Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 6

February 1, 2010

Volume 49, Issue 6

Pages 989–1167

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Total Synthesis of Palau’amine (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 6/2010) (page 989)

      Ian B. Seiple, Shun Su, Ian S. Young, Chad A. Lewis, Junichiro Yamaguchi and Phil S. Baran

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907224

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      The exotic natural product palau'amine contains a number of rare structural features, just like the extraordinary biodiversity found in the island nation of Palau. As such, palau'amine has been the most actively pursued alkaloid among synthetic chemists in the 21st century, and its first total synthesis is now described by P. S. Baran and co-workers in their Communication on page 1095 ff. The successful route features transformations on unprotected intermediates, cascade reactions, and a remarkable finale involving a transannular cyclization to forge the critical bond. Cover designed by Paul Krawczuk; photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.com/clumpner.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Exploring the Conformation-Regulated Function of Titin Kinase by Mechanical Pump and Probe Experiments with Single Molecules (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 6/2010) (page 990)

      Elias M. Puchner and Hermann E. Gaub

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907116

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      The molecular-force sensor titin kinase (TK) is embedded in the M-band structure of the sarcomere at an ideal position to sense force imbalances. H. E. Gaub and E. M. Puchner demonstrate in their Communication on page 1147 ff. a new AFM-based single-molecule pump-and-probe protocol to mechanically prepare different conformations of TK and to read out their function. The results show that the binding pocket for the co-substrate ATP is shielded by two sequential barriers in the force-induced activation pathway.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 6/2010 (pages 993–1003)

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090011

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Simon Aldridge (page 1008)

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905813

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      “The best advice I have ever been given is “Hard work never killed anyone!” The worst advice I have ever been given was “Don't go to Oxford—you'll flounder.” …” This and more about Simon Aldridge can be found on page 1008.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. The Tao of Chemistry and Life. A Scientific Journey. By Eugene H. Cordes. (page 1009)

      Thomas Kolter

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906162

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      Oxford University Press, New York 2009. 432 pp., hardcover € 59.95.—ISBN 978-0195369632

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Binary Catalytic Systems

      Gold and Organocatalysis Combined (pages 1010–1012)

      A. Stephen K. Hashmi and Christoph Hubbert

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906609

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      All that glitters: Binary catalytic systems of gold(I) complexes and chiral Brønsted acids, which were recently reported by the research groups of Dixon and Gong, represent a significant leap forwards in the area of sequential one-pot reactions. The special feature of these reactions is the isolobal analogy of the proton and [LAuI] cations, which requires a delicate balance between the reactivities of the acids and the gold complexes.

    2. Cooperative Catalysis

      Asymmetric Alkynylation of Imines by Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding and Metal Catalysis (pages 1013–1016)

      Pedro de Armas, David Tejedor and Fernando García-Tellado

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906018

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      Simple and practical: The asymmetric alkynylation of imines has been revolutionized with two nice examples of a novel model of H-bonding asymmetric metal catalysis with Brønsted acids. The catalytic model comprises two well-differentiated and parallel catalytic cycles: one involving metallic alkynylydes (metal catalysis) and the other one using a chiral Brønsted acid (organocatalysis; see scheme; PG=protecting group).

  8. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. N2O Activation

      Binding and Activation of N2O at Transition-Metal Centers: Recent Mechanistic Insights (pages 1018–1024)

      William B. Tolman

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905364

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      No laughing matter: In view of its significance as an atmospheric pollutant and greenhouse gas, an important research goal has been to understand the reactivity of N2O with metal centers in the gas phase, on solid supports, in enzymes, and as soluble complexes in solution. Recent studies provide provocative mechanistic insights into how N2O might bind to metal ions and be activated for N[BOND]N or N[BOND]O bond scission or insertion into M[BOND]C or M[BOND]H bonds.

  9. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Clinical Chemistry

      Clinical Chemistry: Challenges for Analytical Chemistry and the Nanosciences from Medicine (pages 1026–1051)

      Jürgen Durner

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200903363

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      From the drawing of blood to diagnosis: Clinical chemistry makes an important contribution to medical diagnostics and the prevention of disease. New insights from the natural sciences and information technologies can reach into medicine by way of clinical chemistry. This Review presents the historic roots of the subject as well as current methods for measurement and analysis. Research projects and future developments are also discussed.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Sensors

      An Aptamer Cross-Linked Hydrogel as a Colorimetric Platform for Visual Detection (pages 1052–1056)

      Zhi Zhu, Cuichen Wu, Haipeng Liu, Yuan Zou, Xiaoling Zhang, Huaizhi Kang, Chaoyong James Yang and Weihong Tan

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905570

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      Cocaine cracked: The gel–sol transition of an enzyme-caged hydrogel has been efficiently controlled by target binding events, which trigger release of the enzyme to take part in its catalytic role for signal amplification (see picture). As low as 20 ng of cocaine can be visually detected within 10 min without any aid of sophisticated instrumentation.

    2. Cationic Framework Materials

      NDTB-1: A Supertetrahedral Cationic Framework That Removes TcO4 from Solution (pages 1057–1060)

      Shuao Wang, Evgeny V. Alekseev, Juan Diwu, William H. Casey, Brian L. Phillips, Wulf Depmeier and Thomas E. Albrecht-Schmitt

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906397

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      Cleaning up: A cubic thorium borate possesses a porous supertetrahedral cationic framework with extraframework borate anions. These anions are readily exchanged with a variety of environmental contaminants (see picture), especially those from the nuclear industry, including chromate and pertechnetate.

    3. Chemical Polishing

      Hydroxyl Radicals Attack Metallic Gold (pages 1061–1063)

      Anna Maria Nowicka, Ulrich Hasse, Michael Hermes and Fritz Scholz

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906358

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      Gold service: The asperities on a polished gold surface are quickly dissolved by the OH. radicals of Fenton's reagent. The dissolution of Au is rapid at the beginning of the reaction and is negligible when the asperities have been dissolved. Although the OH. radicals also oxidize the smooth parts of the Au surface, they do not dissolve them, but form a stable oxide monolayer.

    4. Functionalized DNA

      Direct Polymerase Synthesis of Reactive Aldehyde-Functionalized DNA and Its Conjugation and Staining with Hydrazines (pages 1064–1066)

      Veronika Raindlová, Radek Pohl, Miloslav Šanda and Michal Hocek

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905556

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      Reactive aldehyde-modified DNA was prepared in two steps by Suzuki cross-coupling of halogenated nucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) with 4-formylthiophene-2-boronic acid and subsequent polymerase incorporation of the modified nucleotides into DNA (see scheme; PEX=primer extension, PCR=polymerase chain reaction). Formation of hydrazones with arylhydrazines under aqueous conditions was used for DNA staining.

    5. Helical Foldamers

      The Canonical Helix of Urea Oligomers at Atomic Resolution: Insights Into Folding-Induced Axial Organization (pages 1067–1070)

      Lucile Fischer, Paul Claudon, Nagendar Pendem, Emeric Miclet, Claude Didierjean, Eric Ennifar and Gilles Guichard

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905592

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      Helical by nature: Urea-based peptidomimetics with proteinogenic side chains are fully helical in the crystalline state (see picture). Four acyclic residues are sufficient to drive complete helix formation with all complementary H-bonding sites being satisfied (up to 14 for a 8-mer). Helices pack head-to-tail to create infinite H-bonded networks with different topologies.

    6. NMR Spectroscopy

      2D TR-NOESY Experiments Interrogate and Rank Ligand–Receptor Interactions in Living Human Cancer Cells (pages 1071–1074)

      Silvia Mari, Chiara Invernizzi, Andrea Spitaleri, Luca Alberici, Michela Ghitti, Claudio Bordignon, Catia Traversari, Gian-Paolo Rizzardi and Giovanna Musco

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905941

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      Cell mates: Various ligand–receptor interactions in different human cancer cell lines were probed directly by two-dimensional transferred-NOE spectroscopy (see picture) to prove recognition specificity and determine an affinity ranking of several ligands.

    7. Self-Assembly

      Hierarchical Self-Assembly of a Chiral Metal–Organic Framework Displaying Pronounced Porosity (pages 1075–1078)

      Jack K. Clegg, Simon S. Iremonger, Michael J. Hayter, Peter D. Southon, René B. Macquart, Martin B. Duriska, Paul Jensen, Peter Turner, Katrina A. Jolliffe, Cameron J. Kepert, George V. Meehan and Leonard F. Lindoy

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905497

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      Into the void: A large, cavity-containing trinuclear triangle with accessible binding sites has been synthesized, structurally characterized, and incorporated into a chiral metal–organic framework (see picture). The resulting 3D framework, with a trifunctional amine bridging group, has a void volume of 56 % that is accessible to solvent and adsorbs a variety of gases to various degrees.

    8. Sonoluminescence

      Temperature Inhomogeneity during Multibubble Sonoluminescence (pages 1079–1082)

      Hangxun Xu, Nick G. Glumac and Kenneth S. Suslick

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905754

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      Bright bubbles! Ultrabright sonoluminescence is observed from concentrated phosphoric acid (see picture). Two independent molecular emission species (excited OH. and PO.) can be observed from multibubble sonoluminescence; both of them can be used as spectroscopic thermometers to probe the extreme conditions generated during bubble collapse.

    9. Metal Oxo Complexes

      NMR Spectra of Terminal Oxo Gold and Platinum Complexes: Relativistic DFT Predictions (pages 1083–1086)

      Alessandro Bagno and Riccardo Bini

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905507

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      Missing in action: Relativistic density-functional methods provide a reliable framework to predict the features of 195Pt, 183W, and 17O NMR spectra of terminal oxo Pt and Au complexes (see picture for [P2W20O70Au(O)(OH2)3]9−; Au yellow, W blue, P orange, O red, H white). The complexes have an extremely small HOMO–LUMO gap, and both orbitals are localized on an M[DOUBLE BOND]O fragment.

    10. Coordination Polymers

      A Simple Lithium(I) Salt with a Microporous Structure and Its Gas Sorption Properties (pages 1087–1089)

      Brendan F. Abrahams, Martin J. Grannas, Timothy A. Hudson and Richard Robson

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906322

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      Thoroughly absorbing: The simple combination of lithium ions and isonicotinate anions (1) leads to the formation of a lightweight salt (see picture; C black, O red, N blue, Li purple) that is able to reversibly sorb H2 , N2 , CO2 , and CH4 . The salt exists as a 3D network of microchannels that are occupied by solvent molecules.

    11. Supramolecular Polymers

      Metal Coordination Mediated Reversible Conversion between Linear and Cross-Linked Supramolecular Polymers (pages 1090–1094)

      Feng Wang, Jinqiang Zhang, Xia Ding, Shengyi Dong, Ming Liu, Bo Zheng, Shijun Li, Ling Wu, Yihua Yu, Harry W. Gibson and Feihe Huang

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906389

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      The dynamic duo: Different topologies of dynamic supramolecular polymers, such as linear (see picture, left) and cross-linked species (right), can be reversibly interconverted by external stimuli that utilize host–guest and metal–ligand non-covalent recognition motifs.

    12. Natural Product Synthesis

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      Total Synthesis of Palau’amine (pages 1095–1098)

      Ian B. Seiple, Shun Su, Ian S. Young, Chad A. Lewis, Junichiro Yamaguchi and Phil S. Baran

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907112

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      Worth the wait: The long anticipated total synthesis of palau'amine has been accomplished by a route featuring highly chemoselective transformations, cascade reactions, and a remarkable transannular cyclization to secure the unprecedented trans-5,5 ring junction (shown in red).

    13. Photoluminescent Nanorings

      Preparation of Photoluminescent Nanorings with Controllable Bioreducibility and Stimuli-Responsiveness (pages 1099–1102)

      Ye-Zi You, Zhi-Qiang Yu, Meng-Meng Cui and Chun-Yan Hong

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906707

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      Ring around the rosy: A novel multifunctional disulfide-containing hyperbranched poly(amido amine) that is stimuli-responsive, biocompatible, biodegradable, and photoluminescent can assemble DNA into a well-defined nanoring with strong photoluminescence. The nanoring is stimuli-responsive and the ring wall is biocompatible and controllably bioreducible; it has potential applications in gene and drug delivery, and molecular imaging.

    14. Total Synthesis

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      Catalytic Asymmetric Total Synthesis of ent-Hyperforin (pages 1103–1106)

      Yohei Shimizu, Shi-Liang Shi, Hiroyuki Usuda, Motomu Kanai and Masakatsu Shibasaki

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906678

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      Key to success: The first catalytic asymmetric total synthesis of ent-hyperforin (see picture) was accomplished by using a Diels–Alder reaction promoted by a chiral cationic iron catalyst (A; 96 % ee, d.r.>33:1), a diastereoselective Claisen rearrangement (B; 12:1 selectivity), an intramolecular aldol reaction (C), and a vinylogous Pummerer rearrangement (D) as key steps.

    15. Molecular Devices

      Controlling Molecular Rotary Motion with a Self-Complexing Lock (pages 1107–1110)

      Da-Hui Qu and Ben L. Feringa

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906064

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      The key to motion: A second-generation molecular rotary motor, which contains a DB24C8 macrocycle ring incorporated into the lower stator half and a dialkyl ammonium ion attached to the upper rotor half, forms a [1]pseudorotaxane in less polar solvents such as CH2Cl2. In this self-complexing system, acid–base-controlled threading–dethreading movements can be utilized to unlock or lock the molecular motor (see picture).

    16. Coupling Reactions

      Decarboxylative Cross-Coupling of Aryl Tosylates with Aromatic Carboxylate Salts (pages 1111–1114)

      Lukas J. Gooßen, Nuria Rodríguez, Paul P. Lange and Christophe Linder

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905953

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      A bimetallic copper/palladium catalyst system is disclosed that enables the use of tosylates as carbon electrophiles in decarboxylative coupling reactions. A variety of aromatic carboxylate salts, regardless of their substitution pattern, have been coupled with these inexpensive and readily available electrophiles to give the corresponding biaryl compounds in good yields (see scheme).

    17. Copper Catalysis

      Copper-Catalyzed Direct Alkenylation of N-Iminopyridinium Ylides (pages 1115–1118)

      James J. Mousseau, James A. Bull and André B. Charette

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906020

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      A versatile Cu-catalyzed direct C[BOND]H alkenylation of N-iminopyridinium ylides, compatible with several different copper sources (including a penny), provides a powerful and inexpensive method for the synthesis of functionalized pyridine derivatives. Chemoselective functionalization of halide-containing compounds allows the synthesis of alkenyl pyridines containing reactive tethers for further functionalization.

    18. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      A Practical Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Suzuki, Sonogashira, and Stille Coupling Reactions of Unreactive Aryl Chlorides (pages 1119–1122)

      Myung-Jong Jin and Dong-Hwan Lee

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905626

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      Practical catalyst: A magnetic nanoparticle-supported palladium catalyst was developed for the highly efficient heterogeneous Suzuki, Sonogashira, and Stille couplings of a wide variety of aryl chlorides. Furthermore, the catalyst could be recycled by facile magnetic separation without any loss of activity.

    19. Organofluorine Compounds

      Activation of Allylic C[BOND]F bonds: Palladium-Catalyzed Allylic Amination of 3,3-Difluoropropenes (pages 1123–1127)

      Xavier Pigeon, Maxime Bergeron, Francis Barabé, Pascal Dubé, Heather N. Frost and Jean-François Paquin

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904747

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      Lose one, keep one! A wide range of cyclic and acyclic β-aminofluoroalkenes are prepared by the title reaction. The key fluorinated palladium π-allyl intermediate is generated using a catalytic allylic C[BOND]F bond activation.

    20. Mesoporous Solid Acid

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      Highly Active Mesoporous Nb–W Oxide Solid-Acid Catalyst (pages 1128–1132)

      Caio Tagusagawa, Atsushi Takagaki, Ai Iguchi, Kazuhiro Takanabe, Junko N. Kondo, Kohki Ebitani, Shigenobu Hayashi, Takashi Tatsumi and Kazunari Domen

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904791

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      Pore-ing acid: Mesoporous Nb–W oxides (Nb:W=3:7) are found to be a recyclable, highly active solid acid. They surpass ion-exchange resins (Nafion NR50 and Amberlyst-15) and zeolites (H-ZSM5 and H-Beta) in Friedel–Crafts alkylation and hydrolysis reactions (see picture). The high activity is due to strong acid sites and a mesoporous structure with a high surface area and easy reactant accessibility.

    21. Total Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of (+)-Isatisine A (pages 1133–1135)

      Avedis Karadeolian and Michael A. Kerr

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906632

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      Isatis indigotica has long been used as a source of therapeutic compounds in traditional Chinese medicine (the roots are the source of Ben Lan Gen herbal tea). In 2007 the leaves of I. indigotica yielded isatisine A, an unusual oxidized bis-indole. A concise, enantiospecific total synthesis of isatisine A is reported using a homochiral cyclopropane diester to construct the key tetrahydrofuran ring.

    22. Immunotherapeutic Bisphosphonates

      Lipophilic Pyridinium Bisphosphonates: Potent γδ T Cell Stimulators (pages 1136–1138)

      Yonghui Zhang, Rong Cao, Fenglin Yin, Fu-Yang Lin, Hong Wang, Kilannin Krysiak, Joo-Hwan No, Dushyant Mukkamala, Kevin Houlihan, Jikun Li, Craig T. Morita and Eric Oldfield

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905933

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      Chain gang: Lipophilic pyridinium bisphosphonates containing long alkyl chains (see picture, P red, N blue, C orange, H gray) stimulate human γδ T cells expressing the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell receptor. Stimulation with such compounds is more potent than with zoledronate, which is active against breast and prostate cancer. The lipophilic bisphosphonates bind poorly to bone and are thus less likely to cause side effects associated with bisphosphonates in clinical use.

    23. Synthetic Methods

      Palladium-Catalyzed Carbonylation/Acyl Migratory Insertion Sequence (pages 1139–1142)

      Zhenhua Zhang, Yiyang Liu, Mingxing Gong, Xiaokun Zhao, Yan Zhang and Jianbo Wang

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906349

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      On the move: A palladium-catalyzed reaction of aryl iodides, diazo compounds or N-tosylhydrazones, and carbon monoxide affords β-oxo esters or ketones/enones (see scheme; DCE=1,2-dichloroethane). The products are delivered with high efficiency through the title sequence.

    24. Ligand Design

      Olefin–Oxazolines (OlefOx): Highly Modular, Easily Tunable Ligands for Asymmetric Catalysis (pages 1143–1146)

      Björn T. Hahn, Friederike Tewes, Roland Fröhlich and Frank Glorius

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905712

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      Foxy ligands: An efficient three-step synthesis allows the new highly modular family of olefin–oxazoline ligands (OlefOx; see picture) to be exploited in asymmetric catalysis. The ease of electronic and steric variation and the successful application in the highly enantioselective rhodium-catalyzed conjugate addition of aryl boronic acids to cylic enones demonstrate the importance of this new ligand class.

    25. Atomic Force Microscopy

      Exploring the Conformation-Regulated Function of Titin Kinase by Mechanical Pump and Probe Experiments with Single Molecules (pages 1147–1150)

      Elias M. Puchner and Hermann E. Gaub

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905956

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      Feel the force: A new AFM-based single-molecule pump-and-probe protocol has been used to investigate the function of different force-induced conformations of proteins (see picture). It was found that the autoinhibited enzyme titin kinase reaches its ability to bind ATP after the first two barriers of the complex mechanical activation pathway.

    26. Lantibiotics

      Labyrinthopeptins: A New Class of Carbacyclic Lantibiotics (pages 1151–1154)

      Kathrin Meindl, Timo Schmiederer, Kathrin Schneider, Andreas Reicke, Diane Butz, Simone Keller, Hans Gühring, László Vértesy, Joachim Wink, Holger Hoffmann, Mark Brönstrup, George M. Sheldrick and Roderich D. Süssmuth

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905773

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      A-maze-ing peptides: The structure of the novel lantibiotic labyrinthopeptin A2 (see picture) contains labionin—an unprecedented carbacyclic, posttranslationally modified amino acid. The identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster of labyrinthopeptins was also successful. Labyrinthopeptin A2 revealed a pronounced in vivo efficacy (attenuation of tactile allodynia) in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    27. Medicinal Chemistry

      Breast-Cancer Diagnosis by Neuropeptide Y Analogues: From Synthesis to Clinical Application (pages 1155–1158)

      Irfan U. Khan, Denise Zwanziger, Ilka Böhme, Muhammad Javed, Hamid Naseer, Syed W. Hyder and Annette G. Beck-Sickinger

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905008

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      Selective, sensitive, and specific breast cancer diagnosis: Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the Y1R-selective [Phe7, Pro34]NPY peptide were labeled with Re/99mTc and pre-clinically characterized using competition receptor binding and signal transduction assays, and also microscopic, metabolic-stability, rabbit body-uptake, and protein-binding studies. Selective uptake of the 99mTc(core)3+-(NαHis-ac)-labeled [Phe7, Pro34]NPY analogue in human breast-cancer patients was obtained by whole body scintimammography.

    28. Spinn Crossover

      Spin-State Patterns in Surface-Grafted Beads of Iron(II) Complexes (pages 1159–1163)

      Mohammad S. Alam, Michael Stocker, Klaus Gieb, Paul Müller, Marco Haryono, Katja Student and Andreas Grohmann

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905062

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      Strung out: FeII complexes containing pairs of planar terdentate N ligands form regular one-dimensional aggregates on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, on a length scale of hundreds of nanometers. STM spectroscopy was used to probe the molecular conductance and thus the spin state. The distribution of spin states is random in the single-molecule chain, but local cooperativity sets in when the chain is made up of oligonuclear “beads” (see picture).

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireview
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2010 (page 1167)

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090010

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