Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 24

June 6, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 24

Pages 5403–5585

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Nitrogen Directs Multiple Radical Additions to the 9,9′-Bi-1-aza(C60-Ih)[5,6]fullerene: X-ray Structure of 6,9,12,15,18-C59N(CF3)5 (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 24/2011) (page 5403)

      Dr. Natalia B. Shustova, Dr. Igor V. Kuvychko, Dr. Alexey A. Popov, Max von Delius, Prof. Lothar Dunsch, Prof. Oren P. Anderson, Prof. Dr. Andreas Hirsch, Prof. Steven H. Strauss and Dr. Olga V. Boltalina

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102438

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      The cage N atom in C59N directs the addition pattern in reactions with CF3I. A. A. Popov, A. Hirsch, S. H. Strauss, O. V. Boltalina, and co-workers report in their Communication on page 5537 ff. on a series of C59N(CF3)n compounds (n=5–11). The X-ray structure of C59N(CF3)5 shows that this derivatized azafullerene exhibits a skew-pentagonal-pyramid structure. The molecules are arranged in distorted hexagonal-close-packed layers that are stacked in register (i.e. AAA).

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Efficient and Stereodivergent Electrochemical Synthesis of Optically Pure Menthylamines (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 24/2011) (page 5404)

      Dr. Jörn Kulisch, Dr. Martin Nieger, Dr. Florian Stecker, Dr. Andreas Fischer and Prof. Dr. Siegfried R. Waldvogel

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103180

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      The choice of cathodic material determines which epimer of menthylamine is preferentially formed in a stereodivergent electroorganic synthesis. As S. R. Waldvogel and co-workers report in their Communication on page 5564 ff., Hg cathodes provide selective access to (−)-menthylamine, whereas a decorated Pb cathode directs the formation of (M+)-neomenthylamine. A protective “glove” consisting of cationic additives controls the stereoselectivity, allows quantitative conversion, and avoids corrosion of the cathode.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Enhancement of Donor–Acceptor Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cell Power Conversion Efficiencies by Addition of Au Nanoparticles (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 24/2011) (page 5404)

      Dong Hwan Wang, Do Youb Kim, Kyeong Woo Choi, Dr. Jung Hwa Seo, Dr. Sang Hyuk Im, Prof. Jong Hyeok Park, Prof. O Ok Park and Prof. Alan J. Heeger

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102591

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      The addition of an optimized amount (5 wt %) of truncated octahedral nanoparticles with 70 nm diameter leads to an increase in power conversion efficiency in bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells. In their Communication on page 5519 ff., J. H. Park, O O. Park, A. J. Heeger, et al. describe the fabrication of such solar cells from a variety of donor polymers and PC70BM as acceptor.

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. José L. Alonso (page 5422)

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102215

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      “My favorite food is Spanish ham. The most significant scientific advance of the last hundred years has been the discovery of the laser …” This and more about José L. Alonso can be found on page 5422.

  7. News

    1. Top of page
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    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
  8. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Zeolites and Catalysis. Synthesis, Reactions and Applications. Edited by Jiri Cejka, Avelino Corma and Stacey Zones. (pages 5425–5426)

      Stefan Ernst

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102181

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2010. 2 Volumes, 882 pp., hardcover, € 299.00.—ISBN 978-3527325146

  9. Highlights

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Surface Modification

      Surface Functionalization by Strain-Promoted Alkyne–Azide Click Reactions (pages 5428–5430)

      Radostina Manova, Dr. Teris A. van Beek and Prof. Dr. Han Zuilhof

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100835

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      Clicks without Cu: There is a growing demand for reproducible site-specific functionalization of surfaces with biomolecules without introduction of unwanted groups or catalysts, as they may interfere with later applications. The title reactions (see picture) could fulfill these requirements, and four recent applications are discussed.

    2. Fullerenes

      Fullerene C72Cl4: The Exception that Proves the Rule? (pages 5431–5433)

      Prof. Dr. Nazario Martín

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101323

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      In a stable condition: The first example of a non-IPR hollow fullerene that is more stable than the IPR isomer has been reported for the C2v-C72 fullerene (see picture). This molecule has been trapped by the exohedral chlorination reaction that affords the #11188C72Cl4 molecule, the structure of which has been unambiguously determined by X-ray analyses.

    3. Proteomics

      Hypersensitive Response to Over-reactive Cysteines (pages 5434–5436)

      Sascha Hoogendoorn, Lianne Willems, Dr. Bogdan Florea and Prof. Dr. Herman Overkleeft

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100938

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      Finding the active cysteine in a hay stack: In the search for active proteins and active-site peptides in a proteome, techniques such as quantitative proteomics and protein profiling with activity-based probes (ABPs; see picture) are commonly used. A recently developed proteomics technique combines these approaches to globally identify reactive cysteines, and possibly other amino acids, in a complex proteome.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
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    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Green Nanomaterials

      Nanocelluloses: A New Family of Nature-Based Materials (pages 5438–5466)

      Prof. Dr. Dieter Klemm, Dr. Friederike Kramer, Sebastian Moritz, Prof. Tom Lindström, Mikael Ankerfors, Prof. Derek Gray and Dr. Annie Dorris

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201001273

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      Cellulose goes nano: Renewed research effort on cellulose has led to nanoscale materials derived from this abundant, renewable, and potentially carbon-neutral source. Microfibrillated cellulose, nanocrystalline cellulose (see polarized microscopy image), and bacterial nanocellulose provide unique product opportunities: gels and foams, structured films of cellulose, and medical implants, respectively.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    1. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Tailoring the Selectivity and Stability of Chemically Modified Platinum Nanocatalysts To Design Highly Durable Anodes for PEM Fuel Cells (pages 5468–5472)

      Dr. Bostjan Genorio, Dr. Ram Subbaraman, Dr. Dusan Strmcnik, Dr. Dusan Tripkovic, Dr. Vojislav R. Stamenkovic and Dr. Nenad M. Markovic

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100744

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      Big and small: Chemically modifying platinum with calix[4]arene yields a highly stable anode catalyst that effectively suppresses the oxidation reduction reaction without altering the maximum activity for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (see picture, Pt blue, C gray, O red, S yellow). This behavior extends from long-range-ordered stepped single-crystal surfaces to nanocatalysts.

    2. Nanostructures

      Generation of Hot Spots with Silver Nanocubes for Single-Molecule Detection by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 5473–5477)

      Matthew Rycenga, Xiaohu Xia, Christine H. Moran, Fei Zhou, Prof. Dong Qin, Prof. Zhi-Yuan Li and Prof. Younan Xia

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101632

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      Getting hotter: Hot spots that enable detection of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from a single molecule can form at the nanocube–substrate interface by simply depositing a silver nanocube onto a metal substrate (see picture). This new approach offers great simplicity for the formation of robust and fully accessible hot spots, thus providing an effective platform for ultrasensitive detection.

    3. Cellular Imaging

      A Mitochondrial Surface-Specific Fluorescent Probe Activated by Bioconversion (pages 5478–5481)

      Dr. Yoshinori Kawazoe, Dr. Hiroki Shimogawa, Dr. Ayato Sato and Prof. Motonari Uesugi

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100935

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      Cell-based image screening of 12 000 small molecules with aromatic groups was carried out, and 31 were identified as having potential as fluorescent probes for living cells. One candidate is the first fluorescent probe that specifically stains mitochondrial surfaces. Spectroscopic analyses indicate that the molecule undergoes bioconversion to be fluorescent within cells.

    4. Nanomedicine

      Micelle-Based Brain-Targeted Drug Delivery Enabled by a Nicotine Acetylcholine Receptor Ligand (pages 5482–5485)

      Dr. Changyou Zhan, Bian Li, Dr. Luojuan Hu, Dr. Xiaoli Wei, Prof. Linyin Feng, Dr. Wei Fu and Prof. Weiyue Lu

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100875

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      Candid candoxin: A 16-residue peptide (CDX) that is derived from candoxin binds with a high affinity to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (see picture), which are highly expressed on the blood–brain barrier. In vivo biodistribution and the anti-glioblastoma effect indicate the potential of CDX as a ligand to enable brain-targeted drug delivery.

    5. Sensors

      Magnetochromatic Polydiacetylene by Incorporation of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles (pages 5486–5489)

      Xuli Chen, Dr. Li Li, Xuemei Sun, Yanping Liu, Bin Luo, Prof. Changchun Wang, Prof. Yuping Bao, Prof. Hong Xu and Prof. Huisheng Peng

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100064

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      Magnetic personality: Magnetochromatic polydiacetylene has been prepared by the incorporation of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles into the polymer network. The composite nanomaterial changes color in a magnetic field through a ready and efficient self-assembly process.

    6. Supramolecular Polymers

      Amplification of Chirality by Supramolecular Polymerization of Pyrene Oligomers (pages 5490–5494)

      Alina L. Nussbaumer, Daniel Studer, Vladimir L. Malinovskii and Robert Häner

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100677

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      Achiral pyrene oligomers α show remarkable amplification of chirality (see circular dichroism spectra) in the presence of minute quantities of a chiral inductor χ. Spectroscopy and electron microscopy data support a model in which pyrene oligomers form helical, supramolecular polymers by interstrand stacking interactions.

    7. Amyloid Fibrils

      Direct Observation of Time-Resolved Polymorphic States in the Self-Assembly of End-Capped Heptapeptides (pages 5495–5498)

      Dr. Jozef Adamcik, Dr. Valeria Castelletto, Dr. Sreenath Bolisetty, Prof. Ian W. Hamley and Prof. Raffaele Mezzenga

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100807

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      Fibrillation processes in peptides: Structural states in the time-dependent self-assembly of an amyloid heptapeptide were resolved by single-molecule atomic force microscopy. Statistical analysis of the structures and their topological details revealed a continuous evolution of the polymorphs over time from the initial small spherical micelles into protofilaments, helical ribbons, and finally nanotube-like structures (see picture).

    8. Chiral Nanoparticles

      Intense Optical Activity from Three-Dimensional Chiral Ordering of Plasmonic Nanoantennas (pages 5499–5503)

      Dr. Andrés Guerrero-Martínez, Dr. Baptiste Auguié, Dr. José Lorenzo Alonso-Gómez, Dr. Zoran Džolić, Sergio Gómez-Graña, Prof. Mladen Žinić, Prof. M. Magdalena Cid and Prof. Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007536

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      Twisting nanoparticles: Plasmonic circular dichroism was experimentally obtained in chiral 3D organizations of gold nanorods obtained by self-assembly of the nanoantennas onto a fiber template with a twisted morphology. Numerical simulations based on coupled dipoles confirm the crucial role of gold nanorods in this intense circular dichroism.

    9. Heterometallic Complexes

      Tuning the Spin State of Cobalt in a Co–La Heterometallic Complex through Controllable Coordination Sphere of La (pages 5504–5508)

      Dr. Song-Song Bao, Dr. Yi Liao, Dr. Yan-Hui Su, Xu Liang, Dr. Feng-Chun Hu, Dr. Zhihu Sun, Prof. Dr. Li-Min Zheng, Prof. Dr. Shiqiang Wei, Prof. Dr. Roger Alberto, Yi-Zhi Li and Prof. Dr. Jing Ma

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007872

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      Reversible dehydration of complex 1 switches the spin state of cobalt from low-spin (LS) CoIII to high-spin (HS) CoII (see picture) and allows the magnetic moment to be varied from 0.48 μB at 120 °C to 4.15 μB at 220 °C in fully dehydrated complex 1-220. notpH6=1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triyl-tris(methylenephosphonic acid).

    10. Imaging Technology

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Synthesis of 64CuII–Bis(dithiocarbamatebisphosphonate) and Its Conjugation with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: In Vivo Evaluation as Dual-Modality PET–MRI Agent (pages 5509–5513)

      Dr. Rafael Torres Martin de Rosales, Dr. Richard Tavaré, Dr. Rowena L. Paul, Dr. Maite Jauregui-Osoro, Dr. Andrea Protti, Dr. Arnaud Glaria, Dr. Gopal Varma, Istvan Szanda and Prof. Philip J. Blower

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007894

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      A novel bifunctional chelator combines a dithiocarbamate group for binding the positron-emitter 64Cu (red spheres) for PET imaging and a bisphosphonate group (green ellipsoids) for strong binding to several inorganic materials, such as MRI contrast agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and rare-earth metal oxides. The dual PET–MR imaging capabilities of this approach are demonstrated in vivo by imaging lymph nodes using both imaging modalities.

    11. Protein Folding

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Characteristics of Human Lysozyme and Its Disease-Related Mutants in their Unfolded States (pages 5514–5518)

      Friederike Sziegat, Dr. Julia Wirmer-Bartoschek and Prof. Dr. Harald Schwalbe

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008040

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      A subtle balance: The residual structure and dynamics in nonnative hen lysozyme, human lysozyme, and in two amyloidogenic mutants have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy at atomic resolution. The degree of residual structure correlates with the ability of the protein to form amyloid fibrils. The free-energy landscape connecting different members of the ensemble of premolten protein states is affected by single-point mutations (see picture).

    12. Organic Electronics

      Enhancement of Donor–Acceptor Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cell Power Conversion Efficiencies by Addition of Au Nanoparticles (pages 5519–5523)

      Dong Hwan Wang, Do Youb Kim, Kyeong Woo Choi, Dr. Jung Hwa Seo, Dr. Sang Hyuk Im, Prof. Jong Hyeok Park, Prof. O Ok Park and Prof. Alan J. Heeger

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101021

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      Golden solar cells: Several positive effects arise from the addition of truncated octahedral Au nanoparticles (ca. 70 nm diameter) to bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells fabricated from a variety of donor polymers and PC70BM as acceptor (see picture). At the optimized blend ratio of Au nanoparticles (5 wt %) in the active layer, the power conversion efficiency increased for all polymer/PC70BM systems under study.

    13. Synthetic Methods

      Mild C[BOND]H Halogenation of Anilides and the Isolation of an Unusual Palladium(I)–Palladium(II) Species (pages 5524–5527)

      Prof. Robin B. Bedford, Dr. Mairi F. Haddow, Charlotte J. Mitchell and Ruth L. Webster

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101606

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      Reducing the load: A facile palladium-catalyzed ortho-selective bromination and chlorination of anilides occurs under aerobic conditions at room temperature when N-halosuccinimides (NXS) are used in the presence of p-toluenesulfonic acid (PTSA). The orthopalladated PTSA complex is not only catalytically competent but also undergoes a reductive process to yield an unusual PdI–PdII tetramer (see structure; Pd green, O red, S yellow, C gray).

    14. Catalytic Alkene Dimerization

      A Bifunctional Mechanism for Ethene Dimerization: Catalysis by Rhodium Complexes on Zeolite HY in the Absence of Halides (pages 5528–5531)

      Dr. Pedro Serna and Prof. B. C. Gates

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008086

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      No ligands needed: Rhodium complexes supported on HY zeolite catalyze the formation of C[BOND]C bonds by a new mechanism involving cooperation between the metal species and Brønsted acid sites of the zeolite support (see picture). The catalyst operates in the absence of ligands such as halides and shows high selectivity to n-butenes, even in an excess of H2.

    15. Dinuclear Palladium(III) Complexes

      Dinuclear Palladium(III) Complexes with a Single Unsupported Bridging Halide Ligand: Reversible Formation from Mononuclear Palladium(II) or Palladium(IV) Precursors (pages 5532–5536)

      Dr. Julia R. Khusnutdinova, Dr. Nigam P. Rath and Prof. Dr. Liviu M. Mirica

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100928

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      Stable PdIII: Dinuclear PdIII complexes of the tridentate ligand trimethyltriazacyclononane (Me3tacn) were obtained by one-electron oxidation of mononuclear PdII precursors. Further oxidation led reversibly to mononuclear PdIV species. The PdII and PdIII complexes are shown to be involved in the catalytic Kharasch addition of polyhaloalkanes to alkenes.

    16. Azafullerenes

      Nitrogen Directs Multiple Radical Additions to the 9,9′-Bi-1-aza(C60-Ih)[5,6]fullerene: X-ray Structure of 6,9,12,15,18-C59N(CF3)5 (pages 5537–5540)

      Dr. Natalia B. Shustova, Dr. Igor V. Kuvychko, Dr. Alexey A. Popov, Max von Delius, Prof. Lothar Dunsch, Prof. Oren P. Anderson, Prof. Dr. Andreas Hirsch, Prof. Steven H. Strauss and Dr. Olga V. Boltalina

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101227

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      “Dixie cup” packing: Molecules of the first structurally characterized derivative of (C59N)2 bearing trifluoromethyl groups are stacked in register 10.179 Å apart to form a rare non-close-packed arrangement (AAA…; see picture). The presence of the nitrogen atom on the fullerene core results in unique addition patterns in C59N(CF3)7/9/11.

    17. Asymmetric Hydrocyanation

      Asymmetric Hydrocyanation of α,β-Unsaturated Ketones into β-Cyano Ketones with the [Ru(phgly)2(binap)]/C6H5OLi Catalyst System (pages 5541–5544)

      Dr. Nobuhito Kurono, Noriyuki Nii, Yusuke Sakaguchi, Masato Uemura and Prof. Dr. Takeshi Ohkuma

      Version of Record online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100939

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      Enantioselective conjugate addition of HCN to α,β-unsaturated ketones catalyzed by the combined system of [Ru{(S)-phgly}2{(S)-binap}] and C6H5OLi has afforded β-cyano ketones in high yield (see scheme). No detectable amount of the corresponding 1,2-adduct was produced and tert-C4H9OCH3 was the solvent of choice. The cyanation was conducted with a substrate-to-catalyst molar ratio in the range of 200:1–1000:1 at −20–0 °C.

    18. C[BOND]C Formation

      Tracing the Hydrogen Source of Hydrocarbons Formed by Vanadium Nitrogenase (pages 5545–5547)

      Chi Chung Lee, Dr. Yilin Hu and Prof. Dr. Markus W. Ribbe

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100869

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      Hydrocarbons from CO: The vanadium-nitrogenase-catalyzed reduction of carbon monoxide involves the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent protonation of CO and the subsequent formation of C[BOND]C bonds, leading to the production of small hydrocarbons, such as C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8 (see picture). Isotope-substitution studies monitored by GC–MS analysis show that protons are the source of hydrogen for the CO reduction.

    19. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Copper-Catalyzed 1,4-Addition of Organoboronates to Alkylidene Cyanoacetates: Mechanistic Insight and Application to Asymmetric Catalysis (pages 5548–5552)

      Keishi Takatsu, Dr. Ryo Shintani and Prof. Dr. Tamio Hayashi

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008196

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      In addition: A copper/N-heterocyclic carbene(NHC)-catalyzed 1,4-addition of organoboronates to alkylidene cyanoacetates was developed, in which the catalytic cycle is proposed to consist of a transmetalation/insertion/ligand exchange. An effective asymmetric variant has also been achieved by the use of a chiral NHC ligand (see scheme).

    20. Dynamic Kinetic Resolution

      Nonenzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of α-(Arylthio)- and α-(Alkylthio)alkanoic Acids (pages 5553–5555)

      Xing Yang and Prof. Vladimir B. Birman

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007860

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      Dynamic solution: The title acids undergo dynamic kinetic resolution during an enantioselective esterification catalyzed by (S)-homobenzotetramisole ((S)-HBTM; see scheme). This method extends the scope of the carboxylic acid derivatives that are amenable to the nonenzymatic version of this transformation.

    21. Fast NMR Spectroscopy

      Accelerated NMR Spectroscopy by Using Compressed Sensing (pages 5556–5559)

      Krzysztof Kazimierczuk and Vladislav Yu. Orekhov

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100370

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      High-quality multidimensional NMR spectra can be obtained from rapidly recorded non-uniformly sampled (NUS) data. The inherent loss of the spectrum quality usually associated with NUS data is compensated by compressed sensing (CS); left spectrum: Nyquist–Shannon sampling, 22 h acquisition time, Fourier transform; right: CS non-linear sampling, 8.5 h acquisition time, Ip norm minimization.

    22. Synthetic Methods

      Gold-Catalyzed Hydroamination of Alkynes and Allenes with Parent Hydrazine (pages 5560–5563)

      Dr. Rei Kinjo, Bruno Donnadieu and Prof. Guy Bertrand

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100740

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      A diverse array of nitrogen-containing compounds were formed by the addition of hydrazine to alkynes, diynes, enynes, and allenes in the presence of cationic gold(I) complexes with a cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene ligand (see scheme; the X-ray crystal structure of the gold–hydrazine complex is shown). This hydroamination is an ideal initial step for the preparation of acyclic and heterocyclic bulk chemicals. Dipp=2,6-diisopropylphenyl.

    23. Electrochemical Amine Synthesis

      Efficient and Stereodivergent Electrochemical Synthesis of Optically Pure Menthylamines (pages 5564–5567)

      Dr. Jörn Kulisch, Dr. Martin Nieger, Dr. Florian Stecker, Dr. Andreas Fischer and Prof. Dr. Siegfried R. Waldvogel

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101330

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      The cathode directs the way to the epimeric menthylamines. The reduction of menthone oxime on a Hg cathode generates (−)-menthylamine as the major product, whereas a Pb cathode gives access to (+)-neomenthylamine (see scheme). In situ decoration of the Pb cathode by small amounts of additives results in clean and quantitative conversions. Furthermore, Pb corrosion is completely prevented in this practical method.

    24. Allylic Etherification

      Enantioselective Allylic Etherification: Selective Coupling of Two Unactivated Alcohols (pages 5568–5571)

      Markus Roggen and Prof. Dr. Erick M. Carreira

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007716

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      An Ir(P,alkene) complex catalyzes the enantioselective allylic etherification of unactivated secondary allylic alcohols. Useful levels of enantioselectivity and yield were achieved with this operationally easy and robust protocol. Initial kinetic studies indicate a significant rate difference for the substrate enantiomers, allowing for a resolution process. cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene

    25. Conjugated Macrocycles

      All-or-Nothing Cooperative Self-Assembly of an Annulene Sandwich (pages 5572–5575)

      Johannes K. Sprafke, Dr. Barbara Odell, Dr. Timothy D. W. Claridge and Prof. Harry L. Anderson

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008087

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      Ring-fenced: A 14-component assembly is formed by coordinating 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) to a [12]porphyrin nanoring. The 24 zinc–nitrogen interactions in this sandwich complex lock each conjugated macrocycle into a planar conformation, dramatically sharpening the near-IR absorption band. This result highlights the scope of double-strand formation as a way of creating nano-objects with well-defined shapes.

    26. Gas-Phase Structures

      Cassis Odor through Microwave Eyes: Olfactory Properties and Gas-Phase Structures of all the Cassyrane Stereoisomers and its Dihydro Derivatives (pages 5576–5580)

      Dipl.-Chem. Halima Mouhib, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Stahl, Dr. Monique Lüthy, Michelle Büchel and Dr. Philip Kraft

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100937

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A hint of cassis: By a combination of microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemistry, the gas-phase structures of the Cassyrane stereoisomers and its dihydro derivatives have been determined, and correlated with their olfactory properties. Superposition analyses of the structures (see picture; black Cassyrane, silver Oxane, red O, yellow S) reveal the importance of the 5S configuration on the cassis odor, with the 2S,5R isomers being the most intense.

    27. Fluorescence Nanoscopy

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fluorescence Nanoscopy of Single DNA Molecules by Using Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) (pages 5581–5583)

      Dr. F. Persson, P. Bingen, Dr. T. Staudt, Dr. J. Engelhardt, Prof. J. O. Tegenfeldt and Prof. Stefan W. Hell

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100371

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Clearing the haze: Stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on single DNA strands reveals details with an up to five- to sixfold improved resolution over confocal microscopy (see images). Thus STED nanoscopy allows features to be distinguished down to the persistence length of DNA (ca. 50 nm) without promoting any significant additional photodamage, such as photobleaching or photonicking.

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