Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 5

January 25, 2010

Volume 49, Issue 5

Pages 821–987

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Methane Activation and Catalytic Ethylene Formation on Free Au2+ (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 5/2010) (page 821)

      Sandra M. Lang, Thorsten M. Bernhardt, Robert N. Barnett and Uzi Landman

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906854

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      Cooperation is the key in the gas-phase formation of ethene by gold-dimer cations. As the cycle in the cover picture shows, two methane molecules are required to initiate the dehydrogenation step. A third methane molecule then cooperatively triggers the release of ethylene. The background shows submarine methane evolution, which represents an important geological methane source. In their Communication on page 980 ff. T. M. Bernhardt, U. Landman, and co-workers present the results of their combined gas-phase and theoretical investigation.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Paper Spray for Direct Analysis of Complex Mixtures Using Mass Spectrometry (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 5/2010) (page 822)

      He Wang, Jiangjiang Liu, R. Graham Cooks and Zheng Ouyang

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907225

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      Wet filter paper is central to a powerful new method of mass spectrometry presented by G. Cooks, Z. Ouyang et al. in their Communication on p. 877 ff. Samples can be preloaded onto the paper, added from solution, or transferred from surfaces using the paper as a wipe. Potential applications lie in quantitative analysis of whole blood from finger pricks or in surface wipe-and-analyze experiments for security applications, and in in situ analysis.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Frank Glorius (page 842)

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905299

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      “In a nutshell, my research involves the development of innovative and powerful catalytic methods for the improvement of organic synthesis. If I wasn't a scientist, I would be unhappy …” This and more about Frank Glorius can be found on page 842.

  6. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Metal Amide Chemistry. By Michael F. Lappert, Andrey V. Protchenko, Philip P. Power, and Alexandra L. Seeber. (page 843)

      Reiner Anwander

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905766

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      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2008. 370 pp., hardcover € 109.00.—ISBN 978-0470721841

    2. Metal Complex–DNA Interactions. Edited by Nick Hadjiliadis and Einar Sletten. (pages 844–845)

      Jens Müller

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906042

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2009. 544 pp., hardcover € 125.00.—ISBN 978-1405176293

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
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    1. Organocatalysis

      Enantiodivergent Organocascade Reactions (pages 846–849)

      Bernhard Westermann, Muhammad Ayaz and Sander S. van Berkel

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904638

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      Synchronizing organocatalysis! By targeting structural and stereochemical complexity with organocascade reactions, distinct catalysts can form molecular frameworks in an enantiodivergent way. This goal was elegantly achieved for the asymmetric synthesis of quaternary carbon centers by two complementary routes employing cascades of either enamine or iminium catalysis (see scheme; En=enamine activation, Im=iminium activation).

    2. Methane Activation

      Activation of Methane by Gaseous Metal Ions (pages 850–851)

      Detlef Schröder

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906518

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      Cold methane coupling: Recent experiments with trapped Au2+ clusters reveal a catalytic cycle for the dehydrogenative C–C coupling of methane to give ethene at temperatures between 200 and 300 K (see scheme). The key novelty of the work is the explicit exploration of the multicollisional regime, which represents an important step to bridge the pressure gap between model studies and real catalysis.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Single Molecules

      Single Molecules as Optical Nanoprobes for Soft and Complex Matter (pages 854–866)

      Florian Kulzer, Ted Xia and Michel Orrit

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904858

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      Hit singles: Single-molecule optical approaches have opened a new way of exploring the properties of materials on nanometer scales. For example, a confocal image of perylenediimide, an organic dye molecule, in a thin film of supercooled glycerol reveals a spatially dynamical heterogeneity (see picture). This Review highlights the recent main uses of the single molecules in studies of condensed matter, in particular soft and complex matter.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. Surface Patterning

      Self-Assembly of Rodlike Bio-nanoparticles in Capillary Tubes (pages 868–872)

      Yuan Lin, Elizabeth Balizan, L. Andrew Lee, Zhongwei Niu and Qian Wang

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904993

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      All lined up: Diverse patterns result from drying a solution of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) particles in a glass capillary tube (see AFM images). The hierarchical assembled structure can be controlled by the particle concentration, the drying process, and the surface properties of the interior surface of the tube. The internally patterned tube can potentially be applied to directing the orientation of rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    2. Imaging Mass Spectrometry

      Three-Dimensional Vizualization of Mouse Brain by Lipid Analysis Using Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry (pages 873–876)

      Livia S. Eberlin, Demian R. Ifa, Chunping Wu and R. Graham Cooks

      Version of Record online: 29 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906283

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      Imaging, not imagination: Three-dimensional (3D) images can be constructed from a set of 2D data acquired by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry. The 3D images show the spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in substructures of the mouse brain (see picture).

    3. Mass Spectrometry

      Paper Spray for Direct Analysis of Complex Mixtures Using Mass Spectrometry (pages 877–880)

      He Wang, Jiangjiang Liu, R. Graham Cooks and Zheng Ouyang

      Version of Record online: 4 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906314

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      Complex mixtures can be ionized directly from paper for quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of trace components. Prior separations are an option.

    4. Total Synthesis

      Total Synthesis and Absolute Configuration of Macrocidin A, a Cyclophane Tetramic Acid Natural Product (pages 881–885)

      Tomohiro Yoshinari, Ken Ohmori, Marcus G. Schrems, Andreas Pfaltz and Keisuke Suzuki

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906362

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      Stereocontrolled access to the cyclophane framework of macrocidin A has been achieved for the first time. The key steps include the iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation without fission of the C[BOND]I bond, the macrolactam formation by intramolecular ketene trapping, and the Lacey–Dieckmann cyclization for the construction of the tetramic acid ring.

    5. Fullerenes

      Isolation of a Small Carbon Nanotube: The Surprising Appearance of D5h(1)-C90 (pages 886–890)

      Hua Yang, Christine M. Beavers, Zhimin Wang, An Jiang, Ziyang Liu, Hongxiao Jin, Brandon Q. Mercado, Marilyn M. Olmstead and Alan L. Balch

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906023

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      Totally tubular: The previously undetected higher fullerene D5h(1)-C90 (see structure) was isolated as the major C90 isomer produced from Sm2O3-doped graphite rods and identified structurally by X-ray crystallography.

    6. Color Vision

      An FTIR Study of Monkey Green- and Red-Sensitive Visual Pigments (pages 891–894)

      Kota Katayama, Yuji Furutani, Hiroo Imai and Hideki Kandori

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903837

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      Seeing red (and green): The first structural insight into the color tuning of color visual pigments is obtained by light-induced FTIR studies of monkey green and red retinal pigments in D2O. Their FTIR spectra are similar to those of rhodopsin in the low-frequency region but entirely different in the X[BOND]H and X[BOND]D stretching regions, providing insights into the chromophore–protein interactions in color pigments.

    7. Protein Dimerization

      Protein Dimerization Induced by Supramolecular Interactions with Cucurbit[8]uril (pages 895–898)

      Hoang D. Nguyen, Dung T. Dang, Joost L. J. van Dongen and Luc Brunsveld

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904413

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      Hosted dimerization: Proteins such as yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) with an N-terminal FGG peptide motif form dimers mediated by supramolecular interactions with cucurbit[8]uril (see scheme). The protein dimerization, which is observed by FRET and size-exclusion chromatography, can be reversed with methyl viologen as a bioorthogonal ligand, which displaces the FGG motifs from the cucurbit[8]uril host.

    8. Microreactor Networks

      Multistep Microchemical Synthesis Enabled by Microfluidic Distillation (pages 899–903)

      Ryan L. Hartman, John R. Naber, Stephen L. Buchwald and Klavs F. Jensen

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904634

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      Microchemical solvent switch: A continuous-flow, multistep Heck synthesis was made possible by integrating microreactors, liquid–liquid extraction, and microfluidic distillation. The microfluidic distillation enabled solvent exchange from CH2Cl2 in the first reaction step to N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the final reaction step.

    9. Nitric Oxide

      A Three-Coordinate Copper(II) Amide from Reductive Cleavage of a Nitrosamine (pages 904–907)

      Marie M. Melzer, Susanne Mossin, Xuliang Dai, Ashley M. Bartell, Pooja Kapoor, Karsten Meyer and Timothy H. Warren

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905171

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      A NO-velty: A copper(I) β-diketiminate activates the nitrosamine Ph2NNO to give a rare, three-coordinate copper(II) amide, [(Me2NN)Cu[BOND]NPh2]. Reaction of this amide with NOgas returns Ph2NNO as well as a mixed-valence species with NO-functionalized β-diketiminate ligands (see scheme; Cu light blue, N dark blue, O red). Thus, both the cleavage and formation of R2N[BOND]NO bonds may take place at a common copper center.

    10. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      High-Resolution Single-Turnover Mapping Reveals Intraparticle Diffusion Limitation in Ti-MCM-41-Catalyzed Epoxidation (pages 908–911)

      Gert De Cremer, Maarten B. J. Roeffaers, Evelyne Bartholomeeusen, Kaifeng Lin, Peter Dedecker, Paolo P. Pescarmona, Pierre A. Jacobs, Dirk E. De Vos, Johan Hofkens and Bert F. Sels

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905039

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      Shedding light on catalysis: For the first time, transport phenomena and their influence on catalysis are directly observed for individual catalytic particles by single-turnover mapping using high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. The Thiele modulus could be measured with just one experiment, proving the existence of diffusional limitations for the Ti-MCM-41 catalyzed epoxidation of a fluorescent reporter molecule (see picture; TBHP=tert-butylhydroperoxide).

    11. N-Heterocyclic Carbenes

      Anion-Exchange-Triggered 1,3-Shift of an NH Proton to Iridium in Protic N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: Hydrogen-Bonding and Ion-Pairing Effects (pages 912–917)

      Guoyong Song, Yan Su, Roy A. Periana, Robert H. Crabtree, Keli Han, Hongjie Zhang and Xingwei Li

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905691

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      Proton release: A series of five-coordinate iridium(I) phosphine complexes with protic N-heterocyclic carbene ligands have been prepared which display N[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅Cl hydrogen bonding (see scheme; cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene). Exchange of the chloride for less coordinating anions triggers the reversible 1,3-shift of the NH proton to the iridium, which is thought to proceed by a novel water-assisted proton-relay mechanism.

    12. Reaction Intermediates

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      Ruthenium Bis(σ-B[BOND]H) Aminoborane Complexes from Dehydrogenation of Amine–Boranes: Trapping of H2B[BOND]NH2 (pages 918–920)

      Gilles Alcaraz, Laure Vendier, Eric Clot and Sylviane Sabo-Etienne

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905970

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      One small step for ammonia–borane: The simplest elementary aminoborane compound H2BNH2, which results from dehydrogenation of ammonia–borane, has been trapped by a ruthenium complex fragment leading to the isolation of a bis(σ-B[BOND]H) aminoborane complex. The analogous H2BNHMe and H2BNMe2 complexes were also prepared. (Picture: ruthenium complex; Ru purple, P orange, N blue, B brown, H white.)

    13. Aminoborane Complexes

      Rhodium and Iridium Aminoborane Complexes: Coordination Chemistry of BN Alkene Analogues (pages 921–925)

      Christina Y. Tang, Amber L. Thompson and Simon Aldridge

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906171

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      Side-on or end-on? Rhodium and iridium complexes featuring aminoboranes (R2N[DOUBLE BOND]BH2) as ligands have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Crystallographic measurements show that the ligands—in contrast to isoelectronic alkene donors—bind in an end-on fashion through a bis(σ-borane) binding motif (see structure).

    14. Noncovalent Interactions

      Halogen Bonding: A Supramolecular Entry for Assembling Nanoparticles (pages 926–929)

      Tanya Shirman, Talmon Arad and Milko E. van der Boom

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905984

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      A new glue: Supramolecular assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, see picture) mediated by halogen bonding interactions is demonstrated. The primary time-dependent assembly of functionalized AuNPs controls the inner structure, whereas the appearance of the overall hybrid structures can be engineered by varying the concentration of the organic linker.

    15. Heterocycles

      Carbonyl Imines from Oxaziridines: Generation and Cycloaddition of N[BOND]O[DOUBLE BOND]C Dipoles (pages 930–934)

      Katherine M. Partridge, Ilia A. Guzei and Tehshik P. Yoon

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905801

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      Dipoles apart: Unusual 1,3-dipolar carbonyl imines are generated in the presence of a bulky scandium(III) catalyst by undergoing a Lewis acid catalyzed rearrangement of N-sulfonyl oxaziridines. The 1,3-dipolar carbonyl imines then undergo subsequent cycloaddition with a variety of dipolarophiles. tmbox=2,2′-isopropylidenebis(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline).

    16. Expanded Genetic Code

      Genetically Encoded Alkenes in Yeast (pages 935–937)

      Hui-wang Ai, Weijun Shen, Eric Brustad and Peter G. Schultz

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905590

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      Olefin-containing amino acids have been genetically introduced into proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs. These nonnatural amino acids can be used for selective protein modification through olefin metathesis reactions.

    17. Iron Catalysis

      Iron-Catalyzed Cyclopropanation with Trifluoroethylamine Hydrochloride and Olefins in Aqueous Media: In Situ Generation of Trifluoromethyl Diazomethane (pages 938–941)

      Bill Morandi and Erick M. Carreira

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905573

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      Let's avoid the risk! The title transformation has been developed for the synthesis of trifluoromethyl-substituted cyclopropane derivatives (see scheme). It avoids the preparation of trifluoromethyl diazomethane and merges a number of areas: water as a reaction medium, iron catalysis, and access to reactive intermediates under operationally safe conditions.

    18. Gold Catalysis

      Serendipitous Discovery of the Catalytic Hydroammoniumation and Methylamination of Alkynes (pages 942–945)

      Xiaoming Zeng, Rei Kinjo, Bruno Donnadieu and Guy Bertrand

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905341

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      The gold rush: A cationic gold(I) complex, supported by a CAAC ligand, promotes the intramolecular addition of N[BOND]H or N[BOND]Me bonds (from ammonium salts or tertiary amines, respectively) to carbon–carbon triple bonds; the same complex allows for the isolation of vinylgold intermediates. X=(C6F5)4B. CAAC=cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene.

    19. Electrostatics

      Contact Electrification between Identical Materials (pages 946–949)

      Mario M. Apodaca, Paul J. Wesson, Kyle J. M. Bishop, Mark A. Ratner and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905281

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      Ch-ch-ch-charges: Pieces of identical, atomically flat insulators separate a charge Q when brought into contact and then parted. Repeated contacts cause the magnitudes of the separated charges to increase monotonically (see picture). A theoretical model is presented that explains these phenomena by the inherent, molecular-scale fluctuations in the composition of the seemingly identical contacting surfaces.

    20. Spin-Crossover Complexes

      Temperature-Induced Spin-Transition in a Low-Spin Cobalt(II) Semiquinonate Complex (pages 950–953)

      Michèle Graf, Gotthelf Wolmershäuser, Harald Kelm, Serhiy Demeschko, Franc Meyer and Hans-Jörg Krüger

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903789

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      A new aspect of cobalt dioxolene chemistry: The preparation and characterization of the first low-spin cobalt(II) semiquinonate complex is described. The temperature-induced change of the spin state in this cobalt dioxolene complex (see scheme) is linked to a spin-crossover process rather than to valence tautomerism.

    21. Organometallic Wires

      Linear Trimer of Diruthenium Linked by Butadiyn-Diyl Units: A Unique Electronic Wire (pages 954–957)

      Jie-Wen Ying, Isiah Po-Chun Liu, Bin Xi, You Song, Charles Campana, Jing-Lin Zuo and Tong Ren

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904674

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      Ru communicating? Butadiyn-diyl bridges link three Ru2 moieties together to give a molecular wire (see structure, red Ru, green C, blue N, purple O). Voltammetric, spectroscopic, and magnetic data all point to extensive electronic delocalization across the linear trimer.

    22. C[BOND]H Activation

      Total Synthesis of Celogentin C by Stereoselective C[BOND]H Activation (pages 958–961)

      Yiqing Feng and Gong Chen

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905134

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      A total gent: Inspired by the biosynthesis of celogentin C, a highly stereoselective and efficient palladium-catalyzed C[BOND]H functionalization strategy is employed to construct the key Leu-Trp linkage of this bicyclic compound. A streamlined synthesis is completed in 23 steps from simple amino acid building blocks.

    23. Fullerenes

      Addition of Carbene to the Equator of C70 To Produce the Most Stable C71H2 Isomer: 2 aH-2(12)a-Homo(C70-D5h(6))[5,6]fullerene (pages 962–966)

      Bao Li, Chunying Shu, Xin Lu, Lothar Dunsch, Zhongfang Chen, T. John S. Dennis, Zhiqiang Shi, Li Jiang, Taishan Wang, Wei Xu and Chunru Wang

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905263

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      At long last, the elusive thermodynamically most stable isomer of C71H2 (see structure) has been synthesized through the addition of CH2 across an equatorial bond of C70: a site at which such a reaction is not kinetically favorable. Theoretical studies revealed that the pyrogenic synthetic method used enables reactants to overcome the higher activation barrier to equatorial addition.

    24. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Remote Control of Regio- and Diastereoselectivity in the Hydroformylation of Bishomoallylic Alcohols with Catalytic Amounts of a Reversibly Bound Directing Group (pages 967–970)

      Christian U. Grünanger and Bernhard Breit

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905949

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      Remote and reversible! Phosphinites serve as reversibly bound directing groups for the remote control of the regio- and diastereoselective hydroformylation of bishomoallylic alcohols (see scheme; r.r: regioisomer ratio). The distance between the double bond and the functional hydroxy group to which the directing group is reversibly bound is the longest ever reported.

    25. Biaryls

      Anodic Phenol–Arene Cross-Coupling Reaction on Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes (pages 971–975)

      Axel Kirste, Gregor Schnakenburg, Florian Stecker, Andreas Fischer and Siegfried R. Waldvogel

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904763

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      Particularly sustainable: The anodic cross-coupling reaction between phenols and arenes can be performed on boron-doped diamond electrodes. The arylated products are formed directly and obtained, in some cases, with high selectivity. Since only hydrogen atoms are sacrificed in the course of reaction this methodology opens the door to a novel concept for biaryl formation.

    26. Molecular Imaging

      Labeling and Glycosylation of Peptides Using Click Chemistry: A General Approach to 18F-Glycopeptides as Effective Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography (pages 976–979)

      Simone Maschauer, Jürgen Einsiedel, Roland Haubner, Carsten Hocke, Matthias Ocker, Harald Hübner, Torsten Kuwert, Peter Gmeiner and Olaf Prante

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904137

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      Click for PET: An efficient strategy based on click chemistry has been developed for 18F-labeling alkyne-bearing peptides with concomitant glycosylation. The mild conditions and general applicability of this reliable reaction gives access to a new class of 18F-glycopeptide radiopharmaceuticals with improved biological properties for in vivo imaging studies by positron emission tomography (PET).

    27. Methane Activation

      Methane Activation and Catalytic Ethylene Formation on Free Au2+ (pages 980–983)

      Sandra M. Lang, Thorsten M. Bernhardt, Robert N. Barnett and Uzi Landman

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905643

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      Au pairs: Whereas one methane molecule is not dehydrogenated by free gold-dimer cations, the cooperative interaction of two methane ligands initiates a catalytic formation of ethylene. The cycle is closed by the adsorption of a third methane molecule that cooperatively activates the release of ethylene (see scheme yellow Au, green C, blue H). This cycle is derived from ab initio calculations and gas-phase reaction kinetics measurements.

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 6/2010 (page 987)

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090008

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