Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 20

May 9, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 20

Pages 4519–4713

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Oral, Direct Thrombin and Factor Xa Inhibitors: The Replacement for Warfarin, Leeches, and Pig Intestines? (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 20/2011) (page 4519)

      Dr. Alexander Straub, Dr. Susanne Roehrig and Prof. Dr. Alexander Hillisch

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102242

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      The large water cascade (ital. cascare=to fall) in the baroque landscaped park Wilhelmshöhe in Kassel (Germany) is reminiscent of the blood-clotting cascade in which the different clotting factors initiate the formation of fibrin thrombi in an amplification cascade. This protective mechanism against blood loss is, however, also the cause of thrombotic diseases. In order to inhibit it an extensive search for low-molecular-weight factor Xa and thrombin inhibitors has been carried out. More on this in the Review by A. Straub et al. on page 4574 ff.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Simultaneous Optical Monitoring of the Overgrowth Modes of Individual Asymmetric Hybrid Nanoparticles (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 20/2011) (page 4520)

      Young In Yang, Eunhye Jeong, Dr. Inhee Choi, Suseung Lee, Hyeon Don Song, Kihoon Kim, Prof. Yeonho Choi, Prof. Taewook Kang and Prof. Jongheop Yi

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102212

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      The growth mechanism, which plays a vital role in the rational design and precise fabrication of heterogeneous nanoparticles, can be unveiled by exploiting single-particle scattering spectra, as shown by T. Kang, J. Yi, and co-workers in their Communication on page 4633 ff. Three patterns of scattering spectra for individual gold/polystyrene dimeric nanoparticles are readily differentiated, and overgrowth mechanisms that correspond to each scattering spectrum are proposed.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Carbaborane-Substituted 1,2-Diphosphetanes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 20/2011) (page 4520)

      Anika Kreienbrink, Menyhárt B. Sárosi, Dr. Evgeny G. Rys, Dr. Peter Lönnecke and Prof. Dr. Evamarie Hey-Hawkins

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102437

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      Endocyclic P[BOND]P bonds are found in carbaborane-substituted 1,2-diphosphetanes, which are obtained in high yield from diastereomeric mixtures of 1,2-bis(chlorophosphanyl)-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboranes(12). In their Communication on page 4701 ff., E. Hey-Hawkins and co-workers show that the air- and water-stable racemic 1,2-diphosphetane depicted undergoes a ring-opening reaction with elemental iodine to give exclusively rac-1,2-bis(iodo-tert-butylphosphanyl)-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12).

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. A. Dieter Schlüter (page 4540)

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100667

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      “My favorite piece of research is Günther Maier's tetrahedrane synthesis. The biggest challenge facing scientists is to not surrender in fighting the growing importance of business strategies in science …” This and more about A. Dieter Schlüter can be found on page 4540.

  7. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Perhaloalkylation

      Perhaloalkylation of Metal Enolates—Unconventional and Versatile (pages 4542–4544)

      Tynchtyk Amatov and Dr. Ullrich Jahn

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007672

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      Radically unconventional: Natural products with di- and trichloromethyl groups and trifluoromethylated pharmaceuticals and agrochemicials are interesting compounds, often with intriguing properties. These types of compounds can be prepared by the direct perhaloalkylation of carbonyl compounds in which enolate reactivity and radical reactivity are merged (see scheme; Bn=benzyl).

  8. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Upconverting Nanoparticles

      Upconverting Nanoparticles for Nanoscale Thermometry (pages 4546–4551)

      Dipl.-Chem. Lorenz H. Fischer, Dr. Gregory S. Harms and Prof. Otto S. Wolfbeis

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006835

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      Cell fever: Lanthanoid-ion-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) display a strongly temperature-dependent luminescence that can be used to sense temperature in sub-micrometer dimensions, for example in cells or nanofluidics. The picture showns how green- and red-emitting UCNPs can be used to measure the temperature in kidney cells. The intensity ratio of two of these bands provides a referenced signal.

  9. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Holographic Data Storage

      From the Surface to Volume: Concepts for the Next Generation of Optical–Holographic Data-Storage Materials (pages 4552–4573)

      Dr. Friedrich-Karl Bruder, Dr. Rainer Hagen, Dr. Thomas Rölle, Dr. Marc-Stephan Weiser and Dr. Thomas Fäcke

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002085

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      From surface to volume: Starting with the CD, optical data storage has shaped our lives. For the next generation of optical data-storage devices with robust data transfer characteristics, the development of new materials is necessary. This Review focuses on the material requirements for data-storage media and the chemical concepts they are based on and presents recent progress in the development of holographic read–write devices.

    2. Protease Inhibitors

      Oral, Direct Thrombin and Factor Xa Inhibitors: The Replacement for Warfarin, Leeches, and Pig Intestines? (pages 4574–4590)

      Dr. Alexander Straub, Dr. Susanne Roehrig and Prof. Dr. Alexander Hillisch

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004575

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      The race for orally available antithrombotic agents is in full swing. Several novel inhibitors of the blood-clotting cascade have been recently introduced to the market. The new factor Xa and thrombin inhibitors (for examples see scheme) should herald a new generation of antithrombotic therapy. The history of their development is described here from the viewpoint of medicinal chemistry.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    1. Polyhedral Silsesquioxanes

      Facile, Single-Step Preparation of Versatile, High-Surface-Area, Hierarchically Structured Hybrid Materials (pages 4592–4596)

      Dr. Ivo Nischang, Prof. Oliver Brüggemann and Dr. Ian Teasdale

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100971

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      Strict hierarchy: A facile route to porous hybrid polymeric materials based on the vinyl polymerization of nanohybrid building blocks leads to a 3D nanoporous network with a high surface area. Through the use of porogenic solvents, hierarchically structured porous materials with excellent flow-through properties and microfluidic dimensions were prepared with surface areas up to 900 m2 g−1.

    2. Molecular Switches

      Anion-Dependent Switching: Dynamically Controlling the Conformation of Hydrogen-Bonded Diphenylacetylenes (pages 4597–4600)

      Ian M. Jones and Prof. Andrew D. Hamilton

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100144

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      With a grain of salt: An anion-dependent switch based on an intramolecularly H-bonded diphenylacetylene is reported. The addition of Cl causes the conformation of the H-bond acceptor to switch from the urea protons to the amide proton (see scheme; blue N, red O, green Cl), suggesting the use of such systems as fluorescent anion sensors.

    3. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Descriptor-Based Analysis Applied to HCN Synthesis from NH3 and CH4 (pages 4601–4605)

      Dr. Lars C. Grabow, Dr. Felix Studt, Dr. Frank Abild-Pedersen, Vivien Petzold, Dr. Jesper Kleis, Prof. Thomas Bligaard and Prof. Jens K. Nørskov

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100353

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      A trendy volcano: By the example of HCN synthesis from NH3 and CH4, it is demonstrated how scaling relations for intermediates and transition states provide a basis for the prediction of trends in heterogeneous catalysis (see logarithmic turnover frequency, TOF). These trends include not only the activity but also selectivity and the dominant reaction mechanism. This general approach can be applied to a large number of catalytic systems.

    4. Nanorod Self-Assembly

      Self-Assembly of Single-Tip Metal–Semiconductor Nanorods in Selective Solvents (pages 4606–4610)

      Dr. Nana Zhao, Dr. Jemma Vickery, Dr. Gerald Guerin, Jai Il Park, Prof. Dr. Mitchell A. Winnik and Prof. Dr. Eugenia Kumacheva

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004915

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      Belts, stars, 2D lattices, and elongated objects are formed by solution-based tip-to-tip or side-by-side self-assembly of single-tip Au–CdSe nanorods (see picture). Assembly was mediated by attraction between the Au or CdSe segments in selective solvents.

    5. Fullerene Synthesis

      Template-Assisted Formation of Fullerenes from Short-Chain Hydrocarbons by Supported Platinum Nanoparticles (pages 4611–4614)

      Dr. Francesc Viñes and Prof. Dr. Andreas Görling

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006588

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      A C60bubble-maker: Induced by platinum nanoparticle templates, carbon atoms formed during the dehydrogenation of small hydrocarbon molecules gather and, reaching a certain coverage on the nanoparticle templates, form fullerenes (see picture). The tailor-made Pt nanoparticle templates exhibit defined shapes and sizes and are supported on inert or basic oxide supports.

    6. Nanocarbon Materials

      Carbon Nanotube Wiring of Donor–Acceptor Nanograins by Self-Assembly and Efficient Charge Transport (pages 4615–4619)

      Dr. Tomokazu Umeyama, Noriyasu Tezuka, Fumiaki Kawashima, Prof. Dr. Shu Seki, Prof. Dr. Yoshihiro Matano, Dr. Yoshihide Nakao, Prof. Dr. Tetsuya Shishido, Dr. Masayuki Nishi, Prof. Dr. Kazuyuki Hirao, Dr. Heli Lehtivuori, Prof. Dr. Nikolai V. Tkachenko, Prof. Dr. Helge Lemmetyinen and Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Imahori

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007065

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      Grain wiring: Functionalized single-wall carbon nanotube wiring between the nanograins of porphyrin (donor)–C60 (acceptor) dyads results in efficient charge transport between them, leading to the highest incident photon-to-current efficiency (22 %) ever reported for analogous photoelectrochemical devices utilizing donor–acceptor linked dyads.

    7. DNA Nanostructures

      Chiral Metal–DNA Four-Arm Junctions and Metalated Nanotubular Structures (pages 4620–4623)

      Dr. Hua Yang, Florian Altvater, A. Dowine de Bruijn, Christopher K. McLaughlin, Pik Kwan Lo and Prof. Hanadi F. Sleiman

      Version of Record online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007403

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      Daring to be different: Chiral DNA junctions with a transition metal at the branch point and four different DNA single-stranded arms were assembled by a combination of DNA templating and metal coordination in an approach that enabled chirality transfer from DNA to the metal center (see picture). The intrinsic chirality of the junctions and their information density make them effective building blocks for 3D metal–DNA structures.

    8. Energetic Materials

      Boron Carbide as a Barium-Free Green Light Emitter and Burn-Rate Modifier in Pyrotechnics (pages 4624–4626)

      Dr. Jesse J. Sabatini, Jay C. Poret and Russell N. Broad

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007827

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      Friendly green giant: A pyrotechnic with green-light emission for both military use and civilian fireworks has been developed without the need to use barium or chlorinated compounds. Boron carbide serves as a green colorant and fuel in the presence of potassium nitrate oxidizer and an epoxy binder. This environmentally friendly formulation is very stable to impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge, and has a high thermal stability.

    9. Computational Chemistry

      Ab Initio Energy Landscape of GeF2: A System Featuring Lone Pair Structure Candidates (pages 4627–4632)

      Prof. Klaus Doll and Prof. Martin Jansen

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008070

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      Randomness helps: Ab initio calculations were used to conduct global searches for local minima on the energy landscape of GeF2 to predict stable configurations that can serve as targets for solid-state synthesis. The approach is able to reproduce reasonable structures showing lone pair effects without recourse to any preinformation.

    10. Hybrid Nanoparticles

      Simultaneous Optical Monitoring of the Overgrowth Modes of Individual Asymmetric Hybrid Nanoparticles (pages 4633–4636)

      Young In Yang, Eunhye Jeong, Dr. Inhee Choi, Suseung Lee, Hyeon Don Song, Kihoon Kim, Prof. Yeonho Choi, Prof. Taewook Kang and Prof. Jongheop Yi

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008097

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      A closer look: The growth mechanism of nanoparticles is difficult to elucidate by common UV/Vis and TEM methods, owing to ensemble averaging and 2D projection effects. Single-particle scattering spectra were now used to investigate the overgrowth of gold on gold/polystyrene nanoparticles. Three patterns are readily differentiated, and corresponding overgrowth mechanisms are proposed.

    11. Composite Nanomaterials

      Nanocomposites of Ag2S and Noble Metals (pages 4637–4643)

      Prof. Jun Yang and Prof. Jackie Y. Ying

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101213

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      With a little help from my friends: Successive deposition of different noble metals on Ag2S nanocrystals yields binary, ternary, and quaternary hybrid nanocomposites (see picture). In particular, the platinum-containing systems were found to exhibit superior catalytic activity toward methanol oxidation.

    12. Live-Cell Imaging

      Near-Infrared-Fluorescence-Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Live Cells on Gold Substrates (pages 4644–4648)

      Guosong Hong, Scott M. Tabakman, Dr. Kevin Welsher, Dr. Zhuo Chen, Joshua T. Robinson, Hailiang Wang, Bo Zhang and Prof. Hongjie Dai

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100934

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      In the best light: Plasmonic gold substrates were used to image cells by near-infrared fluorescence microscopy. Two fluorophores (single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized by the RGD sequence as well as the organic fluorophore IR800) tag cells in two different spectral regions. The fluorescence of SWNTs sandwiched between a cell membrane and a gold film was enhanced relative to the fluorescence observed on a quartz substrate (see picture).

    13. Asymmetric Catalysis

      A Chiral Bidentate sp2-N Ligand, Naph-diPIM: Application to CpRu-Catalyzed Asymmetric Dehydrative C-, N-, and O-Allylation (pages 4649–4653)

      Kengo Miyata, Hironori Kutsuna, Sho Kawakami and Prof. Dr. Masato Kitamura

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100772

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      A handy new ligand: The CpRu complex (Cp=cyclopentadienyl) of a new type of chiral bisamidine ligand with a naphtho[1,2-b:7,8-b′]dipyrroloimidazole (Naph-diPIM) skeleton with a Brønsted acid efficiently catalyzes dehydrative intermolecular C-allylation with high enantio- and regioselectivity. The catalytic system also gives nearly enantiomerically pure cycloalkanes and N- and O-heterocycles with a substrate/catalyst ratios of up to 10 000.

    14. Supramolecular Sensors

      Highly Selective Chemical Vapor Sensing by Molecular Recognition: Specific Detection of C1–C4 Alcohols with a Fluorescent Phosphonate Cavitand (pages 4654–4657)

      Francesca Maffei, Dr. Paolo Betti, Damiano Genovese, Dr. Marco Montalti, Prof. Luca Prodi, Dr. Rita De Zorzi, Prof. Silvano Geremia and Prof. Enrico Dalcanale

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100738

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      Fiat lux on alcohols: Molecular-level resolution was achieved for the detection of short-chain alcohols in the vapor phase using a fluorescent cavitand sensor. The transduction mechanism, activated exclusively by the complexation mode, is provided by the change of the electronic density on the fluorophore caused by the formation of an intracavity hydrogen bond between the cavitand P[DOUBLE BOND]O and the alcohol OH group.

    15. Fullerene Chemistry

      The Cycloaddition Reaction of Ih-Sc3N@C80 with 2-Amino-4,5-diisopropoxybenzoic Acid and Isoamyl Nitrite to Produce an Open-Cage Metallofullerene (pages 4658–4662)

      Prof. Dr. Guan-Wu Wang, Tong-Xin Liu, Mingzhi Jiao, Nan Wang, San-E Zhu, Chuanbao Chen, Prof. Dr. Shangfeng Yang, Faye L. Bowles, Dr. Christine M. Beavers, Prof. Dr. Marilyn M. Olmstead, Brandon Q. Mercado and Prof. Dr. Alan L. Balch

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100510

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      Opening a filled cage: Under an aerobic atmosphere, the reaction of Ih-Sc3N@C80 with 4,5-diisopropoxybenzyne generated in situ afforded an unprecedented open-cage metallofullerene with an oxygen atom and a benzyne addend spanning a 13-membered orifice (see picture, green; N blue, Sc pink, C black, O red, H white).

    16. Nanoparticles for MR Imaging

      Highly Magnetic Core–Shell Nanoparticles with a Unique Magnetization Mechanism (pages 4663–4666)

      Prof. Dr. Tae-Jong Yoon, Prof. Dr. Hakho Lee, Huilin Shao and Prof. Dr. Ralph Weissleder

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100101

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      The potent core: A new approach to preparing highly magnetic nanoparticles consisting of a ferromagnetic core (Fe) and an artificial ferrite shell was developed. The monometallic core contributes to high overall magnetization. The superparamagnetic ferrite shell protects the core against oxidation and further increases magnetization while minimizing particle aggregation.

    17. Polyketides

      A Branched Extender Unit Shared between Two Orthogonal Polyketide Pathways in an Endophyte (pages 4667–4670)

      Dr. Zhongli Xu, Dr. Ling Ding and Prof. Dr. Christian Hertweck

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008265

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      Sharing a branch: The first biosynthesis of an unprecedented branched PKS extender unit from valine/isobutyrate was unveiled, involving a designated ketosynthase III and a crotonyl reductase/carboxylase (CCR). Isobutylmalonyl-CoA (ibMCoA) is not only employed in divergolide biosynthesis but is also incorporated into novel, antibacterial germicidins (see scheme). Such natural biocombinatorics are unparalleled in polyketide biosynthesis.

    18. Synthetic Methods

      Mizoroki–Heck-Type Reaction Mediated by Potassium tert-Butoxide (pages 4671–4674)

      Prof. Eiji Shirakawa, Dr. Xuejing Zhang and Prof. Tamio Hayashi

      Version of Record online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008220

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      In the absence of transition-metal catalysts, a Mizoroki–Heck-type reaction proceeded to give stilbene derivatives in a simple manner using an aryl halide, a styrene derivative, KOtBu, EtOH, and DMF (see scheme; DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide).

    19. Nanostructures

      Self-Assembling Ligands for Multivalent Nanoscale Heparin Binding (pages 4675–4679)

      Ana C. Rodrigo, Anna Barnard, James Cooper and Prof. David K. Smith

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100019

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      Supramolecular string of pearls: Polycationic ligands are designed to self-assemble into spherical pseudo-dendrimers that are capable of binding polyanionic heparin with affinities and binding modes similar to covalent nanostructures such as dendrimers and proteins (see picture; purple: heparin, red/blue: self-assembling ligand). Binding of the ligands to heparin induces nanoscale organization of the formed nanostructures.

    20. Heterocyclic Synthesis

      A Palladium-Catalyzed Aminoalkynylation Strategy towards Bicyclic Heterocycles: Synthesis of (±)-Trachelanthamidine (pages 4680–4683)

      Stefano Nicolai, Cyril Piemontesi and Prof. Dr. Jérôme Waser

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100718

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      Sweet cyclizations: The synthesis of pyrrolizidines and indolizidines has been achieved. Olefins were subjected to an intramolecular palladium-catalyzed aminoalkynylation with the hypervalent iodine reagent TIPS-EBX. After removal of the protecting group, a two-step cyclization sequence and subsequent reduction led to the natural product (±)-trachelanthamidine (see scheme; TIPS-EBX=triisopropylsilyl ethynylbenziodoxolone).

    21. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Facile and Efficient Enantioselective Hydroxyamination Reaction: Synthesis of 3-Hydroxyamino-2-Oxindoles Using Nitrosoarenes (pages 4684–4688)

      Ke Shen, Dr. Xiaohua Liu, Gang Wang, Dr. Lili Lin and Prof. Dr. Xiaoming Feng

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100758

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      Sc takes action: The highly enantioselective hydroxyamination reaction of N-unprotected 2-oxindoles with nitrosoarenes has been realized using the Sc(OTf)3/L1 complex. The catalyst system exhibited remarkably broad substrate scope and high efficiency. This transformation is the first example of a chiral ScIII/enolate activating a nitrosoarene, and can be conducted on a gram scale without loss in the ee values.

    22. Polyhedral Boranes

      Extensions of the Icosahedral Closomer Structure by Using Azide–Alkyne Click Reactions (pages 4689–4691)

      Prof. Lalit N. Goswami, Shatadru Chakravarty, Prof. Mark W. Lee, Prof. Satish S. Jalisatgi and Prof. M. Frederick Hawthorne

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101066

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      Clusters with a click: The chemistry of icosahedral borane closomers has been combined with click chemistry for the first time. This approach provided a facile syntheses of diverse 12-fold closomer nanoparticles (see scheme; R=alkyl or aryl) which could be adapted for biomedical and material applications.

    23. Electron-Beam Lithography

      Electron-Beam-Induced Deposition of Metallic Microstructures from a Molten-Salt Film on Conductive and Nonconductive Substrates (pages 4692–4695)

      Dr. Vadym Halka, Matthias J. Schmid, Vsevolod Avrutskiy, Xinzhou Ma and Prof. Dr. Rolf Schuster

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006560

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      Microscale checkerboard: A thin liquid electrolyte layer can serve as the precursor for the direct electron-beam-induced deposition of metal on conductive and nonconductive substrates. Mass transport in the film is the key for nucleation and growth of Ag crystallites, which are strongly attached to the substrate surface. The precision of the structures is of the order of the film dimensions (picture: checkerboard pattern of Ag particles on Si).

    24. Coordination Chemistry

      Stannylene or Metallastanna(IV)ocane: A Matter of Formalism (pages 4696–4700)

      Dr. Erica Brendler, Erik Wächtler, Prof. Dr. Thomas Heine, Dr. Lyuben Zhechkov, Dipl.-Chem. Thorsten Langer, Prof. Dr. Rainer Pöttgen, Prof. Dr. Anthony F. Hill and Dr. Jörg Wagler

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007967

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      Pushmi-pullyu with palladium: Although created by σ donation from SnCl2 to a PdII complex, the Sn[BOND]Pd bonds in the compounds depicted exhibit formal σ donation in the opposite direction. Computational and spectroscopic data support stannylpalladium (PdI[BOND]SnIII) and palladastanna(IV)ocane (Pd0[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]SnIV) descriptions over stannylene coordination.

    25. Phosphorus Heterocycles

      Carbaborane-Substituted 1,2-Diphosphetanes (pages 4701–4703)

      Anika Kreienbrink, Menyhárt B. Sárosi, Dr. Evgeny G. Rys, Dr. Peter Lönnecke and Prof. Dr. Evamarie Hey-Hawkins

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100906

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      The ring and I: Air- and water-stable 1,2-diphosphetanes (see structure) were prepared in high yield utilizing the unique electronic and structural properties of 1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12)s. Ring-opening reactions with elemental iodine gave the first 1,2-bis(iodophosphanyl)-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12)s.

    26. B[BOND]H Borylenes

      Trapping the Elusive Parent Borylene (pages 4704–4707)

      Philipp Bissinger, Prof. Dr. Holger Braunschweig, Katharina Kraft and Dr. Thomas Kupfer

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007543

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      The taming of borylene: Dehalogenation of BHCl2IMe (IMe=1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene) leads to a carbene-stabilized elusive B[BOND]H borylene. A syn-selective [2+1] cycloaddition with naphthalene enabled the isolation and full characterization of the resulting diastereomeric products. These findings along with calculations provide clear evidence for the existence of borylenes (crystal structures: B violet, C black, H gray, N blue).

    27. Polyoxometalates

      Hexadecacobalt(II)-Containing Polyoxometalate-Based Single-Molecule Magnet (pages 4708–4711)

      Masooma Ibrahim, Dr. Yanhua Lan, Dr. Bassem S. Bassil, Yixian Xiang, Andreas Suchopar, Prof. Annie K. Powell and Prof. Ulrich Kortz

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100280

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      POMs, magnets, and Co: The tetrameric 36-tungsto-8-phosphate [{Co4(OH)3PO4}4(PW9O34)4]28− containing 16 cobalt(II) centers was prepared by a simple, one-pot synthetic procedure. The {Co16(OH)12(PO4)4}8+ core (see picture) exhibits single-molecule magnetic behavior.

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