Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Angewandte Chemie International Edition

January 17, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 3

Pages 555–778

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Cover Picture: On–Off Porosity Switching in a Molecular Organic Solid (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 3/2011) (page 555)

      Dr. James T. A. Jones, Daniel Holden, Dr. Tamoghna Mitra, Dr. Tom Hasell, Dr. Dave J. Adams, Dr. Kim E. Jelfs, Dr. Abbie Trewin, Dr. David J. Willock, Dr. Graeme M. Day, Dr. John Bacsa, Dr. Alexander Steiner and Prof. Andrew I. Cooper

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007476

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      An organic molecular crystal that demonstrates “on–off” porosity switching is presented by A. Cooper and co-workers in their Communication on page 749 ff. This organic solid, which is composed of intrinsically porous cage molecules, can reversibly interconvert between porous and nonporous polymorphs in response to solvent vapor. The switch is facilitated by both translational and conformational mobility in the molecular crystal.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Inside Cover: Strain-Controlled Release of Molecules from Arrayed Microcapsules Supported on an Elastomer Substrate (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 3/2011) (page 556)

      Dong Choon Hyun, Geon Dae Moon, Choo Jin Park, Bong Soo Kim, Prof. Younan Xia and Prof. Unyong Jeong

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007477

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      A flexible patch placed on the hand releases molecules upon opening and closing of the hand. U. Jeong and co-workers describe in their Communication on page 724 ff. the fabrication of arrays of microcapsules onto an elastomer substrate. Preloaded molecules are released upon mechanical stretching of the elastomer, thus providing a potential drug-release application.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Axel Schulz (page 575)

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006687

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      “When I wake up I think of molecules I dreamt of. My greatest achievement has been finding a wife, who is not a scientist …” This and more about Axel Schulz can be found on page 575.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Chromatography. A Science of Discovery. Edited by Robert L. Wixom and Charles W. Gehrke. (page 577)

      Klaus K. Unger

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007180

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      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2010. 410 pp., hardcover € 87.90.—ISBN 978-0470283455

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Crystal Growth

      Nanocrystal Self-Assembly Assisted by Oriented Attachment (pages 578–580)

      Rajesh K. Mallavajula and Prof. Lynden A. Archer

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006504

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      Self-assembly with self-control: Fe2O3 nanocrystals underwent self-assembly in a disciplined manner to form one-, two-, and three-dimensional ordered structures by the mechanism of oriented attachment (see picture). Thus, the formation of the organized superstructures did not require external control, for example, by temperature and pressure, but was intrinsic to the nanocrystal system.

    2. Hydrogen Storage

      Hydrogen Storage by Cryoadsorption in Ultrahigh-Porosity Metal–Organic Frameworks (pages 581–582)

      Dr. Michael Hirscher

      Article first published online: 29 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006913

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      Take it to the limit: Ultrahigh-porosity metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) with extremely high specific surface areas show very high hydrogen uptake by physisorption at low temperatures. The total hydrogen storage capacity of MOF-210 through cryoadsorption exceeds even that of complex hydrides.

    3. Protein and mRNA Quantitation

      Genome-wide Correlation between mRNA and Protein in a Single Cell (pages 583–585)

      Prof. Edward S. Yeung

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005969

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      FISHing for complements: The proteome and the transcriptome in single E. coli cells were determined simultaneously through the use of a YFP fusion library (left, yellow) and an Atto-594-labeled complementary probe to the same YFP by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH; right, red), respectively. Interestingly, for the 129 highly expressed genes studied, no correlation between transcription and translation was found.

  9. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Natural Products

      Plant Polyphenols: Chemical Properties, Biological Activities, and Synthesis (pages 586–621)

      Prof. Stéphane Quideau, Dr. Denis Deffieux, Dr. Céline Douat-Casassus and Dr. Laurent Pouységu

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000044

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      To be or not to be polyphenolic! The flavanol-derived procyanidin B2, the polygalloylglucose-derived vescalagin, and the phloroglucinol-derived fucotriphlorethol H are typical examples of condensed tannins, hydrolyzable tannins, and phlorotannins. These, and many other polyphenols, constitute a formidable chemical arsenal used by plants for defence and adaptative evolution, and a rich source of inspiration for the development of novel drugs.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Lipopolysaccharides

      Uniform Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Loaded Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Investigation of LPS–TLR4 Signaling (pages 622–626)

      Dr. Matteo Piazza, Miriam Colombo, Dr. Ivan Zanoni, Prof. Francesca Granucci, Prof. Paolo Tortora, Prof. Jerrold Weiss, Theresa Gioannini, Dr. Davide Prosperi and Prof. Francesco Peri

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004655

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      Taking its toll: LPS-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs) are synthesized by noncovalently linking LPS to oleylamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. LMNPs are stable, water-soluble, have homogeneous size and shape, and load an average of 130 LPS molecules. LMNPs induce mild CD14-dependent Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in innate immune cells (see picture).

    2. Nanocrystal Growth

      Investigation of Indium Phosphide Nanocrystal Synthesis Using a High-Temperature and High-Pressure Continuous Flow Microreactor (pages 627–630)

      Jinyoung Baek, Dr. Peter M. Allen, Prof. Moungi G. Bawendi and Prof. Klavs F. Jensen

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006412

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      The important parameters for the synthesis of indium phosphide nanocrystals (InP NCs) are examined in a continuous three-stage microfluidic system (see figure). InP NC growth is largely independent of the experimental parameters that are significant in CdSe NC syntheses, such as mixing temperature and reagent concentrations. However, the concentration of myristic acid (MA) is important role for the growth of InP NCs.

    3. N-Heterocyclic Carbenes

      A Labile and Catalytically Active Imidazol-2-yl Fragment System (pages 631–635)

      Dr. Valentín Miranda-Soto, Prof. Douglas B. Grotjahn, Prof. Andrew L. Cooksy, Prof. James A. Golen, Dr. Curtis E. Moore and Prof. Arnold L. Rheingold

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005100

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      More than an innocent bystander: Deprotonation of the N[BOND]H group in I with nBuLi/[D8]THF gave a highly reactive {(thf)2LiCl} adduct II of an imidazol-2-yl species. Compounds II and IV readily heterolyze H2 to form III, whereas iPrOH acts as a hydrogen source to generate III from II.

    4. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Metal–Organic Framework Nanospheres with Well-Ordered Mesopores Synthesized in an Ionic Liquid/CO2/Surfactant System (pages 636–639)

      Yueju Zhao, Dr. Jianling Zhang, Prof. Buxing Han, Dr. Jinliang Song, Jianshen Li and Qian Wang

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005314

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      Pores and pores: Metal–organic framework (MOF) nanospheres with long-range ordered mesopores, the walls of which are composed of microporous structure units, were synthesized in binary solvent systems of ionic liquid and supercritical CO2. The MOF nanostructure has many potential applications and its preparation could easily be applied to MOFs with other metal ions and ligands.

    5. Drug Delivery

      Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles End-Capped with Collagen: Redox-Responsive Nanoreservoirs for Targeted Drug Delivery (pages 640–643)

      Dr. Zhong Luo, Prof. Kaiyong Cai, Dr. Yan Hu, Dr. Li Zhao, Dr. Peng Liu, Lin Duan and Dr. Weihu Yang

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005061

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      If the cap fits: Attachment of collagen (Col) to silica nanoparticles (MSN) by a disulfide linker, followed by introduction of lactobionic acid (LA, a cell-specific targeting moiety), results in a redox-responsive system for cell-specific intracellular drug delivery and efficient endocytosis (see picture). Controlled release of a model drug (fluorescein isothiocyanate, FITC) was achieved by cleavage of the disufide bonds.

    6. Multicomponent Reactions

      Finding Reaction Pathways for Multicomponent Reactions: The Passerini Reaction is a Four-Component Reaction (pages 644–649)

      Prof. Satoshi Maeda, Dr. Shinsuke Komagawa, Prof. Masanobu Uchiyama and Prof. Keiji Morokuma

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005336

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      Route finder: The Passerini three-component reaction of a carboxylic acid, an aldehyde (or ketone), and an isocyanide to give an α-acyloxycarboxamide actually follows a four-component mechanism involving an additional molecule of carboxylic acid (see scheme). The discovery was made by applying a new “reaction route explorer” to the simplest Passerini reaction (HCOOH+HCHO+CH3NC).

    7. Nanostructure Assembly

      Building Hematite Nanostructures by Oriented Attachment (pages 650–653)

      Jun Song Chen, Ting Zhu, Prof. Chang Ming Li and Prof. Xiong Wen Lou

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005365

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      Getting bigger: Oriented attachment takes place among large hematite nanocrystals with a size over 100 nm to form 2D assemblies that further assemble into 3D superstructures through dipole–dipole interactions. Based on shape selectivity, 1D nanorods can be assembled into 3D quasi nanocubes by oriented attachment.

    8. Adsorption

      Effective and Selective Adsorption of Zn2+ from Seawater on a Layered Silicate (pages 654–656)

      Dr. Yusuke Ide, Naonori Ochi and Prof. Dr. Makoto Ogawa

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002322

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      Metal exchange: A layered alkali silicate, magadiite, effectively concentrates Zn2+ from seawater by ion exchange even in the presence of Cd2+. The interlayer Na+ of magadiite is almost quantitatively exchanged with Zn2+ in mixed-electrolyte solutions (see picture).

    9. Photocatalysis

      Aerobic Oxidative Coupling of Amines by Carbon Nitride Photocatalysis with Visible Light (pages 657–660)

      Fangzheng Su, Dr. Smitha C. Mathew, Lennart Möhlmann, Prof. Dr. Markus Antonietti, Prof. Dr. Xinchen Wang and Prof. Dr. Siegfried Blechert

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004365

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      Coupling on sunshine: A simple and efficient synthesis of benzoxazoles, benzimidazoles, and benzothiazoles is realized through a one-pot preparation driven by a photocatalytic cascade reaction. Carbon nitride and visible light are employed to achieve this metal-free aerobic oxidation of amines to imines (see scheme; mpg-C3N4=mesoporous graphite carbon nitride).

    10. Mesoporous Materials

      Bifunctionalized Mesoporous Materials with Site-Separated Brønsted Acids and Bases: Catalyst for a Two-Step Reaction Sequence (pages 661–664)

      Dr. Yulin Huang, Dr. Shu Xu and Prof. Dr. Victor S.-Y. Lin

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004572

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      Peaceful coexistence: Brønsted acids and bases were attached to different surfaces of a mesoporous silica nanoparticle. The internal surface was functionalized by using co-condensation, and postsynthesis grafting was used to functionalize the external surface. A two-step reaction sequence that cannot proceed with an acid and base in the same pot was accomplished using the bifunctionalized nanoparticle (see scheme).

    11. Nanoparticles

      Surface-Enhanced Fluorescence with Shell-Isolated Nanoparticles (SHINEF) (pages 665–668)

      Ariel R. Guerrero and Prof. Ricardo F. Aroca

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004806

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      Heart of gold: Surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) is demonstrated with silica-coated gold nanoparticles (SHINEF) that act as “smart dust” on the surface of a Langmuir–Blodgett monolayer. Coating gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes opens a wide range of applications for SEF, where the shape of the core with an appropriate thickness of the coating can be tuned for specific tasks.

    12. Biogas Purification

      Effective Purification of Biogas by a Condensing-Liquid Membrane (pages 669–671)

      Magda Poloncarzova, Dr. Jiri Vejrazka, Dr. Vaclav Vesely and Dr. Pavel Izak

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004821

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      Coming clean: Impurities and carbon dioxide in raw biogas are separated by a “condensing-liquid membrane”, based on the different solubility of components in a very thin continuously refreshed water layer in a hydrophilic porous membrane (see picture; blue areas: thin water layer in the porous membrane).

    13. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Synthesis of ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 by Steam-Assisted Conversion and an Investigation of Their Tribological Behaviors (pages 672–675)

      Qi Shi, Zhaofeng Chen, Zhengwei Song, Prof. Jinping Li and Prof. Jinxiang Dong

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004937

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      Water difference: Using H2O as the reaction medium in a conventional hydrothermal synthesis gives two nonporous materials with dense dia frameworks, dia(Zn) and dia(Co), from 2-methylimidazole and M(OAc)2 (M=Zn, Co; see structures, left). However, separation of the H2O and a solid mixture of the same starting materials in a steam-assisted conversion gives open-framework porous materials, ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 (right).

    14. Natural Products

      Formal Syntheses of (−)- and (+)-Phalarine (pages 676–679)

      Dr. Hanfeng Ding and Prof. Dr. David Y.-K. Chen

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006367

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      A core challenge: The asymmetric formal syntheses of the title compounds have been accomplished. By using a modular approach, phenolic tosylamide 1 was synthesized through palladium cross-couplings (blue bonds), and its participation in a hypervalent iodine mediated oxidative coupling reaction (red bonds) enabled the construction of the challenging heterocyclic core of (−)-phalarine.

    15. Natural Products Synthesis

      Convergent Total Synthesis of (+)-TMC-151C by a Vinylogous Mukaiyama Aldol Reaction and Ring-Closing Metathesis (pages 680–683)

      Ryosuke Matsui, Kentaro Seto, Yuna Sato, Dr. Takahiro Suzuki, Dr. Atsuo Nakazaki and Prof. Dr. Susumu Kobayashi

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006230

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      Two key reaction types were used for the total synthesis of the antibiotic agent (+)-TMC-151C: the vinylogous Mukaiyama aldol reaction and silicon-tethered ring-closing metathesis (RCM; see scheme). This strategy should provide efficient access to a range of related natural polyketides containing pent-2-ene-1,5-diol units.

    16. Rhodium Catalysis

      Regioselective Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Hydroaminations of Propargylguanidines (pages 684–687)

      Morgan J. Gainer, Nitasha R. Bennett, Yu Takahashi and Prof. Dr. Ryan E. Looper

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006087

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      Different than others: Dimeric rhodium(II) carboxylates uniquely catalyze the 6-endo-dig selective hydroamination of propargylguanidines while tranditional π-Lewis acids are typically 5-exo-dig selective (see scheme, oct=octanoate). Furthermore, this represents a new role for RhII to activate alkynes for addition chemistry.

    17. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Intramolecular Allylic Amidation: Enantioselective Synthesis of Chiral Tetrahydroisoquinolines and Saturated Nitrogen Heterocycles (pages 688–691)

      Johannes F. Teichert, Dr. Martín Fañanás-Mastral and Prof. Dr. Ben L. Feringa

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006039

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      For the first time iridium catalysis has been used for the synthesis of chiral tetrahydroisoquinolines with excellent yields and high enantioselectivities (see scheme; cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene, DBU=1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene). These products are important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of biologically active compounds, in particular alkaloids.

    18. Protein Labeling

      Generation of Pseudocontact Shifts in Protein NMR Spectra with a Genetically Encoded Cobalt(II)-Binding Amino Acid (pages 692–694)

      Thi Hoang Duong Nguyen, Dr. Kiyoshi Ozawa, Mitchell Stanton-Cook, Dr. Russell Barrow, Dr. Thomas Huber and Prof. Gottfried Otting

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005672

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      Playing tag: Incorporation of the genetically encoded amino acid bipyridylalanine into a protein creates a site-specific binding site for CoII. Pronounced pseudocontact shifts generated by the CoII ion in the NMR spectra delivers powerful long-range structure information for the facile analysis of proteins as well as protein–protein and protein–ligand complexes (see picture for a representation of the psuedocontact shift in the protein).

    19. Chlorine Compounds

      Catalytic Generation of Chlorine Dioxide from Chlorite Using a Water-Soluble Manganese Porphyrin (pages 695–698)

      Thomas P. Umile and Prof. John T. Groves

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004482

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      The cationic, water soluble manganese imidazolium porphyrin [Mn(TDMImP)] efficiently catalyzes the dismutation of chlorite ion (ClO2) to chlorine dioxide. The gaseous product ClO2 could be isolated in 60 % yield (500 turnovers at 0.5 turnover s−1) and the catalyst was completely recovered. Oxo-transfer from chlorite to the MnIII catalyst is proposed to be the rate limiting step. An immobilized form of the catalyst was also active.

    20. Chlorite Dismutation to Chlorine Dioxide Catalyzed by a Water-Soluble Manganese Porphyrin (pages 699–702)

      Scott D. Hicks, Jennifer L. Petersen, Curt J. Bougher and Prof. Dr. Mahdi M. Abu-Omar

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005128

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      Chloride oxyanions are of interest because of their use as disinfectants and concerns over their accumulation in the environment. A water-soluble manganese porphyrin catalyzes the dismutation of chlorite (ClO2) to chlorine dioxide (ClO2) through a series of electron- and atom-transfer reactions. A high-valent manganese(IV) oxo species is observed and the ClO2 product inhibits the reaction.

    21. Gold Nanoparticles

      Preparation of Optical Resins Containing Dispersed Gold Nanoparticles by the Matrix Sputtering Method (pages 703–705)

      Yuichi Shishino, Prof. Tetsu Yonezawa, Satoshi Udagawa, Kaname Hase and Prof. Hiroshi Nishihara

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005723

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      Transparent examples: Optical resins containing dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be prepared by the title method. The obtained light-yellow AuNPs/thiourethane resins contain nanoparticles less than 1 nm in diameter and show good transparency and fluorescence at 690 nm (see picture). The analogous urethane resins are transparent with a red color arising from the surface plasmon absorption of the AuNPs.

    22. Spatial Reactivity

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A Spatially Propagating Biochemical Reaction (pages 706–708)

      Xiaoli Liao, Rafe T. Petty and Prof. Milan Mrksich

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005638

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      Surfing with the kinase: A soluble kinase phosphorylates an immobilized peptide substrate most rapidly at the boundary between product and substrate, and gives rise to a “wave” of propagating product. Such systems offer an approach to engineering reactions to give spatio-temporal control over progression of reactions.

    23. Polynuclear Complexes

      Synthesis and Redox Properties of Triiron Complexes Featuring Strong Fe–Fe Interactions (pages 709–712)

      Dr. Qinliang Zhao and Prof. Theodore A. Betley

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005198

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      A modular hexadentate polyamide ligand directs the assembly of triiron complexes (see structure). Crystallographic studies reveal significant metal–metal bonding interactions, which are enhanced upon oxidation.

    24. Chirality Transfer

      Effective Chirogenesis in a Bis(metallosalphen) Complex through Host–Guest Binding with Carboxylic Acids (pages 713–716)

      Sander J. Wezenberg, Giovanni Salassa, Eduardo C. Escudero-Adán, Dr. Jordi Benet-Buchholz and Dr. Arjan W. Kleij

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004957

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      Picking Cotton: Strong host–guest complexation of chiral carboxylic acids results in the amplification of one of the chiral conformers of a bis[Zn2+(salphen)] complex, which can racemize by axis rotation (see picture). The complexation leads to a CD signal for which the sign of the first Cotton effect directly relates to the absolute configuration of the substrate and the amplitude depends on the size and nature of the substituents.

    25. Ligand Design

      Azatriquinane as a Platform for Tripodal Metal Complexes and Calixiform Scaffolds (pages 717–719)

      Dr. Martyn Jevric, Dr. Tao Zheng, Dr. Nabin K. Meher, Dr. James C. Fettinger and Prof. Mark Mascal

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006470

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      A puckered platform: Azatriquinanes and azatriquinacenes are convex, rigid molecular scaffolds for constructing tripodal ligands and calix-like structures with a basic nitrogen site at the bottom of the cavity (see space-filling structure; blue N, green Cl, red O, gray C, light gray H)

    26. Luminescent Thin Films

      Reversibly Thermochromic, Fluorescent Ultrathin Films with a Supramolecular Architecture (pages 720–723)

      Dongpeng Yan, Dr. Jun Lu, Prof. Jing Ma, Prof. Min Wei, Prof. David G. Evans and Prof. Xue Duan

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003015

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      Thermochromic luminescence is characteristic of the title system, which is fabricated by layer-by-layer assembly of anionic bis(2-sulfonatostyryl)biphenyl (BSB) and positively charged layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets on quartz glass. The BSB/LDH films show fast luminescent response and switching properties, including changes in color (see picture), fluorescence lifetime, and anisotropy in the range 20–100 °C.

    27. Drug Release

      Strain-Controlled Release of Molecules from Arrayed Microcapsules Supported on an Elastomer Substrate (pages 724–727)

      Dong Choon Hyun, Geon Dae Moon, Choo Jin Park, Bong Soo Kim, Prof. Younan Xia and Prof. Unyong Jeong

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004838

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      Performing under strain: Microcapsules arrayed on an elastomer substrate pumped out preloaded molecules upon mechanical stretching of the substrate as a result of a decrease in microcapsule volume. This technology could be applied to drug release, for example, from a flexible patch containing the drug through mechanical stimulation by opening and closing of the hand (see picture).

    28. Hydrogen Production

      Photocatalytic Production of Hydrogen by Disproportionation of One-Electron-Reduced Rhodium and Iridium–Ruthenium Complexes in Water (pages 728–731)

      Prof. Dr. Shunichi Fukuzumi, Takeshi Kobayashi and Dr. Tomoyoshi Suenobu

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004876

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      One at a time: A rhodium aqua complex and a heterodinuclear iridium–ruthenium complex (see picture) act as effective catalysts for the photocatalytic two-electron reduction of protons. Hydrogen is produced with the aid of a photosensitizer and an electron donor by disproportionation of the corresponding one-electron-reduced metal complexes.

    29. DNA Immobilization

      Facile DNA Immobilization on Surfaces through a Catecholamine Polymer (pages 732–736)

      Hyun Ok Ham, Dr. Zhongqiang Liu, Dr. K. H. Aaron Lau, Prof. Haeshin Lee and Prof. Phillip B. Messersmith

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005001

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      Simple immersion of noble metals, oxides, semiconductors, and synthetic polymer substrates in a mussel-mimetic catecholamine polymer solution p(DOMA-AEMA) leads to formation of a thin film on the substrate. The resulting coated substrates can bind DNA without further surface treatment. This approach provides a new entrance to DNA microarray fabrication.

    30. Molecular Objects

      The Largest Synthetic Structure with Molecular Precision: Towards a Molecular Object (pages 737–740)

      Dr. Baozhong Zhang, Dr. Roger Wepf, Dr. Karl Fischer, Prof. Manfred Schmidt, Dr. Sébastien Besse, Dr. Peter Lindner, Prof. Benjamin T. King, Dr. Reinhard Sigel, Prof. Peter Schurtenberger, Prof. Yeshayahu Talmon, Dr. Yi Ding, Prof. Martin Kröger, Prof. Avraham Halperin and Prof. A. Dieter Schlüter

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005164

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      Pushing the limits: A 200×106 Da structurally defined, linear macromolecule (PG5) has a molar mass, cross-section dimension, and cylindrical shape that are comparable to some naturally occurring objects, such as amyloid fibrils or certain plant viruses. The macromolecule is resistant against flattening out on a surface; the picture shows PG5 embracing the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).

    31. Supramolecular Interactions

      Aziridine Scaffolds for the Detection and Quantification of Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions through Transition-State Stabilization (pages 741–744)

      Dr. Luciana Giordano, Dr. Cam T. Hoang, Prof. Dr. Michael Shipman, Dr. James H. R. Tucker and Dr. Tiffany R. Walsh

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005580

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      The rate of N inversion in aziridine derivatives is found to depend upon intramolecular interactions between the aziridine N and attached functional groups, thus allowing specific noncovalent interactions to be studied. The ortho-substituted pyridine undergoes faster inversion as a result of the formation of an intramolecular amide–pyridine (NH⋅⋅⋅N) hydrogen bond in its transition state (see scheme).

    32. Functional Nanocrystals

      Surfactant-Free Platinum-on-Gold Nanodendrites with Enhanced Catalytic Performance for Oxygen Reduction (pages 745–748)

      Kyung Min Yeo, Suhee Choi, Rahman Md Anisur, Prof. Jongwon Kim and Prof. In Su Lee

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005775

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      Inner value: A new high-concentration synthesis of Pt nanodendrite employs Au-seed-mediated growth inside a hollow silica nanosphere (see picture). The resulting material is substantially more active than commercial Pt black in the oxygen reduction reaction. Pt nanodendrite colloid with tunable dispersity as well as hybrid nanocrystals of various metals were also fabricated by the procedure.

    33. Porous Molecules

      On–Off Porosity Switching in a Molecular Organic Solid (pages 749–753)

      Dr. James T. A. Jones, Daniel Holden, Dr. Tamoghna Mitra, Dr. Tom Hasell, Dr. Dave J. Adams, Dr. Kim E. Jelfs, Dr. Abbie Trewin, Dr. David J. Willock, Dr. Graeme M. Day, Dr. John Bacsa, Dr. Alexander Steiner and Prof. Andrew I. Cooper

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006030

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      Pulling the old switcheroo: Microporosity can be switched “on” and “off” in a crystalline molecular organic solid composed of cage molecules (see scheme). The switch is facilitated by conformational flexibility in the soft organic crystal state.

    34. Vinylogous Aldol Reaction

      Disulfonimide-Catalyzed Asymmetric Vinylogous and Bisvinylogous Mukaiyama Aldol Reactions (pages 754–758)

      Lars Ratjen, Dr. Pilar García-García, Frank Lay, Dr. Michael Edmund Beck and Prof. Dr. Benjamin List

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005954

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      Let's talk about six! A new chiral disulfonimide catalyzed vinylogous Mukaiyama aldol addition of crotonic acid derived nucleophiles to aldehydes has been developed and the concept of vinylogy was further expanded to double vinylogous, sorbic acid derived nucleophiles. This reaction is an example of a previously unknown ε-selective bisvinylogous Mukaiyama Aldol addition that extends the substrate by six carbon atoms (see scheme).

    35. Gas Separation

      CO2-Stable and Cobalt-Free Dual-Phase Membrane for Oxygen Separation (pages 759–763)

      Huixia Luo, Konstantin Efimov, Dr. Heqing Jiang, Dr. Armin Feldhoff, Prof. Dr. Haihui Wang and Prof. Dr. Jürgen Caro

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003723

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      Cleaning up their act: A novel CO2-stable and cobalt-free dual-phase membrane for oxygen separation from air has been developed that consists of 40 wt % NiFe2O4 and 60 wt % Ce0.9Gd0.1O2−δ. This membrane shows a steady oxygen permeation flux over 100 h using CO2 as sweep gas at 1000 °C.

    36. Polyoxometalates

      Organic Functionalization of Polyoxovanadates: Sb[BOND]N Bonds and Charge Control (pages 764–767)

      Elena Antonova, Dr. Christian Näther, Prof. Dr. Paul Kögerler and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Bensch

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002563

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      New docking sites: Sb[BOND]N bonds formed under hydrothermal conditions enable the attachment of primary and secondary organic amines (see structures, C gray, N blue) to antimonato polyoxovanadate cluster anions (polyhedral representations; O red, Sb yellow), whose charge can be compensated by protonated amines.

    37. Molecular Channels

      Design of a Gated Molecular Proton Channel (pages 768–771)

      Dr. Wei Gu, Bo Zhou, Dr. Tihamér Geyer, Dr. Michael Hutter, Prof. Dr. Haiping Fang and Prof. Dr. Volkhard Helms

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002564

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      A molecular revolving door: A gated molecular proton channel that can efficiently transport protons under electric fields was designed and tested in molecular dynamics simulations. In this proton channel a rotatable chemical group, which is attached to the inner wall of the nanopore, serves as the gate and the external electric field as energy source. The binding and release of a proton leads to the opening and closing of the gate, respectively.

    38. Main-Group Chemistry

      The Reactivity of [Zn2Cp*2]: Trapping Monovalent {.ZnZnCp*} in the Metal-Rich Compounds [(Pd,Pt)(GaCp*)a(ZnCp*)4−a(ZnZnCp*)4−a] (a=0, 2) (pages 772–776)

      Timo Bollermann, Kerstin Freitag, Dr. Christian Gemel, Dr. Rüdiger W. Seidel, Moritz von Hopffgarten, Prof. Dr. Gernot Frenking and Prof. Dr. Roland A. Fischer

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005808

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      Inseparable zinc pair: The reaction of homoleptic {GaCp*}-containing compounds [M(GaCp*)4] (M=Pd, Pt; Cp*=Me5C5) with [Zn2Cp*2] leads to the formation of [M(GaCp*)2(ZnCp*)2(ZnZnCp*)2] (see picture: C gray, Ga yellow, Zn green, Pd blue) and [M(ZnCp*)4(ZnZnCp*)4]. Both molecules involve the novel zinc ligand system {ZnZnCp*}, which contains an intact Zn[BOND]Zn bond.

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 4/2011 (page 777)

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190003

  12. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Review
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Back Cover: Effective Chirogenesis in a Bis(metallosalphen) Complex through Host–Guest Binding with Carboxylic Acids (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 3/2011) (page 778)

      Sander J. Wezenberg, Giovanni Salassa, Eduardo C. Escudero-Adán, Dr. Jordi Benet-Buchholz and Dr. Arjan W. Kleij

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006805

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Addition of carboxylic acids to a supramolecular host system based on a metallosalphen framework results in chirality induction. In their Communication on page 713 ff., A. W. Kleij and co-workers describe how the observed effective chirogenesis is expressed in the circular dichroism spectra of the host–guest system, and can lead to new and improved methodologies for the determination of absolute configurations.

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