Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 15

April 4, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 15

Pages 3325–3574

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Cover Picture: Total Synthesis of Pactamycin (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 15/2011) (page 3325)

      Prof. Dr. Stephen Hanessian, Dr. Ramkrishna Reddy Vakiti, Stéphane Dorich, Dr. Shyamapada Banerjee, Dr. Fabien Lecomte, Dr. Juan R. DelValle, Jianbin Zhang and Benoît Deschênes-Simard

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101592

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      Packing dense functionality in a cyclopentane framework is how the soil microorganism Streptomyces pactum produces pactamycin, a cytotoxic and antibacterial aminocyclopentitol. S. Hanessian and co-workers describe the first total synthesis of pactamycin in their Communication on page 3497 ff. The image shows intermediates that eventually culminate in pactamycin. The inserts show B. subtilis (green), crystals of Thermus thermophilus (magenta), and the binding of pactamycin in the 30 S RNA subunit (according to Ramakrishnan et al.) against a background of S. pactum.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Inside Cover: A Self-Assembled M8L6 Cubic Cage that Selectively Encapsulates Large Aromatic Guests (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 15/2011) (page 3326)

      Wenjing Meng, Dr. Boris Breiner, Prof. Kari Rissanen, Prof. John D. Thoburn, Dr. Jack K. Clegg and Dr. Jonathan R. Nitschke

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101114

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      All wrapped up A series of porphyrin-faced M8L6 cubic cages that enclose a volume in excess of 1300 Å3 are reported by J. R. Nitschke and co-workers in their Communication on page 3479 ff. The walls of the cubes provide favorable sites for π–π interactions, thus leading to selectivity between large and chemically similar aromatic guests such as C60, C70, C76, C78, C82, and C84, and the inclusion of three equivalents of coronene.

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
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  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 15/2011 (pages 3332–3343)

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190027

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Helmuth Möhwald (pages 3350–3352)

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007793

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      “My favorite subject at school was mathematics. The biggest problem that scientists face is to realize that the purpose of science is to predominantly serve people, not the other way around …” This and more about Helmuth Möhwald can be found on page 3350.

  7. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Heinz Günther Viehe (19292010) (pages 3353–3354)

      Léon Ghosez and Istvan Marko

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100131

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Ligands that Store and Release Electrons during Catalysis (pages 3356–3358)

      Wojciech I. Dzik, Dr. Jarl Ivar van der Vlugt, Prof. Dr. Joost N. H. Reek and Dr. Bas de Bruin

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006778

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      Electron(ic) banking: First-row transition metals can be given a noble character by redox-active ligands, thus enabling two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination steps (see scheme). A recently reported cobalt-mediated Negishi-type cross-coupling reaction provides an illustrative example of this concept and reveals its potential to develop new catalytic reactions with cheap, abundant metals.

    2. Molecular Motors

      Synthetic Molecular Bipeds (pages 3359–3361)

      Dr. Emilio M. Pérez

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006946

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      Standing on their own two feet! Inspired by naturally occurring molecular motors such as kinesins, dyneins, and myosins, a series of small-molecule walker systems have been synthesized (see picture). These artificial molecular motors are capable of moving directionally along their associated tracks, and show most of the features of their natural counterparts.

  9. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. C[BOND]H Activation

      If C[BOND]H Bonds Could Talk: Selective C[BOND]H Bond Oxidation (pages 3362–3374)

      Timothy Newhouse and Prof. Dr. Phil S. Baran

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006368

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      Let the molecule do the talking: If C[BOND]H bonds could talk, they would tell stories of inductive effects, conjugation, hyperconjugation, steric hindrance, and strain release. These stories are told from the perspective of synthetic planning and draw from the immense body of literature on the topic.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. J-Aggregates

      J-Aggregates: From Serendipitous Discovery to Supramolecular Engineering of Functional Dye Materials (pages 3376–3410)

      Prof. Dr. Frank Würthner, Dr. Theo E. Kaiser and Dr. Chantu R. Saha-Möller

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002307

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      After more than 75 years since their discovery, J-aggregates are continuing to be of great interest. This Review provides an overview on J-aggregates of various classes of dyes, including cyanines, porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and perylene bisimides, with specific emphasis on supramolecular construction principles, optical properties, and perspectives for applications.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Nanowire Separation

      Cross-Flow Purification of Nanowires (pages 3412–3416)

      Ken C. Pradel, Kwonnam Sohn and Prof. Jiaxing Huang

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100087

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      Separating the wheat from the chaff: Cross-flow filtration is shown to be an effective method to remove particle by-products from, for example, silver nanowires. To quantify the effect of purification, number- and weight-average aspect ratios and a polydispersity index are defined, which borrow concepts of molecular weight distributions from polymer science.

    2. Nanosensors

      Quantum-Dot-Based FRET Detection of Histone Acetyltransferase Activity (pages 3417–3420)

      Dr. James E. Ghadiali, Stuart B. Lowe and Prof. Molly M. Stevens

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008263

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      Straightforward and label-free: A simple method for the detection of histone-modifying enzymes is based on quantum dot (QD) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) donors. Histone acetyltransferase activity can be measured via the enzyme-dependent assembly of a quantum dot/peptide immunocomplex (see picture; His=histidine), which can be conducted in a homogeneous reaction without the need for complicated surface derivatization procedures.

    3. Self-Assembly

      Responsive Vesicles from Dynamic Covalent Surfactants (pages 3421–3424)

      Christophe B. Minkenberg, Dr. Feng Li, Dr. Patrick van Rijn, Louw Florusse, Job Boekhoven, Dr. Marc C. A. Stuart, Dr. Ger J. M. Koper, Dr. Rienk Eelkema and Prof. Dr. Jan H. van Esch

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007401

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      Breaking bilayers: Incorporation of dynamic covalent bonds in vesicle-forming surfactants leads to the formation of responsive vesicles, which can be switched back and forth between the bilayer state and the isotropic solution using either dilution or a change in the pH value as external stimuli.

    4. Delivery Platforms

      Multifunctional Trackable Dendritic Scaffolds and Delivery Agents (pages 3425–3429)

      Dr. Roey J. Amir, Lorenzo Albertazzi, Jenny Willis, Dr. Anzar Khan, Taegon Kang and Prof. Craig J. Hawker

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007427

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      Dual action: Trackable multifunctional dendritic scaffolds with high internal loading capacity were synthesized based on a PEG core. Orthogonal functionalization of chain-end and internal groups allowed the dendrimers to be both labeled and loaded with releasable dyes for simultaneous monitoring of the dendritic carrier and release of the dye payload inside living cells (see picture).

    5. In Vivo Probes

      Design of Highly Emissive Polymer Dot Bioconjugates for In Vivo Tumor Targeting (pages 3430–3434)

      Changfeng Wu, Stacey J. Hansen, Prof. Qiong Hou, Jiangbo Yu, Maxwell Zeigler, Yuhui Jin, Daniel R. Burnham, Prof. Jason D. McNeill, Prof. James M. Olson and Prof. Daniel T. Chiu

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007461

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      Lighting up brain tumors: Highly fluorescent nanodots that consist of semiconducting polymer blends were attached to the peptide ligand chlorotoxin. The nanodot–chlorotoxin conjugates were specifically targeted to malignant brain tumors in a transgenic mouse model, thus proving their potential as in vivo probes for clinical cancer diagnostics (see picture).

    6. Alkyne Metathesis

      Introducing A Podand Motif to Alkyne Metathesis Catalyst Design: A Highly Active Multidentate Molybdenum(VI) Catalyst that Resists Alkyne Polymerization (pages 3435–3438)

      Dr. Kuthanapillil Jyothish and Prof. Dr. Wei Zhang

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007559

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      Podand prevents polymers: The molybdenum(VI) propylidyne catalyst 1 with a podand triphenolamine ligand shows high activity in the metathesis of a variety of alkyne substrates, including heterocycles that contain donor moieties. With one substrate-binding site blocked by the multidentate ligand, the undesired polymerization of small alkynes that occurs with non-podand-ligand complex 2 is completely inhibited.

    7. Stem Cells

      Dorsomorphin Promotes Human Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal (pages 3439–3441)

      Dr. Rodolfo Gonzalez, Dr. Jae Wook Lee, Prof. Evan Y. Snyder and Prof. Peter G. Schultz

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005659

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      Self-renewal promoter: Using a high-throughput screening assay, the small molecule dorsomorphin (see scheme) was identified as a positive regulator of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) self-renewal. It is shown that dorsomorphin promotes hESC self-renewal by antagonizing autocrine BMP signaling.

    8. Click Chemistry

      Copper-Mediated Amplification Allows Readout of Immunoassays by the Naked Eye (pages 3442–3445)

      Weisi Qu, Yingyi Liu, Dingbin Liu, Prof. Zhuo Wang and Prof. Xingyu Jiang

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006025

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      An eye for color: Antibodies modified by CuO nanoparticles (NPs) are subjected to immunoreaction with the release of CuII, which can be detected by click chemistry. The Cu acts as a catalyst that induces aggregation of Au NPs functionalized with azide and alkyne groups, which can be seen as a color change (see picture). The detection of HIV in blood serum of infected patients is demonstrated.

    9. Iron-Mediated N2 Fixation

      Transformation of an [Fe(η2-N2H3)]+ Species to π-Delocalized [Fe2(μ-N2H2)]2+/+ Complexes (pages 3446–3449)

      Caroline T. Saouma, R. Adam Kinney, Prof. Brian M. Hoffman and Prof. Jonas C. Peters

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006299

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      Diiron diazenes: A monomeric Fe(η2-N2H3) species has been prepared, and exposure to oxygen yields a diiron complex that features five-coordinate iron centers and an activated bridging diazene ligand (see picture; C gray, N blue, Fe black, P red, O green). Structural, theoretical, and spectroscopic data for the redox pair [Fe2(μ-N2H2)]2+/+ are consistent with 4-center, 4-electron π-delocalized bonding across the Fe-NH-NH-Fe core that finds analogy in butadiene and the butadiene anion.

    10. Nanopatterning

      Self-Assembled Arrays of Dendrimer–Gold-Nanoparticle Hybrids for Functional Cell Studies (pages 3450–3453)

      Anders Lundgren, Yvonne Hed, Kim Öberg, Dr. Anders Sellborn, Dr. Helen Fink, Dr. Peter Löwenhielm, Dr. Jonathan Kelly, Dr. Michael Malkoch and Dr. Mattias Berglin

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006544

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      Dendrimer-controlled cell growth: A dendrimer–gold-nanoparticle hybrid array (see picture; PEG=polyethylene glycol), which can control the apparent dendrimer surface density, was used to investigate cell adhesion. The effect of the macromolecular architecture on the attachment and the morphological development of endothelial cells was studied. The dendrimer outperformed a linear counterpart, most likely modulated by the different interactions between the dendrimer and the proteins in the cell media.

    11. Bubble Coalescence

      Anomalous Stability of Carbon Dioxide in pH-Controlled Bubble Coalescence (pages 3454–3456)

      Dr. Rico F. Tabor, Prof. Derek Y. C. Chan, Prof. Franz Grieser and Prof. Raymond R. Dagastine

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006552

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      A new piece of the puzzle: Bubbles represent one of the simplest and most pervasive entities in the world around us, occurring in almost all liquid systems. The controlled collision between two microbubbles in water was investigated (see experimental setup) to understand the effect of gas type and solution pH on their stability, using ubiquitous gases—pure CO2, air, nitrogen, and argon.

    12. Carbon Nanotubes

      Highly-Ordered Covalent Anchoring of Carbon Nanotubes on Electrode Surfaces by Diazonium Salt Reactions (pages 3457–3461)

      Prof. Olimpia Arias de Fuentes, Prof. Tommaso Ferri, Dr. Marco Frasconi, Valerio Paolini and Prof. Roberto Santucci

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006743

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      Tubes in file: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were covalently anchored on different substrates by diazonium salt reactions (see picture). This unprecedented approach is highly versatile and leads to stable and well-organized SWCNT assemblies with potential for practical applications.

    13. DNA Assay

      One-Step Homogeneous DNA Assay with Single-Nanoparticle Detection (pages 3462–3465)

      Guojun Han, Zhi Xing, Yanhua Dong, Dr. Sichun Zhang and Prof. Xinrong Zhang

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006838

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      Staying single: A DNA hybridization assay employs gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) probes and single-particle inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP-MS; see picture). The degree of aggregation of AuNPs is characterized by simultaneous measurement of decreased concentrations of the AuNP population and increased individual sizes.

    14. Bimetallic Nanocrystals

      Polyhedral Bimetallic Alloy Nanocrystals Exclusively Bound by {110} Facets: Au–Pd Rhombic Dodecahedra (pages 3466–3470)

      Young Wook Lee, Minjung Kim, Shin Wook Kang and Prof. Sang Woo Han

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007220

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      {110}-faceted alloy nanocrystals: Rhombic dodecahedral Au–Pd alloy nanocrystals (NCs) enclosed exclusively by 12 {110} facets were prepared by a simple one-pot aqueous synthetic method. The picture shows an SEM image of the NCs (inset: ideal RD structure). The NCs exhibit higher surface-enhanced Raman scattering and electrocatalytic activities than {111}-faceted nanoparticles.

    15. Nanohybridization

      Nanohybridization of Polyoxometalate Clusters and Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Applications in Molecular Cluster Batteries (pages 3471–3474)

      Naoya Kawasaki, Heng Wang, Ryo Nakanishi, Shun Hamanaka, Dr. Ryo Kitaura, Prof. Hisanori Shinohara, Prof. Toshihiko Yokoyama, Dr. Hirofumi Yoshikawa and Prof. Kunio Awaga

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007264

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      Charging clusters: A hybrid of polyoxometalate (POM) molecules individually adsorbed onto the surfaces of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be used as a cathode-active material in rechargeable lithium batteries. This POM/SWNT battery exhibited a very high capacity (>300 Ah kg−1) with a short charging/discharging time (<2 h).

    16. Porphyrinoids

      Palladium(II)-Triggered Rearrangement of Heptaphyrins to N-Confused Porphyrins (pages 3475–3478)

      Tomoki Yoneda, Dr. Shohei Saito, Prof. Dr. Hideki Yorimitsu and Prof. Dr. Atsuhiro Osuka

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100243

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      More confused: Metalation reactions of [32]heptaphyrins(1.1.1.1.1.1.1) with PdII ions result in a rearrangement to form PdII complexes that contain an N-confused-porphyrin (NCP) framework (see scheme). This rearrangement was also demonstrated for a monozinc(II) heptaphyrin complex with a figure-eight conformation. The occurrence of these transformations shows that NCPs can now be considered a member of the expanded porphyrin family.

    17. Container Molecules

      A Self-Assembled M8L6 Cubic Cage that Selectively Encapsulates Large Aromatic Guests (pages 3479–3483)

      Wenjing Meng, Dr. Boris Breiner, Prof. Kari Rissanen, Prof. John D. Thoburn, Dr. Jack K. Clegg and Dr. Jonathan R. Nitschke

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100193

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      Porphyrins cubed: A series of self-assembled M8L6 cubic cages that enclose a volume in excess of 1300 Å3 were synthesized (see scheme). The porphyrinic walls of the cubes provide favorable sites for π–π interactions, leading to selectivity between large and chemically similar aromatic guests: three molecules of coronene are incorporated and the higher fullerenes C70–C84 are selectively bound in the presence of excess C60.

    18. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Asymmetric Inverse-Electron-Demand Hetero-Diels–Alder Reaction of Six-membered Cyclic Ketones: An Enamine/Metal Lewis Acid Bifunctional Approach (pages 3484–3488)

      Dr. Zhenghu Xu, Dr. Lu Liu, Prof. Dr. Kraig Wheeler and Prof. Dr. Hong Wang

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100160

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      On demand: The first example of the title reaction involving cyclic ketones and β,γ-unsaturated α-ketoesters has been achieved using the novel enamine/metal Lewis acid bifunctional catalysis (see scheme; Tf=trifluoromethanesulfonyl). Enones with both electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups at the γ position reacted smoothly with cyclohexanone affording the products in excellent chemo- and enantioselectivity.

    19. Organocatalysis

      Asymmetric Inverse-Electron-Demand 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition of C,N-Cyclic Azomethine Imines: An Umpolung Strategy (pages 3489–3492)

      Dr. Takuya Hashimoto, Masato Omote and Prof. Dr. Keiji Maruoka

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100331

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      Oompa loompa: The title reaction has been accomplished with high stereoselectivity by use of an axially chiral dicarboxylic acid (see scheme). Employment of vinylogous aza-enamines as novel dipolarophiles was also implemented to establish a new concept of the inverse-electron-demand umpolung 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. Bz=benzoyl, EDG=electron-donating group.

    20. Synthetic Methods

      Enantioselective Iridium-Catalyzed Vinylogous Reformatsky-Aldol Reaction from the Alcohol Oxidation Level: Linear Regioselectivity by Way of Carbon-Bound Enolates (pages 3493–3496)

      Abbas Hassan, Jason R. Zbieg and Prof. Michael J. Krische

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100646

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      Reformatsky reinvented: Highly enantioselective vinylogous Reformatsky-type addition has been achieved from the alcohol oxidation level with linear regioselectivity through carbon-bound enolates (see scheme; Boc=tert-butoxycarbonyl). Complete levels of catalyst-directed diastereoselectivity are observed in the reaction of an α-chiral alcohol.

    21. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of Pactamycin (pages 3497–3500)

      Prof. Dr. Stephen Hanessian, Dr. Ramkrishna Reddy Vakiti, Stéphane Dorich, Dr. Shyamapada Banerjee, Dr. Fabien Lecomte, Dr. Juan R. DelValle, Jianbin Zhang and Benoît Deschênes-Simard

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008079

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      Lest we forget: 50 years after pactamycin was first isolated from a fermentation broth of Streptomyces pactum var pactum, this highly functionalized aminocyclopentitol natural product has finally succumbed to total synthesis. The modular and stereocontrolled introduction of functional groups should lead to the synthesis of less toxic congeners that maintain the antibacterial and cytotoxic activities.

    22. Photocatalysis

      Titanium(IV) Dioxide Surface-Modified with Iron Oxide as a Visible Light Photocatalyst (pages 3501–3505)

      Prof. Dr. Hiroaki Tada, Qiliang Jin, Hiroaki Nishijima, Hironori Yamamoto, Dr. Musashi Fujishima, Shin-ichi Okuoka, Takanori Hattori, Yasutaka Sumida and Prof. Dr. Hisayoshi Kobayashi

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007869

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      The light fandango: Anatase and anatase–rutile composite TiO2 has been modified electronically with highly dispersed surface iron oxide species. The chemisorption–calcination cycle technique was used with [Fe(acac)3] as a precursor (acac=acetylacetonate), leading to pronounced visible-light activity and a concomitant increase in activity under illumination with UV light (cb=conduction band, vb=valence band).

    23. Aromatic Macrocycles

      Triflate-Subphthalocyanines: Versatile, Reactive Intermediates for Axial Functionalization at the Boron Atom (pages 3506–3509)

      Julia Guilleme, Dr. David González-Rodríguez and Prof. Tomas Torres

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007240

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      On the leave: Easily generated triflate boron subphthalocyanines are highly activated universal substrates for efficient axial substitution reactions with oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon nucleophiles (see picture).

    24. C[BOND]C Coupling

      Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Cross-Coupling of N-Tosylhydrazones or Diazoesters with Terminal Alkynes: A Route to Conjugated Enynes (pages 3510–3514)

      Dr. Lei Zhou, Fei Ye, Jiachen Ma, Dr. Yan Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jianbo Wang

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007224

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      Coming at them from another angle: In a fresh approach to the synthesis of conjugated alkynes, the palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling of N-tosylhydrazones or diazoesters with terminal alkynes provided the desired enyne products with excellent stereoselectivity (see scheme; Ts=p-toluenesulfonyl). The reaction is proposed to involve an unprecedented alkynyl migratory insertion of a palladium carbene complex.

    25. Core–Shell Structures

      Gold@Polymer Nanostructures with Tunable Permeability Shells for Selective Catalysis (pages 3515–3519)

      Dr. Conghui Yuan, Dr. Weiang Luo, Lina Zhong, Hujun Deng, Dr. Jie Liu, Prof. Yiting Xu and Prof. Lizong Dai

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007077

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      A heart of gold: Au@polymer nanostructures with hydrophobic mesoporous shells show tunable permeability and Au cores with adjustable diameters. This nanocomposite exhibits selective catalytic activity for hydrophobic molecules.

    26. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

      Low-Cost Molybdenum Carbide and Tungsten Carbide Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 3520–3524)

      Dr. Mingxing Wu, M. Sc. Xiao Lin, Prof. Anders Hagfeldt and Prof. Tingli Ma

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006635

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      Sunny prospects for renewable energy: Molybdenum and tungsten carbides embedded in ordered nanomesoporous carbon materials as well as Mo2C and WC are proposed as alternatives to the expensive platinum counter electrode (Pt CE). The preparation of the CEs was optimized, and the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs; see picture) equipped with these CEs show a higher energy conversion efficiency than those devices with a Pt CE.

    27. Microreactors

      Safe and Efficient Tetrazole Synthesis in a Continuous-Flow Microreactor (pages 3525–3528)

      Dr. Prakash B. Palde and Prof. Dr. Timothy F. Jamison

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006272

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      Safer flow: The synthesis of 5-substituted tetrazoles in flow (see scheme) is safe, efficient, scalable, requires no metal promoter, and uses a near-equimolar amount of NaN3, yet nonetheless displays a broad substrate scope. The hazards associated with HN3 are essentially eliminated, shock-sensitive metal azides such as Zn(N3)2 are avoided, and residual NaN3 is quenched in-line with NaNO2.

    28. Polymerization Catalysts

      Salalen Titanium Complexes in the Highly Isospecific Polymerization of 1-Hexene and Propylene (pages 3529–3532)

      Konstantin Press, Ad Cohen, Prof. Israel Goldberg, Prof. Vincenzo Venditto, Dr. Mina Mazzeo and Prof. Moshe Kol

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007678

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All lined up: C1-symmetric octahedral titanium complexes (see structure, Ti dark gray, N blue, O red, I purple) whose labile positions reside in different electronic environments were designed using the readily available salalen ligands. With methylalumoxane as co-catalyst, highly active catalysts were obtained, which yielded high-molecular-weight polypropylene with ultra-high isotacticities (see 13C NMR spectrum) and melting transitions.

    29. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Ligand–Metal Cooperation in PCP Pincer Complexes: Rational Design and Catalytic Activity in Acceptorless Dehydrogenation of Alcohols (pages 3533–3537)

      Sanaa Musa, Irina Shaposhnikov, Dr. Shmuel Cohen and Prof. Dmitri Gelman

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007367

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A helping hand: The dibenzobarrelene-based PCmath imageP pincer complex 1 was designed as a bifunctional catalyst for the acceptorless dehydrogenation of alcohols. The mechanism of the H2 release involves interaction between the hydride ligand and the acidic sidearm in the intermediate 2 (red O, yellow Cl, green P, blue Ir). The feasibility of the complete catalytic cycle was studied using a stoichiometric model and the reaction was subsequently realized in a catalytic fashion.

    30. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Catalytic Enantioselective Alkynylation of Trifluoromethyl Ketones: Pronounced Metal Fluoride Effects and Implications of Zinc-to-Titanium Transmetallation (pages 3538–3542)

      Guang-Wu Zhang, Wei Meng, Hai Ma, Jing Nie, Wen-Qin Zhang and Prof. Jun-An Ma

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007341

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lost in transmetalation: The titanium(IV)-catalyzed title reaction, utilizing chiral cinchona alkaloids as ligands (L1 and L2), was developed for the synthesis of both enantiomers of trifluoromethylated propargylic tertiary alcohols in high yield and enantioselectivity. Small amounts of BaF2 were found to be essential for maintaining high levels of reactivity and enantioselectivity.

    31. Heterometallic Nanostructures

      Plasmon-Mediated Synthesis of Heterometallic Nanorods and Icosahedra (pages 3543–3547)

      Mark R. Langille, Jian Zhang and Prof. Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007755

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bimetallic nanoparticles: Au–Ag core–shell heterometallic nanorods and icosahedra can be prepared from Au decahedral seed particles using plasmon-mediated synthetic methods and adjusting the pH value of the solution (see picture). This method allows for the preparation of icosahedral nanostructures with an asymmetric metal distribution.

    32. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Palladium-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation of β-ketoesters: An Unusual Counterion Effect (pages 3548–3551)

      Prof. Barry M. Trost, Dr. Benjamin Schäffner, Maksim Osipov and Dr. Donna A. A. Wilton

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007803

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Buy one, get one free: Both enantiomers of tetralone and indanone derivatives are available in a one-pot procedure from allyl chloroformate and their β-ketoesters by using the same catalyst system (see scheme; dba=dibenzylideneacetone, 1,2-DCE=1,2-dichloroethane, THF=tetrahydrofuran). The details of this remarkable effect were investigated by performing scavenging experiments and a variety of substrates were successfully used in the procedure.

    33. Tandem Reactions

      A Regio- and Diastereoselective Platinum-Catalyzed Tandem [2+1]/[3+2] Cycloaddition Sequence (pages 3552–3556)

      Dr. Thierry Achard, Aymeric Lepronier, Dr. Yves Gimbert, Dr. Hervé Clavier, Dr. Laurent Giordano, Dr. Alphonse Tenaglia and Prof. Dr. Gérard Buono

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007992

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Platinum complexes bearing phosphinous acids have efficiently promoted a tandem intermolecular sequence of [2+1]/[3+2] cycloaddition reactions. This process gave access to novel tricyclic systems and the cascade reactions were regio- and diastereoselective (see scheme; Cy=cyclohexyl). The [3+2] cycloaddition reaction was investigated further and two different alkyne partners were used.

    34. Heteroacenes

      An Efficient Synthesis of Tetraazapentacenes (pages 3557–3560)

      Olena Tverskoy, Dr. Frank Rominger, Anastasia Peters, Prof. Hans-Jörg Himmel and Prof. Uwe H. F. Bunz

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007654

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic electronics on demand? The palladium-catalyzed coupling of aromatic ortho-diamines with substituted dichloroquinoxalines furnishes N,N-dihydrotetraazaacenes, which were oxidized by MnO2 into the corresponding tetraazapentacenes (see structures; N blue, Cl green, Si yellow). The modular synthesis of these acenes allows the introduction of any substituent by choice of the proper quinoxaline derivative.

    35. Electronic Materials

      Towards Tunable Graphene/Phthalocyanine–PPV Hybrid Systems (pages 3561–3565)

      Jenny Malig, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Norbert Jux, Daniel Kiessling, Dr. Juan-José Cid, Prof. Purificación Vázquez, Prof. Tomás Torres and Prof. Dirk M. Guldi

      Article first published online: 9 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003364

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Exfoliation of graphite was achieved using a zinc phthalocyanine oligomer that is also an electron donor. The resulting functionalized graphene material was investigated by Raman and electron spectroscopy and was trialed in a photoelectrochemical cell.

    36. Designed Catalysts

      A Catalyst for the Simultaneous Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization/Vinyl Insertion Polymerization (pages 3566–3571)

      Prof. Dr. Michael R. Buchmeiser, Dr. Sebnem Camadanli, Dr. Dongren Wang, Dr. Yuanlin Zou, Dr. Ulrich Decker, Christa Kühnel and Ingrid Reinhardt

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Come together: Catalyst 1, which contains a diethylboryl-protected pyridyl unit, copolymerizes ethylene and cyclic olefins such as norborn-2-ene (NBE) and cis-cyclooctene (COE) to give multiblock copolymers. Both vinyl insertion polymerization and ring-opening metathesis polymerization are in effect within a single polymer chain, and the respective NBE and COE blocks can be obtained in different ratios.

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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    14. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 16/2011 (page 3573)

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190028

  13. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Obituary
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Back Cover: Salalen Titanium Complexes in the Highly Isospecific Polymerization of 1-Hexene and Propylene (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 15/2011) (page 3574)

      Konstantin Press, Ad Cohen, Prof. Israel Goldberg, Prof. Vincenzo Venditto, Dr. Mina Mazzeo and Prof. Moshe Kol

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101506

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An array of road signs indicating no parking, no entry, and parking make it clear for the bound polymeryl group which quadrant it should occupy. In their Communication on page 3529 ff., M. Kol et al. describe how the combined action of electronic and steric effects in octahedral polymerization catalysts controls enantiofacial monomer insertion, thus leading to ultra-highly isotactic polypropylene. (Artwork by Tremani)

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