Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Angewandte Chemie International Edition

July 19, 2010

Volume 49, Issue 31

Pages 5199–5387

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Nonhydrolytic Synthesis of Branched Alkoxysiloxane Oligomers Si[OSiH(OR)2]4 (R=Me, Et) (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 31/2010) (page 5199)

      Ryutaro Wakabayashi, Kazufumi Kawahara and Kazuyuki Kuroda

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003228

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Discrete alkoxysiloxane oligomers were synthesized by nonhydrolytic heterocondensation reactions between alkoxysilanes and chlorosilanes. In their Communication on page 5273 ff., K. Kuroda and co-workers show that the combination of the Lewis acid catalyst bismuth trichloride and alkoxysilanes that can form stable carbocations play an important role in the formation of siloxane bonds prior to the occurrence of other competing side reactions. The photograph of bismuth metal was provided by Dr. Ryoji Tanaka.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Ionothermal Synthesis of an Aluminophosphate Molecular Sieve with 20-Ring Pore Openings (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 31/2010) (page 5200)

      Ying Wei, Zhijian Tian, Hermann Gies, Renshun Xu, Huaijun Ma, Renyan Pei, Weiping Zhang, Yunpeng Xu, Lei Wang, Keda Li, Bingchun Wang, Guodong Wen and Liwu Lin

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002661

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The crystalline aluminophosphate molecular sieve with the largest pore openings (20MR) to date, DNL-1, has been prepared. In their Communication on page 5367 ff., Z. Tian and co-workers describe the ionothermal synthesis of DNL-1 and the confirmation of its structure by Rietveld refinement of PXRD and NMR analysis. Compared with its zeolite analogue of gallophosphate cloverite, DNL-1 exhibits excellent stability, which suggests potential applications in separation, catalysis, and gas storage.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Kazunori Kataoka (page 5218)

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002568

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “In my opinion, the word “scientist” means an artist for the future. If I won the lottery I would buy a winery …” This and more about Kazunori Kataoka can be found on page 5218.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Reactions at Solid Surfaces. By Gerhard Ertl. (page 5219)

      Christof Wöll

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003288

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2009. 208 pp., hardcover € 57.90.—ISBN 978-0470261019

  7. Meeting Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Bioorganometallic Chemistry

      Metal Complexes as Protein Kinase Inhibitors (pages 5226–5227)

      Conrad Kunick and Ingo Ott

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Angiogenesis inhibition: Metal complexes are often overlooked in the development of new drugs. However, rationally designed iridium complexes with bidentate pyridocarbazole ligands have been found to act as selective protein kinase inhibitors. Experiments in zebrafish embryos revealed impressive anti-angiogenic effects for this type of metallodrug. (Picture: tumor-induced angiogenesis in a zebrafish embryo; red: transplanted tumor cells, green: blood vessels).

    2. Intelligent Design?

      The First Artificial Cell—A Revolutionary Step in Synthetic Biology? (pages 5228–5230)

      Uwe T. Bornscheuer

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003393

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It′s alive: The creation of an artificial self-replicating microorganism (Mycobacterium mycoides JCVIsyn1.0) from a chemically synthesized full-length genome by the team of Craig Venter is without doubt a landmark achievement in synthetic biology. But will this technique revolutionize modern biotechnology and eventually lead to an alternative supply of energy, biofuels, and chemicals?

  9. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Gold Catalysis

      Homogeneous Gold Catalysis Beyond Assumptions and Proposals—Characterized Intermediates (pages 5232–5241)

      A. Stephen K. Hashmi

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907078

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hard facts: Which intermediates of homogeneous gold-catalyzed conversions have been isolated or detected, and where do we enter the shaky grounds of speculation? The palette of proven intermediates extends from gold π complexes to pure organic cyclization products (see examples).

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Solid-State Chemistry

      Ab Initio Thermochemistry of Solid-State Materials (pages 5242–5266)

      Ralf Peter Stoffel, Claudia Wessel, Marck-Willem Lumey and Richard Dronskowski

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906780

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The heat of the matter: The quantum-chemical treatment of vibrational modes within crystalline solids is the key towards an ab initio thermochemistry of solid-state materials, which allows classical thermochemistry to be understood atomistically and extended to experimentally inaccessible conditions. Based on Schrödinger's equation, temperature-dependent solid-state chemical problems, such as activation barriers, temperature polymorphs, or free reaction enthalpies, can be tackled computationally.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Arene Radical Cations

      Long-Lived Radical Cations of Monocyclic Arenes at Room Temperature Obtained by NbF5 Acting as an Oxidizing Agent and Counterion Precursor (pages 5268–5272)

      Fabio Marchetti, Calogero Pinzino, Stefano Zacchini and Guido Pampaloni

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001572

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Salt of the earth: Radical cation salts of monocyclic arenes, including benzene, have been obtained in a reaction where niobium pentafluoride behaves both as an oxidizing agent (conversion into NbF4) and fluoride acceptor (to afford the counterion [Nb2F11], see picture). Anion–π-electron density interactions, as revealed by experimental and computational studies, are crucial in providing unprecedented inertness to the radical cations.

    2. Oligomerization

      Nonhydrolytic Synthesis of Branched Alkoxysiloxane Oligomers Si[OSiH(OR)2]4 (R=Me, Et) (pages 5273–5277)

      Ryutaro Wakabayashi, Kazufumi Kawahara and Kazuyuki Kuroda

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001640

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Beyond silanol: A branched siloxane oligomer bearing terminal dialkoxysilyl groups was nonhydrolytically synthesized by direct alkoxysilylation of a tetraalkoxysilane with a chlorodialkoxysilane in the presence of the Lewis acid BiCl3 (see scheme). The reaction proceeds without the formation of intermediate silanol groups, and provides a selective route for siloxane-based oligomers.

    3. Enantioselectivity

      High-Throughput Method for Determining the Enantioselectivity of Enzyme-Catalyzed Hydroxylations Based on Mass Spectrometry (pages 5278–5283)

      Yongzheng Chen, Weng Lin Tang, Jie Mou and Zhi Li

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001772

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Up to speed: An accurate, sensitive, high-throughput, and simple method for measuring the product ee value of enzyme-catalyzed hydroxylations (see scheme) is based on the use of enantiopure or enantioenriched deuterated substrates and mass spectrometric detection.

    4. Palladium Catalysis

      Palladium-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions: Carbonylative Heck Reactions To Give Chalcones (pages 5284–5288)

      Xiao-Feng Wu, Helfried Neumann and Matthias Beller

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chalcones made easy: Carbonylative Heck reactions of aryl and alkenyl triflate derivatives with carbon monoxide and aromatic olefins proceed in the presence of palladium catalysts (see scheme; dppp=1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane, Tf=triflate; R=aryl, vinyl). With this process, the gap between the Suzuki and Sonogashira carbonylative reactions is finally bridged.

    5. Multicomponent Reactions

      Highly Stereoselective Synthesis of Substituted Prolyl Peptides Using a Combination of Biocatalytic Desymmetrization and Multicomponent Reactions (pages 5289–5292)

      Anass Znabet, Eelco Ruijter, Frans J. J. de Kanter, Valentin Köhler, Madeleine Helliwell, Nicholas J. Turner and Romano V. A. Orru

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001592

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Time and pep-tide wait for no man: Optically pure 3,4-disubstituted 1-pyrrolines, generated from the corresponding meso-pyrrolidines by biocatalytic desymmetrization (MAO-N=monoamine oxidase N), react with carboxylic acids and isocyanides in a highly diastereoselective Ugi-type multicomponent reaction to give substituted prolyl peptides of high pharmaceutical relevance.

    6. Fullerenols

      Facile Synthesis of Isomerically Pure Fullerenols and Formation of Spherical Aggregates from C60(OH)8 (pages 5293–5295)

      Gang Zhang, Yun Liu, Dehai Liang, Liangbing Gan  and Yuliang Li

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001280

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Octahydroxy fullerene C60(OH)8 (see picture) is among the isomerically pure fullerenols with two to eight OH groups that were prepared by selective transformation of tert-butylperoxo groups of fullerene mixed peroxides. Since C60(OH)8 has all OH groups on the same hemisphere, it is amphiphilic and forms stable spherical aggregates in water.

    7. Pentapod Nanostructures

      Facile Synthesis of Five-fold Twinned, Starfish-like Rhodium Nanocrystals by Eliminating Oxidative Etching with a Chloride-Free Precursor (pages 5296–5300)

      Hui Zhang, Xiaohu Xia, Weiyang Li, Jie Zeng, Yunqian Dai, Deren Yang and Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002546

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Five-fold twinned, starfish-like Rh nanocrystals consisting of five arms (see TEM) have been synthesized in high yields with the use of [{(CF3COO)2Rh}2] as a precursor to completely eliminate oxidative etching from this system. The as-prepared Rh nanocrystals were shown with great performance as a substrate for SERS.

    8. Phage Display

      Uniform Amplification of Phage with Different Growth Characteristics in Individual Compartments Consisting of Monodisperse Droplets (pages 5301–5304)

      Ratmir Derda, Sindy K. Y. Tang and George M. Whitesides

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Save every clone! In phage display, clones displaying ligands that hinder growth of phage are lost in amplification. Competition of slowly (S) and rapidly (R) growing phage is mitigated in monodisperse emulsions generated by a simple microfluidic device. Separating R and S in ca. 107 droplets maintains R/S ratio throughout amplification. Competition-free amplification of phage preserves ligands that are usually lost in phage display screen.

    9. DNA Structures

      Conformational Switching of G-Quadruplex DNA by Photoregulation (pages 5305–5309)

      Xiaolin Wang, Jing Huang, Yangyang Zhou, Shengyong Yan, Xiaocheng Weng, Xiaojun Wu, Minggang Deng and Xiang Zhou

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002290

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bend and stretch… bend and stretch… An azobenzene derivative was used to induce reversible stretching and folding of G-quadruplex DNA upon photoirradiation (see picture). The G quadruplex formed in the presence of the trans isomer was dissociated by irradiation with UV light, and the resulting open oligomer was refolded into a G quadruplex under visible light. This nanodevice thus converts light directly into mechanical work.

    10. Carbon “Quantum” Dots

      Bandgap-Like Strong Fluorescence in Functionalized Carbon Nanoparticles (pages 5310–5314)

      Xin Wang, Li Cao, Sheng-Tao Yang, Fushen Lu, Mohammed J. Meziani, Leilei Tian, Katherine W. Sun, Mathew A. Bloodgood and Ya-Ping Sun

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000982

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Quantum of solace: Fluorescent carbon dots (surface-passivated carbon nanoparticles) are developed as an alternative to classical semiconductor quantum dots. Gel column chromatography afforded carbon dots with emission yields close to 60 %. Their optical properties resemble band-gap transitions found in nanoscale semiconductors, thus suggesting that nanoscale carbon particles acquire essentially semiconductorlike characteristics.

    11. Metalloenzymes

      Highly Efficient and Site-Selective Phosphane Modification of Proteins through Hydrazone Linkage: Development of Artificial Metalloenzymes (pages 5315–5317)

      Peter J. Deuss, Gina Popa, Catherine H. Botting, Wouter Laan and Paul C. J. Kamer

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002174

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A joint effort: A novel, highly efficient, and selective procedure for phosphane modification of proteins is reported (see scheme). This method involves cysteine modification with a maleimide containing a hydrazide functional group and subsequent hydrazone formation with phosphane aldehydes. Mono- and bidentate phosphane ligands were successfully coupled to several proteins, one of which was coordinated to rhodium to give an artificial metalloenzyme.

    12. Glycopeptide Synthesis

      The Mercaptomethyl Group Facilitates an Efficient One-Pot Ligation at Xaa-Ser/Thr for (Glyco)peptide Synthesis (pages 5318–5321)

      Hironobu Hojo, Chinatsu Ozawa, Hidekazu Katayama, Akiharu Ueki, Yuko Nakahara and Yoshiaki Nakahara

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000384

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going native: A mercaptomethyl group on the side-chain hydroxy group of serine and threonine residues facilitates a native chemical ligation reaction at the Xaa-Ser/Thr site (see scheme; R=H or Me). The intermediate thioester is treated to achieve an S- to N-acyl shift. After ligation, the group is spontaneously removed to obtain the glycopeptide contulakin-G and human calcitonin.

    13. Halogen Bonding

      Halogen Bond Anion Templated Assembly of an Imidazolium Pseudorotaxane (pages 5322–5326)

      Christopher J. Serpell, Nathan L. Kilah, Paulo J. Costa, Vítor Félix and Paul D. Beer

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001729

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Halogen bonding has been exploited in the assembly of an interpenetrated molecular system. The strength of chloride-anion-templated pseudorotaxane formation with a 2-bromo-functionalized imidazolium threading component and an isophthalamide macrocycle (see picture) is significantly enhanced compared to hydrogen-bonded pseudorotaxane analogues.

    14. Functional Monolayers

      Coordinatively Immobilized Monolayers on Porous Coordination Polymer Crystals (pages 5327–5330)

      Mio Kondo, Shuhei Furukawa, Kenji Hirai and Susumu Kitagawa

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001063

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface-specific: Coordinatively immobilized monolayers (CIMs) of fluorescent dyes were fabricated on specific single-crystal surfaces of porous coordination polymers (PCPs) (see picture). This approach enables the fabrication of functional PCP crystal surfaces with precisely controlled fluorescent gating and sensing properties.

    15. Catenanes

      A Water Soluble Donor–Acceptor [2]Catenane that Can Switch between a Coplanar and a Gemini-Sign Conformation (pages 5331–5334)

      Ho Yu Au-Yeung, G. Dan Pantoş and Jeremy K. M. Sanders

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000807

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      When the moon is in the seventh house: A conformationally switchable donor–acceptor [2]catenane was synthesized from a dynamic combinatorial library in water. The arrangement of the π units in one of the observed conformations features an unprecedented Gemini shape, which is reminiscent of the astrological Gemini sign (see picture). The catenane can be switched between the parallel and nonparallel conformations upon thermal, chemical, or hydrophobic stimuli.

    16. Self-Assembly

      Encapsulation of DNA-Templated Chromophore Assemblies within Virus Protein Nanotubes (pages 5335–5338)

      Andrés de la Escosura, Pim G. A. Janssen, Albertus P. H. J. Schenning, Roeland J. M. Nolte and Jeroen J. L. M. Cornelissen

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001702

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A beneficial virus: The hierarchical self-assembly of a three-component system consisting of single-stranded DNA (oligothymines; Tq), chromophores (G), and virus coat proteins (CP) leads to the formation of micrometer-long nanotubes (see picture). Tuning the interaction between the three components leads to the formation of structures with different length scales, and the chromophores within the nanotubes maintain the helical arrangement of the Tq–G template.

    17. Redox Shuttles

      Electronic Tuning of Nickel-Based Bis(dicarbollide) Redox Shuttles in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 5339–5343)

      Alexander M. Spokoyny, Tina C. Li, Omar K. Farha, Charles W. Machan, Chunxing She, Charlotte L. Stern, Tobin J. Marks, Joseph T. Hupp and Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002181

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Redox “B”ees: Rational design of a new series of boron-functionalized NiIII/NiIV–bis(dicarbollide) clusters results in a family of robust and tunable redox shuttles (see diagram; EDG and EWG denote electron-donating and -withdrawing groups, respectively). This offers a means to rationally control the redox properties in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), leading to exceptionally high open-circuit voltages.

    18. Fuel Cells

      Catalytic Activity Enhancement for Oxygen Reduction on Epitaxial Perovskite Thin Films for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (pages 5344–5347)

      Gerardo Jose la O', Sung-Jin Ahn, Ethan Crumlin, Yuki Orikasa, Michael D. Biegalski, Hans M. Christen and Yang Shao-Horn

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001922

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The active ingredient: La0.8Sr0.2CoO3−δ (LSC) epitaxial thin films are prepared on (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystals with a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) buffer layer (see picture). The LSC epitaxial films exhibit better oxygen reduction kinetics than bulk LSC. The enhanced activity is attributed in part to higher oxygen nonstoichiometry.

    19. MOF Electrocatalysts

      A Metal–Organic Framework as an Electrocatalyst for Ethanol Oxidation (pages 5348–5351)

      Lifen Yang, Shozo Kinoshita, Teppei Yamada, Seiichi Kanda, Hiroshi Kitagawa, Makoto Tokunaga, Takayoshi Ishimoto, Teppei Ogura, Ryo Nagumo, Akira Miyamoto and Michihisa Koyama

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000863

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No need for nobles: The copper-based metal–organic framework material N,N′-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)dithiooxamidatocopper(II) (see picture, Cu pink, N blue, S yellow, O red, C gray, H white) is an active catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation. The performance of this noble-metal-free material is comparable to those of some reported Pt-based catalysts.

    20. Multicomponent Reactions

      Robust Generation of Lead Compounds for Protein–Protein Interactions by Computational and MCR Chemistry: p53/Hdm2 Antagonists (pages 5352–5356)

      Anna Czarna, Barbara Beck, Stuti Srivastava, Grzegorz M. Popowicz, Siglinde Wolf, Yijun Huang, Michal Bista, Tad A. Holak and Alexander Dömling

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001343

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The parallel discovery of multiple scaffolds useful to antagonize the cancer-relevant protein–protein interaction p53/Hdm2 is described. The new method is based on the tightly interwoven interplay of multicomponent reaction chemistry, structural biology, computational chemistry, and high-content NMR-based screening.

    21. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      An Isoreticular Series of Metal–Organic Frameworks with Dendritic Hexacarboxylate Ligands and Exceptionally High Gas-Uptake Capacity (pages 5357–5361)

      Daqiang Yuan, Dan Zhao, Daofeng Sun and Hong-Cai Zhou

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Holding gas: One of the isoreticular metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) that have been synthesized and characterized structurally, PCN-68 (see structure), has a Langmuir surface area of as high as 6033 m2 g−1. The MOFs also display excellent gas (H2, CH4, and CO2) adsorption capacity.

    22. Framework Materials

      Porous Metal Carboxylate Boron Imidazolate Frameworks (pages 5362–5366)

      Shoutian Zheng, Tao Wu, Jian Zhang, Mina Chow, Ruben A. Nieto, Pingyun Feng and Xianhui Bu

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001675

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A sponge for carbon: A new family of porous materials with tunable gas sorption properties has been prepared by integrating metal carboxylates and boron imidazolates under hydro- or solvothermal conditions. One hydrothermally synthesized phase exhibits very high volumetric CO2 storage capacity of 81 L L−1 (273 K, 1 atm).

    23. Aluminophosphates

      Ionothermal Synthesis of an Aluminophosphate Molecular Sieve with 20-Ring Pore Openings (pages 5367–5370)

      Ying Wei, Zhijian Tian, Hermann Gies, Renshun Xu, Huaijun Ma, Renyan Pei, Weiping Zhang, Yunpeng Xu, Lei Wang, Keda Li, Bingchun Wang, Guodong Wen and Liwu Lin

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000320

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Open for business: The first aluminophosphate molecular sieve with 20-ring pore openings has been synthesized ionothermally using a co-structure-directing agent (see figure; H white, C turquoise, N blue). The new material has a -CLO framework and excellent stability in comparison to the GaPO4 analogue cloverite. These characteristics indicate its potential applications in separation, catalysis, and gas storage.

    24. Photoresponsive Systems

      Light-Responsive Molecular Recognition and Adhesion of Vesicles (pages 5371–5374)

      Siva Krishna Mohan Nalluri and Bart Jan Ravoo

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001442

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Supramolecular glue: The photoinduced isomerization of difunctional azobenzenes can be used to induce and reverse the molecular recognition and adhesion of bilayer vesicles made up of cyclodextrin (CD) molecules. The molecular basis of this light-responsive supramolecular glue is the cistrans isomerization of the azobenzene (see picture; black circles CD, green trans-azobenzene, red cis-azobenzene).

    25. Hydroxymethylcytosine

      Quantification of the Sixth DNA Base Hydroxymethylcytosine in the Brain (pages 5375–5377)

      Martin Münzel, Daniel Globisch, Tobias Brückl, Mirko Wagner, Veronika Welzmiller, Stylianos Michalakis, Markus Müller, Martin Biel and Thomas Carell

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mind over matter: LC-MS has allowed the amount of the post-replicatively formed DNA base 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (see picture; left) to be quantified in brain tissue. The nucleoside is most abundant in areas that are associated with higher cognitive functions, and its content in mouse hippocampi seems to increase with age. The new method enables hydroxymethylcytosine to be quantified with unprecedented accuracy.

    26. Cyclopeptide Synthesis

      Cyclative Cleavage through Dipolar Cycloaddition: Polymer-Bound Azidopeptidylphosphoranes Deliver Locked cis-Triazolylcyclopeptides as Privileged Protein Binders (pages 5378–5382)

      Ahsanullah and Jörg Rademann

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904980

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Support and guidance: Azidopeptidyl phosphoranes on a solid support react very efficiently through cyclative cleavage to yield cyclopeptides with an incorporated triazole ring. The solid support is advantageous as cyclization is favored strongly over oligomerization reactions and thus only cyclized products are released.

  12. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 32/2010 (page 5387)

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090098

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION