Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 10

March 1, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 10

Pages 2189–2406

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Cover Picture: Multifunctional Capsule-in-Capsules for Immunoprotection and Trimodal Imaging (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2011) (page 2189)

      Dr. Jaeyun Kim, Dr. Dian R. Arifin, Dr. Naser Muja, Taeho Kim, Dr. Assaf A. Gilad, Dr. Heechul Kim, Dr. Aravind Arepally, Prof. Taeghwan Hyeon and Prof. Jeff W. M. Bulte

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100596

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      The dual shielding of pancreatic islets and multimodal imaging by using capsule-in-capsules is described in the Communication by T. Hyeon et al. on page 2317 ff. The semipermeable outer alginate membrane blocks the penetration of immune cells and antibodies, yet allows unhindered diffusion of nutrients, glucose, oxygen, and insulin produced by the islets. The inner capsule, which contains iron oxide and gold imaging agents, prevents direct exposure of the cells to the nanoparticles.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Inside Cover: Watching the Annealing Process One Polymer Chain at a Time (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2011) (page 2190)

      Dr. Jan Vogelsang, Dr. Johanna Brazard, Takuji Adachi, Dr. Joshua C. Bolinger and Prof. Dr. Paul F. Barbara

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100487

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      An inside view into the annealing process of conjugated polymers is provided by using single-molecule spectroscopy to directly study solvent vapor-induced annealing (SVA) on single conjugated polymer chains embedded in a thin poly(methyl methacrylate) film. In their Communication on page 2257 ff., J. Vogelsang and co-workers report how SVA-induced translocations, folding/unfolding dynamics, and changes in the morphological order of the polymer chains can be observed.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2011 (pages 2193–2204)

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190016

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Steven P. Nolan (page 2212)

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007025

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      “When I was eighteen I wanted to be a professional baseball player. The biggest challenge facing scientists is to convince the funding agencies that what they do is meaningful …” This and more about Steven P. Nolan can be found on page 2212.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Stable Radicals. Fundamentals and Applied Aspects of Odd-Electron Compounds. Edited by Robin G. Hicks. (page 2213)

      John C. Walton

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007666

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      John Wiley & Sons, Chichester 2010. 606 pp., hardcover, € 162.00.—ISBN 978-0470770832

  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Astrochemistry

      H2 Generation in the Early Universe Governs the Formation of the First Stars (pages 2214–2215)

      Prof. Dr. Stephan Schlemmer

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005920

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      A star is born: The formation of H2 was crucial to the generation of the first stars and possibly the first galaxies. The rate of H2 generation by associative detachment (thick arrow in the scheme of the reactions of hydrogen in the early universe) has now been determined experimentally and may provide a more detailed understanding of the birth of the first stars.

    2. Iron Catalysis

      New Trends towards Well-Defined Low-Valent Iron Catalysts (pages 2216–2218)

      Dr. Olga García Mancheño

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007271

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      Less is more: This Highlight describes a simple new procedure to access well-defined formal low-valent iron complexes by ligand exchange and reductive elimination (see scheme). This method offers a good starting point for the further development of iron catalysts.

  8. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Chemistry of Taste

      Sweet and Umami Taste: Natural Products, Their Chemosensory Targets, and Beyond (pages 2220–2242)

      Dr. Maik Behrens, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Meyerhof, Caroline Hellfritsch and Prof. Dr. Thomas Hofmann

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002094

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      A question of taste: Much of our appreciation of food is due to the excitement of the “sweet” and “umami” taste. This Review gives a survey of compounds that elicit the sweet or umami taste. It will highlight the activation of the taste receptors and signal transduction, which induces neural activity and is conveyed to the cerebral cortex to represent the taste quality (the picture shows a binding site of a sweet taste receptor).

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Efficient Loading and Kinetic Trapping of Hexameric Pyrogallolarene Capsules in Solution (pages 2244–2248)

      Dr. Miroslav Kvasnica, Jennifer C. Chapin and Prof. Byron W. Purse

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007800

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      Solvent matters: By carrying out the assembly of pyrogallolarene hexamers under thermal conditions in the absence of solvent, highly efficient loading of guest molecules to produce kinetically trapped assemblies was achieved. Such products are not formed when the solvents are present (see schematic).

    2. Asymmetric Synthesis

      Catalytic Enantioselective Protonation of α-Oxygenated Ester Enolates Prepared through Phospha-Brook Rearrangement (pages 2249–2252)

      Masashi Hayashi and Prof. Shuichi Nakamura

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007568

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      Phosphonates go chiral: The organocatalytic enantioselective reaction of α-ketoesters with phosphites using cinchona alkaloids and Na2CO3 has afforded α-phosphonyloxy esters with high enantioselectivities (see scheme). This process allows the formation of both enantiomers of the product. A catalyst loading of as low as 2 mol % does not result in a significant decrease of the enantioselectivity.

    3. Solid-State Photopolymerization

      Cis-Specific Topochemical Polymerization: Alternating Copolymerization of 7,7,8,8-Tetrakis(methoxycarbonyl)quinodimethane with 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane in the Solid State (pages 2253–2256)

      Prof. Dr. Takahito Itoh, Tatsuya Suzuki, Dr. Takahiro Uno, Prof. Dr. Masataka Kubo, Dr. Norimitsu Tohnai and Prof. Dr. Mikiji Miyata

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006928

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      From single crystal to single crystal: A crystalline charge-transfer complex of the title compounds underwent topochemical polymerization through a radical mechanism under UV irradiation or upon heating. This cis-specific solid-state copolymerization of the substituted quinodimethanes required the alternating monomers in the cocrystal to tilt (see picture).

    4. Single-Molecule Studies

      Watching the Annealing Process One Polymer Chain at a Time (pages 2257–2261)

      Dr. Jan Vogelsang, Dr. Johanna Brazard, Takuji Adachi, Dr. Joshua C. Bolinger and Prof. Dr. Paul F. Barbara

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007084

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      An inside job: By using single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) several effects of solvent vapor induced annealing (SVA) were studied directly on single conjugated polymers, e.g.: SVA-induced translocations, folding/unfolding dynamics, and changes in the morphological order. It is shown that single chains can be trapped by spin-coating in a disordered conformation and subsequent SVA leads to an equilibrated, highly ordered conformation (see picture).

    5. Biolabeling

      Superresolution Imaging of Albumin-Conjugated Fluorescent Nanodiamonds in Cells by Stimulated Emission Depletion (pages 2262–2265)

      Yan-Kai Tzeng, Dr. Orestis Faklaris, Be-Ming Chang, Yung Kuo, Dr. Jui-Hung Hsu and Dr. Huan-Cheng Chang

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007215

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      A bunch of loners: Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) noncovalently conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or α-lactalbumin exhibited good dispersibility in a buffer with only minor or no agglomeration. They are useful as photostable fluorescent markers in cells for superresolution imaging by STED (see confocal fluorescence image of an FND-labeled cell (left) and STED image of single BSA-conjugated FNDs (right)).

    6. Charge Transfer

      Charge State of Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Titania under Oxygen Pressure (pages 2266–2269)

      Soeren Porsgaard, Peng Jiang, Ferenc Borondics, Stefan Wendt, Zhi Liu, Hendrik Bluhm, Prof. Flemming Besenbacher and Prof. Miquel Salmeron

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005377

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      Reversible band bending induced by adsorption of molecular oxygen on TiO2(110) was revealed by studying the charge state of TiO2-supported Au nanoparticles under O2 pressure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (see picture). This result is important for correct assignment of charge-transfer phenomena on catalysts in general, and with regard to the high catalytic activity of Au/TiO2 catalysts in numerous reactions, including CO oxidation.

    7. Fuel Cells

      Catalytic Reactions in Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells (pages 2270–2274)

      Dr. In Kim, Dr. Oc Hee Han, Dr. Seen Ae Chae, Dr. Younkee Paik, Sung-Hyea Kwon, Dr. Kug-Seung Lee, Dr. Yung-Eun Sung and Dr. Hasuck Kim

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005745

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      Different anode catalysts (Pt/C, PtRu/C, Pt3Sn/C) and operating potentials lead to different product distributions in the anode exhaust of direct ethanol fuel cells, as shown by liquid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy (see typical spectrum). Addition of Ru or Sn to Pt/C increases current density, mainly because of enhanced acetic acid production, and the potential dependences of products give clues to reaction pathways of ethanol electro-oxidation.

    8. Macrocyclization in Cells

      Controlling Intracellular Macrocyclization for the Imaging of Protease Activity (pages 2275–2279)

      Dr. Deju Ye, Dr. Gaolin Liang, Man Lung Ma and Prof. Jianghong Rao

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006140

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      Reporters on the ground: An intramolecular macrocyclization reaction took place highly efficiently in live cells under the control of a specific enzyme and reduction by glutathione (GSH; see picture). Macrocyclic products (represented as blue rings) synthesized in cells self-assembled into nanoparticles aggregated and retained at the site near the enzyme location to report local proteolytic activity in live cells.

    9. Antiaromaticity

      Metal-Mediated Synthesis of Antiaromatic Porphyrinoids from a BODIPY Precursor (pages 2280–2283)

      Takafumi Sakida, Shigeru Yamaguchi and Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Shinokubo

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006314

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      Metallic route to antiaromaticity: The synthesis of a butadiyne-bridged cyclic BODIPY dimer (see structure; C white, B orange, N blue, F green) and trimer was achieved through Pd-catalyzed Stille coupling and Cu-mediated Glaser-type coupling. These cyclic BODIPYs were found to be stable 24π- and 36π-antiaromatic porphyrinoids with planar conformations, and their structures, electronic states, and reactivity were explored.

    10. RNA Interference

      Unique Gene-Silencing and Structural Properties of 2′-Fluoro-Modified siRNAs (pages 2284–2288)

      Dr. Muthiah Manoharan, Dr. Akin Akinc, Dr. Rajendra K. Pandey, June Qin, Dr. Philipp Hadwiger, Dr. Matthias John, Kathy Mills, Dr. Klaus Charisse, Dr. Martin A. Maier, Dr. Lubomir Nechev, Emily M. Greene, Dr. Pradeep S. Pallan, Prof. Eriks Rozners, Dr. Kallanthottathil G. Rajeev and Prof. Martin Egli

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006519

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      With little or no negative impact on the activity of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), regardless of the number of modifications or the positions within the strand, the 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro (2′-F) modification is unique. Furthermore, the 2′-F-modified siRNA (see crystal structure) was thermodynamically more stable and more nuclease-resistant than the parent siRNA, and produced no immunostimulatory response.

    11. Bioanalytical Methods

      Rapid microRNA Profiling on Encoded Gel Microparticles (pages 2289–2293)

      Stephen C. Chapin, Dr. David C. Appleyard, Dr. Daniel C. Pregibon and Prof. Patrick S. Doyle

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006523

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      Sensitive, flexible, and rapid: A post-hybridization labeling scheme was combined with a high-throughput microfluidic scanning system to demonstrate the use of graphically encoded gel particles for rapid microRNA quantification (see picture). A versatile particle encoding scheme allows for scalable multiplexing that provides attomole sensitivity with a simple and efficient workflow.

    12. Protein Translocation

      Chemical Dissection of Protein Translocation through the Anthrax Toxin Pore (pages 2294–2296)

      Brad L. Pentelute, Onkar Sharma and Prof. R. John Collier

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006460

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      Through the pore: The N-terminal domain of the lethal factor of anthrax toxin was modified to probe protein translocation through the toxin pore. Replacing acidic residues with cysteic acid inhibited translocation, whereas introduction of D-amino acids or an alternating Lys–Glu sequence had no effect. The findings demonstrate independence of translocation from stereospecificity and strict sequence, and dependence on the charge state of acidic residues.

    13. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis and Absolute Stereochemistry of Seragakinone A (pages 2297–2301)

      Akiomi Takada, Yoshimitsu Hashimoto, Dr. Hiroshi Takikawa, Katsuyoshi Hikita and Prof. Dr. Keisuke Suzuki

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006528

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      Cyclic transformation: The key transformations of the asymmetric total synthesis of the marine-derived natural product seragakinone A are two N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed benzoin cyclizations that result in the construction of two rings and a pinacol-type rearrangement to install the angular prenyl substituent.

    14. Porphyrinoids

      Singly N-Confused [26]Hexaphyrin: A Binucleating Porphyrinoid Ligand for Mixed Metals in Different Oxidation States (pages 2302–2306)

      Dr. Sabapathi Gokulnath, Keisuke Yamaguchi, Dr. Motoki Toganoh, Dr. Shigeki Mori, Prof. Dr. Hidemitsu Uno and Prof. Dr. Hiroyuki Furuta

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006784

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      Mix and match: The title porphyrinoid has been synthesized and shows unique coordination chemistry by incorporating two different metals with different oxidation states (see figure). X-ray crystallography was used to confirm that a rectangular conformation in both mono- and binuclear complexes was retained.

    15. Enzyme Assays

      Detection of Enzyme Activity through Catalytic Signal Amplification with Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles (pages 2307–2312)

      Dr. Renato Bonomi, Alessandro Cazzolaro, Dr. Anna Sansone, Prof. Dr. Paolo Scrimin and Dr. Leonard J. Prins

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007389

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      A cascade of two catalytic events was used to detect enzyme activity: When a peptide substrate acting as an inhibitor for a catalytic gold nanoparticle was hydrolyzed by an enzyme, the catalytic activity of the nanoparticle was restored, and a large amount of a yellow reporter molecule was produced (see picture; S=substrate, P=product). The assay can be made selective for a particular enzyme by changing the inhibitory peptide.

    16. Carbon Nanotubes

      Noncovalent Binding of Carbon Nanotubes by Porphyrin Oligomers (pages 2313–2316)

      Johannes K. Sprafke, Samuel D. Stranks, Dr. Jamie H. Warner, Prof. Robin J. Nicholas and Prof. Harry L. Anderson

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007295

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      Like the tentacles of an octopus: Porphyrin oligomers bind strongly to single-walled carbon nanotubes, and debundle multitube aggregates. The strength of this interaction increases sharply with the number of porphyrin units in the oligomer, and the affinity is greatest for chiral (7,5) and (8,6) tubes. Quantitative information on these noncovalent recognition processes was obtained from UV/Vis/NIR absorption (see picture) and fluorescence titrations.

    17. Cell Delivery

      Multifunctional Capsule-in-Capsules for Immunoprotection and Trimodal Imaging (pages 2317–2321)

      Dr. Jaeyun Kim, Dr. Dian R. Arifin, Dr. Naser Muja, Taeho Kim, Dr. Assaf A. Gilad, Dr. Heechul Kim, Dr. Aravind Arepally, Prof. Taeghwan Hyeon and Prof. Jeff W. M. Bulte

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007494

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      The separate encapsulation of nanoparticles (NPs) and pancreatic islets in an alginate capsule-in-capsule (CIC) structure prevents the nanoparticles being toxic to the cells while housing a high payload of nanoparticles for imaging purposes (see picture). The CIC-encapsulated islets showed an improved insulin secretion over cells encapsulated in single capsules and their transplantation into diabetic mice restored normal glycemia.

    18. Silicon Chemistry

      Zwitterionic Si-C-Si-P and Si-P-Si-P Four-Membered Rings with Two-Coordinate Phosphorus Atoms (pages 2322–2325)

      Dr. Sakya S. Sen, Dr. Shabana Khan, Prof. Dr. Herbert W. Roesky, Daniel Kratzert, Dr. Kathrin Meindl, Dr. Julian Henn, Prof. Dr. Dietmar Stalke, Jean-Philippe Demers and Dr. Adam Lange

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005866

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      It's hip to be square: The reaction of amidinato chlorosilylene (PhC(NtBu)2SiCl) with adamantyl phosphaalkyne and white phosphorus affords the formation of Si-C-Si-P and Si-P-Si-P (see picture) four-membered rings. Both compounds were characterized by single-crystal X-ray studies and by solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. DFT calculations elucidated the bonding situation.

    19. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Highly Active Catalysts of Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Three-Dimensionally Ordered Macroporous LaFeO3 for Soot Oxidation (pages 2326–2329)

      Yuechang Wei, Dr. Jian Liu, Prof. Zhen Zhao, Prof. Yongsheng Chen, Prof. Chunming Xu, Dr. Aijun Duan, Dr. Guiyuan Jiang and Prof. Hong He

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006014

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      The catalyst support 3DOM LaFeO3 contains highly ordered macropores that are connected with each other by small windows. 3DOM LaFeO3 supported gold catalysts, which combine the advantages of good contact by the macroporous support and highly active sites for activation of O2 by gold clusters, exhibit super catalytic performance for soot oxidation.

    20. Oligosaccharides

      The Total Synthesis of the Neurogenic Ganglioside LLG-3 Isolated from the Starfish Linckia laevigata (pages 2330–2333)

      Hideki Tamai, Dr. Hiromune Ando, Dr. Hide-Nori Tanaka, Ritsuko Hosoda-Yabe, Dr. Tomio Yabe, Dr. Hideharu Ishida and Dr. Makoto Kiso

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006035

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      A gift from the star: The title compound, which was identified in starfish, contains two sialic acid units and was constructed utilizing a sialic acid derivative as a pivotal precursor. The potentially difficult conjugation of the phytoceramide portion with the glycan portion was achieved through the glucosyl ceramide cassette approach.

    21. Nanowire Solar Cells

      Understanding the Origin of the Low Performance of Chemically Grown Silicon Nanowires for Solar Energy Conversion (pages 2334–2338)

      Guangbi Yuan, Kenneth Aruda, Sa Zhou, Andrew Levine, Jin Xie and Prof. Dr. Dunwei Wang

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006617

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      Wired: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ESI) reveals that high energy-conversion efficiencies are attainable on vertically aligned Si nanowires obtained by electroless etching (see picture). The key reason for the low performance of chemically grown Si nanowires lies in the mid-gap traps as a result of growth chemistry.

    22. In-Cell NMR Spectroscopy

      13C Direct-Detection Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy in Living Cells (pages 2339–2341)

      Prof. Ivano Bertini, Prof. Isabella C. Felli, Dr. Leonardo Gonnelli, Vasantha Kumar M. V. and Prof. Roberta Pierattelli

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006636

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      A direct response: Exclusively heteronuclear 13C direct-detection 2D NMR experiments are performed on 13C,15N-enriched proteins in E. coli cells. Unfolded proteins or protein fragments provide well-resolved carbonyl detection (see picture), whereas folded proteins or structured motifs do not give any detectable spectrum.

    23. C[BOND]H Functionalization

      Palladium-Catalyzed Carbocyclization of Alkynyl Ketones Proceeding through a Carbopalladation Pathway (pages 2342–2345)

      Natalia Chernyak, Dr. Serge I. Gorelsky and Prof. Vladimir Gevorgyan

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006751

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      Dig this: 5-exo-dig carbocyclization of 1 into 2 features intramolecular carbopalladation of alkyne with Pd enolate (see scheme). DFT calculations show that the key Pd enolate forms by deprotonation assisted byb PdII acetate. Subsequent intramolecular alkyne carbopalladation, Z–E isomerization of the formed vinyl palladium species, and protiodepalladation leads to E-alkylidene indanones.

    24. Catalyst Design

      A Chromium Ethylidene Complex as a Potent Catalyst for Selective Ethylene Trimerization (pages 2346–2349)

      Dr. Sebastiano Licciulli, Khalid Albahily, Valeria Fomitcheva, Dr. Ilia Korobkov, Prof. Dr. Sandro Gambarotta and Dr. Robbert Duchateau

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006953

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      Going one, twice… Reaction of the mononuclear complex [{η5-(tBu)2C4H2N}CrCl2(thf)] with AlEt3 afforded the dinuclear species [{[η5-(tBu)2C4H2N]CrEt}2(μ-Cl)2] (see picture; Cr purple, Cl green, C sticks/gray, H white). The complex acts a single-component selective trimerization catalyst; a higher loading of AlEt3 activator afforded isomerization of 1-hexene to cis, trans 2-hexene.

    25. Tandem Catalysis

      Tosylhydrazide-Promoted Palladium-Catalyzed Reaction of β-Aminoketones with o-Dihaloarenes: Combining Organocatalysis and Transition-Metal Catalysis (pages 2350–2353)

      Prof. José Barluenga, Noelia Quiñones, Dr. María-Paz Cabal, Prof. Fernando Aznar and Dr. Carlos Valdés

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006996

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      Working in tandem: Mannich adducts obtained by organocatalyzed processes are readily transformed into phenanthridine and quinoline derivatives by a Pd-catalyzed cascade reaction involving tosylhydrazide (TsNHNH2)-promoted cross-coupling followed by intramolecular amination (see scheme; MW=microwave). The enantioselectivity achieved in the organocatalytic reaction is maintained throughout the process.

    26. Sequential Catalysis

      Access to High Levels of Molecular Complexity by One-Pot Iridium/Enamine Asymmetric Catalysis (pages 2354–2358)

      Adrien Quintard, Prof. Dr. Alexandre Alexakis and Dr. Clément Mazet

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007001

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      Independent workers with team spirit: A catalytic sequence that exploits the compatibility of (chiral) cationic iridium catalysts for the isomerization of primary allylic alcohols to aldehydes with organocatalysts has been developed for the highly enantioselective α functionalization of aldehydes (see scheme: up to 66 % yield, d.r. 49:1, 99 % ee). The reaction displayed useful generality with respect to both the nucleophile and the electrophile.

    27. Chirality

      Metastability in Supersaturated Solution and Transition towards Chirality in the Crystallization of NaClO3 (pages 2359–2363)

      Dr. Zoubir El-Hachemi, Dr. Joaquim Crusats, Prof. Josep M. Ribó, Prof. J. Michael McBride and Dr. Sabino Veintemillas-Verdaguer

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007209

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      This way or that: Analysis of the chiral composition of the crystal mixture obtained from samples of boiling solutions of NaClO3 (see picture) indicates that symmetry breaking towards homochiral compositions may begin in the metastable stage preceding crystallization, that is, at the level of subcritical clusters.

    28. Electron Transfer

      Molecular Motion Inside an Adsorbed [5:1] Fullerene Hexaadduct Observed by Ultrafast Cyclic Voltammetry (pages 2364–2367)

      Dr. Philippe Fortgang, Prof. Emmanuel Maisonhaute, Prof. Christian Amatore, Dr. Béatrice Delavaux-Nicot, Dr. Julien Iehl and Prof. Jean-François Nierengarten

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007289

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      A rigid 3D scaffold in a 2D world! A mixed [5:1] fullerene hexaadduct that bears ten peripheral ferrocene redox subunits has been anchored onto a gold surface (see picture, green: iron, black: carbon, white: hydrogen, red: oxygen, blue: nitrogen). Ultrafast cyclic voltammetry investigations revealed that both intramolecular electron hopping and molecular motions influence the electron transfer from the ferrocene moieties to the electrode.

    29. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Activation of Vinyl Iodides for the Highly Enantioselective Addition to Aldehydes (pages 2368–2370)

      Dr. Albert M. DeBerardinis, Mark Turlington and Prof. Lin Pu

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007351

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      Mild and tolerant: Vinylzinc reagents were directly prepared from the reaction of vinyl iodides with ZnEt2 under mild reaction conditions. The compound (S)-1 was found to catalyze the addition of the vinylzinc reagents to a variety of aldehydes to generate structurally diverse allylic alcohols with high yields and enantioselectivities. This catalytic process can tolerate functional groups such as esters, chlorine, ethers, and silyl ethers on the substrates. acac=acetylacetonate, NMP=N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone.

    30. Clathrates

      Extension of the Clathrate Family: The Type X Clathrate Ge79P29S18Te6 (pages 2371–2374)

      Maria A. Kirsanova, Dr. Andrei V. Olenev, Dr. Artem M. Abakumov, Mikhail A. Bykov and Prof. Dr. Andrei V. Shevelkov

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007483

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Now they are 10! The title compound displays a new type of crystal structure and is labeled clathrate X according to the general classification of clathrate structures. In contrast to typical clathrates, this compound has three-coordinate atoms within the framework and combines distorted 24-vertex polyhedra (see picture, green) centered around tellurium guest atoms with very irregular 10-vertex polyhedra around sulfur atoms (yellow).

    31. Sustainable Chemistry

      Production of High-Quality Diesel from Biomass Waste Products (pages 2375–2378)

      Prof. Dr. Avelino Corma, Olalla de la Torre, Dr. Michael Renz and Dr. Nicolas Villandier

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007508

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-quality liquid fuels are obtained from non-edible carbohydrates by energy-efficient processes. 2-Methylfuran, produced by hydrogenation of furfural, is converted into 6-alkyl undecanes in a catalytic solvent-free process (see scheme with 6-butylundecane). A diesel fuel is produced with an excellent motor cetane number (71) and pour point (−90 °C) and with global process conversions and selectivities close to 90 %.

    32. Janus Particles

      Inorganic Janus Nanosheets (pages 2379–2382)

      Fuxin Liang, Ke Shen, Dr. Xiaozhong Qu, Dr. Chengliang Zhang, Dr. Qian Wang, Dr. Jiaoli Li, Dr. Jiguang Liu and Prof. Zhenzhong Yang

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007519

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Another face to Janus particles: Silica Janus nanosheets were synthesized by crushing Janus hollow spheres formed by self-assembled materialization of an amphiphilic emulsion interface. The Janus nanosheets serve as solid surfactants and can be used collecting oil or hazardous chemical spills.

    33. Uranium Carbene Complexes

      Uranium–Carbon Multiple Bonding: Facile Access to the Pentavalent Uranium Carbene [U{C(PPh2NSiMe3)2}(Cl)2(I)] and Comparison of UV[DOUBLE BOND]C and UIV[DOUBLE BOND]C Bonds (pages 2383–2386)

      Oliver J. Cooper, Dr. David P. Mills, Dr. Jonathan McMaster, Dr. Fabrizio Moro, Dr. E. Stephen Davies, Dr. William Lewis, Prof. Alexander J. Blake and Dr. Stephen T. Liddle

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007675

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A straightforward oxidation strategy affords the first pentavalent uranium carbene complex, 2. Owing to the structural similarity of 1 and 2, it was possible for the first time to directly probe the differences in U[DOUBLE BOND]C bonding on oxidation of UIV to UV.

    34. Oxidative C[BOND]H Arylation

      Oxidative Biaryl Coupling of Thiophenes and Thiazoles with Arylboronic Acids through Palladium Catalysis: Otherwise Difficult C4-Selective C[BOND]H Arylation Enabled by Boronic Acids (pages 2387–2391)

      Sylvia Kirchberg, Satoshi Tani, Kirika Ueda, Dr. Junichiro Yamaguchi, Prof. Dr. Armido Studer and Prof. Dr. Kenichiro Itami

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It adds up to 4! Thiophenes and thiazoles can be arylated in the 4- rather than the expected 5-position in a new C[BOND]H functionalization reaction (see scheme; TEMPO: 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl). The boronic acid proved to be the key to achieving the otherwise difficult C4 selectivity. The method was applied to a concise synthesis of a key pharmacological structure with potential for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    35. Carbon Monoxide Release

      Acyloxybutadiene Iron Tricarbonyl Complexes as Enzyme-Triggered CO-Releasing Molecules (ET-CORMs) (pages 2392–2396)

      Dipl.-Chem. Steffen Romanski, Dr. Birgit Kraus, Prof. Dr. Ulrich Schatzschneider, Dr. Jörg-Martin Neudörfl, Dr. Sabine Amslinger and Prof. Dr. Hans-Günther Schmalz

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006598

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molecular hazardous materials transport: Enzyme-triggered CO-releasing molecules (ET-CORMs) offer new options for the delivery of CO. The cleavage of dienylester iron tricarbonyl complexes by an esterase under mild oxidative conditions generates CO, which causes a strong inhibiting activity of the compounds to inducible nitric oxide synthase as shown in a cellular assay.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Acyloxybutadiene Iron Tricarbonyl Complexes as Enzyme-Triggered CO-Releasing Molecules (ET-CORMs)

      Vol. 50, Issue 18, 4038, Article first published online: 20 APR 2011

    36. Metalloporphyrins

      Iron Catalysis for In Situ Regeneration of Oxidized Cofactors by Activation and Reduction of Molecular Oxygen: A Synthetic Metalloporphyrin as a Biomimetic NAD(P)H Oxidase (pages 2397–2400)

      Dr. Harald Maid, Philipp Böhm, Dr. Stefan M. Huber, Prof. Dr. Walter Bauer, Prof. Dr. Werner Hummel, Priv.-Doz.%emsp14;Dr. Norbert Jux and Prof. Dr. Harald Gröger

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An enzyme substitute: A synthetic FeIII porphyrin was used as a catalyst for the activation and reduction of O2 into H2O with the cofactor NAD(P)H in aqueous solution. The catalyst is compatible with different preparative enzymatic oxidation reactions. Thus, a new method is provided for the in situ regeneration of the oxidized cofactor NAD(P)+ with help from a non-enzymatic, synthetic catalyst (see scheme).

    37. Ion-Mobility Mass Spectrometry

      In-Flight Epimerization of a Bis-Tröger Base (pages 2401–2404)

      Ágnes Révész, Dr. Detlef Schröder, Dr. Tibor András Rokob, Dr. Martin Havlík and Dr. Bohumil Dolenský

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Increased mobility is observed for the sodiated syn and anti isomers of bis-Tröger base 1 relative to that of the protonated variants. Ion-mobility measurements further demonstrate that the pseudo-epimerization of the bis-Tröger base proceeds by a proton-mediated ring opening rather than a retro-Diels–Alder sequence.

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      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 11/2011 (page 2405)

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190017

  11. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlights
    9. Review
    10. Communications
    11. Preview
    12. Back Cover
    1. Back Cover: Understanding the Origin of the Low Performance of Chemically Grown Silicon Nanowires for Solar Energy Conversion (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2011) (page 2406)

      Guangbi Yuan, Kenneth Aruda, Sa Zhou, Andrew Levine, Jin Xie and Prof. Dr. Dunwei Wang

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100626

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The mid-gap traps as a result of growth chemistry are the main reason for low solar energy conversion efficiencies of chemically grown silicon nanowires. In their Communication on page 2334 ff. D. Wang et al. compare silicon nanowires of the same dimension, doping level, and crystallinity obtained by either electroless etching or chemical growth by using electrochemical techniques.

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