Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 44

October 24, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 44

Pages 10257–10461

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Synthesis and Reactions of N-Heterocyclic Carbene Boranes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44/2011) (page 10257)

      Prof. Dennis P. Curran, Andrey Solovyev, Dr. Malika Makhlouf Brahmi, Prof. Louis Fensterbank, Prof. Max Malacria and Dr. Emmanuel Lacôte

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105618

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Like the suguaro cactus the chemistry of carbene boranes sprouted from barren ground and grew slowly for several decades. The rains came in 2008, and now the various branches of the field are all blossoming. In their Review on page 10 294 ff. D. P. Curran and co-workers discuss the synthesis, application, and characterization of N-heterocyclic carbene-borane complexes. Unusual boron species are stabilized by carbenes, and carbene boranes themselves are reagents for organic synthesis and co-initiators for radical photopolymerization. The cover was created by Dr. Julien Monot and Mr. Andrey Solovyev.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: A Highly Active Catalyst for the Hydrogenation of Amides to Alcohols and Amines (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44/2011) (page 10258)

      Jeremy M. John and Prof. Dr. Steven H. Bergens

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105348

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A remarkably active catalyst system for the hydrogenation of a variety of acyclic and cyclic amides to the corresponding alcohols and amines is demonstrated by J. M. John and S. H. Bergens in their Communication on page 10 377 ff. Turnover numbers as high as 7200 are reported, as well as observations of the punitive active homogeneous catalyst, trans-[Ru(H)2(Ph2PCH2CH2NH2)2], derived from Ph2P(CH2)2NH2 and cis-[Ru(CH3CN)2(η3-C3H5)(cod)]BF4 (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene).

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Modular Redox-Active Inorganic Chemical Cells: iCHELLs (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44/2011) (page 10462)

      Dr. Geoffrey J. T. Cooper, Dr. Philip J. Kitson, Ross Winter, Dr. Michele Zagnoni, Dr. De-Liang Long and Prof. Leroy Cronin

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106895

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inorganic compartments with a membrane boundary can be grown which resemble cellular architectures. These inorganic chemical cells or “iCHELLs” are highly modular with controllable functionality and porosity, and they can be inserted inside each other allowing the compartmentalization of chemical reactions as is shown by L. Cronin and co-workers in their Communication on page 10 373 ff.

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial: Chemistry, Science, and Our Sustainable Future (pages 10260–10261)

      Prof. Yuan T. Lee and Andrew Wei-Chih Yang

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105640

  5. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
  6. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: NaSr3Be3B3O9F4: A Promising Deep-Ultraviolet Nonlinear Optical Material Resulting from the Cooperative Alignment of the [Be3B3O12F]10− Anionic Group (page 10274)

      Hongwei Huang, Jiyong Yao, Zheshuai Lin, Xiaoyang Wang, Ran He, Wenjiao Yao, Naixia Zhai and Prof. Chuangtian Chen

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190093

  7. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
  8. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Jurriaan Huskens (page 10282)

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104950

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “Science is fun because it provides a life-long satisfaction of curiosity. My favorite time of day is dinner (for several reasons) …” This and more about Jurriaan Huskens can be found on page 10282.

  9. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
  10. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. F. Gordon A. Stone (1925–2011) (pages 10284–10285)

      Anthony F. Hill

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105151

  11. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Chemistry in Space. From Interstellar Matter to the Origin of Life. By Dieter Rehder. (page 10286)

      Carsten Streb

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105088

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2010. 292 pp., hardcover, € 99.00.—ISBN 978-3527326891

  12. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Boron–Nitrogen Compounds

      Advances with Ammonia-Borane: Improved Recycling and Use as a Precursor to Atomically Thin BN Films (pages 10288–10289)

      Dr. George R. Whittell and Prof. Dr. Ian Manners

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103830

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      BN working: Under ambient conditions, ammonia-borane (AB) dehydrogenates to polyborazylene, which, in a recent advance, can be readily regenerated in a key step for hydrogen-storage applications (see scheme). In contrast, recent reports show that dehydrogenation of AB under chemical vapor deposition conditions yields atomically thin films of hexagonal BN and their hybrids with graphene.

    2. Pseudorotation

      Stereomutation in Trigonal-Bipyramidal Systems: A Unified Picture (pages 10290–10292)

      Prof. Christina Moberg

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103375

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Same difference: Berry pseutorotation (BPR) and Ugi turnstile rotation, which are generally treated as two distinctly different mechanisms for rearrangement of trigonal-bipyramidal structures, have been shown to be equivalent. Alternative mechanisms consist of sequences of pseudorotations proceeding in a single step.

  13. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. NHC-Boranes

      Synthesis and Reactions of N-Heterocyclic Carbene Boranes (pages 10294–10317)

      Prof. Dennis P. Curran, Andrey Solovyev, Dr. Malika Makhlouf Brahmi, Prof. Louis Fensterbank, Prof. Max Malacria and Dr. Emmanuel Lacôte

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102717

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Forget everything you know about boron chemistry … NHC-boranes (see picture) are different. Functionalities that are not usually present in organoboron compounds can be easily introduced. New classes of rare boron-based reactive intermediates (cations, radicals, and anions) have emerged. And NHC-boranes are promising as reagents and catalysts in organic synthesis and as co-initiators in radical polymerization.

  14. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Self-Assembly

      A Sphere-in-Sphere Complex by Orthogonal Self-Assembly (pages 10318–10321)

      Qing-Fu Sun, Dr. Takashi Murase, Dr. Sota Sato and Prof. Dr. Makoto Fujita

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104670

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Russian dolls: Two covalently tethered, curved bispyridinyl ligands and PdII ions have been shown to self-assemble into a sphere-in-sphere complex (6.3 nm in diameter; see X-ray structure). The two ligands did not form heteroleptic mixed complexes, but instead assembled into two distinct homogeneous [M12L24] cuboctahedra, reminiscent of a double-shell viral capsid.

    2. Photoswitches

      Photoswitchable N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: Using Light to Modulate Electron-Donating Properties (pages 10322–10326)

      Bethany M. Neilson, Vincent M. Lynch and Prof. Christopher W. Bielawski

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105032

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ligands in the limelight: Light was used to change the electron-donating properties of an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) moiety within chalcogen and metal adducts. Photoinduced electrocyclic ring closure of a photochromic 4,5-dithienylimidazolone increased its νCO frequency. Likewise, UV irradiation of an analogous photochromic [(NHC)Ir(CO)2Cl] complex decreased the carbene's electron-donating ability. Subsequent exposure to visible light reversed both photocyclization reactions.

    3. Sensors

      Capture and Visualization of Hydrogen Sulfide by a Fluorescent Probe (pages 10327–10329)

      Dr. Chunrong Liu, Jia Pan, Dr. Sheng Li, Yu Zhao, Lisa Y. Wu, Prof. Clifford E. Berkman, Prof. A. Richard Whorton and Prof. Ming Xian

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104305

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reaction-based sensing: A fluorescent probe for the detection of hydrogen sulfide was prepared and evaluated on the basis of H2S-mediated benzodithiolone formation. The probe showed good selectivity and sensitivity for hydrogen sulfide.

    4. Antitumor Agents

      Polysilsesquioxane Nanoparticles for Targeted Platin-Based Cancer Chemotherapy by Triggered Release (pages 10330–10334)

      Joseph Della Rocca, Rachel C. Huxford, Erica Comstock-Duggan and Prof. Wenbin Lin

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104510

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Trigger happy: Polysilsesquioxane (PSQ) nanoparticles that contain a PtIV-based active agent (1; see picture) can be used for the triggered delivery of chemotherapeutics. The cytotoxicity of 1 was superior to that of oxaliplatin against four cancer cell lines in vitro, and targeting further enhanced the cytotoxicity. PEGylated and anisamide-targeted 1 showed drastically superior efficacy to oxaliplatin in inhibiting tumor growth.

    5. miRNA Detection

      Direct Quantitative Analysis of Multiple miRNAs (DQAMmiR) (pages 10335–10339)

      David W. Wegman and Prof. Sergey N. Krylov

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104693

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dragging it out: The first direct quantitative analysis of multiple miRNAs (DQAMmiR) uses miRNAs directly, without chemical or enzymatic modification, and accurately determines concentrations of multiple miRNAs without the need for calibration curves. This method involves a capillary-electrophoresis-based hybridization assay with a combination of two separation-enhancement approaches: drag tags and single strand DNA binding protein (SSB).

    6. Ozone-Containing Hydrates

      Molecular Storage of Ozone in a Clathrate Hydrate Formed from an O3+O2+CO2 Gas Mixture (pages 10340–10343)

      Takahiro Nakajima, Satoru Akatsu, Dr. Ryo Ohmura, Dr. Satoshi Takeya and Dr. Yasuhiko H. Mori

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104660

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ozone in the rocks: A clathrate hydrate can be formed from an O3+O2+CO2 gas mixture (see picture, left; O2+CO2 hydrate is shown for comparison). The pale blue color of the former is probably due to the ozone molecules encaged within. The O3+O2+CO2 hydrate stored in air at normal pressure at −25 °C can preserve ozone (0.1 % in mass fraction) for over four weeks.

    7. Microporous MOFs

      A Microporous Copper Metal–Organic Framework with High H2 and CO2 Adsorption Capacity at Ambient Pressure (pages 10344–10348)

      Daniel Lässig, Jörg Lincke, Jens Moellmer, Christian Reichenbach, Dr. Andreas Moeller, Prof. Dr. Roger Gläser, Dr. Grit Kalies, Dr. Katie A. Cychosz, Dr. Matthias Thommes, Prof. Dr. Reiner Staudt and Prof. Dr. Harald Krautscheid

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102329

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fully accessible: Uptakes of 9.2 mmol g−1 (40.5 wt %) for CO2 at 273 K/0.1 MPa and 15.23 mmol g−1 (3.07 wt %) for H2 at 77 K/0.1 MPa are among the highest reported for metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) and are found for a novel, highly microporous copper-based MOF (see picture; Cu turquoise, O red, N blue). Thermal analyses show a stability of the flexible framework up to 250 °C.

    8. Enzyme Stereospecificity

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      “Lethal Synthesis” of Fluorocitrate by Citrate Synthase Explained through QM/MM Modeling (pages 10349–10351)

      Dr. Marc W. van der Kamp, John D. McGeagh and Prof. Adrian J. Mulholland

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103260

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A classic example of enzyme stereospecificity is the title reaction involving the enantioselective conversion of fluoroacetyl-CoA. High-level modeling of the enzyme reaction shows that preferential formation of an E-enolate explains the experimentally observed specificity. The results indicate that selectivity is primarily a result of the inherent energy difference between the E- and Z-enolates of fluoroacetyl-CoA.

    9. Vesicles

      Reversible and Large-Scale Cytomimetic Vesicle Aggregation: Light-Responsive Host–Guest Interactions (pages 10352–10356)

      Dr. Haibao Jin, Yongli Zheng, Yong Liu, Haixing Cheng, Prof. Yongfeng Zhou and Deyue Yan

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sleeping giants: As a mimic of cell agglomeration to form tissues, a novel vesicle aggregation process with the characteristic advantages of being highly efficient, light-responsive, reversible, large-scale, and stable is reported. Giant hyperbranched polymer vesicles (5–10 μm) are used as the building blocks (see scheme), and the vesicle aggregates can assemble and disassemble with alternating UV and Vis irradiation.

    10. Peptide-Bond Synthesis

      Structural Evidence for Standard-Mechanism Inhibition in Metallopeptidases from a Complex Poised to Resynthesize a Peptide Bond (pages 10357–10360)

      Dr. Joan L. Arolas, Dr. Tiago O. Botelho, Prof. Dr. Andreas Vilcinskas and Prof. Dr. F. Xavier Gomis-Rüth

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103262

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It goes both ways: An unprecedented mechanism of metalloendopeptidase inhibition has been identified for the insect metalloproteinase inhibitor, which is both cleaved and rejoined at bond Asn56[BOND]Ile57 by thermolysin under appropriate conditions. A two-product complex is formed after hydrolysis and, simultaneously, a Michaelis complex is poised for synthesis of a peptide bond (see crystal structure).

    11. Biomineralization

      Structure and Mechanical Properties of a Pteropod Shell Consisting of Interlocked Helical Aragonite Nanofibers (pages 10361–10365)

      Taiji Zhang, Prof. Yurong Ma, Dr. Kai Chen, Dr. Martin Kunz, Dr. Nobumichi Tamura, Ming Qiang, Dr. Jun Xu and Prof. Limin Qi

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103407

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Natural ultrathin flexible armor: Novel hierarchical microstructures composed of densely packed helical aragonite nanofibers were observed in an ultrathin pteropod shell by a combination of techniques. The helical nanofibers are interlocked and crystallographically aligned with a misorientation of up to 10°. These structural features may contribute to its advanced anisotropic mechanical properties.

    12. Cycloaddition

      Experimental Diels–Alder Reactivities of Cycloalkenones and Cyclic Dienes Explained through Transition-State Distortion Energies (pages 10366–10368)

      Dr. Robert S. Paton, Dr. Seonah Kim, Audrey G. Ross, Prof. Samuel J. Danishefsky and Prof. K. N. Houk

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103998

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Quantum chemical calculations are used to investigate the experimentally measured reactivities of cyclic dienes and cycloalkenones in the Diels–Alder reaction. The interaction energies (red) are nearly constant; differences arise in changes in distortion energies of both dienophile (blue) and diene (green; see picture, Ea=activation energy; values in kcal mol−1).

    13. Upconversion

      Single-Band Upconversion Emission in Lanthanide-Doped KMnF3 Nanocrystals (pages 10369–10372)

      Juan Wang, Dr. Feng Wang, Chao Wang, Prof. Zhuang Liu and Prof. Xiaogang Liu

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104192

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Clear sight: The upconversion emission spectra of KMnF3 nanocrystals co-doped with Yb/Er (18:2 mol %; see picture) and Yb/Ho (18:2 mol %) reveal strong single-band emissions. The application of this pure, single-band emission for deep-tissue imaging is demonstrated.

    14. Inorganic Chemical Cells

      Modular Redox-Active Inorganic Chemical Cells: iCHELLs (pages 10373–10376)

      Dr. Geoffrey J. T. Cooper, Dr. Philip J. Kitson, Ross Winter, Dr. Michele Zagnoni, Dr. De-Liang Long and Prof. Leroy Cronin

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105068

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cell within a cell: Interfacial membrane formation by cation exchange of polyoxometalates produces modular inorganic chemical cells with tunable morphology, properties, and composition (see picture). These inorganic chemical cells (iCHELLs), which show redox activity, chirality, as well as selective permeability towards small molecules, can be nested within one another, potentially allowing stepwise reactions to occur in sequence within the cell.

    15. Homogeneous Catalysis

      A Highly Active Catalyst for the Hydrogenation of Amides to Alcohols and Amines (pages 10377–10380)

      Jeremy M. John and Prof. Dr. Steven H. Bergens

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Amide-zing: The reaction between 2 equivalents of Ph2P(CH2)2NH2 and cis-[Ru(CH3CN)23-C3H5)(cod)]BF4 (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) forms a highly active catalyst precursor for the selective hydrogenation of amides. The reaction proceeds with excellent atom economy, yield, and turnover numbers (TONs) under moderate reaction conditions. The technology offers a greener, practical approach to the use of metal hydride reagents commonly employed in both academia and industry.

    16. Enzyme Inhibition

      Tailoring the Specificity and Reactivity of a Mechanism-Based Inactivator of Glucocerebrosidase for Potential Therapeutic Applications (pages 10381–10383)

      Brian P. Rempel, Dr. Michael B. Tropak, Dr. Don J. Mahuran and Prof. Stephen G. Withers

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103924

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chaperoning an enzyme: Fluorosugar glycosidase inactivators with tunable phosphorus-based leaving groups react quickly with the catalytic nucleophile in β glucocerebrosidase (blue circle; Bn=benzyl). In Western blot analysis, Gaucher patient cells treated with these inactivators show increased intracellular levels of mutant enzyme, presumably because of increased transit from the endoplasmic reticulum (pale blue) to the lysosome (pale pink).

    17. Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Composites

      A Thin Silica–Polymer Shell for Functionalizing Colloidal Inorganic Nanoparticles (pages 10384–10387)

      Paul D. McNaughter, Joseph C. Bear, Dr. David C. Steytler, Dr. Andrew G. Mayes and Prof. Thomas Nann

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103954

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doubly capped nanocrystals: A new technique was developed for coating of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles with different surface properties with a thin, cross-linked, and functionalized shell containing organic and inorganic layers (see picture). The underlying amphiphilic polymer foundation arranges on the particle surface as predicted in past reports.

    18. Uranium Arenes

      A Formal High Oxidation State Inverse-Sandwich Diuranium Complex: A New Route to f-Block-Metal Bonds (pages 10388–10392)

      Dr. Dipti Patel, Dr. Fabrizio Moro, Dr. Jonathan McMaster, Dr. William Lewis, Prof. Alexander J. Blake and Dr. Stephen T. Liddle

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      U[BOND]Co bond: Reduction of [U(TsXy)(Cl)(thf)] [1; TsXy=HC(SiMe2NAr)3; Ar=3,5-Me2C6H3] with KC8 in toluene afforded the new arene-bridged diuranium complex 2, whereas reduction of 1 in aliphatic hydrocarbons resulted in C[BOND]N bond activation and formation of an imido-aryl complex, which exhibits an unusual ferromagnetic interaction between the two uranium centers. The synthetic utility of 2 was demonstrated by the first synthesis of a U[BOND]Co complex, [U(TsXy)Co(CO)3(PPh3)] (3).

    19. Stannanes

      Direct Synthesis of Alkynylstannanes: ZnBr2 Catalyst for the Reaction of Tributyltin Methoxide and Terminal Alkynes (pages 10393–10396)

      Kensuke Kiyokawa, Nodoka Tachikake, Dr. Makoto Yasuda and Prof. Dr. Akio Baba

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104208

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal hopping: Various alkynylstannanes were synthesized by the direct reaction of Bu3SnOMe with terminal alkynes at room temperature in the presence of a ZnBr2 catalyst. Rather than acting as a Lewis acid, ZnBr2 was transmetalated with Bu3SnOMe to give Zn(OMe)2, which is key to the catalytic reaction.

    20. Nanosheets

      One-Step Synthesis of Bismuth Telluride Nanosheets of a Few Quintuple Layers in Thickness (pages 10397–10401)

      Dr. Yimin Zhao, Dr. Robert W. Hughes, Dr. Zixue Su, Prof. Wuzong Zhou and Prof. Duncan H. Gregory

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104299

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bi2Te3 nanosheets have been synthesized on Si substrates by surface-assisted chemical vapor transport. The crumpled Bi2Te3 sheets grow in the basal plane of the hexagonal structure and are typically ≤3 nm in thickness (see picture; Te purple, Bi green). Raman studies found that modes involving atom displacement along the c axis that are inactive in the bulk material become Raman-active in the Bi2Te3 nanosheets.

    21. Cross-Coupling

      Cobalt-Catalyzed Reductive Allylation of Alkyl Halides with Allylic Acetates or Carbonates (pages 10402–10405)

      Xin Qian, Dr. Audrey Auffrant, Abdellah Felouat and Dr. Corinne Gosmini

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104390

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An efficient method for the direct allylation of alkyl halides catalyzed by simple cobalt(II) bromide has been developed. This reaction, using a variety of substituted allylic acetates or carbonates, provides the linear product as the major product. It displays broad substrate scope and good functional group tolerance.

    22. C[BOND]C Cleavage

      Manganese-Catalyzed Cleavage of a Carbon–Carbon Single Bond between Carbonyl Carbon and α-Carbon Atoms of Ketones (pages 10406–10408)

      Dr. Yoichiro Kuninobu, Tadamasa Uesugi, Dr. Atsushi Kawata and Prof. Dr. Kazuhiko Takai

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104704

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Singled out: Treatment of ketones with carbodiimides in the presence of a catalytic amount of either [{HMn(CO)4}3] or [Mn2(CO)10] gave amides in good to excellent yields. In this reaction, the carbon–carbon single bond of a ketone is cleaved efficiently. The reaction also proceeded by using isocyanates instead of carbodiimides.

    23. Synthetic Methods

      A Versatile Synthesis of Substituted Isoquinolines (pages 10409–10413)

      Chong Si and Prof. Andrew G. Myers

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104769

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lithiated o-tolualdehyde tert-butylimines were shown to condense with nitriles to form eneamido anion intermediates that were trapped in situ with various electrophiles, thus affording a diverse array of highly substituted isoquinolines, many of which are difficult to access by known methods. Further substitutional diversification was achieved by modification of the work-up conditions and by subsequent transformations.

    24. Siliranes

      Reversible Binding of Ethylene to Silylene–Phosphine Complexes at Room Temperature (pages 10414–10416)

      Dr. Ricardo Rodriguez, Dr. David Gau, Dr. Tsuyoshi Kato, Dr. Nathalie Saffon-Merceron, Dr. Abel De Cózar, Prof. Fernando P. Cossío and Dr. Antoine Baceiredo

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On and off: The concerted [2+1] cycloaddition reaction of phosphine–silylene complexes with ethylene affords the corresponding pentacoordinate siliranes. The conversion is strongly related to the ethylene pressure, and the reaction is reversible at room temperature. The structure of one silirane was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis.

    25. Supramolecular Polymers

      Graft Polyrotaxanes: A New Class of Graft Copolymers with Mobile Graft Chains (pages 10417–10420)

      Dr. Yasuhiro Kohsaka, Dr. Yasuhito Koyama and Prof. Dr. Toshikazu Takata

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103869

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis and structure of graft polyrotaxane, a novel class of graft copolymer possessing mobile graft chains, is described. Poly(tetrahydrofuran) was bound to the axle components of pseudo[2]rotaxane as the graft chain by a grafting-onto method to afford the corresponding graft polyrotaxane (see picture). N-Acetylation of the ammonium moieties lead to an increase in the dynamic radius of the graft polyrotaxane.

    26. Ring Expansion

      Rhodium-Catalyzed Ring Expansion of Cyclopropanes to Seven-membered Rings by 1,5 C[BOND]C Bond Migration (pages 10421–10424)

      Xiaoxun Li, Dr. Min Zhang, Dongxu Shu, Patrick J. Robichaux, Suyu Huang and Prof. Dr. Weiping Tang

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104861

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The golden side of rhodium: Highly functionalized seven-membered rings were prepared from substituted cyclopropanes by a RhI-catalyzed tandem isomerization reaction. The π-acidic RhI catalyst promoted the formation of an allene intermediate by a 1,3 acyloxy migration of a propargyl ester and a subsequent net 1,5 migration of a cyclopropane C[BOND]C bond.

    27. π-Bond-Rich Hydrocarbons

      1,1-Divinylallene (pages 10425–10428)

      Dr. Katie M. Cergol, Christopher G. Newton, Dr. Andrew L. Lawrence, Dr. Anthony C. Willis, Prof. Michael N. Paddon-Row and Assoc. Prof. Michael S. Sherburn

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105541

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      How to hit a triple: The title hydrocarbon, one of the most π-bond-rich small molecules, has been synthesized and characterized for the first time. This highly reactive hydrocarbon undergoes a new diene-transmissive, triple Diels–Alder cycloaddition sequence to form six new C[BOND]C bonds and the fused tricyclic phenalene ring system in one step. Controlled single additions have also been achieved.

    28. C[BOND]H Activation

      Catalytic Asymmetric Activation of a Cmath image[BOND]H Bond Adjacent to a Nitrogen Atom: A Versatile Approach to Optically Active α-Alkyl α-Amino Acids and C1-Alkylated Tetrahydroisoquinoline Derivatives (pages 10429–10432)

      Dr. Gen Zhang, Yaohu Zhang and Prof. Dr. Rui Wang

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105123

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Simple and efficient: A one-pot oxidative and catalytic enantioselective alkylation of α-Cmath image[BOND]H bonds adjacent to a nitrogen atom was realized for the first time. This novel strategy provides a simple, efficient, and environmentally friendly access to diverse optically active α-alkyl α-amino acid and C1-alkylated tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives.

    29. Hydrogen Storage

      A Charge/Discharge Device for Chemical Hydrogen Storage and Generation (pages 10433–10435)

      Dr. Gábor Papp, Jenő Csorba, Prof. Gábor Laurenczy and Prof. Ferenc Joó

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104951

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Soda stream: Sodium bicarbonate was cyclically hydrogenated in aqueous solution to sodium formate at 100 bar H2 in the presence of a RuII–sulfonated phosphine catalyst. The system functions as a true charge/discharge device for storage and delivery of hydrogen without the need for isolation of either formate or bicarbonate.

    30. Coupling Reactions

      Selective 1:2 Coupling of Aldehydes and Allenes with Control of Regiochemistry (pages 10436–10439)

      Dr. Takeharu Toyoshima, Dr. Tomoya Miura and Prof. Dr. Masahiro Murakami

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105077

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Counterions in control: The rhodium(I)-catalyzed coupling of one molecule of aldehyde and two molecules of allene gave β,γ-dialkylidene ketones (see scheme). Either of two constitutional isomers was selectively obtained depending on the counterion of the rhodium(I) complex.

    31. Actinide Photochemistry

      Photochemically Promoted Bond-Cleavage and -Capture in a Diazomethane Derivative of a Triamidoamine Uranium(IV) Complex (pages 10440–10443)

      Benedict M. Gardner, Dr. Dipti Patel, Dr. William Lewis, Prof. Alexander J. Blake and Dr. Stephen T. Liddle

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105098

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photolysis of [U(trenTMS)(μ-N(SiMe3)NC)]2 (see scheme; R=SiMe3) results in multiple bond cleavage and capture to give a well-defined product [U{N(CH2CH2NSiMe3)2(μ-CH2CH2N[BOND]C[TRIPLE BOND]N)}{N(SiMe3)2}]2. This transformation has no precedent in diazoalkane chemistry and is not thermally accessible.

    32. Boron Triangle

      Synthesis and Characterization of a Doubly Base-Stabilized B3H6+ Analogue (pages 10444–10447)

      Nikola Schulenberg, Prof. Dr. Hubert Wadepohl and Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Himmel

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104834

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The answer to an old question: A doubly base-stabilized B3H6+ analogue (see structure: B green, C gray, N blue, H light gray, H on C not shown) has been synthesized and completely characterized. Quantum-chemical calculations on a simplified model confirmed the presence of closed B-B-B three-center bonding and σ-aromatic character.

    33. One-Pot Reactions

      Catalytic Syntheses of N-Heterocyclic Ynones and Ynediones by In Situ Activation of Carboxylic Acids with Oxalyl Chloride (pages 10448–10452)

      M. Sc. Christina Boersch, Dipl.-Chem. Eugen Merkul and Prof. Dr. Thomas J. J. Müller

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Breaking the bottleneck: α-Keto carboxylic acids and N-heterocyclic carboxylic acids are activated in situ with oxalyl chloride then catalytically alkynylated to give ynediones and N-heterocyclic ynones efficiently in a one-pot fashion. 5-Acylpyrazoles and 2-phenylaminopyrimidines, potentially interesting for pharmaceutical applications, are readily synthesized in concise one-pot, three-component syntheses.

    34. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Ruthenium-Catalyzed Selective Hydrogenation of Benzene to Cyclohexene in the Presence of an Ionic Liquid (pages 10453–10456)

      Frederick Schwab, Martin Lucas and Prof. Dr. Peter Claus

      Version of Record online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104959

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reducing circumstances: The hydrogenation of benzene in organic phase leads rapidly to cyclohexane. A very simple catalyst system comprising only supported ruthenium in water with the addition of the ionic liquid 1 (R=Me) in the ppm range catalyzes the extremely difficult selective hydrogenation of benzene to cyclohexene. It is not necessary to add large amounts of salt (ZnSO4) or other metals, which is otherwise done to control selectivity.

    35. B[BOND]F Activation

      Oxidative Addition of Boron Trifluoride to a Transition Metal (pages 10457–10460)

      Jürgen Bauer, Prof. Dr. Holger Braunschweig, Dr. Katharina Kraft and Dr. Krzysztof Radacki

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103226

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A difficult break-up: Boron trifluoride was activated by oxidative addition to the transition-metal complex [(Cy3P)2Pt]. The product of this addition, trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(BF2)(FBF3)], was characterized by NMR spectroscopy and crystal structure determination. Furthermore, the degradation product trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(H)(FBF3)] and the stable derivative trans-[(Cy3P)2Pt(BF2)(Cl)] were fully characterized.

  15. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION