Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 52

December 27, 2010

Volume 49, Issue 52

Pages 10015–10229

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Pitch-Dependent Acceleration of Neurite Outgrowth on Nanostructured Anodized Aluminum Oxide Substrates (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52/2010) (page 10015)

      Dr. Woo Kyung Cho, Kyungtae Kang, Gyumin Kang, Min Jee Jang, Prof. Dr. Yoonkey Nam and Prof. Dr. Insung S. Choi

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007159

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      The pitches of nanostructured substrates regulate the in vitro development of neuron cells. In their Communication on page 10114 ff., I. S. Choi, Y. Nam, and co-workers show that the neurite outgrowth of primary hippocampal neurons within a few days is much faster on an anodized aluminum oxide substrate that has a 400 nm pitch rather than on one that has a 60 nm pitch.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Alane-Based Classical and Frustrated Lewis Pairs in Polymer Synthesis: Rapid Polymerization of MMA and Naturally Renewable Methylene Butyrolactones into High-Molecular-Weight Polymers (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52/2010) (page 10016)

      Dr. Yuetao Zhang, Garret M. Miyake and Prof. Dr. Eugene Y.-X. Chen

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007438

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      Frustrated Lewis pairs have been used as exceptional polymerization catalysts for the conversion of naturally renewable monomers into sustainable polymers. In their Communication on page 10158 ff., E. Chen and co-workers describe the use of [Al(C6F5)3], phosphines, and N-heterocyclic carbenes as classical and frustrated Lewis pair catalysts. Similar to the horns that prevent fighting rams from hitting their heads, the bulky ligands of the Lewis acids and bases inhibit the quenching of their reactivity.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Hans-Günther (Hagga) Schmalz (page 10038)

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006120

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      “I am waiting for the day when someone will discover an implantable memory chip. My science “heroes” are Richard Willstätter and Vladimir Prelog …” This and more about Hans-Günther (Hagga) Schmalz can be found on page 10038.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Aqueous Microwave Assisted Chemistry. Synthesis and Catalysis. RSC Green Chemistry Series. Edited by Vivek Polshettiwar and Rajender S. Varma. (pages 10039–10040)

      Erik V. Van der Eycken

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006427

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      Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge 2010. 242 pp., hardcover £ 99.99.—ISBN 978-1849730389

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Main-Group Chemistry

      A Compound with a Si–C Triple Bond (pages 10042–10044)

      Nicole Lühmann and Prof. Dr. Thomas Müller

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005149

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      An old reaction but an exciting product: Nearly 100 years after Curtius' synthesis of alkynes from bisdiazo compounds, the same reaction principle was applied for the synthesis of a silyne, a compound with a Si[BOND]C triple bond.

    2. Hydrogen Bonding to Metals

      The Hydrogen Bond, Front and Center (pages 10045–10047)

      Prof. Larry R. Falvello

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002928

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      The understanding of the hydrogen bond, an interaction that appears in diverse environments and exercises widely varying functions, continues to expand with the report of a neutron diffraction analysis of a complex displaying an O[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅Pt hydrogen bond with unligated water as the donor. What is known about hydrogen bonding so far provides a broad context for this new result.

    3. Drug Delivery

      A Hierarchical Assembly Process to Engineer a Hydrophobic Core for Virus-like Particles (pages 10048–10050)

      Prof. Zhaohui Su and Prof. Qian Wang

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005548

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      Re-engineer the core: The genomic core of a virus (left) can be re-engineered by the coassembly of viral coat proteins and DNA amphiphiles to produce virus-like nanocarriers to transport both hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds. It is a general strategy for adapting virus-based vehicles for drug-delivery applications.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Particles at Interfaces

      Synthesis of Nano/Microstructures at Fluid Interfaces (pages 10052–10066)

      Prof. Zhongwei Niu, Dr. Jinbo He, Prof. Thomas P. Russell and Prof. Qian Wang

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001623

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      An ideal starting point for the formation of multifunctional materials are air–liquid interfaces and interfaces between two liquids at which nanoparticles or colloidal particles can accumulate. At such liquid interfaces, various organizational processes and reactions have been carried out to form hierarchical structures, such as two-dimensional crystalline films, colloidosomes, raspberry-like core–shell structures, or Janus particles.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Synthetic Methods

      Unusual E-Selective Ring-Closing Metathesis To Form Eight-Membered Rings (pages 10068–10073)

      Ryosuke Matsui, Kentaro Seto, Kazuhiro Fujita, Dr. Takahiro Suzuki, Dr. Atsuo Nakazaki and Prof. Dr. Susumu Kobayashi

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004746

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      Tied back: The title reaction was observed when a silicon-tethered diene was treated with the Hoveyda–Grubbs second-generation catalyst. The structural requirements for the E-olefin-forming ring-closing metathesis, and the transition state leading to E olefin are discussed. This methodology will be useful in the synthesis of polyketides containing a pent-2-ene-1,5-diol unit.

    2. Zeolites

      Zeolite Y Crystals with Trimodal Porosity as Ideal Hydrocracking Catalysts (pages 10074–10078)

      Krijn P. de Jong, Jovana Zečević, Heiner Friedrich, Petra E. de Jongh, Metin Bulut, Sander van Donk, Régine Kenmogne, Annie Finiels, Vasile Hulea and François Fajula

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004360

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      Working at the Y: Zeolite Y crystals with micropores (ca. 1 nm), small mesopores (ca. 3 nm), and large mesopores (ca. 30 nm) were obtained by base leaching of previously steamed and acid-leached material. The zeolite Y crystals with trimodal porosity (see electron-tomographic picture) displayed close to ideal hydrocracking selectivity and enhanced yields of kerosene and diesel.

    3. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Oriented Salts: Dimension-Controlled Charge-by-Charge Assemblies from Planar Receptor–Anion Complexes (pages 10079–10083)

      Yohei Haketa, Prof. Dr. Sono Sasaki, Dr. Noboru Ohta, Dr. Hiroyasu Masunaga, Dr. Hiroki Ogawa, Dr. Nobuhiro Mizuno, Dr. Fumito Araoka, Prof. Dr. Hideo Takezoe and Prof. Dr. Hiromitsu Maeda

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006356

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      Pillars of salts: By combining planar cations and planar anionic structures based on π-conjugated acyclic dipyrroles containing an anion, charge-by-charge assemblies could be formed (see picture). Not only crystals but also soft materials, such as supramolecular gels and thermotropic liquid crystals, could be made by this method.

    4. Graphene Assembly

      Three-Dimensional Self-Assembly of Graphene Oxide Platelets into Mechanically Flexible Macroporous Carbon Films (pages 10084–10088)

      Sun Hwa Lee, Hyun Wook Kim, Jin Ok Hwang, Won Jun Lee, Joon Kwon, Prof. Christopher W. Bielawski, Prof. Rodney S. Ruoff and Prof. Sang Ouk Kim

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006240

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      Hey ho, let's GO: Graphene oxide platelets can be self-assembled into highly ordered, mechanically flexible carbon films with tunable porous morphologies. Further nitrogen doping enhanced the electrical properties and supercapacitor performances of the carbon-based assemblies, and provided chemical functionalization.

    5. Metal–Support Interfaces

      Atomic Resolution of the Structure of a Metal–Support Interface: Triosmium Clusters on MgO(110) (pages 10089–10092)

      Apoorva Kulkarni, Dr. Miaofang Chi, Volkan Ortalan, Prof. Nigel D. Browning and Prof. Bruce C. Gates

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005105

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      Metal atoms piggyback: Aberration-corrected STEM images of MgO-supported triosmium clusters show that the osmium atoms reside atop magnesium atoms (see picture). On the basis of the results, structural models of the clusters that include the metal–support interaction are derived.

    6. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Nanostructured Materials as Catalysts: Nanoporous-Gold-Catalyzed Oxidation of Organosilanes with Water (pages 10093–10095)

      Prof. Dr. Naoki Asao, Yoshifumi Ishikawa, Naoya Hatakeyama, Dr. Menggenbateer, Prof. Dr. Yoshinori Yamamoto, Prof. Dr. Mingwei Chen, Prof. Dr. Wei Zhang and Prof. Dr. Akihisa Inoue

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005138

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      Pores to the fore: Nanoporous gold shows a remarkable catalytic activity for the oxidation of organosilane compounds with water. The catalyst is easily recoverable and can be reused several times without leaching and loss of activity.

    7. Oligosaccharides

      Photodegradation of Target Oligosaccharides by Light-Activated Small Molecules (pages 10096–10100)

      Dr. Daisuke Takahashi, Shingo Hirono, Chigusa Hayashi, Dr. Masayuki Igarashi, Dr. Yoshio Nishimura and Prof. Dr. Kazunobu Toshima

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005161

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      Shine on, shine on: The designed anthraquinone/boronic acid hybrid 1 selectively caused the degradation of oligosaccharides that have a β-D-galactofuranoside residue, which is a unique component in mycobacterial cell walls. Degradation was achieved using long-wavelength UV radiation in the absence of any additives and under neutral conditions.

    8. Hierarchical Membranes

      Ordered Hierarchical Porous Platinum Membranes with Tailored Mesostructures (pages 10101–10105)

      Dr. Xinyi Zhang, Dr. Wei Lu, Prof. Dr. Jiyan Dai, Dr. Laure Bourgeois, Na Hao, Prof. Dr. Huanting Wang, Prof. Dr. Dongyuan Zhao and Prof. Dr. Paul A. Webley

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005222

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      Swiss cheese or slices? A two-step method has been developed for the preparation of the title membranes from lytropic liquid crystals templated with poly(methyl methacrylate). The membranes have ordered mesopores and tunable macropore channels. The mesostructure of the membranes can be tailored by adjusting the concentration of the surfactant solution (see picture: 1=low, 2=high concentration).

    9. DNA Sequencing

      Real-Time Monitoring of DNA Polymerase Function and Stepwise Single-Nucleotide DNA Strand Translocation through a Protein Nanopore (pages 10106–10109)

      John Chu, Dr. Marcos González-López, Dr. Scott L. Cockroft, Dr. Manuel Amorin and Prof. M. Reza Ghadiri

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005460

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      Stepping it forward: A major challenge in realizing single-molecule nanopore DNA sequencing is to devise a way to ratchet DNA strands through a nanopore at appropriate speed that is commensurate with real-time sequential nucleobase identification. A promising approach is presented that exploits the intrinsic motor function of DNA polymerases to effect DNA strand translocation through an α-hemolysin nanopore (see picture).

    10. Thin Films

      Spray-On Organic/Inorganic Films: A General Method for the Formation of Functional Nano- to Microscale Coatings (pages 10110–10113)

      Mathias Lefort, Gabriela Popa, Dr. Emek Seyrek, Dr. Rafael Szamocki, Dr. Olivier Felix, Dr. Joseph Hemmerlé, Dr. Loïc Vidal, Dr. Jean-Claude Voegel, Dr. Fouzia Boulmedais, Prof. Gero Decher and Prof. Pierre Schaaf

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002729

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      Technicolor dreamcoat: Spray-on nanoscale coatings are formed by simultaneous spraying of complementary species (e.g., polyanion/polycation, polyelectrolyte/small oligomeric ion, two inorganic salt solutions) against a receiving surface (see picture). The process leads to the formation of ultrathin films, the thicknesses of which are controlled by the spraying time. This general one-step coating method results in optically homogeneous films from a broad choice of functional compounds.

    11. Neuron Growth on Surfaces

      Pitch-Dependent Acceleration of Neurite Outgrowth on Nanostructured Anodized Aluminum Oxide Substrates (pages 10114–10118)

      Dr. Woo Kyung Cho, Kyungtae Kang, Gyumin Kang, Min Jee Jang, Prof. Dr. Yoonkey Nam and Prof. Dr. Insung S. Choi

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003307

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      Pitching in to help: When nanostructured anodized aluminum oxide substrates of four different types were used as nanotopographical environments for in vitro neuronal culture, the average neurite outgrowth was much faster on surfaces with a 400 nm pitch than on surfaces with a 60 nm pitch (see AFM images of two substrates and fluorescence micrographs of hippocampal neurons after culture for 2 days on these substrates).

    12. Water Clusters

      Infrared Spectra and Hydrogen-Bonded Network Structures of Large Protonated Water Clusters H+(H2O)n (n=20200) (pages 10119–10122)

      Kenta Mizuse, Prof. Naohiko Mikami and Prof. Asuka Fujii

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003662

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      Precisely size-selected protonated water clusters H+(H2O)n (n=20–200) were studied by IR spectroscopy to provide insights into the structures of large-scale H-bonded water networks. The spectral features reveal that cluster structures gradually approach that of the bulk-water network and involve a greater number of four-coordinate water molecules with increasing cluster size (see picture).

    13. Solid-State Conduction

      Mesoscopic Charge Carriers Chemistry in Nanocrystalline SrTiO3 (pages 10123–10126)

      Piero Lupetin, Dr. Giuliano Gregori and Prof. Joachim Maier

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003917

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      Impressive size effect: The conductivity of nanocrystalline SrTiO3 as a function of oxygen partial pressure is compared with the properties of the coarsened, microcrystalline material. Electron-, hole-, and oxygen vacancy-type conduction differ by several orders of magnitude (see plot), critically depending on the grain size of the sample.

    14. Bionanocomposites

      Artificial Nacre-like Bionanocomposite Films from the Self-Assembly of Chitosan–Montmorillonite Hybrid Building Blocks (pages 10127–10131)

      Hong-Bin Yao, Zhi-Hua Tan, Hai-Yu Fang and Prof. Dr. Shu-Hong Yu

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004748

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      Brick-and-mortar microstructures of artificial nacre-like chitosan–montmorillonite (MTM) bionanocomposite films can be readily fabricated by using chitosan–MTM hybrid nanosheets as building blocks (see picture). The fire-retardant nacre-like films have a higher mechanical performance (Young's modulus: 10 GPa, tensile strength: 100 MPa) than a film made by conventional methods.

    15. Nanomaterials

      Excitation-Intensity-Dependent Color-Tunable Dual Emissions from Manganese-Doped CdS/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals (pages 10132–10135)

      Ou Chen, Daniel E. Shelby, Dr. Yongan Yang, Dr. Jiaqi Zhuang, Dr. Tie Wang, Dr. Chenggang Niu, Prof. Nicoló Omenetto and Prof. Y. Charles Cao

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004926

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      Here comes your Mn: Semiconductor nanocrystals doped with manganese exhibit dual emissions that are dependent on the excitation intensity. Under single-wavelength excitation, the emission color of these doped nanocrystals can be tuned from orange to blue at different excitation fluences. This color-tunable property is reversible and originates from the excitation of multiple Mn dopants inside a nanocrystal.

    16. Conducting Polymers

      Bipolar Patterning of Conducting Polymers by Electrochemical Doping and Reaction (pages 10136–10139)

      Dr. Shinsuke Inagi, Yutaka Ishiguro, Prof. Dr. Mahito Atobe and Prof. Dr. Toshio Fuchigami

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005671

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      On the double: When a poly(3-methylthiophene) (PT) film is doped on a bipolar electrode with Bu4NPF6 as supporting electrolyte, the film includes PF6 anions with a composition gradient along the potential gradient on the electrode. The use of Et4NCl results in partial chlorination of the PT film that reflects the potential gradient of the bipolar electrode (see picture; inset: photograph of the film).

    17. Tellurophene Polymers

      Polytellurophenes with Properties Controlled by Tellurium-Coordination (pages 10140–10144)

      Ashlee A. Jahnke, Graeme W. Howe and Prof. Dwight S. Seferos

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005664

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      Coordinated control: Owing to their numerous synthetic challenges, polytellurophenes are a virtually unexplored class of conjugated polymers. A new dihalogenated bitellurophene monomer has been synthesized and its polymerization under palladium-catalyzed conditions was optimized. The resulting polytellurophenes are stable compounds with distinct optoelectronic properties that can be controlled by coordination with bromine (see picture).

    18. Carbocations

      IR Spectrum and Structure of the Phenyl Cation (pages 10145–10148)

      Dipl.-Phys. Alexander Patzer, Dr. Shamik Chakraborty, Dr. Nicola Solcà and Prof. Dr. Otto Dopfer

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006357

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      No way to hide: The IR spectrum of the phenyl cation, c-C6H5+, has been derived by resonant IR photodissociation of weakly bound C6H5+⋅Ar clusters (see picture). The analysis provides the first spectroscopic characterization of this fundamental carbocation in the gas phase. The Ar ligand is used to probe the electrophilicity of the vacant nonbonding σ orbital of c-C6H5+.

    19. Protein Modification

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Chemical Synthesis of Ubiquitin, Ubiquitin-Based Probes, and Diubiquitin (pages 10149–10153)

      Dr. Farid El Oualid, Dr. Remco Merkx, Reggy Ekkebus, Dharjath S. Hameed, Judith J. Smit, Annemieke de Jong, Henk Hilkmann, Prof. Dr. Titia K. Sixma and Dr. Huib Ovaa

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005995

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      Changing the subject: An efficient linear solid-phase peptide synthesis of ubiquitin (Ub) has been developed. This approach allows the incorporation of desired tags and mutations (see picture; blue denotes a pseudoproline dipeptide, red a dimethoxybenzyl dipeptide) as well as specific C-terminal modification and the construction of all diubiquitin conjugates in high yields and purities in a straightforward manner.

    20. Radical Reactions

      Iron-Catalyzed Oxidative Addition of Alkoxycarbonyl Radicals to Alkenes with Carbazates and Air (pages 10154–10157)

      Dr. Tsuyoshi Taniguchi, Yuki Sugiura, Hisaaki Zaimoku and Prof. Dr. Hiroyuki Ishibashi

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005574

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      Clean and simple: Alkoxycarbonyl radicals generated from carbazates by iron catalysis in air underwent addition to a variety of alkenes to give the corresponding β-hydroxyesters (see scheme). The simple experimental procedure for this transformation has the added advantage that the reagents are environmentally friendly. R1,R2=alkyl, alkynyl, aryl, CO2Et; [Fe(Pc)]=iron phthalocyanine.

    21. Polymer Synthesis

      Alane-Based Classical and Frustrated Lewis Pairs in Polymer Synthesis: Rapid Polymerization of MMA and Naturally Renewable Methylene Butyrolactones into High-Molecular-Weight Polymers (pages 10158–10162)

      Dr. Yuetao Zhang, Garret M. Miyake and Prof. Dr. Eugene Y.-X. Chen

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005534

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      Frustrated growth: Al(C6F5)3-based classical and frustrated Lewis pairs with select phosphines or N-heterocyclic carbenes exhibit exceptional activity in polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and naturally renewable methylene butyrolactones (M)MBL at ambient temperature, thereby affording high-molecular-weight PMMA and environmentally sustainable P(M)MBL (see scheme).

    22. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Rhodium(I)-Catalyzed 1,4-Silicon Shift of Unactivated Silanes from Aryl to Alkyl: Enantioselective Synthesis of Indanol Derivatives (pages 10163–10167)

      Tobias Seiser and Dr. Nicolai Cramer

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005399

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      Let's swap! Highly reactive alkyl rhodium species undergo facile C[BOND]Si bond activation resulting in an overall 1,4-Si/Rh positional switch. This reactivity is utilized to access densely functionalized indanol derivatives in a highly enantioselective manner (see scheme).

    23. Polymer Mass Spectrometry

      High-Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry–Mass Spectrometry on Poly(methyl methacrylate) (pages 10168–10171)

      Junkan Song, Dr. Christian H. Grün, Prof. Dr. Ron M. A. Heeren, Prof. Dr. Hans-Gerd Janssen and Dr. Oscar F. van den Brink

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005225

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      Further dimensions: The title mass spectrometric technique offers an extra dimension of separation based on size and conformation of the molecules in addition to m/z separation without the need of time-consuming liquid chromatography separation. Detailed mapping of the mass and drift time separated ions allowed identification of end groups originating from various initiation and termination reactions.

    24. Host–Guest Systems

      A Cyclic [4]rotaxane that Behaves as a Switchable Molecular Receptor: Formation of a Rigid Scaffold from a Collapsed Structure by Complexation with Copper(I) Ions (pages 10172–10175)

      Dr. Jean-Paul Collin, Dr. Fabien Durola, Prof. Valérie Heitz, Dr. Felipe Reviriego, Prof. Jean-Pierre Sauvage and Dr. Yann Trolez

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004008

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      Total collapse: A porphyrinic [4]rotaxane collapses completely after demetalation. The metal-free compound does not act as a receptor whereas the copper(I)-complexed compound is a selective receptor for diamine and dipyridyl substrates (see picture). The recognition process can thus be switched on and off by complexing the free ligand to four CuI ions or demetalating the metal-complexed species, respectively.

    25. Molecular Electronics

      Control over Rectification in Supramolecular Tunneling Junctions (pages 10176–10180)

      Kim S. Wimbush, William F. Reus, Prof. Wilfred G. van der Wiel, Prof. David N. Reinhoudt, Prof. George M. Whitesides, Dr. Christian A. Nijhuis and Dr. Aldrik H. Velders

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003286

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      In complete control: The magnitude of current rectification in well-defined supramolecular tunneling junctions can be controlled by changing the terminal functionality (red spheres) of dendrimers (gray spheres) immobilized on a supramolecular platform (see picture). Junctions containing biferrocene and ferrocene end groups showed larger rectification ratios than junctions containing adamantyl end groups.

    26. Cooperative Catalysis

      Cross-Dehydrogenative Coupling Reactions by Transition-Metal and Aminocatalysis for the Synthesis of Amino Acid Derivatives (pages 10181–10185)

      Jin Xie and Prof. Zhi-Zhen Huang

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004940

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      The direct approach: The title coupling reactions of N-aryl glycine esters with unmodified ketones occurred smoothly in the presence of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) or 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) under mild conditions (see scheme). The oxidant used for C[BOND]H activation determined the selectivity of the reactions for a particular type of ketone substrate.

    27. Iron Catalysis

      Efficient Hydrosilylation of Carbonyl Compounds with the Simple Amide Catalyst [Fe{N(SiMe3)2}2] (pages 10186–10188)

      Dr. Jian Yang and Prof. T. Don Tilley

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005055

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      Keep it simple: A variety of ketones and two aldehydes underwent efficient hydrosilylation under mild conditions in the presence of the title complex (see scheme; R,R′=H, alkyl, aryl). In some cases, a catalyst loading of just 0.01–0.03 mol % was sufficient. This catalyst may provide a simple, cost-effective, and environmentally benign alternative to currently employed methods for the hydrosilylation of ketones.

    28. Indole Chemistry

      Lewis Acid Catalyzed Intramolecular Direct Ene Reaction of Indoles (pages 10189–10191)

      Dr. Bo Han, You-Cai Xiao, Yuan Yao and Prof. Dr. Ying-Chun Chen

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005296

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      How to fuse heterocycles: The direct enamine–imine isomerization of indoles and subsequent intramolecular imino-ene has been observed under Lewis acid catalysis. This unique reaction occurred for indoles that contain a tethered olefin functionality, and led to fused indoline heterocycles with excellent diastereocontrol (see scheme).

    29. Synthetic Methods

      Selective Intramolecular C[BOND]H Amination through the Metalloradical Activation of Azides: Synthesis of 1,3-Diamines under Neutral and Nonoxidative Conditions (pages 10192–10196)

      Dr. Hongjian Lu, Dr. Huiling Jiang, Dr. Lukasz Wojtas and Prof. Dr. X. Peter Zhang

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005552

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      N2is the only by-product in a stereospecific and highly diastereoselective intramolecular C[BOND]H amination of sulfamoyl azides with a cobalt(II)-based metalloradical catalyst (see scheme). The catalytic system has an unusual capacity for the efficient amination of strong primary C[BOND]H bonds, as well as secondary and tertiary C[BOND]H bonds, and functional-group tolerance is excellent owing to the neutral and nonoxidative conditions.

    30. Core–Shell Structures

      Synthesis of AuPt Heteronanostructures with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity toward Oxygen Reduction (pages 10197–10201)

      Yena Kim, Jong Wook Hong, Young Wook Lee, Minjung Kim, Dongheun Kim, Dr. Wan Soo Yun and Prof. Sang Woo Han

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005839

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      The core of the matter: The catalytic activities of Au@Pt heteronanostructures (see scheme; CTAB: cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, NPs: nanoparticles) toward oxygen reduction are highly dependent on the shape of the cores, thus revealing the importance of the core structure for enhancing the activity of core–shell-type nanocatalysts.

    31. Carbon Nanorings

      A Modular and Size-Selective Synthesis of [n]Cycloparaphenylenes: A Step toward the Selective Synthesis of [n,n] Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 10202–10205)

      Haruka Omachi, Sanae Matsuura, Dr. Yasutomo Segawa and Prof. Dr. Kenichiro Itami

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005734

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      A modular strategy served in the size-selective syntheses of [14]-, [15]-, and [16]cycloparaphenylenes (CPPs). A Suzuki–Miyaura coupling was used to assemble a terphenyl-equivalent, L-shaped cis-1,4-diphenylcyclohexane unit and a linear benzene/biphenyl unit in a 3+1+3 or 3+2+3 mode to give U-shaped septi- and octiphenyl units. The cyclizative dimerization of these U-shaped units and subsequent aromatization yielded the CPPs.

    32. Azido Alcohols

      Extremely Simple but Long Overlooked: Generation of α-Azido Alcohols by Hydroazidation of Aldehydes (pages 10206–10209)

      Prof. Dr. Klaus Banert, Christian Berndt, Samia Firdous, Dr. Manfred Hagedorn, Dr. Young-Hyuk Joo, Dr. Tobias Rüffer and Prof. Dr. Heinrich Lang

      Version of Record online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003246

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      Discovered by accident: Just because an example of a simple substructure cannot be found in literature does not mean that corresponding compounds are not readily accessible. α-Azido alcohols like 1-azidoethanol have now been prepared and isolated.

    33. Siderophore Import

      Direct Identification of a Siderophore Import Protein Using Synthetic Petrobactin Ligands (pages 10210–10213)

      Nikolas Bugdahn, Florian Peuckert, Alexander G. Albrecht, Dr. Marcus Miethke, Prof. Dr. Mohamed A. Marahiel and Dr. Markus Oberthür

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005527

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      Nice catch! The immobilization of a synthetic petrobactin derivative on agarose was crucial for the isolation and identification of a bacterial siderophore import protein for the first time from crude cell extracts. The biochemical and genetic characterization of the identified protein confirmed that FpiA (YclQ) is the principal petrobactin importer in Bacillus subtilis.

    34. Light-Emitting Diodes

      Green–Blue Emitters: NHC-Based Cyclometalated [Pt(C^C*)(acac)] Complexes (pages 10214–10216)

      Yvonne Unger, Dirk Meyer, Dr. Oliver Molt, Dr. Christian Schildknecht, Dr. Ingo Münster, Dr. Gerhard Wagenblast and Prof. Dr. Thomas Strassner

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001316

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      White on target: Platinum(II) complexes with cyclometalated 1-phenylimidazole ligands (see picture: R=2,3-OC6H4) show photophysical properties in the blue region of the visible spectrum, thus giving them the potential to be used as the blue component of white-light-emitting diodes.

    35. Surface Plasmons

      Fluorescence Studies into the Effect of Plasmonic Interactions on Protein Function (pages 10217–10220)

      Jana B. Nieder, Prof. Dr. Robert Bittl and Dr. Marc Brecht

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002172

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      Influencing proteins: A protein multichromophore system (photosystem I) is exposed to gold nanoparticles (NPs) and silver island films. In the presence of these nanostructures an altered fluorescence response of the chromophores is observed (see scheme), indicating a change in the protein function. A model to understand these plasmonic effects is generally applicable to other multichromophore systems.

    36. Ionic Liquids

      The Importance of Hydrogen Bonds for the Structure of Ionic Liquids: Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction and Transmission and Attenuated Total Reflection Spectroscopy in the Terahertz Region (pages 10221–10224)

      Christian Roth, Tim Peppel, Dr. Koichi Fumino, Prof. Dr. Martin Köckerling and Prof. Dr. Ralf Ludwig

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004955

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      The low-frequency motions in ionic liquids can be studied by transmission and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy in the THz region (see spectrum for 1). These motions involve flexing of individual ions and intermolecular interactions by hydrogen bonding. Combined measurements show that the degree of hydrogen bonding is crucial for the solid structures of this material.

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