Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 50

December 9, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 50

Pages 11805–12109

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
    18. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Self-Assembled Capsules of Unprecedented Shapes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50/2011) (page 11805)

      Dr. Konrad Tiefenbacher, Prof. Dariush Ajami and Prof. Julius Rebek Jr.

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106640

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      The self-assembly of banana- and S-shaped structures consisting of nine and eleven subunits, respectively, is reported in the Communication by J. Rebek, Jr. and co-workers on page 12003 ff. Characterization of the bent structures by NMR spectroscopic methods and shape-selective encapsulation experiments showed that the banana-shaped molecular capsule could encapsulate a complementary shaped guest that is not encapsulated in the known cylindrical capsules.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
    18. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Completely Encapsulated Oligothiophenes: Synthesis, Properties, and Single-Molecule Conductance (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50/2011) (page 11806)

      Prof. Yutaka Ie, Masaru Endou, See Kei Lee, Prof. Ryo Yamada, Prof. Hirokazu Tada and Prof. Yoshio Aso

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106644

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      Encapsulated π-conjugated systems are central building blocks in single-molecular devices. In their Communication on page 11980 ff., Y. Aso, H. Tada et al. report a series of oligothiophenes having homogeneously substituted encapsulating units that maintain the efficient conjugation of the π systems. Owing to the absence of intermolecular interactions between π-conjugated backbones, the electrical conductance of the single molecule determines the real decay constant of the oligothiophenes.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
    18. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Scope and Mechanism of the (4+3) Cycloaddition Reaction of Furfuryl Cations (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50/2011) (page 12110)

      Dr. Johan M. Winne, Dr. Saron Catak, Prof. Dr. Michel Waroquier and Prof. Dr. Veronique Van Speybroeck

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106645

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      The method of choice for the preparation of six-membered rings is (4 + 2) cycloaddition. The isoelectronic (4 + 3) cycloaddition between a diene and an allyl cation gives seven-membered rings, but the synthesis of suitable cationic reaction partners is challenging. In their Communication on page 11990 ff., J. M. Winne et al. report a novel synthetic method that uses furfuryl alcohols as three-carbon dienophiles for the rapid assembly of cycloheptenes.

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
    18. Preview
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      Editorial: Problem Solvers and Thinkers (pages 11808–11809)

      Prof. Dr. Rutger van Santen

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107346

  5. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
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    7. Corrigendum
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    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
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  6. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
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    7. Corrigendum
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    10. News
    11. Obituary
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    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
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      Corrigendum: Smart Foams: Switching Reversibly between Ultrastable and Unstable Foams (page 11826)

      Dr. Anne-Laure Fameau, Dr. Arnaud Saint-Jalmes, Dr. Fabrice Cousin, Bérénice Houinsou Houssou, Dr. Bruno Novales, Dr. Laurence Navailles, Prof. Frédéric Nallet, Dr. Cédric Gaillard, Dr. François Boué and Dr. Jean-Paul Douliez

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107610

      This article corrects:

      Smart Foams: Switching Reversibly between Ultrastable and Unstable Foams1

      Vol. 50, Issue 36, 8264–8269, Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2011

  7. News

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
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    7. Corrigendum
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    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
    18. Preview
  8. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
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    1. Robert Mulvey (pages 11836–11837)

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105997

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      “A good work day begins with telling a student that their paper has just been accepted, especially if it is for Angewandte Chemie. What I look for first in a publication is that surprise element that we all strive for in our own studies. …” This and more about Robert Mulvey can be found on page 11836.

  9. News

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    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
    18. Preview
  10. Obituary

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
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    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
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    12. Book Review
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    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
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    1. Dieter M. Kolb (19422011) (pages 11840–11841)

      Ludwig A. Kibler and Richard C. Alkire

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107609

  11. Book Review

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
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    7. Corrigendum
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    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
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    1. Macrocycles. Construction, Chemistry and Nanotechnology Applications. By Frank Davis and Séamus Higson. (page 11842)

      David Parker and Stephen J. Butler

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105634

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      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2011. 608 pp., softcover, € 57.90.—ISBN 978-0470714638

  12. Highlights

    1. Top of page
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    4. Back Cover
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. Corrigendum
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
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    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
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    1. Porous Organic Materials

      Click Chemistry Finds Its Way into Covalent Porous Organic Materials (pages 11844–11845)

      Dr. Thierry Muller and Prof. Stefan Bräse

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105707

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      Click the CMPs and POPs: The Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction can be used to generate covalent porous organic materials such as conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) and porous organic polymers (POPs). A triazole-linked network based on complementary tetrahedral monomers has been prepared by means of click chemistry.

    2. Crystal Engineering

      Consecutive Molecular Crystalline-State Reactions with Metal Complexes (pages 11846–11848)

      Prof. Milko E. van der Boom

      Version of Record online: 27 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105940

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      Engineering crystals: Molecular single crystals of well-defined metal complexes selectively and reversibly undergo ligand-exchange reactions. These results are a prelude to sensing and new catalytic reactions within the confined space of a crystal lattice.

    3. Asymmetric Synthesis

      Chiral Hypervalent Iodine Reagents in Asymmetric Reactions (pages 11849–11851)

      Dr. Huan Liang and Prof. Dr. Marco A. Ciufolini

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106127

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      All hyper: Recent advances in the area of chiral hypervalent iodine reagents, notably by the groups of Kita, Ishihara, and Fujita, enable some oxidative transformations to be conducted in an enantioselective manner and with asymmetric inductions in the range of 86–95 % ee (see scheme, Mes=mesityl). This contribution highlights representative reactions, reagent/catalyst design, and mechanistic aspects of the reported transformations.

  13. Essay

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
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    7. Corrigendum
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    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
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    1. Quantum Molecular Magnetism

      Molecular (Nano) Magnets as Test Grounds of Quantum Mechanics (pages 11852–11858)

      Prof. Andrea Dei and Prof. Dante Gatteschi

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100818

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      A bitter pill? The dose of quantum concepts that chemists must digest is steadily increasing. The drug perhaps tastes bitter, but it produces good effects yielding novel systems to test the foundations of quantum mechanics. This point is considered in reference to molecular nanomagnets (see structure of a terbium phthalocyaninate complex), a class of materials that continues to show new facets requiring the exploration of new quantum effects.

  14. Minireview

    1. Top of page
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    14. Essay
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    1. Catalyst Design

      Fluorine Conformational Effects in Organocatalysis: An Emerging Strategy for Molecular Design (pages 11860–11871)

      Dr. Lucie E. Zimmer, Christof Sparr and Prof. Dr. Ryan Gilmour

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102027

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      F in control: Conformational effects of fluorinated molecules have hitherto mainly been restricted to bio-organic chemistry. The renaissance of organocatalysis, however, offers the possibility to exploit many of the stereoelectronic and electrostatic effects of fluorinated organic molecules for molecular preorganization. In this Minireview, we highlight examples of catalyst refinement by the introduction of an aliphatic C[BOND]F bond which functions as a chemically inert steering group for conformational control.

  15. Review

    1. Top of page
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    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
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    1. Carbohydrates

      Toward Automated Oligosaccharide Synthesis (pages 11872–11923)

      Che-Hsiung Hsu, Prof. Shang-Cheng Hung, Prof. Chung-Yi Wu and Prof. Chi-Huey Wong

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100125

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      Sweet dreams: Carbohydrates play important roles in biological processes. The pace of carbohydrate research is, however, relatively slow due, amongst other things, to the lack of general synthetic methods. Current developments in the automated synthesis of oligosaccharides can help overcome many of these problems and to pave the way for biomedical applications.

  16. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    5. Editorial
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    7. Corrigendum
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    9. Author Profile
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    11. Obituary
    12. Book Review
    13. Highlights
    14. Essay
    15. Minireview
    16. Review
    17. Communications
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    1. Nanoparticle Hybrids

      Platinum Nanoparticles Encapsulated by Aminopeptidase: A Multifunctional Bioinorganic Nanohybrid Catalyst (pages 11924–11929)

      Boi Hoa San, Sungsu Kim, Sang Hyun Moh, Prof. Dr. Hyunjoo Lee, Prof. Dr. Duk-Young Jung and Prof. Dr. Kyeong Kyu Kim

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201101833

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      Two birds with one stone: When platinum nanoparticles are encapsulated by a bacterial aminopeptidase, the novel hybrid combines platinum-catalyzed hydrogenation and peptidase-catalyzed hydrolysis for multistep synthesis (see picture). This concept of bioinorganic integration can be extended to various enzymes and inorganic materials, allowing for the design and fabrication of novel multifunctional materials.

    2. Enzymes

      Insights into Lasalocid A Ring Formation by Chemical Chain Termination In Vivo (pages 11930–11933)

      Dr. Manuela Tosin, Luke Smith and Prof. Peter F. Leadlay

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106323

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      Caught in the act: Intermediates in the biosynthesis of lasalocid A are captured in vivo by malonyl carba(dethia)-N-acetyl cysteamine probes. These species constitute novel snapshots of the timing of ether and aromatic ring formation, thus providing valuable insights for the reconstruction and the engineering of polyether biosynthetic pathways.

    3. DNA Switch

      A Responsive Hidden Toehold To Enable Controllable DNA Strand Displacement Reactions (pages 11934–11936)

      Yongzheng Xing, Prof. Dr. Zhongqiang Yang and Prof. Dr. Dongsheng Liu

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105923

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      In the loop: A hidden toehold in a metastable DNA bulge-loop structure allows regulation of DNA strand displacement reactions by the addition of ATP, which can bind to an aptamer located partly on the loop sequence (see picture, blue and green in A), thereby exposing the hidden toehold (green and red in Q). By introducing other aptamer sequences, this regulation mechanism could be easily extended to a variety of other ligands.

    4. Photosensitizers

      Designing Excited States: Theory-Guided Access to Efficient Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Action (pages 11937–11941)

      Yusuf Cakmak, Safacan Kolemen, Selin Duman, Dr. Yavuz Dede, Yusuf Dolen, Bilal Kilic, Ziya Kostereli, Prof. Dr. Leyla Tatar Yildirim, Prof. Dr. A. Lale Dogan, Prof. Dr. Dicle Guc and Prof. Dr. Engin U. Akkaya

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105736

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      The in silico design of tetraradical S1 states was validated experimentally through synthesis, followed by characterization including phosphorescence measurements, use of trap molecules, and cell culture studies, leading to a series of orthogonal dimers of Bodipy chromophores with remarkable singlet oxygen efficiencies (see picture). A new path for the rational development of efficient photosensitizers is thus revealed.

    5. Structural Biology

      Solution NMR Structure of Proteorhodopsin (pages 11942–11946)

      Sina Reckel, Daniel Gottstein, Jochen Stehle, Dr. Frank Löhr, Dr. Mirka-Kristin Verhoefen, Dr. Mitsuhiro Takeda, Robert Silvers, Prof. Dr. Masatsune Kainosho, Prof. Dr. Clemens Glaubitz, Prof. Dr. Josef Wachtveitl, Dr. Frank Bernhard, Prof. Dr. Harald Schwalbe, Prof. Dr. Peter Güntert and Prof. Dr. Volker Dötsch

      Version of Record online: 27 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105648

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      A solved puzzle: The structure of the seven-transmembrane-helix proton pump proteorhodopsin obtained by solution NMR spectroscopy is based on NOE data combined with distance restraints derived from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (see picture). Restraints from residual dipolar couplings improved the structural accuracy.

    6. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      A Multiferroic Perdeutero Metal–Organic Framework (pages 11947–11951)

      Da-Wei Fu, Prof. Wen Zhang, Dr. Hong-Ling Cai, Dr. Yi Zhang, Dr. Jia-Zhen Ge, Prof. Ren-Gen Xiong, Prof. Songping D. Huang and Prof. Takayoshi Nakamura

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103265

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      Vitamin “D”: The perdeutero metal–organic framework [(CD3)2ND2][Co(DCOO)3] (see structure) undergoes two phase transitions, including one above room temperature, which is unprecedented for metal formates. Magnetic and dielectric hysteresis loops make it an example of a multiferroic MOF without coupling of magnetic and electric ordering.

    7. Selenocysteine

      Site-Specific pKa Determination of Selenocysteine Residues in Selenovasopressin by Using 77Se NMR Spectroscopy (pages 11952–11955)

      Dr. Mehdi Mobli, David Morgenstern, Prof. Glenn F. King, Prof. Paul F. Alewood and Dr. Markus Muttenthaler

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104169

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      Selenocysteine (Sec), the 21st amino acid, is a component of a variety of proteins in all lineages of life, and the greater acidity of selenols compared to thiols provides Sec with unique chemical properties. By using 77Se NMR spectroscopy the pKa of Sec residues in a protein could be measured at atomic resolution. This information can be used to predict chemical reactions.

    8. Supramolecular Polymers

      Anion-Assisted Supramolecular Polymerization: From Achiral AB-Type Monomers to Chiral Assemblies (pages 11956–11961)

      Dr. Calogero Capici, Prof. Yoram Cohen, Dr. Alessandro D'Urso, Dr. Giuseppe Gattuso, Dr. Anna Notti, Dr. Andrea Pappalardo, Prof. Sebastiano Pappalardo, Prof. Melchiorre F. Parisi, Prof. Roberto Purrello, Dr. Sarit Slovak and Dr. Valentina Villari

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104357

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      Anions do make a difference! Counterions released during the acid-promoted self-assembly of AB-type monomer precursors dock into designated ancillary binding sites and thus facilitate the polymerization process while transferring their molecular properties to the entire supramolecular structure (see picture).

    9. DNA Conformations

      Formation of Sequence-Independent Z-DNA Induced by a Ruthenium Complex at Low Salt Concentrations (pages 11962–11967)

      Zhiguo Wu, Dr. Tian Tian, Dr. Junping Yu, Prof. Xiaocheng Weng, Prof. Yi Liu and Prof. Xiang Zhou

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104422

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      Switched: The metal complex [Ru(dip)2dppz]2+ can induce the transition from B-DNA to Z-DNA and stabilize the Z conformation in aqueous low-salt solution (see scheme; dip=4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, dppz=dipyridophenazine). The transition is sequence-independent (including non-alternating pyrimidine–purine and AT-rich sequences) and was monitored by CD and 2D NMR spectroscopy, AFM, isothermal titration calorimetry, and gel electrophoresis.

    10. Antitumor Agents

      Photosensitizing Hollow Nanocapsules for Combination Cancer Therapy (pages 11968–11971)

      Kyung Jin Son, Hee-Jae Yoon, Joo-Ho Kim, Prof. Woo-Dong Jang, Yeol Lee and Prof. Won-Gun Koh

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102658

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      Many layers make light work: Layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of a dendritic porphyrin (red; see picture) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (blue) on polystyrene nanoparticles followed by removal of the polystyrene core produces multifunctional hollow nanocapsules. These species can be both loaded with anticancer drugs and used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and therefore have potential in combined cancer therapy.

    11. Hydrogen Generation

      Computational Evidence for Hydrogen Generation by Reductive Cleavage of Water and α-H Abstraction on a Molybdenum Complex (pages 11972–11975)

      Dr. Jun Li and Prof. Dr. Kazunari Yoshizawa

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102917

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      Long-standing hypothesis now verified: H2 generation by reductive cleavage of water and α-H abstraction has long been considered as a possible mechanism for reduction of water to H2, but a clear example was not established up to now. Detailed DFT calculations now reveal that this process is energetically favorable on an MoI site (see picture). Formation of H2 by this mechanism is also feasible, albeit less favorable, on an MoII site.

    12. Enzyme Inhibitors

      Biosynthesis of Isoprene Units: Mössbauer Spectroscopy of Substrate and Inhibitor Binding to the [4Fe-4S] Cluster of the LytB/IspH Enzyme (pages 11976–11979)

      Annegret Ahrens-Botzong, Dr. Karnjapan Janthawornpong, Dr. Juliusz A. Wolny, Dr. Erasmienne Ngouamegne Tambou, Prof. Michel Rohmer, Dr. Sergiy Krasutsky, Prof. C. Dale Poulter, Prof. Volker Schünemann and Dr. Myriam Seemann

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104562

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      A fascinating cube: LytB, an enzyme containing a [4Fe-4S] cluster, catalyzes the last step of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway, a target for antibacterial and antiparasitic drugs. Field-dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the unique fourth iron atom of the [4Fe-4S] cluster coordinates to the hydroxy group of the substrate (see picture) and to the amino and thiol moieties of two potent inhibitor substrate analogues.

    13. Molecular Wires

      Completely Encapsulated Oligothiophenes: Synthesis, Properties, and Single-Molecule Conductance (pages 11980–11984)

      Prof. Yutaka Ie, Masaru Endou, See Kei Lee, Prof. Ryo Yamada, Prof. Hirokazu Tada and Prof. Yoshio Aso

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104700

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      Proper shielding: Encapsulated oligothiophenes for the investigation of single-molecule conductance are described. UV/Vis/NIR measurements of the oxidized species show the absence of intermolecular interactions between the conjugated backbones. The conductance of a single-molecule junction was measured by modified STM techniques (see picture), and the decay constant β was determined to be 1.9 nm−1. SMU=source meter unit.

    14. Metamaterials

      Three-Dimensionally Isotropic Negative Refractive Index Materials from Block Copolymer Self-Assembled Chiral Gyroid Networks (pages 11985–11989)

      Kahyun Hur, Yan Francescato, Dr. Vincenzo Giannini, Prof. Stefan A. Maier, Prof. Richard G. Hennig and Prof. Ulrich Wiesner

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104888

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      Metamaterials are engineered artificial materials that offer new functionalities such as super-resolution imaging and cloaking. Calculations of the photonic properties of three-dimensionally isotropic metamaterials with cubic double gyroid and alternating gyroid morphologies from block copolymer self-assembly are presented.

    15. Synthetic Methods

      Scope and Mechanism of the (4+3) Cycloaddition Reaction of Furfuryl Cations (pages 11990–11993)

      Dr. Johan M. Winne, Dr. Saron Catak, Prof. Dr. Michel Waroquier and Prof. Dr. Veronique Van Speybroeck

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104930

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      It all adds up: Furfuryl alcohols are revealed as direct reaction partners for a wide range of conjugated dienes in a (4+3) cycloaddition motif (see scheme). This novel Lewis acid promoted process gives straightforward access to various polycyclic skeletons containing a seven-membered ring. A plausible cationic stepwise mechanism was confirmed by DFT calculations.

    16. Nanoplasmonics

      Catalytic Gold Nanoparticles for Nanoplasmonic Detection of DNA Hybridization (pages 11994–11998)

      Xiaoxue Zheng, Qing Liu, Chao Jing, Prof. Yang Li, Prof. Di Li, Weijie Luo, Yanqin Wen, Dr. Yao He, Prof. Qing Huang, Prof. Yi-Tao Long and Prof. Chunhai Fan

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105121

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      DNA hybridization can finely regulate the intrinsic glucose oxidase like catalytic activity of AuNPs owing to the marked difference in adsorption of single- and double-stranded DNA on its surface. A sensing strategy for DNA and microRNA is presented; in a different approach, this DNA-regulated AuNP catalysis was coupled with AuNP-mediated seed growth, which was monitored in real time and at a single-nanoparticle level.

    17. Micromixing

      Quantitative Characterization of Micromixing Based on Uniformity and Overlap (pages 11999–12002)

      Dr. Victor Okhonin, Dr. Alexander P. Petrov, Dr. Svetlana M. Krylova and Prof. Sergey N. Krylov

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105173

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      Mix it up: The micromixing extent (ME) quantifies the quality of molecular mixing in microreactors based on uniformity of reactant distribution through the reactor and spatial overlap of the reactants (see picture). ME depends solely on the distribution of reactants in the reactor and is a general attribute that can be applied to all types of micromixtures for which distributions of the mixed solutes can be calculated.

    18. Molecular Capsules

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      Self-Assembled Capsules of Unprecedented Shapes (pages 12003–12007)

      Dr. Konrad Tiefenbacher, Prof. Dariush Ajami and Prof. Julius Rebek Jr.

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102548

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      Curved hosts: The first examples of bent molecular capsules are described: They feature banana or S shapes (see picture) and are capable of selectively binding complementary shaped guests.

    19. Natural Product Synthesis

      Enantioselective Total Syntheses of Communesins A and B (pages 12008–12011)

      Zhiwei Zuo and Prof. Dawei Ma

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106205

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      As easy as A, B: The first total syntheses of (−)-communesins A and B (see picture) were achieved, which featured the formation of their spiro-fused indoline part through an intramolecular oxidative coupling and of their A ring through a cascade reaction.

    20. Block Copolymerization

      Chain-Shuttling Polymerization at Two Different Scandium Sites: Regio- and Stereospecific “One-Pot” Block Copolymerization of Styrene, Isoprene, and Butadiene (pages 12012–12015)

      Li Pan, Dr. Kunyu Zhang, Dr. Masayoshi Nishiura and Prof. Dr. Zhaomin Hou

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104011

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      To each his own: Copolymerization of styrene and isoprene by catalysts Sc1 (syndiospecific for styrene) and Sc2 (cis-1,4-specific for isoprene) with a chain-shuttling agent iBu3Al gives block copolymers of syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) and cis-1,4-polyisoprene (PIP). Replacement of Sc2 with Sc3 (high 3,4-selectivity for isoprene polymerization) gives selectively copolymers having sPS and 3,4-PIP blocks.

    21. Oligonucleotides

      Interplay between “Neutral” and “Charge-Transfer” Excimers Rules the Excited State Decay in Adenine-Rich Polynucleotides (pages 12016–12019)

      Dr. Roberto Improta and Prof. Vincenzo Barone

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104382

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      The excited states of (dA)4 oligonucleotides (A=adenine), including the phosphoribose backbone, were studied in water at a fully quantum mechanical level, providing an atomistic description of the main decay paths and a comprehensive interpretation of the experimental data (see picture). After absorption to exciton states delocalized over multiple A bases, the behavior of the excited state is ruled by the interplay of a number of species responsible for different spectral features.

    22. RNA Detection

      Fluorescence Detection of Intron Lariat RNA with Reduction-Triggered Fluorescent Probes (pages 12020–12023)

      Dr. Kazuhiro Furukawa, Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Abe, Yasutsugu Tamura, Dr. Rei Yoshimoto, Prof. Dr. Minoru Yoshida, Prof. Dr. Satoshi Tsuneda and Prof. Dr. Yoshihiro Ito

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104425

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      Fluorescence through proximity: Reduction-triggered fluorescent probes bearing either a fluorescein derivative or triphenylphosphine bind sequence-specifically at the branch site of lariat RNA. The chemical reaction between the two substrates leads to the formation of unquenched fluorescein and the emission of a fluorescence signal (see picture). Prelariat and lariat structures can be distinguished by using this method.

    23. Ionic Liquids

      Demonstration of Chemisorption of Carbon Dioxide in 1,3-Dialkylimidazolium Acetate Ionic Liquids (pages 12024–12026)

      Dr. Gabriela Gurau, Dr. Héctor Rodríguez, Steven P. Kelley, Peter Janiczek, Roland S. Kalb and Prof. Robin D. Rogers

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105198

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      Real chemistry: Spectroscopic and crystallographic analyses confirm the chemical reaction of CO2 with carbene present in 1,3-dialkylimidazolium acetate ionic liquids and the supporting role of the acetate ion. When CO2 was bubbled through [C2mim][OAc], formation of the corresponding imidazolium carboxylate, [C2mim+-COO], could be observed.

    24. Synthetic Methods

      Synthesis of Functionalized Polycyclic Compounds: Rhodium(I)-Catalyzed Intramolecular Cycloaddition of Yne and Ene Vinylidenecyclopropanes (pages 12027–12031)

      Bei-Li Lu and Prof. Dr. Min Shi

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105292

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      Three ring circus: The title reaction can efficiently provide functionalized polycyclic compounds containing cyclobutene (see scheme; PG=protecting group) or aza-cyclooctene moieties in a highly regio- and diastereoselective manner with moderate to good yields under mild reaction conditions. The scope and limitations are disclosed and plausible reaction mechanisms are discussed.

    25. Nanoparticles

      Thermotropic Liquid Crystals as Templates for Anisotropic Growth of Nanoparticles (pages 12032–12035)

      Dr. Sarmenio Saliba, Dr. Yannick Coppel, Dr. Marie-France Achard, Dr. Christophe Mingotaud, Dr. Jean-Daniel Marty and Dr. Myrtil L. Kahn

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105314

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      In control: The organization of a thermotropic liquid crystal can be used to control the growth of inorganic nano-objects (like ZnO). When the systems are in their nematic phase state, anisotropic nanoparticles are formed, while in isotropic conditions, isotropic nanoparticles are obtained. Playing with the exact nature of the liquid crystal enables control of the size and the aspect ratio of the nanoparticles (see picture).

    26. Synthetic Methods

      One-Pot Three-Component Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Homoallylboronates (pages 12036–12041)

      Prof. Dr. Ismail Ibrahem, Palle Breistein and Prof. Dr. Armando Córdova

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105458

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      No longer a simple bor(ation): The title reaction between bis(pinacolato)diboron, enals, and 2-(triphenylphosphoranylidene)acetates employing bench-stable copper salts and a simple chiral amine co-catalyst is presented (see scheme). The reaction proceeds through a catalytic asymmetric conjugate borane addition/Wittig sequence wherein the β-boration step is 1,4-selective and gives the corresponding homoallylboronate products with high enantiomeric ratios.

    27. Peptides

      Preformed Selenoesters Enable Rapid Native Chemical Ligation at Intractable Sites (pages 12042–12045)

      Dr. Thomas Durek and Prof. Paul F. Alewood

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105512

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      Going pro: The first facile Pro–Cys ligation using a preformed prolyl selenoester is reported (see scheme; P=peptide). In a comparative study of peptide selenoesters in native chemical ligation peptide α-selenoesters are shown to be superior acyl donors and result in rate enhancements of at least two orders of magnitude when compared to the well-established peptide α-thioesters. This method permits rapid chemical ligation even at previously intractable sites, such as Pro-Cys.

    28. Structure Elucidation

      Unusual Thermal Reactivity of [W([TRIPLE BOND]CPh)(NCMe)(η2-C60)(η5-C5Ph5)] in Chlorobenzene Involving Activation of All Ligands (pages 12046–12049)

      Dr. Wen-Yann Yeh

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105542

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      A tung(sten) twister: Heating 1 in chlorobenzene affords 2, 3, C6Ph6, and C60, and involves C[BOND]H bond activation and C[BOND]C bond formation of the ligands, as well as chlorine atom abstraction from the solvent. C6Ph6 is presumably generated from insertion of the benzylidyne ligand into the C5Ph5 ring. Compound 3 is an air-stable, 17-electron species, with the phenyldichloromethyl ligand having a unique η3-allyl-type bonding motif.

    29. Nanowires

      Solution-Phase Synthesis and Characterization of Single-Crystalline SnSe Nanowires (pages 12050–12053)

      Dr. Sheng Liu, Dr. Xiaoyang Guo, Prof. Mingrun Li, Prof. Wen-Hua Zhang, Prof. Xingyuan Liu and Prof. Can Li

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105614

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      Wiry solar cells: A solution-phase synthetic approach gave monocrystalline SnSe nanowires with a mean diameter of approximately 20.8 nm and a lattice distance of 0.575 nm (see HRTEM image). Hybrid solar cells based on a blend of these SnSe nanowires and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) were fabricated.

    30. Total Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of Sialic Acid by a Sequential Rhodium-Catalyzed Aziridination and Barbier Allylation of D-Glycal (pages 12054–12057)

      Dr. Rujee Lorpitthaya, Dr. Sharad B. Suryawanshi, Siming Wang, Kalyan Kumar Pasunooti, Shuting Cai, Dr. Jimei Ma and Prof. Dr. Xue-Wei Liu

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104516

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      Acid test: Sialic acid Neu5Ac was synthesized in a regio and stereoselective manner from a glycal (see scheme) via a [1,2,3]-oxathiazocane-2,2-dioxide intermediate. The sequential rhodium-catalyzed aziridination/indium-mediated Barbier allylation approach adopted offers a potentially flexible route to other sialic acid derivatives, since the oxathiazocane intermediate was compatible with a variety of nucleophiles.

    31. Quantum Dots

      Phase Transitions in Quantum-Dot Langmuir Films (pages 12058–12061)

      Karel Lambert, Yolanda Justo, John Sundar Kamal and Prof. Dr. Zeger Hens

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105991

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      Crowd-surfing quantum dots: Quantum-dot Langmuir layers (see picture) were compressed beyond their collapse pressure, resulting in phase transitions where particles are promoted from a monolayer into a bi- or even a trilayer depending on the applied pressure. The procedure works for different quantum dot types and can be rationalized from thermodynamic considerations.

    32. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Efficient Heterogeneous Epoxidation of Alkenes by a Supported Tungsten Oxide Catalyst (pages 12062–12066)

      Dr. Keigo Kamata, Dr. Koji Yonehara, Yasutaka Sumida, Kazuhisa Hirata, Susumu Nojima and Prof. Dr. Noritaka Mizuno

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106064

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      Oxidation optimization: A combination of tungsten and zinc oxides on a SnO2 support (W–Zn/SnO2) is a heterogeneous and reusable solid catalyst for selective oxidation with aqueous H2O2. With it, various substrates, such as alkenes, amines, silanes, and sulfides, were oxidized into the corresponding products in high yields (see scheme). The catalyst can be reused several times without an appreciable loss in catalytic performance.

    33. Cycloaddition

      [3+2] Cycloaddition Reaction of Cyclopropyl Ketones with Alkynes Catalyzed by Nickel/Dimethylaluminum Chloride (pages 12067–12070)

      Takashi Tamaki, Dr. Masato Ohashi and Prof. Sensuke Ogoshi

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106174

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      Nick and Al join forces: The nickel-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition between the title compounds gives cyclopentene derivatives in the presence of Me2AlCl. The organoaluminum reagent activates the carbonyl group of the cyclopropyl ketone through coordination of the oxygen atom to the aluminum, and stabilizes the reaction intermediate by the coordination of the chloride to nickel. cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene, THF=tetrahydrofuran.

    34. ZnO Nanocrystals

      Synthesis of Exciton Luminescent ZnO Nanocrystals Using Continuous Supercritical Microfluidics (pages 12071–12074)

      Yann Roig, Dr. Samuel Marre, Dr. Thierry Cardinal and Dr. Cyril Aymonier

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106201

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      ZnO nanocrystals of high quality with pure UV-emitting properties were synthesized through a new microfluidic approach based on supercritical fluids and separation of nucleation/growth and functionalization steps (see picture). The as-synthesized ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) show exciton luminescence without classical defect-state luminescence.

    35. Synthetic Methods

      Catalytic [3+2] Annulation of Aminocyclopropanes for the Enantiospecific Synthesis of Cyclopentylamines (pages 12075–12079)

      Florian de Nanteuil and Prof. Dr. Jérôme Waser

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106255

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      With nitrogen too: The first catalytic [3+2] annulation of aminocyclopropanes with enol ethers is reported (see scheme; Phth=phthaloyl). The reaction worked with easily accessible phthalimidocyclopropanes using 5 mol % of SnCl4 in nearly quantitative yields. Polysubstituted cyclopentylamines, which are often present in bioactive compounds, were obtained with high diastereoselectivity and enantiospecificity.

    36. Surface Reactivity

      Ruthenium Nanoparticles Stabilized by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: Ligand Location and Influence on Reactivity (pages 12080–12084)

      Dr. Patricia Lara, Orestes Rivada-Wheelaghan, Dr. Salvador Conejero, Dr. Romuald Poteau, Dr. Karine Philippot and Dr. Bruno Chaudret

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106348

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      NHCs go nano: Ruthenium nanoparticles were formed from (cyclooctadiene)(cyclooctatriene)ruthenium(0) and stabilized by N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs). Solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed both the coordination of the NHC ligands on the surface of the particles and their surface reactivity.

    37. Cyanoborates

      “Umpolung” at Boron by Reduction of [B(CN)4] and Formation of the Dianion [B(CN)3]2− (pages 12085–12088)

      Priv.-Doz. Dr. Eduard Bernhardt, Vera Bernhardt-Pitchougina, Prof. Dr. Helge Willner and Dr. Nikolai Ignatiev

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105848

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      A homoleptic cyanoborate with nucleophilic boron atom: An unprecedented dianion in the salts M2[B(CN)3] (M=Li, Na, K) with nucleophilic boron in the formal oxidation state +1 was obtained by reductive B[BOND]C bond cleavage in the [B(CN)4] anion and characterized by NMR (11B, 13C), vibrational spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction.

    38. Rare-Earth-Metal Alkyl Complexes

      LaAl3Et12: A Homoleptic Ethyllanthanum Complex (pages 12089–12093)

      Dr. H. Martin Dietrich, Prof. Dr. Karl W. Törnroos and Prof. Dr. Reiner Anwander

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105251

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      They do exist after all: Molecular [La(AlEt4)3] of high purity can be obtained from the reaction of [La(NMe2)3(LiCl)3] with excess triethylaluminum. Although kinetically labile—the title complex decomposes gradually through β-H abstraction and release of ethane—alkane elimination reactions are feasible, as shown for the synthesis of metallocene complex [(C5Me5)2La(AlEt4)].

    39. π-Conjugated Compounds

      Bis(phosphoryl)-Bridged Biphenyls by Radical Phosphanylation: Synthesis and Photophysical and Electrochemical Properties (pages 12094–12098)

      Achim Bruch, Prof. Dr. Aiko Fukazawa, Eriko Yamaguchi, Prof. Dr. Shigehiro Yamaguchi and Prof. Dr. Armido Studer

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104114

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      The efficient fourfold radical phosphanylation of 2,2,2′,2′-tetrabromobiphenyl with a bis(stannyl)phosphane followed by oxidation produces a highly strained biphenyl with two phosphoryl bridges (see picture). Extended π-conjugated compounds consisting of this core unit can be also synthesized by using the same approach. The two phosphoryl bridges significantly alter the electronic structure, making this biphenyl a unique electron-accepting scaffold.

    40. Aromaticity

      Li NMR Spectroscopy on Crystalline Li12Si7: Experimental Evidence for the Aromaticity of the Planar Cyclopentadienyl-Analogous Si56− Rings (pages 12099–12102)

      Alexander Kuhn, Dr. Puravankara Sreeraj, Prof. Dr. Rainer Pöttgen, Prof. Dr. Hans-Dieter Wiemhöfer, Dr. Martin Wilkening and Prof. Dr. Paul Heitjans

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105081

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      An aromatic relation: The upfield-shifted NMR signal of the Li ions sandwiched between two Si56− rings in Li12Si7 points to carbon-like aromaticity of a ring formed exclusively from silicon atoms (see structure (left; Si blue, Li orange) and NMR signal (right)).

    41. Molecular Imaging

      Imaging and Quantifying Chemical and Physical Properties of Native Proteins at Molecular Resolution by Force–Volume AFM (pages 12103–12108)

      Dr. Izhar Medalsy, Dr. Ulf Hensen and Prof. Dr. Daniel J. Muller

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103991

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      Use the force: Force–volume atomic force microscopy (AFM) can image native membrane proteins and quantify and map their chemical and physical properties at molecular resolution (see images). For the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR), the data shows that lipids form a flexible framework embedding a mechanically anisotropic proton pump, and that the BR adopts different structurally stable conformations that are important for proton pumping.

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