Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 41

October 4, 2010

Volume 49, Issue 41

Pages 7359–7595

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Reversible Self-Assembly of Metal Chalcogenide/Metal Oxide Nanostructures Based on Pearson Hardness (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 41/2010) (page 7359)

      Jugal Kishore Sahoo, Dr. Muhammad Nawaz Tahir, Dr. Aswani Yella, Thomas D. Schladt, Dr. Enrico Mugnaoli, Dr. Ute Kolb and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Tremel

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004411

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The use of layered … … chalcogenide nanoparticles in composite materials was facilitated by a better binding of the nanoparticles to the chalcogenide/matrix interface. In their Communication on page 7578 ff. W. Tremel et al. present a strategy for the reversible functionalization and formation of MS2/MOx nanoparticle assemblies. This functionalization, in which the Pearson HSAB concept is tested on the nanoscale, allows kinetic and thermodynamic control of the product.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Discovery, Structure, and Anticancer Activity of an Iridium Complex of Diselenobenzoquinone (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 41/2010) (page 7360)

      Dr. Hani Amouri, Dr. Jamal Moussa, Dr. Anna K. Renfrew, Prof. Paul J. Dyson, Dr. Marie Noelle Rager and Lise-Marie Chamoreau

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003932

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first diselenobenzoquinone has been isolated as the stable complex [Cp*Ir(η4-C6H4Se2)], as confirmed by X-ray analysis. H. Amouri and co-workers also describe the anticancer activity of this complex in their Communication on page 7530 ff. The diseleno complex is cytotoxic and has activity that is comparable to that of cisplatin.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
    1. Takuzo Aida (pages 7380–7382)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004669

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “If I were not a scientist, I would be an architect or a designer. My favorite subject at school was art because art provides essentially unlimited possibilities based on one's imagination …” This and more about Takuzo Aida can be found on page 7380.

  6. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
    1. Telomeres/Telomerase

      DNA Ends: Just the Beginning (Nobel Lecture) (pages 7386–7404)

      Prof. Jack W. Szostak

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000635

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Secrets revealed: The Nobel Prize for Medicine 2009 was awarded for the solution to one of the greatest mysteries of biology: how are chromosomes copied upon cell division and protected from degradation? The answer can be found at the ends of the chromosomes—the telomeres—and in the enzyme that forms them—telomerase. The laureates describe the events leading to the discovery first-hand.

    2. Telomeres and Telomerase: The Means to the End (Nobel Lecture) (pages 7405–7421)

      Prof. Elizabeth H. Blackburn

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002387

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Secrets revealed: The Nobel Prize for Medicine 2009 was awarded for the solution to one of the greatest mysteries of biology: how are chromosomes copied upon cell division and protected from degradation? The answer can be found at the ends of the chromosomes—the telomeres—and in the enzyme that forms them—telomerase. The laureates describe the events leading to the discovery first-hand.

    3. Telomerase Discovery: The Excitement of Putting Together Pieces of the Puzzle (Nobel Lecture) (pages 7422–7439)

      Prof. Carol W. Greider

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002408

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Secrets revealed: The Nobel Prize for Medicine 2009 was awarded for the solution to one of the greatest mysteries of biology: how are chromosomes copied upon cell division and protected from degradation? The answer can be found at the ends of the chromosomes—the telomeres—and in the enzyme that forms them—telomerase. The laureates describe the events leading to the discovery first-hand.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
    1. Hydrogen Bonding

      Dispersion-Driven Hydrogen Bonding: Predicted Hydrogen Bond between Water and Platinum(II) Identified by Neutron Diffraction (pages 7440–7443)

      Dr. Silvia Rizzato, Dr. Jacqueline Bergès, Dr. Sax A. Mason, Prof. Alberto Albinati and Prof. Jiří Kozelka

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001892

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An alternative to classical? In square-planar d8 complexes the metal ion can interact with axial H2O molecules either as a Lewis acid or as a Lewis base. Ab initio calculations predicted that uncharged PtII complexes form a hydrogen-bond-like interaction with H2O, in which PtII acts as a Lewis base. Such a nonclassical O[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅Pt hydrogen bond has now been identified in crystals of trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(N-glycine)]⋅H2O by neutron diffraction.

    2. Fluorescent BN-Heterocycles

      1,2-Azaborine Cations (pages 7444–7447)

      Adam J. V. Marwitz, Jesse T. Jenkins, Dr. Lev N. Zakharov and Prof. Dr. Shih-Yuan Liu

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004084

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Positively brilliant: The first examples of 1,2-azaborine cations have been prepared and their structure and optoelectronic properties characterized (see picture). 1,2-Azaborine cations exhibit solid-state fluorescence that is distinct from their neutral all-carbon analogues, and the 1,2-azaborine moiety is a critical component for the optoelectronic properties. There is a potential for the utility of these complexes in materials applications.

    3. Single-Ion Magnets

      A Mononuclear Dysprosium Complex Featuring Single-Molecule-Magnet Behavior (pages 7448–7451)

      Shang-Da Jiang, Prof. Dr. Bing-Wu Wang, Prof. Dr. Gang Su, Prof. Dr. Zhe-Ming Wang and Prof. Dr. Song Gao

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No dates for Dy3+: With a single-ion magnet containing dysprosium, magnetic-site dilution leads to a hysteresis loop that can be detected at 0.5 and 2 K. On cooling below 8 K, the relaxation mechanism of the undiluted complex changes from a thermally activated process to quantum tunneling. The quantum tunneling can be suppressed by applying a direct-current field and by magnetic site dilution.

    4. Mechanochemistry

      Competition between Orbitals and Stress in Mechanochemistry (pages 7452–7455)

      Gurpaul S. Kochhar, Adrian Bailey and Prof. Nicholas J. Mosey

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003978

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stress test: Quantum chemical methods were used to study how subjecting molecules to mechanical stresses (see picture; Fext is an external force) can overcome the Woodward–Hoffmann (WH) rules. The results show that applied stresses do not alter the electronic structure (as is the case for irradiation) but rather render the WH rules secondary to mechanochemical factors that favor progression to the products.

    5. Doped Nanoparticles

      Direct Evidence of a Surface Quenching Effect on Size-Dependent Luminescence of Upconversion Nanoparticles (pages 7456–7460)

      Dr. Feng Wang, Juan Wang and Prof. Xiaogang Liu

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003959

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A series of Yb/Tm co-doped NaGdF4nanoparticles without or with a thin surface protection layer provide direct evidence of a surface quenching effect on size-dependent upconversion luminescence (see picture). The coating preserves the optical integrity of the nanoparticles (right-hand spectrum) and minimizes emission loss induced by surface quenching.

    6. Photoresponsive Materials

      Photoswitchable Supramolecular Hydrogels Formed by Cyclodextrins and Azobenzene Polymers (pages 7461–7464)

      Dr. Shingo Tamesue, Dr. Yoshinori Takashima, Dr. Hiroyasu Yamaguchi, Prof. Dr. Seiji Shinkai and Prof. Dr. Akira Harada

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003567

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shine a light: A supramolecular hydrogel is formed by the glucan curdlan equipped with α-cyclodextrins (CD-CUR) and azobenzene-modified poly(acrylic acid)(pAC12Azo). The sol–gel transition and the morphology of the supramolecular hydrogel can be switched by photoirradiation at the appropriate wavelength, which controls the formation of an inclusion complex between the α-cyclodextrins and the azobenzene moieties (see picture).

    7. Container Molecules

      Ion Dynamics in Confined Spaces: Sodium Ion Mobility in Icosahedral Container Molecules (pages 7465–7469)

      Maren Podewitz, Dr. Jacco D. van Beek, Dr. Michael Wörle, Dr. Timo Ott, Dr. Daniel Stein, Dr. Heinz Rüegger, Prof. Dr. Beat H. Meier, Prof. Dr. Markus Reiher and Prof. Dr. Hansjörg Grützmacher

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003441

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cage it: A central PH2 ion (see picture, magenta) is encapsulated within a container of twelve tert-butoxides (red and black) in an icosahedral arrangement. The twelve or thirteen sodium countercations are dynamically disordered over the twenty corners of a regular dodecahedron (blue). The estimated activation barriers for sodium exchange are remarkably low (10–30 kJ mol−1) and in the range of fast Li+ ion conductors.

    8. Modified RNA Derivatives

      Efficient Access to Nonhydrolyzable Initiator tRNA Based on the Synthesis of 3′-Azido-3′-Deoxyadenosine RNA (pages 7470–7472)

      Jessica Steger, Dagmar Graber, Dr. Holger Moroder, Anna-Skrollan Geiermann, Michaela Aigner and Prof. Dr. Ronald Micura

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003424

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexibility exercised: Hydrolysis-resistant 3′-aminoacyl-tRNA conjugates that contain a stable amide linkage instead of the natural ester are valuable substrates for biochemical studies of ribosomal processes. In a novel preparation of the stable E. coli initiator tRNA derivative 3′-(N-formylmethionyl)amino-tRNAfMet the key feature is the synthesis of 3′-azido oligoribonucleotides using a new functionalized solid support.

    9. Protein Sensing

      Azidohomoalanine: A Conformationally Sensitive IR Probe of Protein Folding, Protein Structure, and Electrostatics (pages 7473–7475)

      Humeyra Taskent-Sezgin, Juah Chung, Partha S. Banerjee, Dr. Sureshbabu Nagarajan, Prof. R. Brian Dyer, Prof. Isaac Carrico and Prof. Daniel P. Raleigh

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003325

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly sensitive: The azido analogue of methionine, azidohomoalanine (see picture), is shown to be a sensitive IR probe of protein structure, folding, and electrostatics, as demonstrated for ribosomal protein NTL9. It can be readily incorporated in to proteins, and the azido frequency is significantly blue-shifted in the thermally unfolded state.

    10. Natural Products

      An Unusual Galactofuranose Lipopolysaccharide That Ensures the Intracellular Survival of Toxin-Producing Bacteria in Their Fungal Host (pages 7476–7480)

      Dr. Maria R. Leone, Dipl.-Biochem. Gerald Lackner, Prof. Dr. Alba Silipo, Prof. Dr. Rosa Lanzetta, Prof. Dr. Antonio Molinaro and Prof. Dr. Christian Hertweck

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003301

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dress code for living in a fungus: Analysis of the carbohydrate coating of the toxin-producing endobacterium of the phytopathogenic fungus Rhizopus microsporus revealed an unprecedented lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure, which is important for infection and colonization of the fungal host. A mutant lacking the unusual [[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]2)-β-D-galactofuranose-(1[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]]n O antigen (red in the schematic illustration) was incapable of forming a stable symbiosis with the fungus.

    11. Polymerases

      Selective Modulation of DNA Polymerase Activity by Fixed-Conformation Nucleoside Analogues (pages 7481–7485)

      Dr. Robert L. Eoff, Dr. Colleen E. McGrath, Dr. Leena Maddukuri, Dr. S. Giovanna Salamanca-Pinzón, Dr. Victor E. Marquez, Prof. Lawrence J. Marnett, Prof. F. Peter Guengerich and Prof. Martin Egli

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003168

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Picking a pucker! Fixed-conformation North (N)- and South (S)-methanocarba-2′-deoxyadenosine-triphosphate (MC-dATP) have different effects in DNA strand extension catalyzed by HIV-1 RT and three human Y-family DNA polymerases (pols). All of the polymerases tested preferred the N-oriented furanose geometry, though pol η could insert both pucker mimics. The growth of malignant breast cancer cells overexpressing pol ι was more severely inhibited by N-MC-dATP than that of nonmalignant breast cells.

    12. Conjugated Polymers

      Fluorous Biphase Synthesis of a Poly(p-phenyleneethynylene) and its Fluorescent Aqueous Fluorous-Phase Emulsion (pages 7486–7488)

      Jeewoo Lim and Prof. Dr. Timothy M. Swager

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It's just a phase: A highly fluorinated compound with a rigid three-dimensional architecture was synthesized as a monomer for poly(p-phenyleneethynylene)s (PPEs). Fluorous biphase reactions were applied for the synthesis of a PPE that is soluble only in fluorous solvents. A fluorous solution of the polymer could be processed into aqueous emulsions that display high fluorescence quantum yields (see picture).

    13. Supramolecular Catalysis

      Catalytic Hydrogenation of Norbornadiene by a Rhodium Complex in a Self-Folding Cavitand (pages 7489–7492)

      Dr. Maria Angeles Sarmentero, Dr. Héctor Fernández-Pérez, Dr. Erik Zuidema, Dr. Carles Bo, Prof. Anton Vidal-Ferran and Prof. Pablo Ballester

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It's a wrap! The inclusion of [Rh(nbd)2]BF4 (nbd=norbornadiene) in a deep-cavity cavitand produces a catalytically active species that promotes the hydrogenation of norbornadiene to norbornene (see picture). The structure of the cavitand acts as a second-sphere ligand and modifies the stability, selectivity, and reactivity observed for the free organometallic complex in solution.

    14. Imaging Methods

      Scanning Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Quantitative Molecular Imaging (pages 7493–7496)

      Dr. Li Yao, Andrew C. Jamison and Prof. Shoujun Xu

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002830

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Quantitative molecular imaging: Labeled magnetic nanoparticles serve as molecular probes that bind to specific antibody molecules. The magnetic field of the bound particles is detected using scanning magnetic imaging with an optical atomic magnetometer based on the magnetooptical property of alkali metals. The magnetization, and thus the number of the antibody-bound magnetic nanoparticles, and the corresponding two-dimensional spatial information are obtained simultaneously.

    15. Imaging Agents

      A Fluorescent Rosamine Compound Selectively Stains Pluripotent Stem Cells (pages 7497–7500)

      Dr. Chang-Nim Im, Dr. Nam-Young Kang, Dr. Hyung-Ho Ha, Dr. Xuezhi Bi, Dr. Jae Jung Lee, Dr. Sung-Jin Park, Dr. Sang Yeon Lee, Dr. Marc Vendrell, Dr. Yun Kyung Kim, Dr. Jun-Seok Lee, Dr. Jun Li, Dr. Young-Hoon Ahn, Dr. Bo Feng, Dr. Huck-Hui Ng, Dr. Seong-Wook Yun and Prof. Dr. Young-Tae Chang

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002463

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cell-by date: The fluorescent compound CDy1 selectively stains embryonic stem cells (see scheme). CDy1 was used to identify fibroblasts undergoing reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells prior to the expression of green fluorescent protein under the control of the Oct4 promoter.

    16. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Flexibility in a Metal–Organic Framework Material Controlled by Weak Dispersion Forces: The Bistability of MIL-53(Al) (pages 7501–7503)

      Dr. Andrew M. Walker, Dr. Bartolomeo Civalleri, Dr. Ben Slater, Dr. Caroline Mellot-Draznieks, Dr. Furio Corà, Prof. Claudio M. Zicovich-Wilson, Guillermo Román-Pérez, Prof. José M. Soler and Prof. Julian D. Gale

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002413

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Breathtaking MOFs: DFT calculations reveal that the exceptional, thermally induced density change of the metal–organic framework MIL53(Al) is controlled by a competition between short- and long-range interactions and entropic factors. As shown in the picture (C green, Al cyan, O red, H white), dispersive interactions between the phenyl rings are responsible for stabilizing a narrow-pore form at low temperature. At 325–375 K, vibrational entropy causes the structure to expand markedly, permitting large volumes of light gases to be adsorbed.

    17. Drug Binding

      Interaction of Epothilone B (Patupilone) with Microtubules as Detected by Two-Dimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy (pages 7504–7507)

      Dr. Ashutosh Kumar, Prof. Henrike Heise, Dr. Marcel J. J. Blommers, Dr. Philipp Krastel, Dr. Esther Schmitt, Dr. Frank Petersen, Dr. Siva Jeganathan, Dr. Eva-Maria Mandelkow, Dr. Teresa Carlomagno, Prof. Christian Griesinger and Prof. Marc Baldus

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001946

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solid evidence: Induction of the polymerization of αβ-tubulin dimers into microtubules by epothilones, such as patupilone, by an as yet unknown mechanism leads to the apoptosis of cancer cells. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of patupilone bound to microtubules has now enabled the identification of atomic positions of the drug that undergo clear chemical-shift changes upon binding (see correlation spectra of free (black) and complexed patupilone (red)).

    18. Enzyme Mimics

      The Third Hydrogenase: A Ferracyclic Carbamoyl with Close Structural Analogy to the Active Site of Hmd (pages 7508–7511)

      Peter J. Turrell, Dr. Joseph A. Wright, Jamie N. T. Peck, Dr. Vasily S. Oganesyan and Prof. Dr. Christopher J. Pickett

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004189

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Natural model: The synthesis of a close structural analogue of the active site of [Fe]-hydrogenase is described (see structure; C gray, H dark blue, Fe green, N light blue, O red, S yellow). Nature most probably constructs the five membered ferracyclic ring to poise the 2-hydroxy pyridine substituent in a position to assist the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and the accessibility of the analogue should now provide opportunities for probing this.

    19. Enzyme Models

      [Fe]-Hydrogenase Models Featuring Acylmethylpyridinyl Ligands (pages 7512–7515)

      Dr. Dafa Chen, Dr. Rosario Scopelliti and Prof. Dr. Xile Hu

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004579

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Where is my iron? The synthesis, structure, and reactivity of small-molecule models of [Fe]-hydrogenase are described. These models feature the intriguing acylmethylpyridinyl ligands found exclusively in the enzyme.

    20. Photolytic Activation of P4

      Photochemical Incorporation of Diphosphorus Units into Organic Molecules (pages 7516–7518)

      Daniel Tofan and Prof. Christopher C. Cummins

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004385

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      From P4to organic diphosphanes in a single operation: Photolysis of solutions containing P4 and readily available 1,3-dienes produces bicyclic organic diphosphanes, in a one-step, metal-free protocol. Use of 2,3-dimethylbutadiene or 1,3-butadiene (see drawing) allowed the isolation and solid-state structural characterization of the diphosphane products P2(C6H10)2 and P2(C4H6)2.

    21. C[BOND]F Activation

      C[BOND]F Activation of Fluorobenzene by Silylium Carboranes: Evidence for Incipient Phenyl Cation Reactivity (pages 7519–7522)

      Simon Duttwyler, Dr. Christos Douvris, Prof. Dr. Nathanael L. P. Fackler, Fook S. Tham, Prof. Christopher A. Reed, Prof. Dr. Kim K. Baldridge and Prof. Dr. Jay S. Siegel

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003762

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Si(mply) rips it apart: C[BOND]F activation of fluorobenzene has been achieved using the extremely strong silyl Lewis acids [Et3Si(X)]+ (X=PhF or Et3SiH) and [(2,6-dixylyl-C6H3)SiMe2]+ paired with the anion CHB11Cl11. They abstract fluoride from unactivated fluorobenzene to give arylated products, consistent with phenyl-cation-like reactivity (see scheme).

    22. Keto–Enol Kinetics

      Carboxylic Acid Catalyzed Keto-Enol Tautomerizations in the Gas Phase (pages 7523–7525)

      Dr. Gabriel da Silva

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003530

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Long live the ketone! Carboxylic acids are shown to directly participate in gas-phase keto–enol tautomerizations that occur through a novel chemically activated double-hydrogen-shift (DHS) mechanism. This mechanism decreases the reaction barrier by an order of magnitude, and is predicted to reduce the lifetimes of the atmospheric enol forms to approximately one hour.

    23. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Using Pressure to Provoke the Structural Transition of Metal–Organic Frameworks (pages 7526–7529)

      Dr. Isabelle Beurroies, Mohammed Boulhout, Dr. Philip L. Llewellyn, Prof. Bogdan Kuchta, Prof. Gérard Férey, Dr. Christian Serre and Dr. Renaud Denoyel

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Performance under pressure: Hysteresis of intrusion–extrusion of mercury observed in MIL-53(Cr) particles is interpreted as the transition from large-pore to narrow-pore forms of this metal–organic framework (MOF) material, provoked by the isostatic pressure created by mercury around the porous particles. The observed behavior may be qualitatively explained by a simple energetic model and opens possibilities for applications as dampers or molecular springs.

    24. Quinone Complexes

      Discovery, Structure, and Anticancer Activity of an Iridium Complex of Diselenobenzoquinone (pages 7530–7533)

      Dr. Hani Amouri, Dr. Jamal Moussa, Dr. Anna K. Renfrew, Prof. Paul J. Dyson, Dr. Marie Noelle Rager and Lise-Marie Chamoreau

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002532

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Caught in the act: The first stable η4-diseleno-p-benzoquinone complex, [Cp*Ir(η4-C6H4Se2)], has been isolated. The X-ray structure (see picture; Ir magenta, Se yellow) confirms the coordination of the elusive diselenobenzoquinone intermediate. The anticancer activity of this complex was compared to related oxygen and sulfur analogues; only the diseleno complex was cytotoxic, having a comparable activity to cisplatin.

    25. Cycloaddition Reactions

      [4+2] Cycloaddition Reaction of Cyclic Alkyne–{Co2(CO)6} Complexes with Dienes (pages 7534–7537)

      Prof. Dr. Nobuharu Iwasawa, Isao Ooi, Dr. Kennichi Inaba and Dr. Jun Takaya

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002683

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A general protocol for the title transformation has been achieved and is applicable to a wide range of acyclic 1,3-dienes and cyclic alkyne—{Co2(CO)6} complexes leading to various types of benzannulated medium-sized cyclic compounds after oxidative work up (see scheme; DDQ=2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone). Interestingly, the [4+2] cycloaddition proceeded preferentially over the Pauson–Khand reaction.

    26. Buckybowls

      The Bicorannulenyl Dianion: A Charged Overcrowded Ethylene (pages 7538–7542)

      David Eisenberg, Dr. Edward A. Jackson, Jennifer M. Quimby, Prof. Dr. Lawrence T. Scott and Dr. Roy Shenhar

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002515

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Super bowl: Bicorannulenyl, a large biaryl composed of two corannulene bowls, effectively becomes an overcrowded ethylene upon reduction to form a dianion (see picture). DFT calculations and NMR spectroscopic experiments reveal the double-bond character of the connection between the two bowls. Three stable diastereomers that interconvert through bowl inversions and central bond rotations were shown to exist.

    27. Microreactors

      Cross-Coupling in a Flow Microreactor: Space Integration of Lithiation and Murahashi Coupling (pages 7543–7547)

      Dr. Aiichiro Nagaki, Akira Kenmoku, Yuya Moriwaki, Atsushi Hayashi and Prof. Jun-ichi Yoshida

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002763

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going with the flow: The use of palladium catalysts bearing a carbene ligand resulted in a faster Murahashi coupling, and enabled its integration with the Br–Li exchange of ArBr with BuLi in a microreactor (see picture). This system allows the cross-coupling of two different aryl bromides within a minute without necessitating low temperatures (−78°C).

    28. Transfer Hydrogenation

      A Versatile Catalyst for Reductive Amination by Transfer Hydrogenation (pages 7548–7552)

      Chao Wang, Dr. Alan Pettman, Dr. John Bacsa and Prof. Jianliang Xiao

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002944

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An iridium catalyst enables the reductive amination of carbonyl groups with unprecedented substrate scope, selectivity, and activity using formic acid as the hydrogen source (see scheme). The catalyst system provides significant improvement over commonly used boron hydrides.

    29. Silyl Compounds

      Chemoselective Catalytic Hydrosilylation of Nitriles (pages 7553–7556)

      Dipl.-Chem. Dmitry V. Gutsulyak and Dr. Georgii I. Nikonov

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Well-behaved: The ruthenium complex [Cp(iPr3P)Ru(NCCH3)2]+ (Cp=cyclopentadienyl) catalyzes monohydrosilylation of nitriles (see scheme) with unprecedented tolerance of most common functional groups. The catalyst is easily synthesized starting from commercially available compounds, is air-stable, recyclable, and works under solvent-free conditions.

    30. Magnetic Materials

      Facile Synthesis of Copper(II)Immobilized on Magnetic Mesoporous Silica Microspheres for Selective Enrichment of Peptides for Mass Spectrometry Analysis (pages 7557–7561)

      Shasha Liu, Hemei Chen, Xiaohui Lu, Prof. Chunhui Deng, Prof. Xiangmin Zhang and Prof. Pengyuan Yang

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003602

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Captivating pores: Copper ions were immobilized on mesoporous silica shells with perpendicularly aligned pore channels, formed on Fe3O4 cores through a surfactant-templated sol–gel process. The highly accessible mesopores, large in-pore surface, and numerous Cu2+ ions on the microspheres allowed selective capture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic peptides from complex biosamples followed by magnetic separation and MS analysis (see picture).

    31. Asymmetric Synthesis

      Catalytic Asymmetric Direct Henry Reaction of Ynals: Short Syntheses of (2S,3R)-(+)-Xestoaminol C and (−)-Codonopsinines (pages 7562–7565)

      Dr. Daisuke Uraguchi, Shinji Nakamura and Prof. Dr. Takashi Ooi

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004072

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Triple for all: Various optically active anti-β-nitro propargylic alcohols are synthesized by the catalytic stereoselective addition of nitroalkanes to ynals (the direct Henry reaction of ynals). The utilization of the rich chemistry of carbon–carbon triple bond allows rapid access to three natural products.

    32. Square-Planar RuII

      A Square-Planar Ruthenium(II) Complex with a Low-Spin Configuration (pages 7566–7569)

      Bjorn Askevold, Dr. Marat M. Khusniyarov, Dr. Eberhardt Herdtweck, Prof. Dr. Karsten Meyer and Dr. Sven Schneider

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ground-about: The ruthenium(II) complex [RuCl{N(CH2CH2PtBu2)2}] (B) is obtained in high yield by the reaction of [RuCl2{HN(CH2CH2PtBu2)2}] (A) with KOtBu. Complex B exhibits an unusual electronic low-spin (S=0) ground-state configuration. Comparison with Caulton's [RuCl{N(SiMe2CH2PtBu2)2}] (ground state: S=1) shows that the ground-state spin multiplicity in these complexes is controlled by the N[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]Ru π-donor strength.

    33. Molecular Rulers

      A Quantum-Dot-Based Molecular Ruler for Multiplexed Optical Analysis (pages 7570–7574)

      Dipl.-Chem. Frank Morgner, Dipl.-Chem. Daniel Geißler, Dr. Stefan Stufler, Dr. Nathaniel G. Butlin, Prof. Dr. Hans-Gerd Löhmannsröben and Dr. Niko Hildebrandt

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002943

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoshapes and sizes: A time-resolved multicolor optical analysis of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a luminescent terbium complex to different semiconductor quantum dots allows the rapid and accurate measurement of the size and shape of different functionalized quantum dots under physiological conditions. This spectroscopic ruler opens the possibility of a simultaneous analysis of different biological processes at sub-nanomolar concentrations.

    34. Bi–N Heterocycles

      Dichlorocyclodibismadiazane (pages 7575–7577)

      Dr. Dirk Michalik, Prof. Dr. Axel Schulz and Dr. Alexander Villinger

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003860

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Labile but stable: Despite a labile Bi[BOND]N bond, the first example of a dichlorocycldibismadiazane (see picture) is prepared by treatment of terphenyl[BOND]N(H)BiCl2 with the base DBU. The product only decomposes above 205 °C and is stable under argon at room temperature in the solid state and in benzene solution. The background shows the electrostatic potential mapped onto the electron density of the molecule.

    35. Surface Functionalization

      Reversible Self-Assembly of Metal Chalcogenide/Metal Oxide Nanostructures Based on Pearson Hardness (pages 7578–7582)

      Jugal Kishore Sahoo, Dr. Muhammad Nawaz Tahir, Dr. Aswani Yella, Thomas D. Schladt, Dr. Enrico Mugnaoli, Dr. Ute Kolb and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Tremel

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000774

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Softly, softly: A novel modification strategy for layered chalcogenide nanoparticles (NPs) takes advantage of the chalcophilic affinity of Mn2+. Surface-bound MnO NPs can be selectively bound to the surface of WS2 nanotubes and functionalized with the fluorescent dopamine derivative NBD at room temperature. The MnO NPs can also be reversibly detached from the chalcogenide surface with excess dopamine at elevated temperatures.

    36. Single-Molecule Magnets

      An Octanuclear [CrIII4DyIII4] 3d–4f Single-Molecule Magnet (pages 7583–7587)

      Julia Rinck, Dr. Ghenadie Novitchi, Willem Van den Heuvel, Liviu Ungur, Dr. Yanhua Lan, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Wernsdorfer, Dr. Christopher E. Anson, Prof. Dr. Liviu F. Chibotaru and Prof. Dr. Annie K. Powell

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002690

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “Square-within-a-square”: The first Cr–Dy single-molecule magnet (SMM) with an energy barrier to spin reorientation of 15 K is presented. The anisotropy in this octanuclear compound arises from the orientations of the four DyIII centers (dark blue), which, in conjunction with the contributions from the CrIII centers (green), leads to the SMM behavior.

    37. Natural Products

      Total Synthesis of the Marine Antibiotic Pestalone and its Surprisingly Facile Conversion into Pestalalactone and Pestalachloride A (pages 7588–7591)

      Nikolay Slavov, Dr. Ján Cvengroš, Dr. Jörg-Martin Neudörfl and Prof. Dr. Hans-Günther Schmalz

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003755

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surprise, surprise! The total synthesis of the marine natural product pestalone (1), a highly substituted benzophenone with strong antibiotic acitivity, has provided insight into the surprising tendency of this and related molecules to undergo intramolecular Cannizzaro–Tishchenko-type reactions. Pestalone can be readily converted into pestalachloride A, a strongly antifungal metabolite isolated from an endophytic fungus, by simple treatment with ammonia at pH 8.

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Obituary
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION