Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 30

July 18, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 30

Pages 6673–6929

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Supercapacitor Electrodes with High-Energy and Power Densities Prepared from Monolithic NiO/Ni Nanocomposites (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2011) (page 6673)

      Qi Lu, Michael W. Lattanzi, Yunpeng Chen, Dr. Xiaoming Kou, Dr. Wanfeng Li, Dr. Xin Fan, Prof. Dr. Karl M. Unruh, Prof. Dr. Jingguang G. Chen and Prof. Dr. John Q. Xiao

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103449

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      High energy storage and delivery are observed for supercapacitor electrodes based on NiO/Ni nanocomposite materials. In their Communication on page 6847 ff., J. Q. Xiao and co-workers report a simple, cost-effective, and potentially scalable technique for fabricating support- and additive-free supercapacitor electrodes. The maximum performance of energy storage and delivery were simultaneously achieved by developing a slow-charging and fast-discharging procedure.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: A Light-Stimulated Molecular Switch Driven by Radical–Radical Interactions in Water (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2011) (page 6674)

      Hao Li, Albert C. Fahrenbach, Dr. Ali Coskun, Dr. Zhixue Zhu, Gokhan Barin, Dr. Yan-Li Zhao, Youssry Y. Botros, Prof. Jean-Pierre Sauvage and Prof. J. Fraser Stoddart

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104290

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      A light-stimulated molecular switch in the form of a bistable [2]rotaxane, which undergoes controllable intramolecular motion through many cycles in water, is described by J. F. Stoddart and co-workers in their Communication on page 6782 ff. The fundamental understanding of molecular switches that operate in water is improved and the possibility of developing integrated nanobiomechanical systems for applications in challenging arenas, such as molecular prosthetics, is opened up.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Separation of Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays by “Scotch Tape” (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2011) (page 6674)

      Guo Hong, Matthew Zhou, Ruoxing Zhang, Prof. Dr. Shimin Hou, Dr. Wonmook Choi, Dr. Yun Sung Woo, Dr. Jae-Young Choi, Prof. Dr. Zhongfan Liu and Prof. Dr. Jin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103519

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      Macroscopic “scotch tape” selectively separates semiconducting (s) and metallic (m) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In their Communication on page 6819 ff., J. Zhang and co-workers characterize the density changes of the SWNT arrays by AFM and SEM, while Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements were applied to identify the selectivity. The interactions between the individual layers of the scotch tape and the mechanism of selectivity were carefully investigated by calculations.

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Vincent L. Pecoraro (page 6696)

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102924

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      “My best investment was my education. The best advice I have ever been given is ,‘Don't get bogged down in BS’ …” This and more about Vincent L. Pecoraro can be found on page 6696.

  7. Meeting Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
  8. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Emanuel Vogel (19272011) (pages 6701–6703)

      Hans-Josef Altenbach

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103222

  9. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Energy for a Sustainable World. From the Oil Age to a Sun-Powered Future. By Nicola Armaroli and Vincenzo Balzani. (pages 6704–6705)

      Marc Fontecave

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102819

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2010. 368 pp., softcover € 29.90.—ISBN 978-3527325405

    2. Functional Molecules from Natural Sources. Edited by Stephen K. Wrigley, Robert Thomas, Colin Bedford, and Neville Nicholson. (page 6705)

      Mark von Itzstein

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102657

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      RSC Publishing, 2010. 244 pp., hardcover, £ 109.99.—ISBN 978-1847552594

  10. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Brønsted Acid Catalysis

      Modulating the Acidity: Highly Acidic Brønsted Acids in Asymmetric Catalysis (pages 6706–6720)

      Prof. Dr. Magnus Rueping, Prof. Dr. Boris J. Nachtsheim, Dr. Winai Ieawsuwan and Dr. Iuliana Atodiresei

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100169

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      Chiral highly acidic Brønsted acids B*-H (see scheme, bottom) are efficient organocatalysts for numerous enantioselective reactions. Owing to their high acidity, these catalysts are suitable for the activation of imines, carbonyl compounds, and other weakly basic substrates. The formation of chiral contact-ion pairs (see scheme, top) implicates completely new modes of activation for asymmetric synthesis.

  11. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Nobel Review

      Cross-Coupling Reactions Of Organoboranes: An Easy Way To Construct C[BOND]C Bonds (Nobel Lecture) (pages 6722–6737)

      Prof. Akira Suzuki

      Version of Record online: 25 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101379

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      Tools for chemists: The Nobel Prize in Chemie 2010 was awarded for research on palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling in organic synthesis. Two of the Laureates, A. Suzuki and E. Negishi, report here first hand on the historical development and the current status of this research.

    2. Magical Power of Transition Metals: Past, Present, and Future (Nobel Lecture) (pages 6738–6764)

      Prof.  Ei-ichi Negishi

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101380

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      Tools for chemists: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2010 was awarded for research on palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling in organic synthesis. Two of the Laureates, A. Suzuki and E. Negishi, report here first hand on the historical development and the current status of this research.

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. Meeting Review
    9. Obituary
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Minireview
    12. Reviews
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Contact Electrification

      Is Water Necessary for Contact Electrification? (pages 6766–6770)

      Dr. H. Tarik Baytekin, Dr. Bilge Baytekin, Siowling Soh and Prof. Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008051

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      Was Thales right about water? Contrary to previous reports, contact charging can occur in the absence of water. At the same time, water helps stabilize the developed charges. Water-free conditions are realized by performing all experiments and charge measurements under oil-immersion.

    2. Gas Release

      An XY Addressable Matrix Odor-Releasing System Using an On–Off Switchable Device (pages 6771–6775)

      Hyunsu Kim, Dr. Jongjin Park, Kunbae Noh, Calvin J. Gardner, Dr. Seong Deok Kong, Dr. Jongmin Kim and Prof. Dr. Sungho Jin

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102759

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      An olfactory factory: Using a novel polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer-based device, the switchable release of specific gases is demonstrated. Heating elements trigger the gas release by warming the gas-containing capsule (see scheme). The release can be switched on and off by repeated thermal cycles. An XY addressable matrix of such capsules results in an odor-releasing system for multiple odors for virtual-reality applications.

    3. Post-Translational Modification

      Dynamic Monitoring of Newly Synthesized Proteomes: Up-Regulation of Myristoylated Protein Kinase A During Butyric Acid Induced Apoptosis (pages 6776–6781)

      Kai Liu, Peng-Yu Yang, Zhenkun Na and Prof. Dr. Shao Q. Yao

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102542

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      Doubly charged: A double metabolic incorporation approach capable of proteome-wide profiling of post-translational modification dynamics on newly synthesized proteins has been developed (see scheme; blue box: methionine surrogate, orange diamond: PTM probe). This strategy reveals for the first time that up-regulation of myristoylated PKA protein is necessary for the occurrence of butyric acid induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells.

    4. Molecular Switches

      A Light-Stimulated Molecular Switch Driven by Radical–Radical Interactions in Water (pages 6782–6788)

      Hao Li, Albert C. Fahrenbach, Dr. Ali Coskun, Dr. Zhixue Zhu, Gokhan Barin, Dr. Yan-Li Zhao, Youssry Y. Botros, Prof. Jean-Pierre Sauvage and Prof. J. Fraser Stoddart

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102510

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      A redox-controllable bistable [2]rotaxane has been synthesized using templation and click chemistry. With assistance from a sacrificial electron donor, light-triggered switching through numerous cycles can be initiated by radical-pairing interactions between the reduced forms of the cyclophane and the bipyridinium unit in aqueous solution in the absence of air. In the presence of air (O2), the interactions are reset by donor–acceptor charge transfer.

    5. Plasmonic Nanoparticles

      Single Gold Nanoparticles as Real-Time Optical Probes for the Detection of NADH-Dependent Intracellular Metabolic Enzymatic Pathways (pages 6789–6792)

      Lei Zhang, Dr. Yang Li, Dr. Da-Wei Li, Chao Jing, Prof. Xiaoyuan Chen, Min Lv, Prof. Qing Huang, Prof. Yi-Tao Long and Prof. Itamar Willner

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102151

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      A coat of many colors: Plasmon resonance Rayleigh scattering (PRRS) spectroscopy is applied to the in-situ monitoring of the NADH-dependent growth of Au@Cu core–shell nanoparticles (NPs). The scattering signal of the AuNPs is red shifted when they are coated with Cu (see scheme). In conjunction with dark-field microscopy, a colorimetric NADH-dependent biosensor was constructed and tested to screen an anticancer drug affecting cell NADH metabolism.

    6. Imaging Agents

      One-Pot Synthesis of an 125I-Labeled Trifunctional Reagent for Multiscale Imaging with Optical and Nuclear Techniques (pages 6793–6795)

      Dr. Ran Yan, Dr. Ethaar El-Emir, Dr. Vineeth Rajkumar, Mathew Robson, Dr. Amit P. Jathoul, Prof. R. Barbara Pedley and Dr. Erik Årstad

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102072

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      A highly efficient and rapid CuII-mediated three-component “click reaction” allows one-pot assembly of dual optical and nuclear labeling reagents. Proof-of-concept imaging studies demonstrate that the distribution of the dual-labeled antibody A5B7 can be interrogated from the cellular to the macroscopic level using a combination of optical and nuclear imaging techniques.

    7. Asymmetric Synthesis

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Enantioselective C[BOND]C Bond Formation as a Result of the Oriented Prochirality of an Achiral Aldehyde at the Single-Crystal Face upon Treatment with a Dialkyl Zinc Vapor (pages 6796–6798)

      Dr. Tsuneomi Kawasaki, Sayaka Kamimura, Ai Amihara, Kenta Suzuki and Prof. Dr. Kenso Soai

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102031

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      Show your best face: An achiral pyrimidine-5-carbaldehyde that forms an achiral crystal (equation image) with enantiotopic (001) and (equation image) faces underwent enantioselective addition of iPr2Zn to the single exposed enantiotopic surface to give highly enantiomerically enriched S and R secondary alcohols (see scheme). The absolute configuration of the alcohol product correlated with the orientation of the prochiral aldehyde in the achiral crystal lattice.

    8. Nanostructures

      Dopamine as a Carbon Source: The Controlled Synthesis of Hollow Carbon Spheres and Yolk-Structured Carbon Nanocomposites (pages 6799–6802)

      Dr. Rui Liu, Dr. Shannon M. Mahurin, Chen Li, Dr. Raymond R. Unocic, Dr. Juan C. Idrobo, Dr. Hongjun Gao, Dr. Stephen J. Pennycook and Prof. Dr. Sheng Dai

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102070

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      C shells: A facile and versatile synthesis using dopamine as a carbon source gives hollow carbon spheres and yolk–shell Au@Carbon nanocomposites (see pictures). The uniform nature of dopamine coatings and their high carbon yield endow the products with high structural integrity. The Au@C nanocomposites are catalytically active.

    9. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Highly Enantioselective Cyclopropenation Reaction of 1-Alkynes with α-Alkyl-α-Diazoesters Catalyzed by Dirhodium(II) Carboxylates (pages 6803–6808)

      Takayuki Goto, Dr. Koji Takeda, Dr. Naoyuki Shimada, Dr. Hisanori Nambu, Dr. Masahiro Anada, Dr. Motoo Shiro, Prof. Dr. Kaori Ando and Prof. Dr. Shunichi Hashimoto

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101905

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      Two rhodium(II) ions work together: [Rh2(S-tbpttl)4] is an exceptionally effective catalyst for enantioselective cyclopropenation reactions of 1-alkynes with α-alkyl-α-diazoacetates (see scheme). Cyclopropenation is preferred over alkene formation through a 1,2-hydride shift.

    10. Reaction Mechanisms

      The Inherent Competition between Addition and Substitution Reactions of Br2 with Benzene and Arenes (pages 6809–6813)

      Jing Kong, Prof. Boris Galabov, Gergana Koleva, Prof. Ji-Jun Zou, Prof. Henry F. Schaefer III and Prof. Paul von Ragué Schleyer

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101852

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      Tug of war: Comprehensive DFT computational exploration of the reaction mechanisms predicts that the barriers for Br2 addition processes to benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene in isolation (i.e., in the absence of catalysts, see picture) and in simulated CCl4 solution can be even lower than the barriers for direct substitution. Moreover, substitution products also can arise from stepwise Br2 addition–HBr elimination routes.

    11. Natural Product Synthesis

      The Catalytic Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (+)-Liphagal (pages 6814–6818)

      Dr. Joshua J. Day, Ryan M. McFadden, Dr. Scott C. Virgil, Helene Kolding, Jennifer L. Alleva and Prof. Brian M. Stoltz

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101842

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      Ring a ding: The meroterpenoid natural product (+)-liphagal has been synthesized enantioselectively in 19 steps from commercially available materials. The trans-homodecalin system was achieved by ring expansion followed by stereoselective hydrogenation.

    12. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

      Separation of Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays by “Scotch Tape” (pages 6819–6823)

      Guo Hong, Matthew Zhou, Ruoxing Zhang, Prof. Dr. Shimin Hou, Dr. Wonmook Choi, Dr. Yun Sung Woo, Dr. Jae-Young Choi, Prof. Dr. Zhongfan Liu and Prof. Dr. Jin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101700

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      Peeling off nanotubes: Chemically modified soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) thin films act as “scotch tape” for the separation of semiconducting (s) and metallic (m) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Whereas the amine-functionalized A-scotch tape selectively removed s-SWNTs, the phenyl-functionalized P-scotch tape acted specifically towards m-SWNTs (see picture). The resulting separation process is very gentle, no damage to the SWNTs was observed.

    13. C[BOND]H Alkylation

      Allylic C[BOND]H Alkylation of Unactivated α-Olefins: Serial Ligand Catalysis Resumed (pages 6824–6827)

      Andrew J. Young and Prof. M. Christina White

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101654

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      A delicate interplay of several kinetically labile ligands is required for reactions that proceed through serial ligand catalysis mechanisms. An investigation of the disruption of this balance has enabled the development of a method for the intermolecular allylic C[BOND]H alkylation of unactivated as well as activated α-olefins (see example, Bn=benzyl).

    14. pH-Responsive Release

      pH-Responsive Release of Acetal-Linked Melittin from SBA-15 Mesoporous Silica (pages 6828–6830)

      Dr. Axel Schlossbauer, Christian Dohmen, Dr. David Schaffert, Prof. Dr. Ernst Wagner and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bein

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005120

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      Free to go: A pH-labile immobilization of the melittin peptide with acetal linkers in the pore system of a SBA-15 host allows release of the peptide upon decrease of the pH value from 7.4 to 5.5. Such a release is shown by melittin-induced lysis of mouse erythrocytes. The method could be used to prepare new silica-based peptide delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy.

    15. Biomass

      Highly Selective Decarbonylation of 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural in the Presence of Compressed Carbon Dioxide (pages 6831–6834)

      Frank M. A. Geilen, Thorsten vom Stein, Barthel Engendahl, Sonja Winterle, Prof. Dr. Marcel A. Liauw, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Klankermayer and Prof. Dr. Walter Leitner

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007582

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      Less is more: The integrated development and optimization of catalysts and reaction media led to a highly selective decarbonylation of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to furfuryl alcohol (FFA) with an iridium/phosphine catalyst in the presence of compressed carbon dioxide. Subsequent hydrogenation over ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) led to tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA), a possible solvent for the decarbonylation reaction (see scheme).

    16. Collagen

      Importance of Ring Puckering versus Interstrand Hydrogen Bonds for the Conformational Stability of Collagen (pages 6835–6838)

      Roman S. Erdmann and Prof. Dr. Helma Wennemers

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008118

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      Mismatch is fine: Proline derivatives with a ring pucker mismatching that of natural collagen but with favorable torsional angles along the peptide chain are readily tolerated within the collagen triple helix (see picture). In contrast, a competition between intramolecular and interstrand H bonds destabilizes the collagen triple helix.

    17. Gene Editing

      Light-Activated Gene Editing with a Photocaged Zinc-Finger Nuclease (pages 6839–6842)

      Dr. Chungjung Chou and Prof. Dr. Alexander Deiters

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101157

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      Light, zinc-finger nuclease, action: Using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, a light-activated zinc-finger nuclease enzyme was engineered through incorporation of a photocaged tyrosine residue at a DNA–protein interface. The caged zinc-finger nuclease was completely inactive until irradiated with UV light, thus enabling photochemical control of sequence specific gene editing in mammalian cells (see picture).

    18. Silicon(II) Compounds

      The Pentamethylcyclopentadienylsilicon(II) Cation as a Catalyst for the Specific Degradation of Oligo(ethyleneglycol) Diethers (pages 6843–6846)

      Dr. Kinga Leszczyńska, Dr. Andreas Mix, Dr. Raphael J. F. Berger, Britta Rummel, Beate Neumann, Dr. Hans-Georg Stammler and Prof. Dr. Peter Jutzi

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101139

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      Catalytic open sandwiches: Oligo(ethyleneglycol) diethers RO(CH2CH2O)nR are degraded by the unusual catalyst Cp*Si+ (see scheme). The open coordination sphere at silicon allows up to four Si[BOND]O contacts; crystal structure data of the reactive compounds [Cp*Si(dme)]+BR4 and [Cp*Si([12]crown-4)]+BR4 (R=C6F5) show weakly bound ether molecules.

    19. Energy Storage

      Supercapacitor Electrodes with High-Energy and Power Densities Prepared from Monolithic NiO/Ni Nanocomposites (pages 6847–6850)

      Qi Lu, Michael W. Lattanzi, Yunpeng Chen, Dr. Xiaoming Kou, Dr. Wanfeng Li, Dr. Xin Fan, Prof. Dr. Karl M. Unruh, Prof. Dr. Jingguang G. Chen and Prof. Dr. John Q. Xiao

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101083

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      Impressive energy storage and delivery: A simple, cost-effective, and potentially scalable technique is described for fabricating support- and additive-free NiO/Ni nanocomposite electrodes (see picture) for electrochemical supercapacitors. Maximum performances of energy storage and delivery were simultaneously achieved by developing a slow-charging and fast-discharging procedure.

    20. Biosensors

      Biosensing Platform Based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer from Upconverting Nanocrystals to Graphene Oxide (pages 6851–6854)

      Cuiling Zhang, Yunxia Yuan, Shiming Zhang, Yuhui Wang and Prof. Zhihong Liu

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100769

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      A glucose sensor based on FRET between concanavalin A (ConA)-labeled upconverting phosphor (UCP) nanocrystals and chitosan (CS)-labeled graphene oxide (GO) is presented. Binding of ConA to CS quenches the fluorescence of UCP, which is restored in the presence of glucose, owing to competition between glucose and CS for ConA (see picture).

    21. Porphyrinoids

      Confusion and Neo-Confusion: Corrole Isomers with an NNNC Core (pages 6855–6859)

      Keitaro Fujino, Yasuyuki Hirata, Yasunori Kawabe, Tatsuki Morimoto, Dr. Alagar Srinivasan, Dr. Motoki Toganoh, Yugo Miseki, Prof. Dr. Akihiko Kudo and Prof. Dr. Hiroyuki Furuta

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100429

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      More confused than ever: Three types of N-confused corrole isomers (NCCs) were synthesized, and the structures of these isomers were revealed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The position of the confused pyrrole ring in the NCC has a pronounced effect on optical and anion-binding properties.

    22. π-Stacking Interactions

      Intramolecular π-Stacking Interactions of Bridged Bis-p-Phenylenediamine Radical Cations and Diradical Dications: Charge-Transfer versus Spin-Coupling (pages 6860–6863)

      Almaz S. Jalilov, Prof. Stephen F. Nelsen, Dr. Ilia A. Guzei and Dr. Qin Wu

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102629

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      Stacked against the odds: A bridged mixed-valent compound with direct through-space interactions between the charge-bearing units in its singly charged paramagnetic and its doubly charged diamagnetic forms is isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy (see scheme). π-Stacking interactions for the singlet diradical dication were more pronounced than for the doublet monocation, despite the Coulomb repulsion effect in the diradical dication.

    23. DNA Photochemistry

      Hydrogen Bonding Regulates the Monomeric Nonradiative Decay of Adenine in DNA Strands (pages 6864–6867)

      You Lu, Dr. Zhenggang Lan and Prof. Dr. Walter Thiel

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008146

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      Distinct fates: For adenine in (dA)10, the internal conversion to the ground state is dominated by an S0/S1 conical intersection with a strong out-of-plane deformation of the amino group (left). In (dA)10⋅(dT)10, this channel is suppressed by adenine–thymine hydrogen bonding (right). The excited-state lifetimes of adenine are computed to be ten times longer in DNA strands than in vacuo or in water.

    24. Gold Catalysis

      Gold-Catalyzed 1,3-Acyloxy Migration/5-exo-dig Cyclization/1,5-Acyl Migration of Diynyl Esters (pages 6868–6871)

      Dr. David Lebœuf, Antoine Simonneau, Dr. Corinne Aubert, Prof. Dr. Max Malacria, Prof. Dr. Vincent Gandon and Prof. Dr. Louis Fensterbank

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101179

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      Working three shifts: Polyconjugated δ-diketones are formed stereoselectively in high yields by the gold-catalyzed rearrangement of 1,6-diyn-3-yl esters. This cascade involves a 1,3-sigmatropic acyloxy shift, a 5-exo-dig cyclization of the resulting allenyne, and an unprecedented 1,5-sigmatropic shift of an acyl fragment. The usefulness of the products was shown by an efficient acid-catalyzed transformation into a complex polycyclic framework.

    25. Bio-Electrochemistry

      Electrochemical Signals of Mitochondria: A New Probe of Their Membrane Properties (pages 6872–6875)

      Dr. Michael Hermes, Prof. Dr. Fritz Scholz, Carmen Härdtner, Prof. Dr. Reinhard Walther, Prof. Dr. Lorenz Schild, Dr. Carmen Wolke and Prof. Dr. Uwe Lendeckel

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101235

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      Current events: Isolated functionally intact mitochondria attach to the hydrophobic surface of a static mercury electrode and disintegrate by forming islands on the surface of the electrode within about 1–2 ms (see picture). The kinetics of this process reveals information on the microfluidity of the mitochondrial membrane.

    26. Photoluminescence

      Electric-Induced Enhancement and Modulation of Upconversion Photoluminescence in Epitaxial BaTiO3:Yb/Er Thin Films (pages 6876–6880)

      Prof. Jianhua Hao, Yang Zhang and Dr. Xianhua Wei

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101374

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      Upconversion control: Applying a relatively low bias voltage to an epitaxial lanthanide-doped BaTiO3 thin film results in a significant enhancement of the upconversion emission. Moreover, the photoluminescence (PL) intensity can be modulated with an ac electric field (see picture). This approach provides a real-time and dynamic way to control photoluminescence.

    27. CO Reduction to Methoxide

      Facile Conversion of CO/H2 into Methoxide at a Uranium(III) Center (pages 6881–6883)

      Dr. Alistair S. P. Frey, Prof. Dr. F. Geoffrey N. Cloke, Dr. Martyn P. Coles, Prof. Dr. Laurent Maron and Dr. Thomas Davin

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101509

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      Hydrogenation of CO: The reaction of [U(η-C8H6{SiiPr3-1,4}2)(η-Cp*)] in toluene with CO and H2 at subambient to ambient temperature and pressure affords the methoxide complex [U(η-C8H6{SiiPr3-1,4}2)(η-Cp*)OMe].

    28. Conducting Polymers

      A Soft Chemistry Approach to Coating of LiFePO4 with a Conducting Polymer (pages 6884–6887)

      David Lepage, Dr. Christophe Michot, Dr. Guoxian Liang, Dr. Michel Gauthier and Prof. Steen B. Schougaard

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101661

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      No carbon added: Using the intrinsic oxidative power of LiFePO4/FePO4 combined with the reinsertion of lithium ions, the formation of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) at the solid surface is demonstrated (see picture). The resulting composites have very promising electrochemical properties in rechargeable lithium batteries; in particular, they allow for the elimination of carbon additives.

    29. C[BOND]H Bond Functionalization

      Cobalt–Phenanthroline Catalysts for the ortho Alkylation of Aromatic Imines under Mild Reaction Conditions (pages 6888–6892)

      Ke Gao and Prof. Naohiko Yoshikai

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101823

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      Mild mannered: Cobalt catalysts complexed with phenanthroline-type ligands and activated with Grignard reagents serve as inexpensive and effective catalysts for the ortho alkylation of aromatic imines with a variety of olefins (see scheme). The new catalytic systems feature remarkably mild reaction conditions for C[BOND]H bond activation and functionalization.

    30. Organocatalysis

      Catalytic Enantioselective Addition of Sodium Bisulfite to Chalcones (pages 6893–6895)

      Dr. Maria Moccia, Dr. Francesco Fini, Michela Scagnetti and Prof. Mauro F. A. Adamo

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102162

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      At last! The addition of bisulfite to olefins, discovered over a century ago, remains the most straightforward approach to aliphatic sulfonic acids. A catalytic enantioselective procedure has now been realized that employs a bifunctional aminothiourea catalyst (see picture). Sulfonic acids were obtained from chalcones in high yields and high enantioselectivity and in both configurations.

    31. Palladium Complexes

      Synthesis of a Palladium(IV) Complex by Oxidative Addition of an Aryl Halide to Palladium(II) and Its Use as Precatalyst in a C[BOND]C Coupling Reaction (pages 6896–6899)

      Prof. Dr. José Vicente, Prof. Dr. Aurelia Arcas, M. Sc. Francisco Juliá-Hernández and Dr. Delia Bautista

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102214

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      Four's a charm: Complex 1⋅OAc (see scheme) reacts with 2-iodobenzoic acid to afford the stable PdIV complexes 2 a and 2 b. Complexes 2 are precatalysts for the orthovinylation of 2-iodobenzoic acid with CH2[DOUBLE BOND]CHCO2Me and AgClO4 at room temperature. The reaction is not quenched by excess Hg nor does it afford dibenzyl in the presence of benzyl chloride, suggesting that neither Pd nanoparticles nor a Pd0 complex are involved.

    32. Cascade-Reaction Design

      Branching Cascades: A Concise Synthetic Strategy Targeting Diverse and Complex Molecular Frameworks (pages 6900–6905)

      Dipl.-Chem. Wei Liu, Dr. Vivek Khedkar, Dr. Baburaj Baskar, Dr. Markus Schürmann and Dr. Kamal Kumar

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102440

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      Touch 'n' transform: A synthetic strategy based on cascade or domino reaction sequences enabled the simultaneous incorporation of skeletal diversity and molecular complexity in focused compound collections. Thus, the treatment of a common multifunctionalized substrate with various cascade-triggering molecules (see picture) generated a wide range of both natural product related and unprecedented molecular frameworks.

    33. Polycyclic Hydrocarbons

      Indeno[2,1-a]fluorene: An Air-Stable ortho-Quinodimethane Derivative (pages 6906–6910)

      Dr. Akihiro Shimizu and Prof. Yoshito Tobe

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101950

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      A new isomer: 11,12-Dimesitylindeno[2,1-a]fluorene was synthesized and isolated in crystal form. The indenofluorene exhibits significant bond-length alternation in the o-quinodimethane structure, limited singlet biradical character, and weakly antiaromatic character. Optical and electrochemical properties suggest that indeno[2,1-a]fluorene derivatives may be candidates for optoelectronic materials.

    34. Synthetic Methods

      Gold-Catalyzed Oxidative Cyclization of 1,5-Enynes Using External Oxidants (pages 6911–6914)

      Dhananjayan Vasu, Hsiao-Hua Hung, Dr. Sabyasachi Bhunia, Sagar Ashok Gawade, Dr. Arindam Das and Prof. Dr. Rai-Shung Liu

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102581

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      Golden circle: Two gold-catalyzed oxidative cyclizations of 1,5-enynes using 8-methylquinoline N-oxide are presented (see example). Experimental results indicate that both reactions proceed through prior oxidation of alkyne to form α-carbonyl intermediates and subsequent intramolecular carbocyclization.

    35. Organocatalysis

      N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: Organocatalysts with Moderate Nucleophilicity but Extraordinarily High Lewis Basicity (pages 6915–6919)

      Biplab Maji, Dr. Martin Breugst and Prof. Dr. Herbert Mayr

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102435

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      Unique organocatalysts: Arduengo's carbenes 1 and 2 are 103 times more nucleophilic than the Enders carbene 3, which attacks electrophiles with similar rates as diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undecene (DBU) and 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP). The unique organocatalytic activities of 13 are explained by their extraordinarily high Lewis basicities, which exceed those of PPh3, DBU, and DMAP by more than 100 kJ mol−1.

    36. Magnetic Materials

      Coexistence of Metamagnetism and Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization in a Cobalt Thiocyanate 2D Coordination Network (pages 6920–6923)

      Dipl.-Chem. S. Wöhlert, Dipl.-Chem. J. Boeckmann, Dr. M. Wriedt and Prof. Dr. Christian Näther

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007899

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      Coexistence of metamagnetism and slow relaxation of magnetization is a very rare phenomenon, which is found in the title compound that is accessible through thermal decomposition reaction of precursors with terminally N-bonded anions and bidentate ligands. The picture shows the relaxation of the magnetism for H>HC.

    37. Copper Monooxygenase Models

      Benzylic Ligand Hydroxylation Starting from a Dicopper μ-η22 Peroxo Intermediate: Dramatic Acceleration of the Reaction by Hydrogen-Atom Donors (pages 6924–6927)

      Dr. Malte Rolff, Jessica Nadine Hamann and Prof. Dr. Felix Tuczek

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102332

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      Radicals in directed pathways: The μ-η22 peroxo CuII2 intermediate 1 shows a much faster benzylic ligand hydroxylation than systems without phenol. This novel reactivity can be further accelerated by addition of external H-atom donors such as TEMPO-H. The results imply initial H-atom transfer leading to the formation of phenoxyl radicals. A highly reactive copper oxyl intermediate is then formed, which inserts oxygen into the benzylic C[BOND]H bond.

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