Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 18

April 26, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 18

Pages 4023–4235

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Micromachine-Enabled Capture and Isolation of Cancer Cells in Complex Media (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 18/2011) (page 4023)

      Dr. Shankar Balasubramanian, Daniel Kagan, Che-Ming Jack Hu, Dr. Susana Campuzano, Dr. M. Jesus Lobo-Castañon, Nicole Lim, Dae Y. Kang, Maria Zimmerman, Dr. Liangfang Zhang and Prof. Joseph Wang

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102193

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antibody-functionalized microengine rockets can selectively capture and transport pancreatic cancer cells in complex biological media. In their Communication on page 4161 ff., Zhang, Wang, and co-workers report that these microrockets recognize individual cancer cells from a cell mixture with high selectivity. This strategy holds promise for the design of bioanalytical protocols and microchip devices for early-stage tumor cell detection.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Polyoxometalates as Inhibitors of the Aggregation of Amyloid β Peptides Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 18/2011) (page 4024)

      Jie Geng, Meng Li, Prof. Jinsong Ren, Prof. Enbo Wang and Prof. Xiaogang Qu

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102185

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Four types of polyoxometalates(POMs) have been found to be efficient inhibitors of amyloid formation by amyloid β peptides (Aβ) associated with Alzheimer's disease. X. Qu and co-workers show in their Communication on page 4184 ff. that the inhibition selectivity of the POMs is due to size-specific electrostatic interactions between the POMs and Aβ, with the POMs binding to the positively charged His13–Lys16 cluster region of Aβ.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Simple Synthesis and Functionalization of Iron Nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 18/2011) (page 4024)

      Dr. Soshan Cheong, Dr. Peter Ferguson, Dr. Kirk W. Feindel, Dr. Ian F. Hermans, Prof. Paul T. Callaghan, Dr. Claire Meyer, Angela Slocombe, Dr. Chia-Hao Su, Prof. Fong-Yu Cheng, Prof. Chen-Sheng Yeh, Dr. Bridget Ingham, Dr. Michael F. Toney and Prof. Richard D. Tilley

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102240

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Strongly magnetic single-crystal iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles have been synthesized in a facile manner without the need for highly toxic precursors (DMSA=dimercaptosuccinic acid, OLA=oleylamine). R. D. Tilley et al. describe in their Communication on page 4206 ff., how the nanoparticles are highly effective as negative contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. In vivo studies show that the core/shell nanoparticles enable the successful detection of tumors as small as 1–3 nm.

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  5. Corrigenda

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: Catalytic Selective Cyclizations of Aminocyclopropanes: Formal Synthesis of Aspidospermidine and Total Synthesis of Goniomitine (page 4038)

      Filippo De Simone, Prof. Dr. Jürg Gertsch and Prof. Dr. Jérôme Waser

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190034

      This article corrects:
    2. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: Acyloxybutadiene Iron Tricarbonyl Complexes as Enzyme-Triggered CO-Releasing Molecules (ET-CORMs) (page 4038)

      Dipl.-Chem. Steffen Romanski, Dr. Birgit Kraus, Prof. Dr. Ulrich Schatzschneider, Dr. Jörg-Martin Neudörfl, Dr. Sabine Amslinger and Prof. Dr. Hans-Günther Schmalz

      Version of Record online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190036

      This article corrects:

      Acyloxybutadiene Iron Tricarbonyl Complexes as Enzyme-Triggered CO-Releasing Molecules (ET-CORMs)1

      Vol. 50, Issue 10, 2392–2396, Version of Record online: 14 FEB 2011

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  7. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Daniel J. Mindiola (page 4046)

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      If I could be anyone for a day, I would be Tiger Woods (before the scandal). The greatest scientific advance of the last decade was making C[BOND]C bonds with alkanes. …” This and more about Daniel J. Mindiola can be found on page 4046.

  8. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  9. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Chemistry of Nanocarbons. Edited by Takeshi Akasaka, Fred Wudl and Shigeru Nagase. (pages 4048–4049)

      Xinliang Feng

      Version of Record online: 7 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101108

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2010. 526 pp., hardcover € 129.00.—ISBN 978-0470721957

  10. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. H2 Complexes

      A Mercurial Route to a Cobalt Dihydrogen Complex (pages 4050–4052)

      Dr. R. Morris Bullock

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006731

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mercury for protection? Mercury protects the highly reactive 14-electron {Co(POCOP)} fragment in a Co–Hg–Co complex, but reaction with H2 gives a rare dihydrogen complex of cobalt, and a second H2 molecule is added at higher pressures and low temperature (see scheme).

    2. CO2 Utilization

      Mixing Copper Nanoparticles and ZnO Nanocrystals: A Route towards Understanding the Hydrogenation of CO2 to Methanol? (pages 4053–4054)

      Dr. Frederic C. Meunier

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The shape of things to come: The preparation and combination of nanoparticles of copper and zinc oxide with controlled morphology opens new avenues in the understanding of metal–support interactions and may help resolving the intricacy of methanol synthesis during the hydrogenation of CO2. The improved selectivity to methanol formation observed with some of the morphology combinations suggests that the reverse water–gas-shift side-reaction to give CO could be dramatically minimized (see scheme).

  11. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Fluorescent Nanoparticles

      Luminescent Silica Nanoparticles: Extending the Frontiers of Brightness (pages 4056–4066)

      Dr. Sara Bonacchi, Damiano Genovese, Riccardo Juris, Prof. Marco Montalti, Prof. Luca Prodi, Dr. Enrico Rampazzo and Prof. Nelsi Zaccheroni

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004996

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All aglow: Silica nanoparticles are extremely versatile platforms with unique potential in the nanotechnology arena. Further improvement of these materials will enable ambitious applications in fields of high social and economic impact.

  12. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Total Synthesis

      Dearomatization Strategies in the Synthesis of Complex Natural Products (pages 4068–4093)

      Dr. Stéphane P. Roche and Prof. Dr. John A. Porco Jr.

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      1, 2, … 3 dearomaticity: The conversion of planar, aromatic scaffolds (arenes, phenols, and heteroarenes) into three-dimensional molecular architectures is a powerful strategy for the total synthesis of complex natural products. This Review highlights recent developments and outlines future perspectives and opportunities for catalytic, enantioselective dearomatization processes.

  13. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Surface Chemistry

      Robust and Open Tailored Supramolecular Networks Controlled by the Template Effect of a Silicon Surface (pages 4094–4098)

      Bulent Baris, Vincent Luzet, Dr. Eric Duverger, Prof. Dr. Philippe Sonnet, Prof. Dr. Frank Palmino and Dr. Frederic Cherioux

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100332

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fullerenes framed: The combination of molecule–molecule interactions and molecule–silicon substrate interactions leads to the formation of a large-scale 2D open supramolecular framework with improved thermal stability up to 400 K on a semiconductor surface. The robust open honeycomb network controls the growth of and serves as a template for a noncompact hexagonal fullerene array at room temperature (see picture).

    2. Nanoparticles

      Laser Dispersion of Detonation Nanodiamonds (pages 4099–4102)

      Kai-Yang Niu, Dr. Hai-Mei Zheng, Prof. Zhi-Qing Li, Dr. Jing Yang, Prof. Jing Sun and Prof. Dr. Xi-Wen Du

      Version of Record online: 7 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007731

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Laser blasting: Complete dispersion of detonation nanodiamonds was realized by laser irradiation. The infrared laser could selectively destroy the agglomerant of detonation nanodiamonds (see picture), resulting in well-dispersed nanodiamonds in solution. The optical properties of nanodiamonds were modified by changing their surface ligands in situ.

    3. Logic Gates

      Resettable, Multi-Readout Logic Gates Based on Controllably Reversible Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles (pages 4103–4107)

      Dingbin Liu, Wenwen Chen, Kang Sun, Prof. Ke Deng, Prof. Wei Zhang, Prof. Zhuo Wang and Prof. Xingyu Jiang

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008198

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A resettable logic system based on spiropyran-modified gold nanoparticles that is capable of AND, OR, and INHIBIT logic operations has been constructed. Several methods can record the output of this process, including the naked eye, UV/Vis spectroscopy, determination of the ζ potential, and dynamic light scattering. These logic gates can also detect copper(II) ions in aqueous media.

    4. Photochemistry

      Near-Infrared[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]Visible Light Upconversion in a Molecular Trinuclear d–f–d Complex (pages 4108–4112)

      Lilit Aboshyan-Sorgho, Dr. Céline Besnard, Dr. Phil Pattison, Dr. Kevin R. Kittilstved, Dr. Annina Aebischer, Prof. Dr. Jean-Claude G. Bünzli, Prof. Dr. Andreas Hauser and Prof. Dr. Claude Piguet

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100095

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Giving the green light: The connection of two CrIII sensitizers around a central ErIII acceptor in a self-assembled cation provides high local metal concentrations that favor efficient nonlinear energy transfer upconversion luminescence (see picture). Upon selective low-energy near-infrared irradiation of CrIII-centered transitions, 1 displays an unprecedented molecular two-photon upconverted green ErIII-centered emission.

    5. Glycobiology

      Tracking N-Acetyllactosamine on Cell-Surface Glycans In Vivo (pages 4113–4118)

      Tianqing Zheng, Dr. Hao Jiang, Dr. Marilyn Gros, Dr. David Soriano del Amo, Subha Sundaram, Prof. Grégoire Lauvau, Prof. Florence Marlow, Dr. Yi Liu, Prof. Pamela Stanley and Prof. Peng Wu

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100265

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In living color: Many mammalian glycans associated with signaling receptors contain terminal or penultimate N-acetyllactosamine. A highly specific method for labeling this disaccharide on cell-surface glycoproteins of live cultured cells and zebrafish embryos is reported. The two-step chemoenzymatic approach involves in situ fucosylation followed by a bioorthogonal click reaction (see scheme; α(1,3)FucT=α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase).

    6. Catalytic Electrons

      Electron Impact Catalytic Dissociation: Two-Bond Breaking by a Low-Energy Catalytic Electron (pages 4119–4122)

      Dr. Daly Davis, Victor P. Vysotskiy, Dr. Y. Sajeev and Prof. Dr. Lorenz S. Cederbaum

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005129

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Upon impact of a low-energy electron on a neutral molecule, an intermediate metastable electron–molecule compound is formed. This species can undergo electron-catalyzed two-bond breaking or cycloelimination, as in the simplest case of the cyclobutane–ethylene conversion (see scheme). This mechanism is illustrated for the quadricyclanone–norbornadienone cycloelimination reaction using ab initio methods, and its generality appears promising.

    7. Selenium Heterocycles

      Octaselenocyclododecane (pages 4123–4126)

      Dr. Guoxiong Hua, Dr. John M. Griffin, Dr. Sharon E. Ashbrook, Prof. Alexandra M. Z. Slawin and Prof. J. Derek Woollins

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The first of its kind? A simple, twelve-membered C-Se heterocycle (see structure; blue C, yellow Se, black H) was obtained by treatment of secondary amines with Woollins' reagent. The ring formation proceeds through diselenoate intermediates and requires a polar solvent like dichloromethane.

    8. Glycoprotein Vaccines

      A Coordinated Synthesis and Conjugation Strategy for the Preparation of Homogeneous Glycoconjugate Vaccine Candidates (pages 4127–4132)

      Dr. Elizabeth J. Grayson, Dr. Gonçalo J. L. Bernardes, Justin M. Chalker, Dr. Omar Boutureira, Dr. Julia R. Koeppe and Prof. Benjamin G. Davis

      Version of Record online: 31 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006327

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A sweet solution: A strategy for the synthesis of well-defined carbohydrate-based vaccines is presented. The approach couples complex oligosaccharide synthesis to site-specific conjugation methodology to provide pure glycoprotein vaccine candidates (see scheme).

    9. Proteomics

      Identification of Drug Targets In Vitro and in Living Cells by Soluble-Nanopolymer-Based Proteomics (pages 4133–4136)

      Lianghai Hu, Anton Iliuk, Jacob Galan, Michael Hans and W. Andy Tao

      Version of Record online: 31 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006459

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Getting in where the action is: Drug-conjugated dendrimers were used in combination with mass spectrometric analysis to identify drug targets in vitro and in living cells. In this proteomic strategy, the drug-conjugated nanopolymer is incubated with cells to ensure efficient delivery (see picture), and the cells are then lysed. Proteins bound to the drug are isolated on a solid support and identified by mass spectrometry.

    10. Advanced Biosensing

      Direct Genetic Analysis of Ten Cancer Cells: Tuning Sensor Structure and Molecular Probe Design for Efficient mRNA Capture (pages 4137–4141)

      Elizaveta Vasilyeva, Brian Lam, Zhichao Fang, Prof. Mark D. Minden, Prof. Edward H. Sargent and Prof. Shana O. Kelley

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006793

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A chip-based platform is reported that is able to detect as few as 10 cancer cells. By developing sub-milliscale sensors that are able to capture slow moving biological targets with high efficiency (see picture; scale bar 50 μm), cancer-specific sequences were detected in crude lysates of leukemia cells. This achievement relied on the development of a new type of molecular probe that improves the solubility and performance of neutral nucleic acids.

    11. Cell Patterning

      Laser-Induced Cell Detachment and Patterning with Photodegradable Polymer Substrates (pages 4142–4145)

      Dr. George Pasparakis, Theodore Manouras, Dr. Alexandros Selimis, Dr. Maria Vamvakaki and Dr. Panagiotis Argitis

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007310

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A glimpse of light is all it takes: Polymers that undergo main-chain scission at remarkably low photolysis energies were developed as efficient photodegradable substrates for safe laser-mediated cell detachment and patterning. The polymers, which contain acetal or ketal units in their backbone along with suitable absorbing groups, underwent fast degradation to release live cells upon irradiation with an excimer laser (see picture).

    12. DNA–Ligand Conjugates

      DNA as a Molecular Ruler: Interrogation of a Tandem SH2 Domain with Self-Assembled, Bivalent DNA–Peptide Complexes (pages 4146–4150)

      Hendrik Eberhard, Franziska Diezmann and Prof. Dr. Oliver Seitz

      Version of Record online: 31 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007593

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two peptides on display: The self-assembly of DNA complexes enables the bivalent presentation of phosphopeptides. Flexibility and distance in the ligand arrangement can be adjusted through the choice of appropriate DNA templates. Spatial screening of the tandem SH2 domain of Syk kinase with these probes (see picture) indicated the accessible arrangements of the two homologous binding pockets and the flexibility of the connecting protein linker.

    13. Rotaxane Synthesis

      Macrocycle Size Matters: “Small” Functionalized Rotaxanes in Excellent Yield Using the CuAAC Active Template Approach (pages 4151–4155)

      Hicham Lahlali, Kajally Jobe, Michael Watkinson and Dr. Stephen M. Goldup

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100415

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By shrinking the macrocycle in the CuAAC active template reaction not only is it demonstrated to be possible to use smaller macrocycles, but, surprisingly, that smaller macrocycles lead to higher yields of rotaxane product (see scheme). The synthesis of “small” functionalized [2]rotaxanes showcases this as a method for the production of materials with potential applications in molecular electronics, drug delivery, sensing, and enantioselective catalysis.

    14. Hydrogen Storage

      Hydrogen Storage in Magnesium Hydride: The Molecular Approach (pages 4156–4160)

      Prof. Dr. Sjoerd Harder, Dr. Jan Spielmann, Julia Intemann and Heinz Bandmann

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101153

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Big can be small: The largest ligand-stabilized magnesium hydride cluster, containing 8 Mg2+ and 10 H ions, is a model for the smallest sub-nanometer-sized hydrogen storage material. This molecular cluster displays magnetic hydride–hydride coupling (see picture) and complete hydrogen desorption at the record-low temperature of 200 °C.

    15. Cancer Cells

      Micromachine-Enabled Capture and Isolation of Cancer Cells in Complex Media (pages 4161–4164)

      Dr. Shankar Balasubramanian, Daniel Kagan, Che-Ming Jack Hu, Dr. Susana Campuzano, Dr. M. Jesus Lobo-Castañon, Nicole Lim, Dae Y. Kang, Maria Zimmerman, Dr. Liangfang Zhang and Prof. Joseph Wang

      Version of Record online: 7 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microrockets detect cancer: A micromachine is used for the in vitro isolation of pancreatic cancer cells in complex media. The strategy is based on the selective binding and transport ability of antibody-functionalized microengine rockets: these microrockets selectively recognize the surface antigens overexpressed by pancreatic cancer cells, and capture and transport the cancer cells over a preselected path (see picture).

    16. Natural Products

      Synthesis of ent-Nanolobatolide (pages 4165–4168)

      Dr. Hau Man Cheng, Dr. Weiwei Tian, Dr. Philippe A. Peixoto, Dr. Bhartesh Dhudshia and Prof. Dr. David Y.-K. Chen

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100926

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Efficient and adaptable: The key steps in the total synthesis of ent-nanolobatolide, the enantiomer of the novel and potent neuroprotective agent, involve an oxidative ring expansion of (−)-menthone, a Nazarov cyclization, an intermolecular Diels–Alder reaction, and an intramolecular epoxide-opening reaction (see scheme). The two latter transformations provided evidence in support of the speculated biosynthetic pathway.

    17. C[BOND]H Activation

      Regioselective Synthesis of Indenols by Rhodium-Catalyzed C[BOND]H Activation and Carbocyclization of Aryl Ketones and Alkynes (pages 4169–4172)

      Krishnamoorthy Muralirajan, Dr. Kanniyappan Parthasarathy and Prof. Dr. Chien-Hong Cheng

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100229

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ketones and alkynes join together: The catalytic title reaction proceeds rapidly at 120 °C and requires only 1 hour for completion (see scheme). The reaction mechanism likely involves chelation-assisted ortho C[BOND]H activation, insertion of the alkyne moiety, carbocyclization, and protonation. Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl.

    18. Enantioselective Allylation

      Iridium-Catalyzed anti-Diastereo- and Enantioselective Carbonyl (α-Trifluoromethyl)allylation from the Alcohol or Aldehyde Oxidation Level (pages 4173–4175)

      Xin Gao, Dr. Yong Jian Zhang and Prof. Michael J. Krische

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A flourish of fluorine: Exposure of α-trifluoromethyl allyl benzoate to alcohols in the presence of an ortho-cyclometalated iridium catalyst results in the generation of aldehyde–allyliridium intermediates to form enantiomerically enriched products of anti-(α-trifluoromethyl)allylation. An identical set of products is obtained from aldehydes under related transfer hydrogenation conditions employing isopropyl alcohol as terminal reductant.

    19. DNA Nanotechnology

      Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds by Use of the Tollens Reaction (pages 4176–4179)

      Suchetan Pal, Dr. Reji Varghese, Dr. Zhengtao Deng, Zhao Zhao, Ashok Kumar, Prof. Hao Yan and Prof. Yan Liu

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007529

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Origami embellished with silver: DNA strands with specific sequences and covalently attached sugar moieties were used for the site-specific incorporation of the sugar units on a DNA origami scaffold. This approach enabled the subsequent site-specific synthesis and in situ immobilization of fluorescent Ag clusters at predefined positions on the DNA nanoscaffold by treatment with the Tollens reagent (see picture).

    20. Fluorescent Probes

      An Effective Minor Groove Binder as a Red Fluorescent Marker for Live-Cell DNA Imaging and Quantification (pages 4180–4183)

      Prof. Xiaojun Peng, Tong Wu, Jiangli Fan, Prof. Jingyun Wang, Si Zhang, Fengling Song and Shiguo Sun

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007386

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Seeing red: DEAB-TO-3 shows a large fluorescence enhancement upon binding to native DNA and a distinct selectivity for double-stranded DNA over total RNA. As a red fluorescent live-cell-permeant DNA minor groove binder, DEAB-TO-3 is promising for highly sensitive DNA detection in vitro and nucleus-specific imaging and DNA quantification in vivo (see picture).

    21. Drug Discovery

      Polyoxometalates as Inhibitors of the Aggregation of Amyloid β Peptides Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease (pages 4184–4188)

      Jie Geng, Meng Li, Prof. Jinsong Ren, Prof. Enbo Wang and Prof. Xiaogang Qu

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007067

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inorganic amyloid inhibitors: Four types of polyoxometalates (POMs) were found to be efficient inhibitors of amyloid formation by amyloid β peptides (Aβ; see picture: unlike the top POM (red), the bottom POM (dark green) inhibited amyloid formation). The inhibition selectivity of POMs is due to size-specific electrostatic interactions between POMs and Aβ through binding to the positively charged His13–Lys16 cluster region of Aβ.

    22. Natural Products

      A Boron-Based Synthesis of the Natural Product (+)-trans-Dihydrolycoricidine (pages 4189–4192)

      Dr. Sarah L. Poe and Prof. Dr. James P. Morken

      Version of Record online: 31 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Diastereoselective diboration results in the highly selective 1,4-dihydroxylation of chiral cyclohexadienes (see scheme). Together with the catalytic enantioselective conjugate allylboration, the diene diboration facilitates the asymmetric synthesis of the cytotoxic agent (+)-trans-dihydrolycoricidine (1). pin=pinacol.

    23. Chemical Ligation

      Dynamic and Programmable DNA-Templated Boronic Ester Formation (pages 4193–4196)

      Anthony R. Martin, Dr. Ivan Barvik, Dr. Delphine Luvino, Dr. Michael Smietana and Dr. Jean-Jacques Vasseur

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007170

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plug and play: A helix with a boronate ester linkage was constructed by DNA- or RNA-templated assembly through the plugging together of appropriately designed half-sequences, one with a boronic acid at its 5′ end, the other with a ribonucleotide at its 3′ end. The two hybridization steps in the three-component assembly (see picture) could be controlled reversibly by external stimuli, including an acid or base, cyanide ions, or fructose.

    24. Glycosylation

      S-Benzimidazolyl Glycosides as a Platform for Oligosaccharide Synthesis by an Active–Latent Strategy (pages 4197–4201)

      Scott J. Hasty, Matthew A. Kleine and Prof. Dr. Alexei V. Demchenko

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007212

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doing the Biz: The S-benzimidazolyl (SBiz) anomeric moiety is a new leaving group that can be activated for glycosylation under a variety of conditions, including metal-assisted and alkylation pathways. Application of a substituted SBiz moiety (X=anisoyl, see picture) allows active–latent and armed–disarmed types of oligosaccharide assembly.

    25. Tunable Nanoarchitectures

      Tunable, Discrete, Three-Dimensional Hybrid Nanoarchitectures (pages 4202–4205)

      Dr. Feng Li, Ding Gao, Dr. Xiaomin Zhai, Yanhua Chen, Dr. Tao Fu, Prof. Dr. Dongmin Wu, Prof. Zhi-Ping Zhang, Prof. Dr. Xian-En Zhang and Prof. Dr. Qiangbin Wang

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007433

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Virus-based nanoparticle scaffolds (VNPs) were used for two-step construction of discrete 3D nanoarchitectures (see picture): 1) loading of quantum dots (QDs) into VNPs formed by cysteine-modified capsid protein VP1 of simian virus 40; 2) attaching controlled numbers of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) to VNP surfaces through Au[BOND]S bond formation.

    26. MRI Contrast Agent

      Simple Synthesis and Functionalization of Iron Nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 4206–4209)

      Dr. Soshan Cheong, Dr. Peter Ferguson, Dr. Kirk W. Feindel, Dr. Ian F. Hermans, Prof. Paul T. Callaghan, Dr. Claire Meyer, Angela Slocombe, Dr. Chia-Hao Su, Prof. Fong-Yu Cheng, Prof. Chen-Sheng Yeh, Dr. Bridget Ingham, Dr. Michael F. Toney and Prof. Richard D. Tilley

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100562

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Visualizing small tumors: A novel, facile synthesis leads to the formation of strongly magnetic single-crystal core/shell iron/iron oxide nanoparticles without the use of highly toxic chemicals. The core/shell nanoparticles are highly effective MRI contrast agents and enable unambiguous detection of small tumors of 1–3 mm in vivo (see picture).

    27. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Selective Removal of N-Heterocyclic Aromatic Contaminants from Fuels by Lewis Acidic Metal–Organic Frameworks (pages 4210–4214)

      Michael Maes, Maarten Trekels, Mohammed Boulhout, Stijn Schouteden, Frederik Vermoortele, Dr. Luc Alaerts, Dr. Daniela Heurtaux, You-Kyong Seo, Dr. Young Kyu Hwang, Dr. Jong-San Chang, Dr. Isabelle Beurroies, Dr. Renaud Denoyel, Prof. Dr. Kristiaan Temst, Prof. Dr. Andre Vantomme, Dr. Patricia Horcajada, Prof. Dr. Christian Serre and Prof. Dr. Dirk E. De Vos

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bring in the cleaner! Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are able to separate nitrogen and sulfur contaminants from fuel, which may lead to the production of cleaner fuels (see picture; ppmw=parts per million by weight). The separation ability is shown to originate from the Lewis acidity of the metal sites in the MOFs.

    28. Mesoionic Carbenes

      A Stable Acyclic Ligand Equivalent of an Unstable 1,3-Dithiol-5-ylidene (pages 4215–4218)

      Gaël Ung, Dr. Daniel Mendoza-Espinosa, Dr. Jean Bouffard and Prof. Guy Bertrand

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100420

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Substitutes you can rely on: Mesoionic carbenes (MICs) are not always stable. However, the acyclic ethynylcarbamodithioate 2 formed (instead of the corresponding MIC) by deprotonation of dithiolium salt 1 underwent cyclization to its precursor under acidic conditions and reacted with a variety of transition-metal centers to yield robust MIC complexes 3; (see scheme; Tipp=2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl).

    29. Electrochemistry

      The Electrochemical Detection and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles in Aqueous Solution (pages 4219–4221)

      Yi-Ge Zhou, Dr. Neil V. Rees and Prof. Dr. Richard G. Compton

      Version of Record online: 7 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100885

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Current spikes after collision: Analysis of current transients arising from impacts between the nanoparticles and an electrode surface (see picture) can be used to detect, identify, and determine the size of silver nanoparticles. This provides an exciting new strategy for the characterization of metal nanoparticles for analytical and environmental monitoring applications.

    30. Natural Product Synthesis

      A Unified Approach for the Stereoselective Total Synthesis of Pyridone Alkaloids and Their Neuritogenic Activity (pages 4222–4226)

      Dr. Henning Jacob Jessen, Andreas Schumacher, Travis Shaw, Prof. Dr. Andreas Pfaltz and Prof. Dr. Karl Gademann

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007671

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Unus pro omnibus: The development of compounds inducing neurite outgrowth might constitute a valuable approach for the non-invasive medical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. With the aid of a bifunctional building block, the total syntheses of a group of pyridone polyenes originally produced by entomopathogenic fungi was achieved (see picture). All of these natural products displayed neuritogenic activity in the PC-12 cell line.

    31. Binary CN Compounds

      C2N14: An Energetic and Highly Sensitive Binary Azidotetrazole (pages 4227–4229)

      Prof. Dr. Thomas M. Klapötke, Franz A. Martin and Dr. Jörg Stierstorfer

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100300

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      7:1 to nitrogen! Diazotization and subsequent dimerization of the triaminoguanidinium cation gave 1-diazidocarbamoyl-5-azidotetrazole (see picture). The structurally and spectroscopically characterized binary CN compound shows great energetic performance and a high heat of formation, but also extremely high sensitivity to friction and shock.

    32. Natural Silicon Complexes

      The E. coli Siderophores Enterobactin and Salmochelin Form Six-Coordinate Silicon Complexes at Physiological pH (pages 4230–4233)

      Timo Schmiederer, Saskia Rausch, Marianne Valdebenito, Yogita Mantri, Eva Mösker, Todor Baramov, Kamil Stelmaszyk, Dr. Peter Schmieder, Diane Butz, Silke I. Müller, Kathrin Schneider, Prof. Dr. Mu-Hyun Baik, Prof. Dr. Klaus Hantke and Prof. Dr. Roderich D. Süssmuth

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005792

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Not limited to iron: The high affinity of the bacterial iron siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin for Fe3+ ions, which are bound through chelating catecholate groups, is well known. These two siderophores have now been found to also bind silicon ions with high affinity, giving the first examples of silicon complexes of natural products stable under physiological conditions.

  14. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Corrigenda
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION