Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 30

July 12, 2010

Volume 49, Issue 30

Pages 5013–5197

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: A Docosanuclear {Mo8Mn14} Cluster Based on [Mo(CN)7]4− (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2010) (page 5013)

      Xin-Yi Wang, Andrey V. Prosvirin and Kim R. Dunbar

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002741

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      A record-breaking high-spin state is observed in a molecule based on the [Mo(CN)7]4− building block. As K. R. Dunbar and co-workers describe in their Communication on page 5081 ff., the anionic nanosized docosanuclear {Mo8Mn14} cluster is the first discrete compound based on [Mo(CN)7]4−. The compound contains the most paramagnetic centers (22) and the largest ground-state spin value (S=31) for a cyanide-bridged cluster.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Hypermodified Fluorescent Chlorophyll Catabolites: Source of Blue Luminescence in Senescent Leaves (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2010) (page 5014)

      Srinivas Banala, Simone Moser, Thomas Müller, Christoph Kreutz, Andreas Holzinger, Cornelius Lütz and Bernhard Kräutler

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002974

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      The typical degradation of chlorophyll in degreening leaves leads to catabolites that are colorless and difficult to detect. In their Communication on page 5174 ff., B. Kräutler and co-workers report that blue-fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites accumulate in yellowing banana leaves, which exhibit blue luminescence under UV light. These catabolites present new molecular in vivo probes for the study of senescence in plants.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  4. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
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      Corrigendum: Copper-Free Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation with Grignard Reagents (page 5026)

      Olivier Jackowski and Alexandre Alexakis

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090093

      This article corrects:

      Copper-Free Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation with Grignard Reagents1

      Vol. 49, Issue 19, 3346–3350, Version of Record online: 1 APR 2010

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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    1. Roderich D. Süssmuth (page 5032)

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002150

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      “My favorite subjects at school were natural sciences, history, music lessons, and the theatre group. The biggest challenge facing scientists is solving social challenges with the achievements of scientific knowledge …” This and more about Roderich D. Süssmuth can be found on page 5032.

  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
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    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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    1. Handbook of Synthetic Photochemistry. Edited by Angelo Albini and Maurizio Fagnoni. (page 5033)

      Axel G. Griesbeck

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003164

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2009. 464 pp., hardcover € 139.00.—ISBN 978-3527323913

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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    1. Natural Products

      Convergence Leads to Success: Total Synthesis of the Complex Nonribosomal Peptide Polytheonamide B (pages 5034–5036)

      Christian Ducho

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001917

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      Beyond the ribosome: The highly cytotoxic 48 residue nonribosomal peptide polytheonamide B, proposed to act as an ion channel, was synthesized by the coupling of four building blocks. The assembly of these peptide segments required the synthesis of eight nonproteinogenic amino acids, including a unique sulfoxide. This first synthetic route towards polytheonamide B (see scheme) demonstrates the potential of state-of-the-art peptide chemistry.

    2. α-Oligofurans

      α-Oligofurans: Molecules without a Twist (pages 5037–5040)

      Uwe H. F. Bunz

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002458

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      Be planar! The planar oligofurans (see picture, lower; C gray, H white, O red) are, despite a lack of solubilizing alkyl groups, quite soluble. They are also highly fluorescent and surprisingly stable, and might give the oligothiophenes (upper; S yellow) a run for their money when seeking applications in organic electronics.

  9. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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    1. Cage Compounds

      Shape-Persistent Organic Cage Compounds by Dynamic Covalent Bond Formation (pages 5042–5053)

      Michael Mastalerz

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000443

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      Hole in one: Discrete organic molecules with defined cavities are accessible in one synthetic step by reversible reactions (e.g. Schiff base or boronic ester condensations). This Minireview highlights recent progress in the synthesis of organic cage compounds by dynamic covalent chemistry. The picture shows three cage molecules of various size, synthesized by [3+2], [6+4], and [8+12] imine condensation reactions.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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    1. Photochemistry

      Artificial Light-Gated Catalyst Systems (pages 5054–5075)

      Ragnar S. Stoll and Stefan Hecht

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000146

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      Plug-and-play catalysis: An active catalyst system enabled by switching on light allows a specific chemical transformation at well-defined location and time, thanks to the high spatial and temporal resolution of the initial light stimulus. Such artificial light-gated systems can be specifically designed for particular applications.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. DNA Nanotechnology

      Programmable Shape-Shifting Micelles (pages 5076–5080)

      Miao-Ping Chien, Anthony M. Rush, Matthew P. Thompson and Nathan C. Gianneschi

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000265

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      Getting in shape: DNA-brush copolymer amphiphiles assemble into micelles with morphologies determined by selective interactions that allow manipulation of the magnitude of steric and electrostatic repulsions in the micelle shells. Cylinder-to-sphere phase transitions occur when an input DNA sequence is added to the micelles (see picture).

    2. Magnetic Properties

      A Docosanuclear {Mo8Mn14} Cluster Based on [Mo(CN)7]4− (pages 5081–5084)

      Xin-Yi Wang, Andrey V. Prosvirin and Kim R. Dunbar

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001664

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      I'll take the high road: An anionic nanosize docosanuclear {Mo8Mn14} cluster based on the [Mo(CN)7]4− unit was synthesized and fully characterized by X-ray and magnetic studies. This molecule (see picture; Mo red, Mn purple, C gray, N blue) is the first discrete compound based on [Mo(CN)7]4− and contains the most paramagnetic centers (22) and the largest ground state spin value (S=31) for a cyanide-bridged cluster.

    3. Metal–Ion Chelation

      Single-Molecule Kinetics of Two-Step Divalent Cation Chelation (pages 5085–5090)

      Anne F. Hammerstein, Seong-Ho Shin and Hagan Bayley

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906601

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      A double hug: Two half-chelating ligands were covalently attached within the lumen of a protein nanopore (see picture). By electrical recording, the formation of fully chelated Zn2+ ions was monitored at the single-molecule level, thus revealing the rate constants for the eight major steps in the process.

    4. Biomimetic Chemistry

      Unprecedented Rate Enhancements of Hydrogen-Atom Transfer to a Manganese(V)–Oxo Corrolazine Complex (pages 5091–5095)

      Katharine A. Prokop, Sam P. de Visser and David P. Goldberg

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001172

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      Runaway reactivity: A manganese(V)–oxo porphyrinoid complex displays an unprecedented increase in reaction rate for a hydrogen-atom abstraction upon addition of anionic axial ligands (X=F and CN; see scheme). Density functional theory calculations are in excellent agreement with experiment, and provide insight into the origins of these remarkable axial ligand effects.

    5. Crystal Growth

      A Strategy for Retrospectively Mapping the Growth History of a Crystal (pages 5096–5100)

      Benjamin A. Palmer, Kenneth D. M. Harris and François Guillaume

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000952

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      Like the rings of a tree: A novel strategy is presented that yields insights on crystal growth processes from retrospective analysis of crystals recovered at the end of the process. The strategy is based on systems in which the composition of the growing crystal surfaces varies during crystal growth, while the crystal structure remains constant. The compositional distribution in the crystal is monitored using confocal Raman microspectrometry (see picture).

    6. Photocatalysis

      Visible-Light-Induced Selective CO2 Reduction Utilizing a Ruthenium Complex Electrocatalyst Linked to a p-Type Nitrogen-Doped Ta2O5 Semiconductor (pages 5101–5105)

      Shunsuke Sato, Takeshi Morikawa, Shu Saeki, Tsutomu Kajino and Tomoyoshi Motohiro

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000613

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      Lights, CO2, action! Selective CO2 reduction by hybrid photocatalysts such as a p-type semiconductor and a ruthenium complex catalyst (see picture) was induced by visible light. The quantum efficiency for HCOOH production was 1.9 % at 405 nm. For electron transfer, it is essential that the potential of the conduction band minimum of the semiconductor is more negative than the reduction potential of the complex catalyst.

    7. Photoconversion

      A Structured Macroporous Silicon/Graphene Heterojunction for Efficient Photoconversion (pages 5106–5109)

      Hongtao Yu, Shuo Chen, Xinfei Fan, Xie Quan, Huimin Zhao, Xinyong Li and Yaobin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907173

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      New roles of graphene as a protective layer and transparent charge collector are demonstrated in a structured macroporous Si (MPSi)/graphene (Gr) heterojunction, which shows stable photocurrent (see picture) and a maximum photoconversion efficiency of 2.36 % in 0.05 M H2SO4 without adding a redox pair.

    8. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Highly Selective Ratiometric Emission Color Change by Zinc-Assisted Self-Assembly Processes (pages 5110–5114)

      Takuya Ogawa, Junpei Yuasa and Tsuyoshi Kawai

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001676

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      Color sense: 2-(Anthracen-9-ylethynyl)-1-methylbenzimidazole (BzIm-An) shows a ratiometric color change in emission from blue to light yellow to green with increasing Zn2+ concentration. The dimeric 3:1 complex [{(BzIm-An)3Zn2+}2] formed at low Zn2+ concentration is converted into the 2:1 complex [(BzIm-An)2Zn2+] at high concentrations of Zn2+.

    9. Aminoacyl-tRNA Mimics

      Decoding the Logic of the tRNA Regiospecificity of Nonribosomal FemXWv Aminoacyl Transferase (pages 5115–5119)

      Matthieu Fonvielle, Maryline Chemama, Maxime Lecerf, Régis Villet, Patricia Busca, Ahmed Bouhss, Mélanie Ethève-Quelquejeu and Michel Arthur

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001473

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      Natural selection: Replacement of the 3′-OH group of Ala-tRNAAla with 3′-H affected FemXWv-catalyzed aminoacyl transfer from the 2′-position, but not substrate binding. The ability of FemXWv to bind and transacylate the 3′-O-Ala isomer initially formed by alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) may be crucial for efficient competition with the ribosome (see scheme).

    10. Luminescence Probes

      Reversible Three-State Switching of Multicolor Fluorescence Emission by Multiple Stimuli Modulated FRET Processes within Thermoresponsive Polymeric Micelles (pages 5120–5124)

      Changhua Li, Yanxi Zhang, Jinming Hu, Jianjun Cheng and Shiyong Liu

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002203

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      Micellar traffic lights: The title FRET system (FRET=fluorescence resonance energy transfer) consists of one type of donor dye and two types of acceptor dyes. On/off fluorescence switching of the latter two dyes can be controlled by pH changes and light, respectively. This novel type of multicolor luminescent polymeric assembly can act as a ratiometric probe for pH and temperature with tunable sensitivity.

    11. Water Wires

      Water Chains in Hydrophobic Crystal Channels: Nanoporous Materials as Supramolecular Analogues of Carbon Nanotubes (pages 5125–5129)

      Ramalingam Natarajan, Jonathan P. H. Charmant, A. Guy Orpen and Anthony P. Davis

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002418

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      Pore design: Nanoporous steroidal crystals can be engineered for a range of channel properties. For example, the walls may be coated with aromatic groups to mimic the interior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The pores in these structures are occupied by “water wires”, as proposed for water in CNTs themselves.

    12. Organocatalysis

      Metal-Free Catalytic Boration at the β-Position of α,β-Unsaturated Compounds: A Challenging Asymmetric Induction (pages 5130–5134)

      Amadeu Bonet, Henrik Gulyás and Elena Fernández

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001198

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      Enantiomerically enriched secondary organoboronates containing β-carbonyl functional groups have been prepared using an unprecedented organocatalytic system (see scheme). The use of chiral tertiary phosphorus compounds induced ee values of up to 95 % in the absence of transition metals.

    13. Biomineralization

      Structural Control of Crystal Nuclei by an Eggshell Protein (pages 5135–5137)

      Colin L. Freeman, John H. Harding, David Quigley and P. Mark Rodger

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000679

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      Growing a good egg: Metadynamics simulations show that the eggshell protein ovocleidin-17 induces the formation of calcite crystals from amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles. Multiple spontaneous crystallization and amorphization events were simulated; these simulations suggest a catalytic cycle that explains the role of ovocleidin-17 in the first stages of eggshell formation (the picture shows one intermediate of this cycle).

    14. Pauson–Khand Reaction

      Rhodium-Catalyzed Pauson–Khand-Type Reaction Using Alcohol as a Source of Carbon Monoxide (pages 5138–5141)

      Ji Hoon Park, Yoonhee Cho and Young Keun Chung

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001246

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      Three in one pot! Bicyclic cyclopentenones have been synthesized from enynes in alcohol in the presence of a rhodium catalyst through a newly developed auto-tandem catalytic reaction. This process combines three mechanistically distinctive reactions—an oxidation of alcohols, a decarbonylation of aldehydes, and a carbonylative [2+2+1] cycloaddition (see scheme; dppp=propane-l,3-diylbis(diphenylphosphane)).

    15. Enantioselective Synthesis

      Full Chirality Transfer in the Conversion of Secondary Alcohols into Tertiary Boronic Esters and Alcohols Using Lithiation–Borylation Reactions (pages 5142–5145)

      Viktor Bagutski, Rosalind M. French and Varinder K. Aggarwal

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001371

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      New conditions, full transfer: Using MgBr2/MeOH as an additive now provides essentially 100 % retention of configuration in the lithiation–borylation reaction, thus leading to tertiary boronic esters (or tertiary alcohols) with exceptionally high ee values in all cases—even with rather hindered substrates and more stabilized lithiated carbamates (see scheme; Cb=carbamate, pin=OCMe2CMe2O).

    16. Natural Products

      Total Syntheses of Dalesconol A and B (pages 5146–5150)

      Scott A. Snyder, Trevor C. Sherwood and Audrey G. Ross

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002264

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      A polycyclic collapse: Use of a carefully designed acyclic intermediate participated in a cascade reaction that formed the entire core of the polyketide-derived dalesconols in a single flask (see scheme). A number of additional and carefully controlled synthetic operations completed an expeditious synthesis of both of these highly bioactive natural products as well as structural congenors.

    17. Artificial Metalloenzymes

      An Artificial Metalloenzyme: Creation of a Designed Copper Binding Site in a Thermostable Protein (pages 5151–5155)

      John Podtetenieff, Andreas Taglieber, Eckhard Bill, Edward J. Reijerse and Manfred T. Reetz

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002106

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      Guided by nature: A designed binding site comprising the His/His/Asp motif for CuII complexation has been constructed in a robust protein by site-specific mutagenesis (see picture). The artificial metalloenzyme catalyzes an enantioselective Diels–Alder reaction.

    18. Reaction Mechanisms

      Aryl Trifluoroborates in Suzuki–Miyaura Coupling: The Roles of Endogenous Aryl Boronic Acid and Fluoride (pages 5156–5160)

      Mike Butters, Jeremy N. Harvey, Jesus Jover, Alastair J. J. Lennox, Guy C. Lloyd-Jones and Paul M. Murray

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001522

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      Undercover agents: The biaryl coupling of an aryltrifluoroborate with an aryl bromide involves in situ hydrolysis of the boron reagent. The hydrolysis products are key components in ensuring that the reaction proceeds with high efficiency and avoids the extensive generation of undesired phenolic and homocoupling side products.

    19. Gas-Phase Synthesis

      Gas-Phase Synthesis and Reactivity of Lithium Acetylide Ion, Li[BOND]C[TRIPLE BOND]C (pages 5161–5164)

      Matthew M. Meyer, Bun Chan, Leo Radom and Steven R. Kass

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001485

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      No solvent, no complications! The lithium acetylide ion, which is the monolithium salt of the carbide ion, was prepared in the gas phase (see scheme; CID=collision-induced dissociation, ESI=electrospray ionization). Its reactivity and energetics are reported along with high-level computational results.

    20. Ambident Nucleophiles

      Marcus Analysis of Ambident Reactivity (pages 5165–5169)

      Martin Breugst, Hendrik Zipse, J. Peter Guthrie and Herbert Mayr

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001574

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      A better approach to ambident reactivity: The principle of hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) cannot rationalize the reactivities of even the prototypical ambident nucleophiles shown in the picture. Marcus theory, which describes activation energies by a combination of intrinsic and thermodynamic terms, is a superior alternative.

    21. Protein Labeling

      Enzymatic Site-Specific Functionalization of Protein Methyltransferase Substrates with Alkynes for Click Labeling (pages 5170–5173)

      Wibke Peters, Sophie Willnow, Mike Duisken, Henning Kleine, Thomas Macherey, Kelly E. Duncan, David W. Litchfield, Bernhard Lüscher and Elmar Weinhold

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001240

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      Pass and click: Protein methylation is an important posttranslational modification. Because the methyl group is a poor reporter group, new methods are needed to analyze methyltransferase substrates. A S-adenosyl-L-methionine-based cofactor was synthesized and used for the site-specific functionalization of proteins with alkynes by methyltransferases (first step) and subsequent labeling through CuAAC click chemistry (second step; see scheme).

    22. Blue Luminescent Leaves

      Hypermodified Fluorescent Chlorophyll Catabolites: Source of Blue Luminescence in Senescent Leaves (pages 5174–5177)

      Srinivas Banala, Simone Moser, Thomas Müller, Christoph Kreutz, Andreas Holzinger, Cornelius Lütz and Bernhard Kräutler

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000294

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      Yellow leaves of bananas glow blue under UV light. The luminescence is caused by uniquely glycosylated (“hypermodified”) chlorophyll catabolites that accumulate in senescent banana leaves. These findings suggest that (some) chlorophyll catabolites are not mere detoxification products, but are likely to play still unknown physiological roles.

    23. Biomimetics

      Vitamin B12 Mimics Having a Peptide Backbone and Tuneable Coordination and Redox Properties (pages 5178–5180)

      Kai Zhou and Felix Zelder

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001928

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      A fortified vitamin: A new class of vitamin B12 mimics with a peptide backbone has been developed (see structure). The choice of an appropriate linker between the corrin macrocycle and the dimethylbenzimidazole base makes it possible to modulate selectively the coordination and redox properties at the metal center.

    24. DNA Replication

      Structures of DNA Polymerases Caught Processing Size-Augmented Nucleotide Probes (pages 5181–5184)

      Karin Betz, Frank Streckenbach, Andreas Schnur, Thomas Exner, Wolfram Welte, Kay Diederichs and Andreas Marx

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905724

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      The right fit: Synthetic nucleotide analogues are widely used to investigate the mechanisms that govern DNA polymerase selectivity—processes that are crucial for the survival of every living organism. The first crystal structures of size-augmented 4′-methylated and 4′-ethylated thymidine triphosphates (TTPs) in complex with a DNA polymerase have been elucidated (picture: superposition of three DNA polymerase structures in complex with TTPs).

    25. Ferromagnetic Materials

      Combined Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements and 57Fe Mössbauer Spectroscopy on a Ferromagnetic {FeIII4Dy4} Ring (pages 5185–5188)

      Dirk Schray, Ghulam Abbas, Yanhua Lan, Valeriu Mereacre, Alexander Sundt, Jan Dreiser, Oliver Waldmann, George E. Kostakis, Christopher E. Anson and Annie K. Powell

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001110

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      Ferromagnetic interactions in an Fe4Dy4 single-molecule magnet were studied using a combination of magnetic susceptibility measurements (see diagram; inset: cluster core) and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy.

    26. Encoded Capsules

      Inwards Buildup of Concentric Polymer Layers: A Method for Biomolecule Encapsulation and Microcapsule Encoding (pages 5189–5193)

      Jianhao Bai, Sebastian Beyer, Wing Cheung Mak, Raj Rajagopalan and Dieter Trau

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906498

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      Encoding by encapsulation: A polymeric shell fabrication approach combines biomolecule encapsulation with encoding. Striated polymeric shells, fabricated through an inwards diffusion of poly(allylamine) into the matrices of agarose microbeads, serves to encapsulate the biomolecules within the microcapsule. Encoding is performed through the color and/or thickness permutation of the striated polymeric shells (see picture).

  12. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
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