Joo and Prof. Dr. Hee Cheul Choi

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005076

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      Good solvent, poor solvent: A simple precipitation method enabled the spontaneous formation of homogeneous C70 cube crystals by self-crystallization in cavities of a good solvent (mesitylene) surrounded by a poor solvent (isopropyl alcohol, IPA; see picture). The enormously increased photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the C70 cube crystals relative to that of C70 powder was mainly attributed to the high crystallinity of the cubes.

    11. Supramolecular Gels

      Formation of Nanoporous Fibers by the Self-Assembly of a Pyromellitic Diimide-Based Macrocycle (pages 9676–9679)

      Takeshi Nakagaki, Aya Harano, Yoko Fuchigami, Dr. Eishi Tanaka, Prof. Dr. Satoru Kidoaki, Dr. Tatsuya Okuda, Dr. Tetsuo Iwanaga, Dr. Kenta Goto and Prof. Dr. Teruo Shinmyozu

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004992

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      Spaghetti sensor: A pyromellitic diimide based macrocycle selectively gelates N,N-dimethylaniline to form a nanofibril structure. Removal of N,N-dimethylaniline forms channel type empty cavities constructed from stacked molecules of the macrocycle in the nanofiber. By taking advantage of host ability of 1, the nanofibers can serve as a chemosensor for the π-donating compounds.

    12. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      High Activity of Ce1−xNixO2−y for H2 Production through Ethanol Steam Reforming: Tuning Catalytic Performance through Metal–Oxide Interactions (pages 9680–9684)

      Dr. Gong Zhou, Dr. Laura Barrio, Dr. Stefano Agnoli, Dr. Sanjaya D. Senanayake, Prof. Jaime Evans, Dr. Anna Kubacka, Michael Estrella, Dr. Jonathan C. Hanson, Dr. Arturo Martínez-Arias, Dr. Marcos Fernández-García and Dr. José A. Rodriguez

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004966

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      The importance of the oxide: Ce0.8Ni0.2O2−y is an excellent catalyst for ethanol steam reforming (see graph). Metal–oxide interactions perturb the electronic properties of the small particles of metallic nickel present in the catalyst under the reaction conditions and thus suppress any methanation activity. The nickel embedded in ceria induces the formation of O vacancies, which facilitate cleavage of the O[BOND]H bonds in ethanol and water.

    13. Asymmetric Organocatalysis

      Cooperative Organocatalysis for the Asymmetric γ Alkylation of α-Branched Enals (pages 9685–9688)

      Giulia Bergonzini, Dr. Silvia Vera and Prof. Dr. Paolo Melchiorre

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004761

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      α Branched leads to γ: The direct and enantioselective γ alkylation of α-substituted α,β-unsaturated aldehydes under dienamine catalysis has been achieved. A cooperative catalysis system that involves dienamine activation of α-branched enals and chiral Brønsted acid catalysis promotes an SN1-alkylation pathway while ensuring complete γ-site selectivity and high stereocontrol (see scheme; Bn=benzyl).

    14. Virus Patterning

      Polymer-Coated Tips for Patterning of Viruses by Dip-Pen Nanolithography (pages 9689–9692)

      Young-Hun Shin, Seong-Hun Yun, Su-Hyun Pyo, Yi-Seul Lim, Hyeok-Jin Yoon, Ki-Hoon Kim, Prof. Sung-Kwon Moon, Prof. Seung Woo Lee, Dr. Young Geun Park, Prof. Soo-Ik Chang, Prof. Kyung-Min Kim and Prof. Jung-Hyurk Lim

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004654

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      Pen-pushing: Direct-write dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) using a tip coated with nanoporous poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) allows the creation of precise patterns of large-sized biomaterials such as viruses. The hydrogel tip absorbs the virus-containing ink solution and atomic force microscopy is used to transport it to a surface (see picture).

    15. Oligomeric Natural Products

      Synthetic and Theoretical Investigations of Myrmicarin Biosynthesis (pages 9693–9698)

      Prof. Dr. Scott A. Snyder, Adel M. ElSohly and Ferenc Kontes

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005825

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      Off to a good start: Use of a carefully designed building block coupled with several highly selective reactions has enabled the syntheses of the monomeric myrmicarins (see scheme) and the investigation of higher-order oligomer synthesis by enabling access to previously unobtainable stereochemical arrangements. These studies, in combination with quantum chemical calculations, question whether the higher-order structures can be obtained through acid-promoted biomimetic synthesis.

    16. Sonochemistry

      Efficient Sonochemistry through Microbubbles Generated with Micromachined Surfaces (pages 9699–9701)

      MSc. David Fernandez Rivas, Prof. Dr. Andrea Prosperetti, MSc. Aaldert G. Zijlstra, Prof. Dr. Detlef Lohse and Prof. Dr. Han J. G. E. Gardeniers

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005533

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      It's the pits: Increased efficiency and controllability of sonochemical reactions was achieved with silicon surfaces on which pits were micromachined to entrap gas, which, upon ultrasonic excitation, emits a stream of microbubbles (see picture). The microbubbles are chemically active at ultrasonic amplitudes well below those necessary for sonochemical activity in conventional reactors.

    17. Chlorinated Natural Products

      Concise Total Synthesis of Sintokamides A, B, and E by a Unified, Protecting-Group-Free Strategy (pages 9702–9705)

      Dr. Zhenhua Gu and Prof. Dr. Armen Zakarian

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005354

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      One for all: A group of polychlorinated marine peptides known as sintokamides show intriguing activity against hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells. Three members of the group have now been synthesized by a general strategy enabled by a ruthenium-catalyzed radical chloroalkylation of titanium enolates (see scheme).

    18. Chemosensors

      Cubic Mesoporous Graphitic Carbon(IV) Nitride: An All-in-One Chemosensor for Selective Optical Sensing of Metal Ions (pages 9706–9710)

      Eun Zoo Lee, Dr. Young-Si Jun, Prof. Won Hi Hong, Prof. Arne Thomas and Prof. Moonsoo M. Jin

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004975

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      I can Cu: Cubic mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (c-mpg-C3N4) is an all-in-one chemosensor that plays the roles of ligand, fluorophore, and supporting material, enables the simple detection of metal ions, and is highly selective and sensitive to Cu2+.

    19. C[BOND]N Bond Cleavage

      Primary Carbon–Nitrogen Bond Scission and Methyl Dehydrogenation across a W[BOND]W Multiple Bond (pages 9711–9714)

      Soumya Sarkar, Jeffrey A. Culver, Andrew J. Peloquin, Ion Ghiviriga, Dr. Khalil A. Abboud and Prof. Adam S. Veige

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004233

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      It takes two: A W[BOND]W triple bond provides four electron equivalents to activate an amido C[BOND]N bond and dehydrogenate a methyl group to produce a bridging methylidyne WV–WV complex (see picture: W green, C blue, N pink, O red, H black). Two detectable intermediates provide insight into this unusual sequence of bond ruptures.

    20. Endohedral Fullerenes

      Dichlorophenyl Derivatives of La@C3v(7)-C82: Endohedral Metal Induced Localization of Pyramidalization and Spin on a Triple-Hexagon Junction (pages 9715–9719)

      Prof. Dr. Takeshi Akasaka, Dr. Xing Lu, Hidenori Kuga, Dr. Hidefumi Nikawa, Dr. Naomi Mizorogi, Prof. Dr. Zdenek Slanina, Dr. Takahiro Tsuchiya, Dr. Kenji Yoza and Prof. Dr. Shigeru Nagase

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004318

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      Core controls shell: The X-ray structure of a dichlorophenyl adduct of the unprecedented La@C3v(7)-C82 shows that the substituent is singly bonded to a triple-hexagon junction C atom, which has pronounced radical character due to strong metal–cage interactions, revealed by plotting theoretical p-orbital axis vector (POAV) values against SOMO spin densities for the different types of C atoms (see picture).

    21. Multicomponent Reactions

      Enantioselective Synthesis of 4-Hydroxy-2-cyclohexenones through a Multicomponent Cyclization (pages 9720–9724)

      Prof. Dr. José Barluenga, Dr. Marcos G. Suero, Raquel De la Campa and Dr. Josefa Flórez

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004413

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      Three metal cooperation promotes the one-pot selective coupling of a chromium carbene complex, an imide lithium enolate, and a propargylic organomagnesium reagent giving access to novel and densely functionalized 4-allenyl-2-cyclohexenones (see scheme). These useful synthetic intermediates have been prepared through a cyclization process that involves newly reported reaction steps and an unusually high level of asymmetric induction.

    22. Organocatalysis

      Enantioselective Synthesis of Isoindolines: An Organocatalyzed Domino Process Based On the aza-Morita–Baylis–Hillman Reaction (pages 9725–9729)

      Dr. Shinobu Takizawa, Dr. Naohito Inoue, Shuichi Hirata and Prof. Dr. Hiroaki Sasai

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004547

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      Facile, selective, and organic: Acid–base organocatalyzed aza-Morita–Baylis–Hillman/aza-Michael domino reactions of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds 1 with N-tosylimines 2 have been developed. The enantioselective process produces the highly functionalized isoindoline as a single diastereomer (Ts=4-toluenesulfonyl).

    23. Light-Activated MOFs

      Photochemical Activation of a Metal–Organic Framework to Reveal Functionality (pages 9730–9733)

      Kristine K. Tanabe, Corinne A. Allen and Prof. Seth M. Cohen

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004736

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      Seeing the light: Two highly porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) were transformed using UV light to produce MOFs with hydroxy and catechol groups through an unusual postsynthetic deprotection reaction (see scheme).

    24. Organocatalysis

      Chiral Brønsted Acid Catalyzed Pinacol Rearrangement (pages 9734–9736)

      Tao Liang, Zhenjie Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jon C. Antilla

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004778

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      Asymmetric pinacol rearrangement: The pinacol rearrangement has long been known to be difficult to control in terms of regioselectivity and stereoselectivity. It has been found that indolyl diols can be treated with chiral phosphoric acids to effect a regio- and enantioselective pinacol rearrangement with high efficiency (see scheme; Ar=1-naphthyl).

    25. Graphene

      Layer-by-Layer Films of Graphene and Ionic Liquids for Highly Selective Gas Sensing (pages 9737–9739)

      Dr. Qingmin Ji, Prof. Dr. Itaru Honma, Dr. Seung-Min Paek, Misaho Akada, Dr. Jonathan P. Hill, Dr. Ajayan Vinu and Prof. Dr. Katsuhiko Ariga

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004929

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      The best of both worlds: Graphene/ionic liquid (G–IL) layered films were obtained by direct reduction of graphene oxide in the presence of ionic liquids, followed by reassembly through electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption (see picture). The layer spacing of the graphene sheets is regularly expanded upon insertion of ionic liquid molecules (green discs). Selective sensing of aromatic compounds (red spheres) by using the G–IL LbL films was also achieved.

    26. Mesostructures

      Liquid-Crystal Templating in Ammonia: A Facile Route to Micro- and Mesoporous Metal Nitride/Carbon Composites (pages 9740–9743)

      Dr. Hao Qi, Xavier Roy, Kevin E. Shopsowitz, Joseph K.-H. Hui and Prof. Dr. Mark J. MacLachlan

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004974

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      Templation in liquid ammonia: The first porous materials formed by templating in liquid ammonia utilize the liquid-crystalline phase formed by cellulose/NH4SCN in NH3. By changing the proportions of reactants, the porosity, surface area, and morphology of the materials can be modified. The as-synthesized mesoporous materials present a lamellar morphology (see picture).

    27. Surface Chemistry

      Fully Reversible Metal Deactivation Effects in Gold/Ceria–Zirconia Catalysts: Role of the Redox State of the Support (pages 9744–9748)

      José M. Cíes, Eloy del Río, Miguel López-Haro, Dr. Juan J. Delgado, Dr. Ginesa Blanco, Dr. Sebastián Collins, Dr. José J. Calvino and Prof. Serafín Bernal

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005002

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      Strong and reversible modification of the chemical properties of supported Au nanoparticles caused by alternating oxidizing (a and c) and reducing (b) pretreatment of Au/CeO2–ZrO2 catalysts were revealed by a methodology that combines FTIR spectroscopy (see picture), studies on the volumetric adsorption of CO and ultimate oxygen storage capacity, determination of metal dispersion by electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    28. Organocatalysis

      N-Phosphinyl Phosphoramide—A Chiral Brønsted Acid Motif for the Direct Asymmetric N,O-Acetalization of Aldehydes (pages 9749–9752)

      Dr. Sreekumar Vellalath, Ilija Čorić and Prof. Dr. Benjamin List

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005347

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      Fine-tuning the sites: The readily accessible N-phosphinyl phosphoramide 1 proved to be highly efficient and enantioselective in catalyzing the title reaction. The synthetic utility of this methodology was demonstrated with the first catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the analgesic pharmaceutical (R)-chlorothenoxazine (see scheme).

    29. Catalytic Enantioselective Claisen Rearrangements of O-Allyl β-Ketoesters (pages 9753–9756)

      Christopher Uyeda, Andreas R. Rötheli and Prof. Dr. Eric N. Jacobsen

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005183

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      A chiral guanidinium ion is shown to catalyze enantioselective Claisen rearrangements of O-allyl β-ketoesters in 78–87 % ee (see scheme). The pericyclic nature of the process allows products containing vicinal stereogenic centers to be accessed with both enantio- and diastereocontrol.

    30. DNA Technology

      “Illusionary” Polymerase Activity Triggered by Metal Ions: Use for Molecular Logic-Gate Operations (pages 9757–9760)

      Ki Soo Park, Cheulhee Jung and Prof. Hyun Gyu Park

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004406

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      Metal ion, an astonishing illusionist: In a new concept, “illusionary” polymerase activity is intentionally triggered at T–T and C–C mismatched primers by Hg2+ and Ag+ ions, respectively. A novel strategy to construct molecular-scale logic gates utilizes the nonnatural polymerase activity induced by the metal ions by rational design of the primers and selection of the type of DNA polymerase (see picture).

    31. Organocatalysis

      Intermolecular N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalyzed Hydroacylation of Arynes (pages 9761–9764)

      Dr. Akkattu T. Biju and Prof. Dr. Frank Glorius

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005490

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      A formal introduction: The conceptually new N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed formal insertion of arynes into the Cformyl[BOND]H bond of aldehydes demonstrates the compatibility of nucleophilic NHCs with electrophilic arynes. This NHC-catalyzed hydroacylation of arynes allows the conversion of aliphatic, α,β-unsaturated, and aromatic aldehydes into aryl ketones; 27 examples and a preliminary mechanistic investigation are provided.

    32. O2 Generation

      Water Oxidation Catalyzed by Strong Carbene-Type Donor-Ligand Complexes of Iridium (pages 9765–9768)

      Dr. Ralte Lalrempuia, Dr. Neal D. McDaniel, Dr. Helge Müller-Bunz, Prof. Stefan Bernhard and Prof. Dr. Martin Albrecht

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005260

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      Think oxygen: Iridium(III) complexes containing an unusually bound chelating triazolylidene ligand (see picture) show excellent activity towards water oxidation, producing hundreds of milliliters or O2 per milligram of iridium. The active catalysts include either an ylide or an unusually bound pyridylidene as the chelating L group and are readily accessible by click chemistry.

    33. Synthetic Equivalents

      4-Substituted tert-Butyl Phenylazocarboxylates—Synthetic Equivalents for the para-Phenyl Radical Cation (pages 9769–9772)

      Sarah B. Höfling, Amelie L. Bartuschat and Prof. Dr. Markus R. Heinrich

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004508

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      First electrophile, then radical: 4-Substituted tert-butyl phenylazocarboxylates 1 are versatile synthetic equivalents of the para-phenyl radical cation 2. The tert-butyloxycarbonylazo group enables nucleophilic substitutions to proceed under mild conditions and can later be employed for the generation of aryl radicals.

    34. Microcontainers

      Surface-Bound Microenclosures for Biomolecules (pages 9773–9776)

      Laiyi Lin, Sebastian Beyer, Prof. Thorsten Wohland, Prof. Dieter Trau and Dr. Daniel Lubrich

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907321

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      It's a trap! A simple process based on reverse-phase layer-by-layer encapsulation can be used to produce surface-bound semipermeable microenclosures that can trap biomolecules. Biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins can be encapsulated whilst preserving their functionality. Electrophoresis can be used to create sharp concentration gradients, and enzymatic reactions such as DNA digestion can be controlled by diffusion of ions into the microenclosures (see picture).

    35. Iron-Catalyzed CO2 Hydrogenation

      A Well-Defined Iron Catalyst for the Reduction of Bicarbonates and Carbon Dioxide to Formates, Alkyl Formates, and Formamides (pages 9777–9780)

      Christopher Federsel, Albert Boddien, Dr. Ralf Jackstell, Reiko Jennerjahn, Prof. Dr. Paul J. Dyson, Dr. Rosario Scopelliti, Prof. Dr. Gabor Laurenczy and Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004263

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      A will of iron: An active well-defined iron complex (see structure; gray C, white H, yellow B, green F, brown Fe, pink P) catalyzes the title reaction (see scheme). The iron-catalyzed reduction of readily available bicarbonates to formates has also been demonstrated for the first time. This reaction could be an important step in the use of CO2 for hydrogen storage.

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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essays
    12. Correspondence
    13. Review
    14. Communications
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      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51/2010 (page 9785)

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090158

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