Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 46

November 11, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 46

Pages 10735–11011

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Achieving Secondary Structural Resolution in Kinetic Measurements of Protein Folding: A Case Study of the Folding Mechanism of Trp-cage (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46/2011) (page 10735)

      Robert M. Culik, Arnaldo L. Serrano, Prof. Dr. Michelle R. Bunagan and Prof. Dr. Feng Gai

      Article first published online: 7 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106049

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      The folding dynamics of individual structural elements in proteins is studied by a multi-probe and multi-frequency approach. In their Communication on page 10 884 ff., M. R. Bunagan, F. Gai, and co-workers achieve a significantly improved structural resolution in kinetic studies of protein folding using their approach. Application of this approach to the miniprotein Trp-cage provides new insights into the folding mechanism of this extensively studied protein.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Solid-State NMR Measurements of Asymmetric Dipolar Couplings Provide Insight into Protein Side-Chain Motion (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46/2011) (page 10736)

      Dr. Paul Schanda, Matthias Huber, Dr. Jérôme Boisbouvier, Prof. Dr. Beat H. Meier and Prof. Dr. Matthias Ernst

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106145

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      Molecular dynamics are generally anisotropic in nature. For the case of a three-site jump motion of a protein side chain (shown for valine), the apparent dipolar coupling tensor (turquoise/red lobes) therefore becomes asymmetric. In their Communication on page 11 005 ff., B. H. Meier, M. Ernst et al. report the first direct measurement of such asymmetric dipolar coupling tensors using isotopic labeling and REDOR solid-state NMR spectroscopy (REDOR data shown in the center).

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Tuning Chemoselectivity in Iron-Catalyzed Sonogashira-Type Reactions Using a Bisphosphine Ligand with Peripheral Steric Bulk: Selective Alkynylation of Nonactivated Alkyl Halides (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46/2011) (page 11012)

      Dr. Takuji Hatakeyama, Yoshihiro Okada, Yuya Yoshimoto and Prof. Masaharu Nakamura

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106865

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      Iron complexes synthesized from iron salts and a newly developed bisphosphine ligand are described by M. Nakamura et al. in their Communication on page 10 973 ff. These complexes were used to achieve the Cmath image-center-selective alkynylation of nonactivated alkyl halides. Thus, this method uses iron complexes to forge substituted alkynes in a new practical synthesis just as the picture shows the forging of a samurai sword from iron.

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial: Scientific Social Responsibility: A Call to Arms (pages 10738–10740)

      Prof. Povl Krogsgaard-Larsen, Dr. Peter Thostrup and Prof. Flemming Besenbacher

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105641

  5. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46/2011 (pages 10742–10756)

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190097

  6. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
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    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: Asymmetric Allylboration of vic-Tricarbonyl Compounds: Total Synthesis of (+)-Awajanomycin (page 10756)

      Dipl.-Chem. Malte Wohlfahrt, Dr. Klaus Harms and Prof. Dr. Ulrich Koert

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106653

      This article corrects:

      Asymmetric Allylboration of vic-Tricarbonyl Compounds: Total Synthesis of (+)-Awajanomycin1

      Vol. 50, Issue 36, 8404–8406, Article first published online: 14 JUL 2011

  7. News

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
  8. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Xinliang Feng (page 10762)

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103939

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      “Young people should study chemistry because they can learn how to cook. My favorite time of day is reading literature. …” This and more about Xinliang Feng can be found on page 10762.

  9. News

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
  10. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Bioinorganic Medicinal Chemistry. Edited by Enzo Alessio. (pages 10765–10767)

      Ulrich Schatzschneider

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104828

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2011. 422 S., hardcover, € 139.00.—ISBN 978-3527326310

  11. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Double C[BOND]H Activation

      Nickel-Mediated Cycloaddition by Two Sequential C[BOND]H Activations (pages 10768–10769)

      Puneet Kumar and Prof. Dr. Janis Louie

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103621

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      Double the fun: The future of cross-coupling chemistry lies in the development of cleaner synthetic methods for carbon–carbon bond formation. A recent advancement in the field of nickel-catalyzed C(sp2)–C(sp3) cross-couplings (see scheme) via two C[BOND]H activations represents a major step forward.

    2. Templating Giants

      Vernier Templating of Nanoscopic Porphyrin Rings (pages 10770–10771)

      Prof. Dr. Arjan W. Kleij

      Article first published online: 7 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103984

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      Growing bigger: A versatile approach toward the construction of nanosize π-conjugated macrocycles by Vernier templation has been demonstrated. The use of linear tetranuclear ZnII porprhyrin complexes and a suitable and readily available six-site template leads to formation and isolation of a giant, monodisperse macrocycle in a limited amount of synthetic steps, marking Vernier complex formation a powerful and new tool for the creation of superstructures (see picture).

    3. N-Heterocyclic Nitrenium Ligands

      N-Heterocyclic Nitrenium Ligands: A Missing Link Explored (pages 10772–10774)

      Dr. Joyanta Choudhury

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104868

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      Pince me: N-heterocyclic nitrenium cations have been framed into pincer motifs to explore their unprecedented ligand behavior to transition metals. This work fills a long-standing gap in the series of main-group N-heterocyclic carbene(NHC)-type ligands (see picture). Reasonable π-acceptor and weak σ-donor properties of these new ligands are expected to play a pivotal role in many organometallic reactions and in catalysis in the near future.

    4. Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011

      Quasicrystals: Sections of Hyperspace (pages 10775–10778)

      Prof. Dr. Walter Steurer

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107163

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      Since the moment Dan Shechtman discovered a material with an ordered but aperiodic (“quasiperiodic”) structure, which was believed to be impossible at the time, he began a long battle to convince his colleagues that his data were real. His efforts were finally rewarded with a Nobel Prize. The picture shows the projected electron density distribution function of decagonal Al-Co-Ni with Penrose tiling as an example of a quasicrystal.

  12. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Coordination Chemistry

      Alfred Werner’s Coordination Chemistry: New Insights from Old Samples (pages 10780–10787)

      Prof. Dr. Karl-Heinz Ernst, Dr. Ferdinand R. W. P. Wild, Dr. Olivier Blacque and Prof. Dr. Heinz Berke

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104477

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      Save your samples! The original compound [Co(en)2(NO2)2]Br prepared by Alfred Werner's student Edith Humphrey around 1900 did not crystallize as a conglomerate, but rather formed twinned crystals of both enantiomorphs. These findings, together with similar results for further samples from the Werner laboratory, provide new insight to the claim that Werner could have proved his coordination theory ten years earlier.

  13. Minireview

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Oxidative Carbonylation

      Oxidative Carbonylation Reactions: Organometallic Compounds (R[BOND]M) or Hydrocarbons (R[BOND]H) as Nucleophiles (pages 10788–10799)

      Qiang Liu, Hua Zhang and Prof. Aiwen Lei

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100763

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      A new option: Classical carbonylation reactions employ organohalides as electrophiles to produce carbonyl compounds. Now a series of carbonylative derivatives can also efficiently synthesized by oxidative carbonylation reactions that have an enriched substrate scope and milder reaction conditions. This Minireview summarizes newly developed oxidative carbonylation reactions employing either R[BOND]M or R[BOND]H as the nucleophiles.

  14. Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Medicinal Chemistry

      Biology-Oriented Synthesis (pages 10800–10826)

      Dr. Stefan Wetzel, Dr. Robin S. Bon, Dr. Kamal Kumar and Prof. Dr. Herbert Waldmann

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007004

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      From nature with love! Biological relevance is the key argument in the search for small molecules that enable the chemical-biological analysis of biological systems or modulation of disease states. Biology-oriented synthesis (BIOS) uses this criterion to chart and navigate vast chemical structure space and to identify biologically relevant scaffold structures as guides for the synthesis of compound libraries (see picture).

  15. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essay
    14. Minireview
    15. Review
    16. Communications
    17. Preview
    1. Nanocomposites

      Investigating the Amorphous–Crystalline Interplay in SiO2/TiO2 Nanocomposites by Total Scattering Methods (pages 10828–10833)

      Dr. Giuseppe Cernuto, Dr. Simona Galli, Dr. Federica Trudu, Dr. Gian Maria Colonna, Prof. Norberto Masciocchi, Dr. Antonio Cervellino and Dr. Antonietta Guagliardi

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104149

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      Come together! A combined real- and reciprocal-space total scattering approach was realized by applying Debye and radial distribution functions to nanocrystalline and amorphous fractions within the same experimental pattern. The method allows for the quantitative description of microstructural features induced by the amorphous–crystalline interplay in silica–titania nanocomposites (see picture).

    2. Rotaxanes

      A Twin-Axial Hetero[7]rotaxane (pages 10834–10838)

      Zhi-Jun Zhang, Prof. Dr. Heng-Yi Zhang, Hui Wang and Prof. Dr. Yu Liu

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105375

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      Two in one: Two pseudorotaxanes can be combined to form a twin-axial hetero[7]rotaxane (see picture) by using the copper-catalyzed alkyne–azide “click” reaction. The synthetic route, in which twin-axial and single-axial rotaxanes are formed, combines self-assembly and the formation of covalent bonds to ensure the correct positioning of the two types of rings in the final product.

    3. Inorganic Graphene Analogues

      A Mixed-Solvent Strategy for Efficient Exfoliation of Inorganic Graphene Analogues (pages 10839–10842)

      Kai-Ge Zhou, Nan-Nan Mao, Hang-Xing Wang, Prof. Yong Peng and Prof. Hao-Li Zhang

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105364

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      Two are better than one: A mixed-solvent method for liquid exfoliation of MoS2, WS2, and BN nanosheets is presented. Although ethanol and water are both poor solvents for this process, ethanol/water mixtures of appropriate composition, which can be predicted on the basis of Hansen solubility parameters, result in efficient exfoliation (see schematic) to give highly stable suspensions.

    4. Enzymatic Reaction Dynamics

      Is There a Dynamic Protein Contribution to the Substrate Trigger in Coenzyme B12-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia Lyase? (pages 10843–10846)

      Dr. Alex R. Jones, Dr. Samantha J. O. Hardman, Dr. Sam Hay and Prof. Nigel S. Scrutton

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105132

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      “Cohort-ry” in motion: The chemistry following Co[BOND]C bond homolysis in coenzyme B12-dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase is known to favor dissociation, but what of the protein contribution? Experiments reveal the radical pair reaction dynamics to be coupled to the ps–ns protein dynamics in B12 photolysis. This raises the possibility of a subtle, dynamic contribution to homolysis, which acts in cohort with electrostatics and H-abstraction from the substrate.

    5. NIR Dyes

      Halochromic Phenolate Perylene Bisimides with Unprecedented NIR Spectroscopic Properties (pages 10847–10850)

      Dr. Mei-Jin Lin, Benjamin Fimmel, Dr. Krzysztof Radacki and Prof. Dr. Frank Würthner

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105129

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      C[BOND]C coupling of 1,7-dibromoperylene bisimide with sterically hindered 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol by a carbon nucleophilic substitution reaction in the absence of transition-metal catalysts gave novel halochromic perylene bisimides (see picture). The corresponding phenolate ions of these compounds exhibit unprecedented NIR spectroscopic properties including strong absorption with maxima at around 1200 nm.

    6. DNA-Directed Chemistry

      DNA-Programmed Glaser–Eglinton Reactions for the Synthesis of Conjugated Molecular Wires (pages 10851–10854)

      Jens B. Ravnsbæk, Mikkel F. Jacobsen, Christian B. Rosen, Niels V. Voigt and Prof. Kurt V. Gothelf

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105095

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      Wire self-assembly: Short oligo(phenylene ethynylene) modules (black structures, see picture) are assembled by attached DNA strands, which also direct the formation of 1,3-diyne linkages between the modules by the Cu-mediated Glaser–Eglinton reaction to selectively form dimer, trimer, and tetramer conjugated wires of up to 8 nm in length.

    7. Nanostructures

      Regulated Oxidation of Nickel in Multisegmented Nickel–Platinum Nanowires: An Entry to Wavy Nanopeapods (pages 10855–10858)

      Dr. Yang Yang, Dr. Lifeng Liu, Firat Güder, Dr. Andreas Berger, Dr. Roland Scholz, Dr. Ole Albrecht and Prof. Margit Zacharias

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102740

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      Split peas: Nanopeapods consisting of highly ordered, wavy NiO nanopods embedded with equally spaced Pt nanopeas were fabricated by the oxidation of multisegmented Ni/Pt nanowires at low temperatures. The Ni/Pt interface is an efficient platform for enhancing the outward diffusion of Ni during oxidation and for manipulating the nucleation of vacancies in Ni, which intrinsically behaves in an uncontrolled manner.

    8. Peptide Structure

      A Membrane-Bound Antiparallel Dimer of Rat Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (pages 10859–10862)

      Dr. Abhinav Nath, Prof. Andrew D. Miranker and Prof. Elizabeth Rhoades

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102887

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      Gaining recognition: The structure of a previously unrecognized antiparallel dimer of rat islet amyloid polypeptide bound to anionic membrane nanodiscs was examined by using a combination of single-pair FRET and Rosetta model refinement. Models of the dimer showed a likely interface for lipid binding and suggest key interactions may also occur in the human isoform, thereby providing possible insights into fibril formation in type II diabetes.

    9. Artificial Metalloenzymes

      OsO4⋅Streptavidin: A Tunable Hybrid Catalyst for the Enantioselective cis-Dihydroxylation of Olefins (pages 10863–10866)

      Dr. Valentin Köhler, Dr. Jincheng Mao, Tillmann Heinisch, Dr. Anca Pordea, Dr. Alessia Sardo, Dr. Yvonne M. Wilson, Livia Knörr, Dr. Marc Creus, Jean-Christophe Prost, Prof. Dr. Tilman Schirmer and Prof. Dr. Thomas R. Ward

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103632

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      Taking control: Selective catalysts for olefin dihydroxylation have been generated by the combination of apo-streptavidin and OsO4. Site-directed mutagenesis allows improvement of enantioselectivity and even inversion of enantiopreference in certain cases. Notably allyl phenyl sulfide and cis-β-methylstyrene were converted with unprecedented enantiomeric excess.

    10. Nonlinear Optics

      Strongly Nonlinear Optical Chalcogenide Thin Films of APSe6 (A=K, Rb) from Spin-Coating (pages 10867–10870)

      Dr. In Chung, Myung-Gil Kim, Dr. Joon I. Jang, Dr. Jiaqing He, Prof. John B. Ketterson and Prof. Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103691

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      The first example of solution-based deposition of strongly nonlinear optical inorganic thin films at low temperatures of 125–250 °C is presented. The obtained glassy and crystalline films of highly nonlinear APSe6 compounds (A=K, Rb; χ(2)≈150 pm V−1) exhibit strong, inherent second harmonic and difference frequency generation (SHG and DFG) in the visible and near-IR spectral region at room temperature without the need of poling (see picture).

    11. Surface Chemistry

      Facile and Efficient Control of Bioadhesion on Poly(dimethylsiloxane) by Using a Biomimetic Approach (pages 10871–10874)

      Dr. Windy Mussard, Dr. Nasreddine Kebir, Dr. Irène Kriegel, Dr. Marc Estève and Dr. Vincent Semetey

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101029

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      An antiadhesive nanofilm has been designed and prepared in one step in water onto commercial poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by mimicking the external region of cell membranes. The resulting biomimetic surfaces are effective in suppressing protein adsorption as well as bacterial and mammalian cell adhesion.

    12. Microengines

      Light-Controlled Propulsion of Catalytic Microengines (pages 10875–10878)

      Alexander A. Solovev, Dr. Elliot J. Smith, Dr. Carlos C. Bof ' Bufon, Dr. Samuel Sanchez and Prof. Oliver G. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102096

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      Turn off the light: A white-light source is used to control the propulsion of catalytic microengines powered by the local decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. The influence of the wavelength of the light and intensity on the fuel conditions provides a remote control over the power of the self-propelled microengines (see picture).

    13. Thermochromism

      A Functional Nitroxide Radical Displaying Unique Thermochromism and Magnetic Phase Transition (pages 10879–10883)

      Sachiko Matsumoto, Tsutomu Higashiyama, Dr. Hiroki Akutsu and Prof. Dr. Shin'ichi Nakatsuji

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104068

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      Thermochromic nitroxide: A nitroxide radical (AZADO) exhibits thermochromism with a structural change from a dimer at low temperature (4 °C) to paired monomers with large antiferromagnetic interaction at high temperature (35 °C). An hysteresis loop is observed in the magnetic data of this compound, revealing it to exhibit a first-order phase transition with room-temperature magnetic bistability.

    14. Protein Folding

      Achieving Secondary Structural Resolution in Kinetic Measurements of Protein Folding: A Case Study of the Folding Mechanism of Trp-cage (pages 10884–10887)

      Robert M. Culik, Arnaldo L. Serrano, Prof. Dr. Michelle R. Bunagan and Prof. Dr. Feng Gai

      Article first published online: 29 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104085

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      A new twist: A multi-probe and multi-frequency approach is shown for dissecting the folding dynamics of individual protein structural elements. In response to a temperature jump the 310-helix (blue in the picture) of the miniprotein Trp-cage unfolds before the global unfolding of the protein, whereas the formation of the cage structure depends on the folding of the α-helix (red).

    15. CO2-Selective Adsorption

      Selective Adsorption of CO2 from Light Gas Mixtures by Using a Structurally Dynamic Porous Coordination Polymer (pages 10888–10892)

      Dr. Kristi L. Kauffman, Dr. Jeffrey T. Culp, Dr. Andrew J. Allen, Dr. Laura Espinal, Dr. Winnie Wong-Ng, Thomas D. Brown, Dr. Angela Goodman, Mark P. Bernardo, Russel J. Pancoast, Danielle Chirdon and Dr. Christopher Matranga

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104130

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      Flexibility provides selectivity: The selective adsorption of CO2 from mixtures with N2, CH4, and N2O in a dynamic porous coordination polymer (see monomer structure) was evaluated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, GC, and SANS. All three techniques indicate highly selective adsorption of CO2 from CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2 mixtures at 30 °C, with no selectivity observed for the CO2/N2O system.

    16. Tissue Imaging

      Simultaneous Photographing of Oxygen and pH In Vivo Using Sensor Films (pages 10893–10896)

      Dr. Robert J. Meier, Dr. Stephan Schreml, Dr. Xu-dong Wang, Prof. Michael Landthaler, Dr. Philipp Babilas and Prof. Otto S. Wolfbeis

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104530

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      Two kinds of imaging: A fluorescent sensor membrane is presented that responds to pH and to pO2 at different emission wavelengths. The fluorescence intensities can be imaged with a digital camera using the red-green-blue (RGB) data storage option.

    17. Reaction Mechanisms

      The Molecular Mechanism of Enzymatic Glycosyl Transfer with Retention of Configuration: Evidence for a Short-Lived Oxocarbenium-Like Species (pages 10897–10901)

      Albert Ardèvol and Prof. Carme Rovira

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104623

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      A quantum leap: By means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics simulations, a front-face SNi-type reaction for glycosyl transfer with retention of the anomeric configuration is shown to be feasible. A short-lived oxocarbenium-like species (see picture; O red, P gold, N blue, C black) is identified and provides the complete itinerary of this long sought after molecular mechanism.

    18. Organic Materials

      Coupling Tetracyanoquinodimethane to Tetrathiafulvalene: A Fused TCNQ–TTF–TCNQ Triad (pages 10902–10906)

      Dr. Francisco Otón, Dr. Vega Lloveras, Dr. Marta Mas-Torrent, Dr. José Vidal-Gancedo, Prof. Jaume Veciana and Prof. Concepció Rovira

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104841

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      Happy marriage: For the first time, a fused TCNQ–TTF–TCNQ triad has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Strong bending is observed in both the TTF bridge and the benzo-TCNQ moieties, which prevents good packing for intermolecular charge transfer. The Vis/NIR and VT-EPR studies of the mixed-valence derivative of the triad indicate that the electrons are moving from one acceptor moiety to the other through the donor TTF bridge.

    19. Dendritic Solar Concentrators

      Towards Unimolecular Luminescent Solar Concentrators: Bodipy-Based Dendritic Energy-Transfer Cascade with Panchromatic Absorption and Monochromatized Emission (pages 10907–10912)

      Dr. O. Altan Bozdemir, Sundus Erbas-Cakmak, O. Oner Ekiz, Dr. Aykutlu Dana and Prof. Dr. Engin U. Akkaya

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104846

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A polymer-embedded dendritic, bodipy-based panchromatic absorber with a built-in energy gradient concentrates incident solar radiation at a terminal chromophore, resulting in a monochromatized emission directed to the sides of the polymer waveguide (see picture). This particular design minimizes self-absorption losses from the peripheral antenna units with an impressive S factor of 10 000.

    20. Arene Functionalization

      Friedel–Crafts Benzylation of Activated and Deactivated Arenes (pages 10913–10916)

      Gabriel Schäfer and Prof. Dr. Jeffrey W. Bode

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105380

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      NO going back makes possible facile Friedel–Crafts benzylations with moderate reaction temperatures, simple reaction workups, and improved substrate scope for the formation of synthetically important diarylmethanes (see scheme). Upon complexation with BF3⋅OEt2, hydroxamates serve as reversible leaving groups that stabilize highly reactive carbocations. Even deactivated arenes and electron-deficient benzylhydroxamates react cleanly under these conditions.

    21. Fulvene Synthesis

      Catalytic [2+2+1] Cross-Cyclotrimerization of Silylacetylenes and Two Alkynyl Esters To Produce Substituted Silylfulvenes (pages 10917–10921)

      Yu Shibata and Prof. Dr. Ken Tanaka

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105517

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three become one: The cationic rhodium(I) complex [Rh(cod)2]BF4 catalyzes the [2+2+1] cross-cyclotrimerization of silylacetylenes and two alkynyl esters, leading to substituted silylfulvenes (see scheme; cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene). The reductive complexation of the silylfulvene product with RhCl3 in EtOH furnished the corresponding dinuclear electron-deficient cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) complex.

    22. [2+2+2] Cross-Trimerization

      Rhodium-Catalyzed Intermolecular [2+2+2] Cross-Trimerization of Aryl Ethynyl Ethers and Carbonyl Compounds To Produce Dienyl Esters (pages 10922–10926)

      Yuta Miyauchi, Masayuki Kobayashi and Prof. Dr. Ken Tanaka

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105519

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Positive thinking: A cationic rhodium(I)/H8-binap complex catalyzes the chemo-, regio-, and stereoselective completely intermolecular [2+2+2] cross-trimerization of two aryl ethynyl ethers with both electron-deficient and electron-rich carbonyl compounds (see scheme; cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene). This reaction proceeded at room temperature to give aryloxy-substituted dienyl esters in good yields.

    23. C[BOND]H activation

      PdII-Catalyzed C[BOND]H Olefination of N-(2-Pyridyl)sulfonyl Anilines and Arylalkylamines (pages 10927–10931)

      Alfonso García-Rubia, Beatriz Urones, Dr. Ramón Gómez Arrayás and Prof. Dr. Juan C. Carretero

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105611

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexible friend: The N-(2-pyridyl)sulfonyl group acts as a removable directing group in the PdII-catalyzed aryl C[BOND]H ortho alkenylation of N-alkyl aniline, benzylamine, and phenethylamine derivatives with electron-poor alkenes. The products were obtained in high yields (70–90 %) and with complete regiocontrol. The mild reductive N-sulfonyl removal enables the construction of a variety of nitrogen heterocycles. EWG=electron-withdrawing group.

    24. Polyketone Synthesis

      Morphology Control of Polymer Particles in Ethylene/Carbon Monoxide Copolymerization (pages 10932–10935)

      Ji Hae Park, Kyoung Hwan Oh, Sung Hun Kim, Anish Cyriac, Jobi Kodiyan Varghese, Prof. Myung Whan Hwang and Prof. Bun Yeoul Lee

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105270

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Partial to particular particles: The morphology of the polymer particles can be controlled in ethylene/CO copolymerization by pressurizing catalyst-containing 1-octanol droplets dispersed in water. The palladium catalyst should be harnessed with lipophilic long alkyl chains. Polymer particles of 0.5–1.0 mm size (see micrographs) with bulk densities of 0.2–0.3 g mL−1 are produced without reactor fouling.

    25. Dioxygen Activation

      Directing Protons to the Dioxygen Ligand of a Ruthenium(II) Complex with Pendent Amines in the Second Coordination Sphere (pages 10936–10939)

      Tristan A. Tronic, Dr. Mary Rakowski DuBois, Dr. Werner Kaminsky, Michael K. Coggins, Dr. Tianbiao Liu and Prof. James M. Mayer

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105266

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Proton relay: A side-on Ru–O2 complex with pendent amines in the ligand backbone has been synthesized to model proton delivery in O2 reduction (see scheme and structure; red O, purple Ru, blue N, yellow P). Protonation occurs at the amine near the O2 ligand, forming a hydrogen bond between the ammonium ion and the O2 ligand, leading to a small increase in O[BOND]O bond length.

    26. Heterocyclic Compounds

      Synthesis of 1-Phospha-2-boraacenaphthenes: Reductive 1,2-Aryl Migration of 1-Diarylboryl-8-dichlorophosphinonaphthalenes (pages 10940–10943)

      Dr. Akihiro Tsurusaki, Prof. Dr. Takahiro Sasamori, Prof. Dr. Atsushi Wakamiya, Prof. Dr. Shigehiro Yamaguchi, Kazuhiko Nagura, Prof. Dr. Stephan Irle and Prof. Dr. Norihiro Tokitoh

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104971

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On the move: The title compounds 1, which are unique heterocyclic systems containing a P[BOND]B bond, have been synthesized by the reduction of 1-diarylboryl-8-dichlorophosphinonaphthalene derivatives (see scheme). Both experimental and theoretical results for 1 revealed an effective interaction between the phosphorus atom, boron atom, and naphthyl moiety. Furthermore, 1 exhibits orange fluorescence in solution.

    27. Dynamic Kinetic Resolution

      Ionic-Surfactant-Coated Burkholderia cepacia Lipase as a Highly Active and Enantioselective Catalyst for the Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Secondary Alcohols (pages 10944–10948)

      Hyunjin Kim, Yoon Kyung Choi, Jusuk Lee, Eungyeong Lee, Jaiwook Park and Prof. Mahn-Joo Kim

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104141

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      With a coat for activity: A highly active enzyme was prepared by coating Burkholderia cepacia lipase with an ionic surfactant for use in dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR). Important features of this enzyme include: the fastest DKR of 1-phenylethanol, the highly enantioselective DKR of a wide range of secondary alcohols (RCH(OH)Ar), and the switching of lipase enantioselectivity in DKR depending on the shape of the aliphatic chain (R).

    28. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Solid-State Structural Transformations from 2D Interdigitated Layers to 3D Interpenetrated Structures (pages 10949–10952)

      Raghavender Medishetty, Dr. Lip Lin Koh, Goutam Kumar Kole and Prof. Dr. Jagadese J. Vittal

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104106

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Construction by shining light! A [2+2] cycloaddition reaction in a 2D coordination polymer accompanied by single-crystal-to-single-crystal structural transformation to a 3D structure highlights the retrosynthesis of a 3D structure from a 2D layer compound (see scheme, Zn red, 4-styrylpyridine blue/turquoise).

    29. Nanotechnology

      Plasma-Assisted Dissociation of Organometallic Vapors for Continuous, Gas-Phase Preparation of Multimetallic Nanoparticles (pages 10953–10956)

      Pin Ann Lin and Prof. R. Mohan Sankaran

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101881

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vapor-sized: In a plasma-based route to multimetallic nanoparticles (NPs), vapor mixtures of organometallic compounds are dissociated in an atmospheric-pressure microplasma (see picture). The size and composition of the particles is controlled by the relative vapor concentrations of the precursors.

    30. Amino Acids as Nitrogen Sources

      Amino Acid-Based Reoxidants for Aminohydroxylation: Application to the Construction of Amino Acid–Amino Alcohol Conjugates (pages 10957–10960)

      Prof. Timothy J. Donohoe, Dr. Cedric K. A. Callens, Dr. Aida Flores, Dr. Stefanie Mesch, Darren L. Poole and Ishmael A. Roslan

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103293

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A viable nitrogen source for the aminohydroxylation reaction of terminal alkenes: By adding a N-O based reoxidant onto an amino acid acyl carbon atom, compounds were obtained that facilitated catalytic turnover and also promoted the conjugation of an amino acid with an alkene. High levels of regioselectivity were observed, as well as good stereoselectivity induced by catalytic amounts of a chiral ligand.

    31. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Asymmetric Reduction of Ketones by Phosphoric Acid Derived Catalysts (pages 10961–10964)

      Dr. Zuhui Zhang, Pankaj Jain and Prof. Dr. Jon C. Antilla

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103883

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new path to chiral alcohols: Asymmetric reduction of ketones was achieved utilizing a chiral Brønsted acid as precatalyst for the first time. Using catecholborane as the reducing agent, a highly enantioselective formation of chiral secondary alcohols was found with a broad substrate scope. Mechanistic studies indicate that phosphoryl catechol borate derived from the reaction of the Brønsted acid with catecholborane produced the active catalyst (see scheme).

    32. Hydrogen Bonds

      Structural Characterization, Infrared Spectroscopy, and Theoretical Calculations for B(C6F5)3-Stabilized Benzene–Ammonia and Benzene–Water Complexes (pages 10965–10968)

      Prof. Xinping Wang and Prof. Philip P. Power

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103904

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      O/N[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅π hydrogen bonds: Water–benzene and ammonia–benzene complexes are stabilized by the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 and provide rare structural (X-ray) and infrared spectroscopic data for water–benzene and ammonia–benzene complexes in the solid state (see picture). The infrared spectra of the complexes showed that the O[BOND]H and N[BOND]H stretching frequencies decrease significantly on benzene complexation.

    33. Oxygen Reduction

      Co1−xS–Graphene Hybrid: A High-Performance Metal Chalcogenide Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction (pages 10969–10972)

      Hailiang Wang, Yongye Liang, Yanguang Li and Prof. Hongjie Dai

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104004

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A hybrid electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), consisting of Co1−xS nanoparticles directly nucleated and grown on sheets of reduced graphene oxide (RGO; see SEM image), was prepared by a mild solution-phase reaction followed by an annealing step. The Co1−xS–RGO hybrid has the highest catalytic performance of all cobalt chalcogenide based ORR catalysts, as revealed inter alia by measurements with a rotating-disk electrode (see picture; RHE = reversible hydrogen electrode).

    34. Cross-Coupling

      Tuning Chemoselectivity in Iron-Catalyzed Sonogashira-Type Reactions Using a Bisphosphine Ligand with Peripheral Steric Bulk: Selective Alkynylation of Nonactivated Alkyl Halides (pages 10973–10976)

      Dr. Takuji Hatakeyama, Yoshihiro Okada, Yuya Yoshimoto and Prof. Masaharu Nakamura

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The incredible bulk: A highly Cmath image-center-selective alkynylation of nonactivated alkyl halides with the corresponding Grignard reagents is achieved by using the iron-phosphine complex 1. Primary and secondary alkyl iodides, bromides, and chlorides take part in the reaction to give the substituted alkynes in good to excellent yields. Sequential cyclization/cross-coupling reactions are also demonstrated.

    35. Lithography

      Patterning Materials through Viscoelastic Flow and Phase Separation (pages 10977–10980)

      Minwoo Park, Prof. Younan Xia and Prof. Unyong Jeong

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104270

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going with the flow: Patterning of various inorganic materials was achieved by phase separation between the nanomaterials and a polymer melt as well as concentrating the nanomaterials in defined areas by a polymer melt flow. This technique generated micro- and nanostructured patterns of metals and semiconductors (see picture).

    36. Synthetic Methods

      Using Nazarov Electrocyclization to Stage Chemoselective [1,2]-Migrations: Stereoselective Synthesis of Functionalized Cyclopentenones (pages 10981–10985)

      Dr. David Lebœuf, Dr. Jie Huang, Prof. Vincent Gandon and Prof. Alison J. Frontier

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104870

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly functionalized cyclopentenones have been prepared stereospecifically through a chemoselective copper(II)-mediated Nazarov/Wagner–Meerwein rearrangement sequence. After the initial 4π electrocyclization, this reaction involves two sequential [1,2]-migrations depending upon both migratory ability and steric bulk of the substituents at C1 and C5 (see scheme). The proposed mechanism of the reaction is supported by DFT studies.

    37. Photochromism

      Unprecedented Stability of a Photochromic Bisthienylethene Based on Benzobisthiadiazole as an Ethene Bridge (pages 10986–10990)

      Prof. Dr. Weihong Zhu, Yuheng Yang, Dr. Rémi Métivier, Dr. Qiong Zhang, Dr. Régis Guillot, Prof. Dr. Yongshu Xie, Prof. Dr. He Tian and Prof. Dr. Keitaro Nakatani

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105136

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An open and closed case: The photochromic bisthienylethene BTTE based on benzobisthiadiazole exhibits excellent photochromic performance in both solution and single crystals (see picture). BTTE shows excellent thermal stability, which is comparable to the widely known five-membered hexafluorocyclopentene-based counterpart.

    38. Chiral Nanomaterials

      Chiral Nematic Mesoporous Carbon Derived From Nanocrystalline Cellulose (pages 10991–10995)

      Kevin E. Shopsowitz, Dr. Wadood Y. Hamad and Prof. Dr. Mark J. MacLachlan

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105479

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Twisted organization: Pyrolysis of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC)/silica composite films leads to mesoporous carbon materials with long-range chiral organization (see picture). The NCC acts as a template and the resulting mesoporous carbon has a high specific surface area (>1400 m2 g−1) and accurately replicates the left-handed helical structure of the chiral nematic NCC films.

    39. Phosphorus Polysulfides

      Rational Syntheses and Structural Characterization of Sulfur-Rich Phosphorus Polysulfides: α-P2S7 and β-P2S7 (pages 10996–11000)

      Thomas Rödl, Dr. Richard Weihrich, Julia Wack, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Senker and Prof. Dr. Arno Pfitzner

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103485

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sulfur, so good: Crystallization of phosphorus polysulfides catena-P2S7 is enhanced by catalytic amounts of anhydrous FeCl3 (see scheme, P blue, S yellow). The formation of polysulfide bridges is observed which is typical for vulcanization reactions.

    40. Heterooligomeric Complexes

      Vibralactone as a Tool to Study the Activity and Structure of the ClpP1P2 Complex from Listeria monocytogenes (pages 11001–11004)

      Evelyn Zeiler, Dr. Nathalie Braun, Dr. Thomas Böttcher, Andreas Kastenmüller, Prof. Dr. Sevil Weinkauf and Prof. Dr. Stephan A. Sieber

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104391

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Clp proteolytic machinery has important functions in many bacteria such as L. monocytogenes. Some organisms encode for two uncharacterized ClpP isoforms. Vibralactone was used to study the activity and assembly of ClpP1 and ClpP2 subunits in a hetero-oligomeric complex. Electron microscopic images reveal that the tetradecameric assembly is made up of two stacked homoheptameric ClpP1 and ClpP2 rings.

    41. Protein NMR Spectroscopy

      Solid-State NMR Measurements of Asymmetric Dipolar Couplings Provide Insight into Protein Side-Chain Motion (pages 11005–11009)

      Dr. Paul Schanda, Matthias Huber, Dr. Jérôme Boisbouvier, Prof. Dr. Beat H. Meier and Prof. Dr. Matthias Ernst

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103944

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nonsymmetric motion: Solid-state NMR measurements of dipolar coupling tensors provide insight into protein dynamics. The hitherto ignored asymmetry of the dipolar coupling tensor contains valuable information about motional asymmetry, which was used in the first direct site-resolved measurement of such tensors. Important motions such as rotamer jumps can now be directly detected in the solid state.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Solid-State NMR Measurements of Asymmetric Dipolar Couplings Provide Insight into Protein Side-Chain Motion

      Vol. 51, Issue 40, 9959, Article first published online: 26 SEP 2012

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      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190098

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