Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Angewandte Chemie International Edition

February 8, 2010

Volume 49, Issue 7

Pages 1169–1331

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editorial
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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    1. Cover Picture: Wacker-Type Oxidation of Internal Olefins Using a PdCl2/N,N-Dimethylacetamide Catalyst System under Copper-Free Reaction Conditions (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2010) (page 1169)

      Takato Mitsudome, Keiichi Mizumoto, Tomoo Mizugaki, Koichiro Jitsukawa and Kiyotomi Kaneda

      Version of Record online: 26 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000112

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      A Wacker-type oxidation of internal olefins into ketones is described by K. Kaneda and co-workers in their Communication on page 1238 ff. The reaction proceeds under an atmosphere of O2 in the presence of a homogeneous palladium catalyst with water as the oxygen source. Artistically, the reaction is depicted as moving through an hour glass as the reactants are transformed into product.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editorial
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Reviews
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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    1. Inside Cover: Neptunium Diverges Sharply from Uranium and Plutonium in Crystalline Borate Matrixes: Insights into the Complex Behavior of the Early Actinides Relevant to Nuclear Waste Storage (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2010) (page 1170)

      Shuao Wang, Evgeny V. Alekseev, Jie Ling, S. Skanthakumar, L. Soderholm, Wulf Depmeier and Thomas E. Albrecht-Schmitt

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000114

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      A large family of crystalline uranium, neptunium, and plutonium borates has been prepared to explore how the chemical behavior of these neighboring elements might differ. In their Communication on page 1263 ff., T. E. Albrecht-Schmitt et al. describe highly unusual behavior for neptunium, which forms several layered neptunyl borates with nanoscale features that simultaneously contain NpIV, NPV, and NpVI. The properties of these neptunium compounds contrast sharply with those of uranium and plutonium, which are both present solely as UVI or PuVI.

  3. Graphical Abstract

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    4. Graphical Abstract
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    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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      Editorial: Frontiers of Chemistry in Paris (page 1173)

      Peter Goelitz

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907777

  5. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editorial
    6. Corrigenda
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      All-Inorganic Nanocrystal Arrays (page 1183)

      Stephanie L. Brock

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090013

      This article corrects:

      All-Inorganic Nanocrystal Arrays

      Vol. 48, Issue 41, 7484–7486, Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2009

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      Stable Aziridinium Salts as Versatile Intermediates: Isolation and Regio- and Stereoselective Ring-Opening and Rearrangement (page 1184)

      Hyun A. Song, Mamta Dadwal, Yeseul Lee, Emily Mick and Hyun-Soon Chong

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090014

      This article corrects:
    3. You have free access to this content
      A Population of Thermostable Reverse Transcriptases Evolved from Thermus aquaticus DNA Polymerase I by Phage Display (page 1184)

      Sophie Vichier-Guerre, Stéphane Ferris, Nicolas Auberger, Karim Mahiddine and Jean-Luc Jestin

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201090017

      This article corrects:
  6. News

    1. Top of page
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  7. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
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    1. Martin Kaupp (page 1190)

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906307

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      “In a nutshell, my research involves understanding how molecules work. The biggest challenge facing scientists is securing sufficient renewable energy resources. …” This and more about Martin Kaupp can be found on page 1190.

  8. Book Reviews

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    1. Controlled and Living Polymerizations. From Mechanisms to Applications. Edited by Axel H. E. Müller and Krzysztof Matyjaszewski. (pages 1191–1192)

      Andreas F. M. Kilbinger

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907064

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2009. 612 pp., hardcover € 149.00.—ISBN 978-3527324927

    2. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Imaging. Edited by Reiner Salzer and Heinz W. Siesler. (page 1192)

      Sebastian Schlücker

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906567

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2009. 510 pp., hardcover € 149.00.—ISBN 978-3527319930

  9. Highlights

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editorial
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    1. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Enantioselective Conjugate Borylation (pages 1194–1196)

      Julia A. Schiffner, Kristine Müther and Martin Oestreich

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906521

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      Learn your ABCs! The asymmetric borylation in conjugate fashion has rapidly progressed in recent years if not months (see scheme, pin=pinacolato, TM=transition metal). This Highlight summarizes these breathtaking developments, including a mechanistic analysis. An outlook onto a future asymmetric organocatalysis is presented as well.

    2. RNA Sequencing

      Reading the Code of Single RNA Molecules (pages 1197–1199)

      Sabine Müller

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906336

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      Direct RNA sequencing (DRS) is based on the principle of single-molecule sequencing by synthesis. This next-generation sequencing technology requires only minute amounts of RNA and has the potential to make snapshots of the transcriptome of any given cell population without the need for copying to cDNA.

  10. Review

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    1. DNA–Protein Conjugates

      Semisynthetic DNA–Protein Conjugates for Biosensing and Nanofabrication (pages 1200–1216)

      Christof M. Niemeyer

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904930

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      The best of both worlds: Semisynthetic conjugates of DNA oligonucleotides and proteins (see picture for an example) combine the self-assembly properties of nucleic acids with the large repertoire of protein functionality optimized by evolution. This Review surveys chemical approaches to generate DNA–protein hybrids as well as their application in biosensing, molecular nanofabrication, and materials science.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    1. Nanostructures

      Molecular Structure–Function Relations of the Optical Properties and Dimensions of Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies (pages 1218–1221)

      Revital Kaminker, Michal Lahav, Leila Motiei, Maida Vartanian, Ronit Popovitz-Biro, Mark A. Iron and Milko E. van der Boom

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906636

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      Stolen identity: The molecular geometries of a series of cross-linkers that bear between one and four pyridyl moieties are expressed in the optical properties of AuNP assemblies (see picture). TEM analysis indicates that the molecular-level structural differences of the cross-linkers are also transferred at the submicrometer level in the formation of the AuNP assemblies.

    2. Luminescent Materials

      Complex Iridium(III) Salts: Luminescent Porous Crystalline Materials (pages 1222–1226)

      Matteo Mauro, Klaus C. Schuermann, Roger Prétôt, Andreas Hafner, Pierluigi Mercandelli, Angelo Sironi and Luisa De Cola

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905713

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      Let your light shine: A new class of noncovalently linked crystalline porous materials is based on luminescent iridium complexes. Pairs complexes possessing different emission colors and complementary charges form complex salts. The crystalline materials form 3D porous motifs, and the emission color can be tuned by inclusion of a solvent or by selective quenching of one of the components of the crystal.

    3. Molecular Beacons

      A Highly Sensitive, Excimer-Controlled Molecular Beacon (pages 1227–1230)

      Robert Häner, Sarah M. Biner, Simon M. Langenegger, Tao Meng and Vladimir L. Malinovskii

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905829

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      Non-nucleosidic chromophores in the stem of a molecular beacon inhibit excimer fluorescence through the formation of a donor–acceptor complex (see picture). The excellent reduction of the background fluorescence allows the detection of DNA and RNA targets in the presence of a significant excess of the probe.

    4. Tumor Targeting

      Selective Aggregation of a Platinum–Gadolinium Complex Within a Tumor-Cell Nucleus (pages 1231–1233)

      Ellen L. Crossley, Jade B. Aitken, Stefan Vogt, Hugh H. Harris and Louis M. Rendina

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902309

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      Hitching a ride: Treatment of A549 human lung carcinoma cells with a DNA metallointercalator complex results in the selective aggregation of the intact drug within the cell nuclei, as determined by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging (see images). This work is the first example of gadolinium delivery by a platinum complex to a tumor-cell nucleus.

    5. Glycosyltransferase Inhibitors

      Mechanistic Insight into Enzymatic Glycosyl Transfer with Retention of Configuration through Analysis of Glycomimetic Inhibitors (pages 1234–1237)

      James C. Errey, Seung Seo Lee, Robert P. Gibson, Carlos Martinez Fleites, Conor S. Barry, Pierre M. J. Jung, Anthony C. O'Sullivan, Benjamin G. Davis and Gideon J. Davies

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905096

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      Structural “valid”-ation: The mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed glycosyl transfer with retention of anomeric configuration continues to baffle, a situation compounded by the lack of insightful 3-D structures of ternary enzyme complexes. Synthesis and multi-dimensional kinetic analysis of validoxylamine derivatives are used to access the 3-D structure of a ternary complex (see picture; U=uridyl) providing insight into the geometry and donor–acceptor interplay at the glycosyltransfer site.

    6. Synthetic Methods

      Wacker-Type Oxidation of Internal Olefins Using a PdCl2/N,N-Dimethylacetamide Catalyst System under Copper-Free Reaction Conditions (pages 1238–1240)

      Takato Mitsudome, Keiichi Mizumoto, Tomoo Mizugaki, Koichiro Jitsukawa and Kiyotomi Kaneda

      Version of Record online: 28 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905184

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      A simple catalyst system consisting of PdCl2 and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) as the solvent can successfully promote Wacker-type oxidation of internal olefins. This catalyst system does not require copper compounds and is tolerant of a wide range of substrates having internal olefins.

    7. Gold Electrochemistry

      Carbon Monoxide as a Promoter for its own Oxidation on a Gold Electrode (pages 1241–1243)

      Paramaconi Rodríguez, Andrey A. Koverga and Marc T. M. Koper

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905387

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      Goldeneye: A model for CO oxidation on gold electrodes in alkaline media is presented, and it assumes that CO enhances the adsorption of its own oxidant. This model explains a reaction order larger than 1, and that dissolved CO was easier to oxidize than adsorbed CO. DFT calculations confirmed that CO and OH enhanced each other′s binding on the Au(111) surface. C black, O red, H gray.

    8. Chemical Dynamics

      Mode-Dependent Fano Resonances Observed in the Predissociation of Diazirine in the S1 State (pages 1244–1247)

      Doo-Sik Ahn, So-Yeon Kim, Goo-Il Lim, Sungyul Lee, Young S. Choi and Sang Kyu Kim

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905619

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      Lights, spectrometer, action: Crucial information about the detailed shape of the potential-energy surface in the vicinity of the transition state is obtained from the Fano resonances in the photodissociation cross-section of diazirine in the S1 state. The excitation along the asymmetric C[BOND]N stretching mode accelerates the ring-opening reaction, suggesting that two C[BOND]N bonds of the excited diazirine break in a stepwise manner (see scheme).

    9. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Supramolecular “Transmetalation” Leads to an Unusual Self-Assembled P2L3 Cryptand (pages 1248–1251)

      Virginia M. Cangelosi, Lev N. Zakharov and Darren W. Johnson

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906460

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      Out with the old, in with the new: Can the transmetalation of metal–organic supramolecular assemblies lead to new structure types? A series of Bi, Sb, and As-containing cryptands is reported that can be transmetalated to give a novel P2L3 cryptand (see scheme). The P[BOND]S bonds behave reversibly, like traditional metal–ligand bonds, suggesting a possible new motif for dynamic covalent chemistry.

    10. Protein Microarrays

      Oriented Immobilization of Farnesylated Proteins by the Thiol-Ene Reaction (pages 1252–1257)

      Dirk Weinrich, Po-Chiao Lin, Pascal Jonkheijm, Uyen T. T. Nguyen, Hendrik Schröder, Christof M. Niemeyer, Kirill Alexandrov, Roger Goody and Herbert Waldmann

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906190

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      Anchoring the protein: Proteins were immobilized rapidly under mild conditions by thiol-ene photocoupling between S-farnesyl groups attached to a genetically encodable “CAAX-box” tetrapeptide sequence (A is aliphatic) at the C terminus of the protein and surface-exposed thiols (see scheme). This method enables the oriented covalent immobilization of proteins directly from expression lysates without additional purification or derivatization steps.

    11. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      In Situ Synthesis of an Imidazolate-4-amide-5-imidate Ligand and Formation of a Microporous Zinc–Organic Framework with H2-and CO2-Storage Ability (pages 1258–1262)

      Franziska Debatin, Arne Thomas, Alexandra Kelling, Niklas Hedin, Zoltan Bacsik, Irena Senkovska, Stefan Kaskel, Matthias Junginger, Holger Müller, Uwe Schilde, Christian Jäger, Alwin Friedrich and Hans-Jürgen Holdt

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906188

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      Narrow channels with polar walls are the structural and functional features responsible for the high capacity of a zinc–organic framework based on an imidazolate–amide–imidate ligand for the uptake of H2 and CO2 (see structure: orange Zn, blue N, red O, dark gray C, light gray H). The rigid and stable chelating ligand was synthesized in situ by partial hydrolysis of a dicyanoimidazole compound.

    12. Actinides

      Neptunium Diverges Sharply from Uranium and Plutonium in Crystalline Borate Matrixes: Insights into the Complex Behavior of the Early Actinides Relevant to Nuclear Waste Storage (pages 1263–1266)

      Shuao Wang, Evgeny V. Alekseev, Jie Ling, S. Skanthakumar, L. Soderholm, Wulf Depmeier and Thomas E. Albrecht-Schmitt

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906127

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      Not like the others: In contrast to uranium and plutonium borates, neptunium borates are mixed-valent and simultaneously display three coordination environments and three oxidation states (see picture; polyhedra: NpIV light blue, NpV dark blue, NpVI green, B yellow; spheres: O red, K or Ba blue).

    13. Chirality Induction

      A Tale of Three Carboxylates: Cooperative Asymmetric Crystallization of a Three-Dimensional Microporous Framework from Achiral Precursors (pages 1267–1270)

      Jian Zhang, Shumei Chen, Ruben A. Nieto, Tao Wu, Pingyun Feng and Xianhui Bu

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906248

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      Something for nothing? A chiral induction reagent catalyzes the growth of chiral crystals and controls their bulk chirality. Time-dependent experiments show that an initial achiral phase is slowly converted into enantioenriched crystals in the presence of the chiral induction agent.

    14. Nanoparticle Properties

      Synthetic Tuning of the Catalytic Properties of Au-Fe3O4 Nanoparticles (pages 1271–1274)

      Youngmin Lee, Miguel Angel Garcia, Natalie A. Frey Huls and Shouheng Sun

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906130

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      Dumbbell-like Au-Fe3O4nanoparticles and their single-component counterparts, Au and Fe3O4, were compared regarding their H2O2 reduction capability. The Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles are catalytically more active, which is attributed to polarization effects from Au to Fe3O4. This activity can be further tuned by the size of the nanoparticles.

    15. C[BOND]H Activation

      Pd0/PR3-Catalyzed Arylation of Nicotinic and Isonicotinic Acid Derivatives (pages 1275–1277)

      Masayuki Wasa, Brady T. Worrell and Jin-Quan Yu

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906104

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      Good for your health: Intermolecular C[BOND]H functionalization of pyridine rings at the 3- and 4-positions is described using a Pd0/PR3/ArBr catalytic system. This reaction provides a powerful method for the preparation of structurally diverse nicotinic and isonicotinic acids that are of great importance in drug discovery.

    16. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Copper-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Alkyl and Aryl Grignard Reagents with Alkynyl Halides (pages 1278–1281)

      Gérard Cahiez, Olivier Gager and Julien Buendia

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905816

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      Good old copper! A new general procedure to couple aliphatic and aromatic Grignard reagents with alkynyl halides under copper catalysis is described (see scheme; NMP=N-methylpyrrolidinone). The reaction is chemoselective and allows preparation of a vast array of simple and functionalized internal alkynes in high yields.

    17. Oxidation Catalysts

      Composition-Dependent Electrocatalytic Activity of Pt-Cu Nanocube Catalysts for Formic Acid Oxidation (pages 1282–1285)

      Dan Xu, Stoyan Bliznakov, Zhaoping Liu, Jiye Fang and Nikolay Dimitrov

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905248

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      The die is cast: The electrocatalytic performance of Pt and Pt-Cu nanocubes with different compositions was investigated. Pt80Cu20 nanocubes were found to have high electrocatalytic activity and remarkable long-term stability for formic acid oxidation.

    18. Supported Catalysts

      Gold-Catalyzed Phosgene-Free Synthesis of Polyurethane Precursors (pages 1286–1290)

      Raquel Juárez, Patricia Concepción, Avelino Corma, Vicente Fornés and Hermenegildo García

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905160

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      Golden catalyst: In a two-step one-pot catalytic process gold nanoparticles supported on CeO2 are able to convert nitroaromatics into aromatic carbamates, thereby providing an alternative phosgene-free route towards aromatic polyurethanes (see figure).

    19. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Assembly of Substituted Phenothiazines by a Sequentially Controlled CuI/ L-Proline-Catalyzed Cascade C[BOND]S and C[BOND]N Bond Formation (pages 1291–1294)

      Dawei Ma, Qian Geng, Hui Zhang and Yongwen Jiang

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905646

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      In the pro-line of fire: A general and efficient cascade reaction approach to substituted phenothiazines, which relies on controlled sequential CuI/L-proline-catalyzed C[BOND]S and C[BOND]N bond formations, is described. DMSO=dimethylsulfoxide.

    20. Gold Nanocatalysts

      Atomically Precise Au25(SR)18 Nanoparticles as Catalysts for the Selective Hydrogenation of α,β-Unsaturated Ketones and Aldehydes (pages 1295–1298)

      Yan Zhu, Huifeng Qian, Bethany A. Drake and Rongchao Jin

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906249

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      A golden opportunity: A mechanism has been proposed to account for the chemoselective hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated ketones (or aldehydes) to unsaturated alcohols catalyzed by monodisperse Au25(SR)18 particles (see picture). Now that the structure of these nanoparticles is known, structure–activity correlations can be drawn.

    21. Hybrid Fuel Cell

      Hybrid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells: Alkaline Electrodes with Proton Conducting Membrane (pages 1299–1301)

      Murat Ünlü, Junfeng Zhou and Paul A. Kohl

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906021

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      Smart management: A new hybrid fuel-cell configuration (see picture) exploits the stability and high ionic conductivity of proton-exchange materials (PEM) and electrochemical advantages of anion-exchange membrane (AEM) electrodes. Water management is significantly improved compared to traditional polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, allowing self-humidification of the cell.

    22. Matrix Isolation

      Chemistry on Single Atoms: Spontaneous Hydrogen Production from Reactions of Transition-Metal Atoms with Methanol at Cryogenic Temperatures (pages 1302–1305)

      Guanjun Wang, Jing Su, Yu Gong, Mingfei Zhou and Jun Li

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906473

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      Implications for methanol fuel cells: In reactions of ground-state early-transition-metal atoms with methanol in an argon matrix, dihydrogen and methoxide salts M(OMe)2 (M=Sc, Ti, V, Nb) form through spontaneous replacement reactions. This work demonstrates that hydrogen can be directly produced from the reactions of ground-state metal atoms with methanol even at cryogenic temperatures.

    23. Synthetic Methods

      Sequential Five-Component Construction of the Cyclopenta[e][1,3]oxazine Skeleton using Stable 2-Azetine Derivatives (pages 1306–1308)

      José Barluenga, Aránzazu Gómez, Javier Santamaría and Miguel Tomás

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906357

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      Hawaii Five-Oxazine: The sequential one-pot reaction of a methoxy-stabilized carbene with an acetylide and an imine provides stable, metal–carbene-containing 2-azetines. Subsequent mild treatment with an alkyne affords a regioselective, three-component cyclization route to fully substituted fused 1,3-oxazines.

    24. CO2 Fixation

      Atmospheric CO2 Fixation by Unsaturated Alcohols Using tBuOI under Neutral Conditions (pages 1309–1311)

      Satoshi Minakata, Itsuro Sasaki and Toshihiro Ide

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906352

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      Hold on tight! Reaction of CO2 with unsaturated alcohols and tBuOI to form cyclic carbonates leads to fixation of the greenhouse gas. In contrast to known CO2 fixation methods, this process proceeds under extremely mild conditions.

    25. In Vivo Chemistry

      A Diatomic Molecule Receptor That Removes CO in a Living Organism (pages 1312–1315)

      Hiroaki Kitagishi, Shigeru Negi, Akiko Kiriyama, Akino Honbo, Yukio Sugiura, Akira T. Kawaguchi and Koji Kano

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906149

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      A CO stripper: The O2-bound form of an iron(II) porphyrin cyclodextrin supramolecular complex (hemoCD) infused into a rat vein reacted with internal CO through ligand exchange, and the CO-bound hemoCD was immediately excreted in the urine (see picture). The hemoCD acting as a CO receptor made it possible to quantify endogenous CO in a living organism.

    26. Synthetic Biology

      Single-Molecule DNA Biosensors for Protein and Ligand Detection (pages 1316–1320)

      Konstantinos Lymperopoulos, Robert Crawford, Joseph P. Torella, Mike Heilemann, Ling Chin Hwang, Seamus J. Holden and Achillefs N. Kapanidis

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904597

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      Transcription factors (TFs) control gene expression and are promising biomarkers for diseases. In a new, robust, and sensitive single-molecule fluorescence assay TFs and associated small molecules (such as nucleotides and sugars) are detected based on DNA coincidence of the two halves of the binding site (see picture; S=stoichiometry). The assay is compatible with measurements in solution, on solid supports, and even in complex biological samples.

    27. Flexible Fibrils

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nanoscale Flexibility Parameters of Alzheimer Amyloid Fibrils Determined by Electron Cryo-Microscopy (pages 1321–1323)

      Carsten Sachse, Nikolaus Grigorieff and Marcus Fändrich

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200904781

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      Versatile nanomaterial: Unusually high nanoscale flexibility was displayed by amyloid fibils in electron microscopy studies (see picture). This finding is relevant for understanding amyloid pathogenicity and for potential biotechnological applications.

    28. Non-natural Amino Acids

      A Highly Active DNA Polymerase with a Fluorous Core (pages 1324–1327)

      Bastian Holzberger, Marina Rubini, Heiko M. Möller and Andreas Marx

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200905978

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multifluorinated DNA polymerase with all 14 methionine residues (Met; red in the structure) globally replaced by the non-natural amino acid trifluoromethionine (TFM) exhibits enzymatic activity and selectivity similar to the wild type. The fluorinated enzyme serves as a 19F NMR probe, and despite its size of 63 kDa, individual 19F resonances allow the study of enzyme dynamics during DNA synthesis by NMR spectroscopy.

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