Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Angewandte Chemie International Edition

October 17, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 43

Pages 9993–10254

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Inside Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Essays
    12. Reviews
    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: CO Oxidation as a Prototypical Reaction for Heterogeneous Processes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 43/2011) (page 9993)

      Prof. Hans-Joachim Freund, Prof. Gerard Meijer, Prof. Matthias Scheffler, Prof. Robert Schlögl and Prof. Martin Wolf

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106913

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      CO oxidation is a classic model reaction in heterogeneous catalysis, as demonstrated by H.-J. Freund et al. in their Review on page 10 064 ff. The cover picture shows the Fritz Haber Institute in Berlin-Dahlem, which has a long tradition of research into heterogeneous reactions. In addition to Fritz Haber (top) six other Nobel Laureates have held positions there: Max von Laue, James Franck, Heinrich Wieland, Eugene Wigner, Ernst Ruska, and Gerhard Ertl.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
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    4. Back Cover
    5. Inside Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Essays
    12. Reviews
    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
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    1. Inside Cover: Atomic-Scale Edge Structures on Industrial-Style MoS2 Nanocatalysts (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 43/2011) (page 9994)

      Lars P. Hansen, Quentin M. Ramasse, Christian Kisielowski, Michael Brorson, Erik Johnson, Henrik Topsøe and Stig Helveg

      Article first published online: 7 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105816

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      MoS2-based nanocatalysts are used in hydrodesulfurization processes at oil refineries. In their Communication on page 10 153 ff., S. Helveg and co-workers provide single-atom-sensitive electron microscopy images of nanocatalysts prepared by industrial-style methods. The catalytically important edge structures observed match predictions made by surface science studies. Cover courtesy of P. Møller and S. Nygaard, Haldor Topsøe A/S.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
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    4. Back Cover
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    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
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    10. Book Review
    11. Essays
    12. Reviews
    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
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    1. Back Cover: Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction Computed Tomography Reveals Real-Time Insight into Catalyst Active Phase Evolution (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 43/2011) (page 10255)

      Dr. Simon D. M. Jacques, Dr. Marco Di Michiel, Dr. Andrew M. Beale, Taha Sochi, Dr. Matthew G. O'Brien, Dr. Leticia Espinosa-Alonso, Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen and Prof. Dr. Paul Barnes

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106511

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      Color X-ray images can be obtained by X-ray diffraction computed tomography (XRD-CT) where the mapping of the diffraction signal from the interiors of solid objects enables material-specific imaging. In their Communication on page 10 148 ff., S. D. M. Jacques et al. describe the first time-resolved XRD-CT experiment, which reveals the mechanism by which a catalyst evolves from its precursor during the preparation of millimeter-sized industrial hydrogenation catalyst body.

  4. Inside Back Cover

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    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
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    10. Book Review
    11. Essays
    12. Reviews
    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
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    1. Inside Back Cover: Insights into the Mechanism of Photocatalytic Water Reduction by DFT-Supported In Situ EPR/Raman Spectroscopy (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 43/2011) (page 10256)

      Dr. Dirk Hollmann, Felix Gärtner, Prof. Dr. Ralf Ludwig, Enrico Barsch, Dr. Henrik Junge, Dr. Matthias Blug, Dr. Sascha Hoch, Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller and Prof. Dr. Angelika Brückner

      Article first published online: 7 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106051

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      Understanding the mechanism of photocatalytic water splitting is essential for the development of effective catalysts beyond trial and error. In their Communication on page 10 246 ff., R. Ludwig, M. Beller, A. Brückner et al. monitored the simultaneous action of iridium and iron catalysts within the cycle of H2 production from water by a combination of three in-situ spectroscopic methods and thus verified the reaction mechanism.

  5. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
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    4. Back Cover
    5. Inside Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Essays
    12. Reviews
    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
  6. News

    1. Top of page
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    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
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    9. News
    10. Book Review
    11. Essays
    12. Reviews
    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
  7. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
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    4. Back Cover
    5. Inside Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
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    10. Book Review
    11. Essays
    12. Reviews
    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
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    1. Hans-Joachim (Hajo) Freund (pages 10016–10017)

      Article first published online: 30 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105527

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      “When I was eighteen I wanted to be either a physicist or a chemist. I am waiting for the day when someone will discover a cure for Alzheimer′s disease …” This and more about Hans-Joachim (Hajo) Freund can be found on page 10016.

  8. News

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    10. Book Review
    11. Essays
    12. Reviews
    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
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  9. Book Review

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    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
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  10. Essays

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    15. Communications
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    1. One Hundred Years of the Fritz Haber Institute (pages 10022–10049)

      Prof. Dr. Bretislav Friedrich, Prof. Dr. Dieter Hoffmann and Dr. Jeremiah James

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104792

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      A retrospect: The institute that was later renamed the Fritz Haber Institute began as a much-awaited remedy for the feared waning of Germany's scientific and technological superiority. The history of the Institute—from its “golden era” in the 1920s and early 1930s, through war-related research during both World Wars, crippling losses following World War II, and impressive growth since the 1950s—has largely paralleled that of 20th century Germany.

    2. History of Chemistry

      Fritz Haber: The Damned Scientist (pages 10050–10062)

      Magda Dunikowska and Ludwik Turko

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105425

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      In the gallery of famous people tracing their origins to Wrocław, few are as controversial, as complex, or as tragic as Fritz Haber, ever more distant in the flux of time, yet still stirring emotions. He developed a method for the direct synthesis of ammonia from its elements and later pioneered chemical warfare on the battlefields of the First World War.

  11. Reviews

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    11. Essays
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    13. Minireview
    14. Highlights
    15. Communications
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    1. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      CO Oxidation as a Prototypical Reaction for Heterogeneous Processes (pages 10064–10094)

      Prof. Hans-Joachim Freund, Prof. Gerard Meijer, Prof. Matthias Scheffler, Prof. Robert Schlögl and Prof. Martin Wolf

      Article first published online: 29 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101378

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      The best reference: The enormous progress in the elementary understanding of heterogeneous catalysis is based to a large degree on the study of CO oxidation as a probe reaction of heterogeneous processes. Experimental and theoretical results from this seemingly simple reaction are presented and it will be shown how these can be used to draw general conclusions about heterogeneous reactions

    2. Gas-Phase Chemistry

      Chemistry with Methane: Concepts Rather than Recipes (pages 10096–10115)

      Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwarz

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006424

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      Elementary steps associated with the activation of methane are addressed from experimental and computational viewpoints; what matters most are relativistic effects, two-state reactivity scenarios, and cluster-size and ligand effects, which all play a role in the organometallic chemistry of methane at ambient conditions.

  12. Minireview

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    1. In Situ Analysis

      Determination of Molecular Surface Structure, Composition, and Dynamics under Reaction Conditions at High Pressures and at the Solid–Liquid Interface (pages 10116–10129)

      Prof. Gabor A. Somorjai, Simon K. Beaumont and Selim Alayoglu

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008214

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      Seeing is believing: Changes in adsorbate and surface structure, composition, and dynamics are observed when such systems are studied under typical reaction conditions (see picture), either at high pressures or in the presence of liquids. Using instruments specifically designed to meet this challenge allows the exploration of interfacial phenomena under realistic conditions at the molecular level.

  13. Highlights

    1. Top of page
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    1. Chemical Sensors

      High-Sensitivity Hydrogen Detection: Hydrogen-Induced Swelling of Multiple Cracked Palladium Films on Compliant Substrates (pages 10130–10132)

      Dr. Aleksander Gurlo and Prof. David R. Clarke

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103845

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      Hydrogen sponge: The reversible swelling of palladium–nickel alloys upon hydrogen absorption mechanically closes nanogaps in multiple cracked Pd–Ni films on elastomeric substrate allowing for the electric current to flow across (see picture). When the hydrogen is removed the elastomer elastically returns to its original state reopening numerous potential break junctions along each crack.

    2. CO2 Capture

      Capture of Carbon Dioxide at the Gas–Liquid Interface Elucidated by Surface Science Approaches (pages 10133–10134)

      Dr. Florian Maier

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105157

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      Just below the surface: New methods of photoelectron spectroscopy and the application of ionic liquids offer insight into fundamental processes in CO2–liquid systems for carbon dioxide capture and storage, for example, the selective absorption of CO2 in aqueous monoethanolamine (see picture; gray C, white H, blue N, red O).

  14. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    1. Selective Oxidation

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Selective Oxidation of Glycerol by Highly Active Bimetallic Catalysts at Ambient Temperature under Base-Free Conditions (pages 10136–10139)

      Gemma L. Brett, Qian He, Ceri Hammond, Dr. Peter J. Miedziak, Dr. Nikolaos Dimitratos, Dr. Meenakshisundaram Sankar, Dr. Andrew A. Herzing, Dr. Marco Conte, Dr. Jose Antonio Lopez-Sanchez, Prof. Christopher J. Kiely, Prof. David W. Knight, Dr. Stuart H. Taylor and Prof. Graham J. Hutchings

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101772

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      Au–Pt alloy nanoparticles deposited on Mg(OH)2 (see STEM-HAADF image) show high activity in the selective oxidation of polyols using molecular oxygen as oxidant at mild and base-free conditions.

    2. Nanostructures

      Anisotropic Growth of Titania onto Various Gold Nanostructures: Synthesis, Theoretical Understanding, and Optimization for Catalysis (pages 10140–10143)

      Zhi Wei Seh, Dr. Shuhua Liu, Shuang-Yuan Zhang, Dr. M. S. Bharathi, Dr. H. Ramanarayan, Michelle Low, Kwok Wei Shah, Prof. Yong-Wei Zhang and Prof. Ming-Yong Han

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104943

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      How does your garden grow? A facile method can tune the anisotropic growth of TiO2 onto differently shaped gold nanoparticles to form Janus, eccentric, and concentric geometries (see picture). The Janus Au-TiO2 nanostructures were found to be energetically stable using calculations, and they possess the highest catalytic activity out of all three geometries due to the highly accessible, exposed gold core on one side.

    3. Gold Catalysis

      Mechanism and Active Sites of the Oxidation of CO over Au/TiO2 (pages 10144–10147)

      Dr. Tadahiro Fujitani and Dr. Isao Nakamura

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104694

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      At low reaction temperatures (<320 K), moisture plays an essential role in promoting the oxidation of CO over Au/TiO2(110) surfaces, whereas at high temperatures (>320 K), such promotional effect is not observed, suggesting that the mechanism and active sites of the reaction change with the reaction temperature (see picture; rmath image=rate of CO2 formation and pmath image=pressure of H2O).

    4. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction Computed Tomography Reveals Real-Time Insight into Catalyst Active Phase Evolution (pages 10148–10152)

      Dr. Simon D. M. Jacques, Dr. Marco Di Michiel, Dr. Andrew M. Beale, Taha Sochi, Dr. Matthew G. O'Brien, Dr. Leticia Espinosa-Alonso, Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen and Prof. Dr. Paul Barnes

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104604

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      Chemistry by color: The first dynamic study using X-ray diffraction computed tomography investigates the evolving chemistry and structural changes during the preparation of a millimeter-sized industrial hydrogenation catalyst body (see picture; time evolves from left to right, and different colors represent different phases). The method has potential for chemical imaging of materials within bulk objects undergoing physicochemical changes.

    5. High-Resolution Microscopy

      Atomic-Scale Edge Structures on Industrial-Style MoS2 Nanocatalysts (pages 10153–10156)

      Lars P. Hansen, Quentin M. Ramasse, Christian Kisielowski, Michael Brorson, Erik Johnson, Henrik Topsøe and Stig Helveg

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103745

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      Atoms on the edge: The atomic edge structure of industrial-style MoS2 nanocatalysts was imaged using single-atom sensitive electron microscopy (see picture). The observed industrial-style edge terminations match predictions of model catalyst studies and thus address the so-called “materials gap” in catalysis.

    6. Gold Catalysis

      Systematic Morphology Changes of Gold Nanoparticles Supported on CeO2 during CO Oxidation (pages 10157–10160)

      Tetsuya Uchiyama, Dr. Hideto Yoshida, Yasufumi Kuwauchi, Dr. Satoshi Ichikawa, Satoshi Shimada, Prof. Masatake Haruta and Prof. Seiji Takeda

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102487

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      The morphology of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) supported on CeO2 in various partial pressures of CO and O2 is presented; their morphology correlates well with their catalytic activity. Adsorbed CO molecules stabilize the major {111} and {100} facets of GNP polyhedra and dissociation of O2 molecules may occur at the perimeter interface of GNPs and CeO2 supports with the aid of electron irradiation, thus causing rounded morphology of the GNPs (see diagram).

    7. Phase Clusters

      Phase Clusters in Large Populations of Chemical Oscillators (pages 10161–10164)

      Dr. Annette F. Taylor, Dr. Mark R. Tinsley, Fang Wang and Prof. Kenneth Showalter

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008248

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      Complex synchronization: Chemical oscillators communicating by exchange of intermediate species through the surrounding solution form clusters of individuals with synchronized oscillations that are out of phase with other clusters. The system evolves from unsynchronized oscillations at low number density n to four, three, two, and finally one cluster with increasing n (see picture).

    8. Nanomotors

      Interaction of a Chemically Propelled Nanomotor with a Chemical Wave (pages 10165–10169)

      Snigdha Thakur, Jiang-Xing Chen and Prof. Raymond Kapral

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100111

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      A chemically powered nanodimer motor interacting with a chemical wave results in the deflection of the nanomotor (see picture). Such an effect provides a possible mechanism for the control of nanomotor motion.

    9. Hydrogen Storage

      The Particle-Size Dependence of the Activation Energy for Decomposition of Lithium Amide (pages 10170–10173)

      Dr. Khang Hoang, Dr. Anderson Janotti and Prof. Chris G. Van de Walle

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100810

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      A question of size: LiNH2 decomposes into Li2NH and NH3 through two competing mechanisms, one that involves the formation of native defects in the interior of the material (by a Frenkel pair mechanism) and the other at the surface (see picture; H red, Li gray, N blue). The prevailing mechanism and hence the activation energy thus depend on the surface-to-volume ratio, or the specific surface area, which changes with the particle size.

    10. Photoelectron Spectroscopy

      Analysis of the Broadening of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Peaks for Ionic Crystals (pages 10174–10177)

      Dr. Connie J. Nelin, Prof. Dr. Paul S. Bagus, Dr. Matthew A. Brown, Dr. Martin Sterrer and Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Freund

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100964

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      Breathing: A simple and intuitive approach relates changes in bond lengths of core-hole ionized states to the extent of vibrational fine structure, or Franck–Condon broadening (ΔE), in X-ray photoelectron spectra of ionic compounds. For the extreme case of a monolayer of MgO on Ag(100), the difference in Franck–Condon broadening compared to bulk MgO reflects the different binding situation in the supported oxide (see picture, r=Mg[BOND]O distance).

    11. CO2 Capture

      CO2 Capture in Amine-Based Aqueous Solution: Role of the Gas–Solution Interface (pages 10178–10181)

      Tanza Lewis, Dr. Manfred Faubel, Dr. Bernd Winter and Prof. Dr. John C. Hemminger

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101250

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      Interface matters! Photoelectron spectra of aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA) that had been treated with CO2 were used to determine the spatial distribution of MEA and the reaction products with respect to the solution interface (see picture). Neutral MEA shows a propensity for the solution surface, whereas protonated MEA and the reaction products prefer bulk solvation.

    12. Electrocatalysis

      Role of Surface Iron in Enhanced Activity for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction on a Pd3Fe(111) Single-Crystal Alloy (pages 10182–10185)

      Dr. Xiaofang Yang, Dr. Jun Hu, Jie Fu, Prof. Ruqian Wu and Prof. Bruce E. Koel

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101251

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      Working together: Pd0.9Fe0.1–Pd3Fe(111) (see picture, Pd adatoms yellow, Fe purple, Pd blue-green, O red, H white) displays enhanced performance for the oxygen reduction reaction with five to eight times higher activity than Pd(111). The high catalytic activity may originate from a cooperative effect of a segregated Pd layer with its large tendency to remove surface O species by protonation and active Fe with its ability to dissociate O2.

    13. Gold Catalysis

      Low-Temperature Catalytic H2 Oxidation over Au Nanoparticle/TiO2 Dual Perimeter Sites (pages 10186–10189)

      Isabel Xiaoye Green, Dr. Wenjie Tang, Prof. Dr. Matthew Neurock and Prof. Dr. John T. Yates Jr.

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101612

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      The catalytic reaction of H2+O2 over a Au/TiO2 catalyst was studied by transmission IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. A reaction path of O2-assisted H2 dissociation at the Au/TiO2 dual perimeter site was found to proceed through a Ti[BOND]OOH intermediate (see scheme). The calculated barrier range (0.13–0.25 eV) for the sequence of low-energy steps agree with the experimental Ea of 0.22 eV.

    14. Fuel Cell Catalysis

      Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts: An In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study (pages 10190–10192)

      Dr. Daniel Friebel, Daniel J. Miller, Dr. Dennis Nordlund, Dr. Hirohito Ogasawara and Prof. Anders Nilsson

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101620

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      Gold support destabilizes platinum: Driven by the low surface energy of Au, a Pt fuel cell catalyst is removed from the surface of the Au support. Depending on the electrochemical potential, this removal can occur through Pt dissolution either into the Au substrate or into the electrolyte (see picture). In situ HERFD XAS measurements indicate formation of PtO2 by a dissolution–precipitation mechanism.

    15. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Highly Efficient and Stable CeNiHZOY Nano-Oxyhydride Catalyst for H2 Production from Ethanol at Room Temperature (pages 10193–10197)

      Dr. Cyril Pirez, Dr. Mickaël Capron, Dr. Hervé Jobic, Prof. Franck Dumeignil and Dr. Louise Jalowiecki-Duhamel

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102617

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      The CeNiHZOYoxyhydride compound is an exceptional catalyst that totally converts ethanol at 60 °C and produces H2 in the presence of water and oxygen. The H2 fraction of the gas-phase products is about 50 % (see picture; c: conversion, p: production). The oxyhydride compound is formed by in-situ activation of CeNiOY with H2 at 250 °C. The presence of hydride species in the catalyst is evidenced by inelastic neutron scattering.

    16. Determining the Behavior of RuOx Nanoparticles in Mixed-Metal Oxides: Structural and Catalytic Properties of RuO2/TiO2(110) Surfaces (pages 10198–10202)

      Dr. Fan Yang, Dr. Shankhamala Kundu, Dr. Alba B. Vidal, Prof. Jesús Graciani, Pedro J. Ramírez, Dr. Sanjaya D. Senanayake, Dr. Dario Stacchiola, Prof. Jaime Evans, Dr. Ping Liu, Prof. Javier Fdez Sanz and Dr. José A. Rodriguez

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103798

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      Hot off the wire: Scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional calculations were used to study the interaction of RuO2 nanostructures with TiO2(110). Ruthenium oxide forms unique Ru3O6 wire-like structures on TiO2 that can be easily reduced and re-oxidized at temperatures in the range of 400–600 K, and it has a very high catalytic activity for the low-temperature oxidation of CO.

    17. Nanoparticle Photocatalysis

      Structural and Electronic Study of an Amorphous MoS3 Hydrogen-Generation Catalyst on a Quantum-Controlled Photosensitizer (pages 10203–10207)

      Dr. Ming L. Tang, David C. Grauer, Dr. Benedikt Lassalle-Kaiser, Dr. Vittal K. Yachandra, Dr. Lilac Amirav, Prof. Jeffrey R. Long, Dr. Junko Yano and Prof. A. Paul Alivisatos

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104412

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      Light–water reactor: An amorphous molybdenum sulfide species structurally similar to reduced MoS3 is shown to be photocatalytically active for hydrogen generation from H2O with visible light (see picture; TEOA=triethanolamine). Thermally deposited in one step, MoS3 is photosensitized by quantum-controlled semiconductor nanocrystals that serve as model systems for the photophysics of solar fuel generation.

    18. Gold Nanoparticles

      A Yolk@Shell Nanoarchitecture for Au/TiO2 Catalysts (pages 10208–10211)

      Dr. Ilkeun Lee, Dr. Ji Bong Joo, Prof. Yadong Yin and Prof. Francisco Zaera

      Article first published online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007660

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      Trapped inside: A new catalyst was developed where gold nanoparticles are encased inside hollow titania nanospheres (see picture). The new nanoarchitecture prevents the nanoparticles from sintering and losing their activity while still providing the reactants free access to the metal surface. The result is a catalyst capable of promoting the oxidation of CO at room temperature while surviving calcination at temperatures above 775 K.

    19. Complex Dynamic Structures

      Engineering of Synchronization and Clustering of a Population of Chaotic Chemical Oscillators (pages 10212–10215)

      Dr. Craig G. Rusin, Prof. Isao Tokuda, Prof. István Z. Kiss and Prof. John L. Hudson

      Article first published online: 6 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008194

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      Dialing up complex dynamic structures: A population of 64 chaotic chemical oscillators (phase–space snapshots, left) in a nickel electrodissolution is steered with mild global feedback to one (middle) and two (right) clustered states.

    20. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Titania-Supported Iridium Subnanoclusters as an Efficient Heterogeneous Catalyst for Direct Synthesis of Quinolines from Nitroarenes and Aliphatic Alcohols (pages 10216–10220)

      Lin He, Prof. Dr. Jian-Qiang Wang, Ya Gong, Dr. Yong-Mei Liu, Prof. Dr. Yong Cao, Prof. Dr. He-Yong He and Prof. Dr. Kang-Nian Fan

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104089

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      A versatile heterogeneous catalyst consisting of sub-nanosized iridium clusters deposited on titania (Ir/TiO2-NCs) promotes the direct tandem synthesis of quinoline derivatives from readily available nitroarenes and aliphatic alcohols under mild and additive-free conditions (see scheme). The process tolerates the presence of various reactive functional groups and is highly selective.

    21. Silicon Defects

      Activation Energies for Diffusion of Defects in Silicon: The Role of the Exchange-Correlation Functional (pages 10221–10225)

      Prof. Dr. Stefan K. Estreicher, Dr. Daniel J. Backlund, Dr. Christian Carbogno and Prof. Dr. Matthias Scheffler

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100733

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DFT calculations were used to determine the activation energies (Ea values) for the diffusion of defects such as O atoms (Oi0 red sphere in the picture) in silicon (blue spheres). The migration paths were obtained from the nudged elastic band method. The activation energies calculated with four exchange-correlation functionals (Exc) were compared to experimental data. The Ea values of “atomic-like” interstitials are mostly independent of Exc, but those of strongly bound impurities are sensitive to the choice of Exc.

    22. Metal-Free Catalysis

      Oxygen Insertion Catalysis by sp2 Carbon (pages 10226–10230)

      Dr. Benjamin Frank, Dr. Raoul Blume, Dr. Ali Rinaldi, Dr. Annette Trunschke and Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103340

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Black matter in catalysis: Graphitic carbon catalyzes the insertion of O atoms into acrolein. Such complex multistep atom rearrangements were believed to be the exclusive domain of metal (oxide) catalysis. In the C-catalyzed process, the nucleophilic O atoms terminating the graphite (0001) surface abstract the formyl H atom and the activated aldehyde is oxidized by a mobile epoxide O atom. Thus, the sp2 carbon acts as a bifunctional catalyst.

    23. Nanostructured Catalysts

      Nanosizing Intermetallic Compounds Onto Carbon Nanotubes: Active and Selective Hydrogenation Catalysts (pages 10231–10235)

      Dr. Lidong Shao, Dr. Wei Zhang, Dr. Marc Armbrüster, Dr. Detre Teschner, Dr. Frank Girgsdies, Dr. Bingsen Zhang, Dr. Olaf Timpe, Matthias Friedrich, Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl and Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanosized, yet ordered: Active and selective Pd2Ga intermetallic compounds supported on carbon nanotubes have been synthesized and applied to alkyne hydrogenation. Intermetallic compounds on the nanoscale are necessary to achieve high mass activity, whereas ordered structures within intermetallic compounds form high barriers for subsurface chemistry and prevent large active ensembles on Pd surface.

    24. Iron Oxide Nanostructures

      Layered-Carbon-Stabilized Iron Oxide Nanostructures as Oxidation Catalysts (pages 10236–10240)

      Yongjun Gao, Prof. Dr. Ding Ma, Dr. Gang Hu, Peng Zhai, Prof. Dr. Xinhe Bao, Dr. Bo Zhu, Dr. Bingsen Zhang and Prof. Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101737

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Into the layer: Layered carbon–iron oxide nano-composites catalysts are very active in catalytic oxidation reactions. The size and structure of the iron oxide nanoparticles (blue in the TEM image) embedded in the layered carbon can be controlled very simply by changing the temperature of the synthesis reaction.

    25. Active Oxygen

      Active Oxygen on a Au/TiO2 Catalyst: Formation, Stability, and CO Oxidation Activity (pages 10241–10245)

      Dipl. Chem. Daniel Widmann and Prof. Dr. R. Jürgen Behm

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ideal location: The active oxygen for CO oxidation on Au/TiO2 catalysts is a highly stable oxygen species, whose formation is facile and hardly activated. This species is proposed to be surface lattice oxygen at the perimeter of the Au–TiO2 interface, activated by the presence of the Au nanoparticle. At higher temperatures, thermally activated Olatt migration also gives access to adjacent Olatt species.

    26. Reaction Mechanisms

      Insights into the Mechanism of Photocatalytic Water Reduction by DFT-Supported In Situ EPR/Raman Spectroscopy (pages 10246–10250)

      Dr. Dirk Hollmann, Felix Gärtner, Prof. Dr. Ralf Ludwig, Enrico Barsch, Dr. Henrik Junge, Dr. Matthias Blug, Dr. Sascha Hoch, Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller and Prof. Dr. Angelika Brückner

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103710

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light on the water: The coupling of Raman and EPR spectroscopy was crucial in the study of the activation, operation, and deactivation steps in the light-driven splitting of water catalyzed by iridium and iron. The results may provide the foundation for improved water-reduction catalysts. IrPS=iridium photosensitizer, TEA=triethylamine.

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      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44/2011 (page 10254)

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190090

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