Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 7

February 11, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 7

Pages 1447–1726

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Cover Picture: The Catalytic Asymmetric Knoevenagel Condensation (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2011) (page 1447)

      Anna Lee, Dr. Anna Michrowska, Dr. Sarah Sulzer-Mosse and Prof. Dr. Benjamin List

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000522

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The annual rings of the pictured tree represent the time gap, 116 years, between the discovery of the Knoevenagel condensation and that of the first catalytic asymmetric variant. As described by B. List et al. in their Communication on page 1707 ff., a cinchona amine catalyst promotes the reaction of α-branched aldehydes and malonates through a dynamic kinetic resolution to give alkylidene malonates with high enantioselectivity.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Inside Cover: Lewis Acid Activated Synthesis of Highly Substituted Cyclopentanes by the N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalyzed Addition of Homoenolate Equivalents to Unsaturated Ketoesters (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2011) (page 1448)

      Daniel T. Cohen, Dr. Benoit Cardinal-David and Prof. Karl A. Scheidt

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007985

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A highly diastereo- and enantioselective N-heterocyclic carbene catalyzed/titanium(IV)-mediated homoenolate addition to β,γ-unsaturated α-ketoesters to assemble cyclopentanols with four contiguous stereogenic centers is described by Scheidt and co-workers in their Communication on page 1678 ff. The Lewis acid is essential for the reaction and a wide range of β,γ-unsaturated α-ketoesters and enals are tolerated, with the products obtained in 52–85% yield and up to 99% ee.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Ben L. Feringa (pages 1470–1472)

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006997

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “If I could be anyone for a day, I would be Leonardo da Vinci. My greatest achievement has been the design of a molecular motor. …” This and more about Ben L. Feringa can be found on page 1470.

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures. Synthesis, Characterization, Functionalization, and Applications. Edited by Dirk M. Guldi and Nazario Martín. (pages 1473–1474)

      Tomás Torres

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006930

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2010. 540 S., hardcover, € 149.00.—ISBN 978-3527324064

  7. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Hydrogen Production

      Minimizing the Use of Platinum in Hydrogen-Evolving Electrodes (pages 1476–1477)

      Dr. Ifan E. L. Stephens and Prof. Ib Chorkendorff

      Version of Record online: 24 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005921

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      One layer is enough: A new catalyst comprising a platinum monolayer on tungsten monocarbide (WC) could lead to inexpensive and efficient (photo)electrochemical production of molecular hydrogen (see scheme). The system uses far less platinum than conventional platinum-foil electrodes but is just as effective.

  8. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Reductive Elimination

      Bystanding F+ Oxidants Enable Selective Reductive Elimination from High-Valent Metal Centers in Catalysis (pages 1478–1491)

      Keary M. Engle, Tian-Sheng Mei, Dr. Xisheng Wang and Prof. Jin-Quan Yu

      Version of Record online: 24 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005142

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An emerging strategy for controlling the selectivity in reductive elimination from high-valent metal species is examined: using bystanding F+ oxidants. Recent applications of this concept in PdII/PdIV and AuI/AuIII catalysis are presented, along with a rare example in which one-electron oxidants have been used to promote selective reductive elimination in C[BOND]H functionalization.

  9. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Materials Science

      Responsive Photonic Crystals (pages 1492–1522)

      Dr. Jianping Ge and Prof. Yadong Yin

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.200907091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Always good for an answer: Responsive photonic crystals fabricated by self-assembly processes can display photonic properties that can be tuned in response to external stimuli. These smart materials have wide applications in areas such as color displays, rewritable paper, optical switches, chemical and biological sensors, and antifraud devices.

    2. Synthetic Methods

      2-Iodoxybenzoic Acid—A Simple Oxidant with a Dazzling Array of Potential Applications (pages 1524–1552)

      Alexander Duschek and Dr. Stefan F. Kirsch

      Version of Record online: 26 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000873

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oxidation made easy! 2-Iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) has emerged as a universally applicable oxidizing agent. Besides the simple oxidation of alcohols, it is also suitable for dehydrogenations, oxygenations, and other oxidative processes (see picture), and has also found numerous applications in total synthesis.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Coordination Chemistry

      A Cavity-Shaped Diphosphane Displaying “Oschelating” Behavior (pages 1554–1559)

      Rafael Gramage-Doria, Prof. Dominique Armspach, Dr. Dominique Matt and Dr. Loïc Toupet

      Version of Record online: 26 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A molecular balance wheel: Transition metals form β-cyclodextrin-derived diphosphane chelate complexes (picture: ligand structure) in which a fast oscillatory motion about the metal ion takes place (“oschelating behavior”). The observed movement occurs without dissociation of the metal–phosphorus bond.

    2. Metalloporphyrins

      Formation of a Dinuclear Mercury(II) Complex with a Regular Bis-Strapped Porphyrin Following a Tunable Cooperative Process (pages 1560–1564)

      Nicolas Motreff, Dr. Stéphane Le Gac, Prof. Michel Luhmer, Dr. Eric Furet, Dr. Jean-François Halet, Dr. Thierry Roisnel and Dr. Bernard Boitrel

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Teamwork: Structural characterization of the first dinuclear mercury(II) complex with a regular porphyrin reveals dissymmetry induced by binding of dimethyl sulfoxide molecules to the metal ions, which form two allosterically connected binding sites (see structure; gray C, orange Hg, blue N, red O, yellow S). The cooperativity of the metal insertion can be tuned, either positively or negatively, by the presence of a base or by the interaction with exogenous ligands.

    3. Photochromic Switches

      Photon-Quantitative Reaction of a Dithiazolylarylene in Solution (pages 1565–1568)

      Sayo Fukumoto, Dr. Takuya Nakashima and Prof. Tsuyoshi Kawai

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006844

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ready for action: An excellent quantum yield was observed for a photocoloration reaction of a photochromic molecule based on a triangular terarylene structure. The molecule is brought into a conformation favorable for photocyclization by multiple intramolecular interactions, including CH[BOND]N hydrogen bonding and S[BOND]N and CH[BOND]π interactions (see picture).

    4. Protein Nanoprobes

      Hybrid Ferritin Nanoparticles as Activatable Probes for Tumor Imaging (pages 1569–1572)

      Dr. Xin Lin, Dr. Jin Xie, Lei Zhu, Dr. Seulki Lee, Dr. Gang Niu, Dr. Ying Ma, Dr. Kwangmeyung Kim and Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006757

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rattling the cage: Protein cages are used as a scaffold to build protease-activatable probes. The self-assembly of ferritin cages generates hybrid proteins with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-specific activation (see picture). The formula with the highest activation efficiency is validated as a tumor-specific probe in a xenograft mouse model.

    5. Magnetic Properties

      [Cu(HF2)2(pyrazine)]n: A Rectangular Antiferromagnetic Lattice with a Spin Exchange Path Made Up of Two Different FHF Bridges (pages 1573–1576)

      Prof. Jamie L. Manson, Michelle L. Warter, Dr. John A. Schlueter, Dr. Tom Lancaster, Andrew J. Steele, Prof. Stephen J. Blundell, Dr. Francis L. Pratt, Dr. John Singleton, Dr. Ross D. McDonald, Dr. Changhoon Lee, Prof. Myung-Hwan Whangbo and Alex Plonczak

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006653

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The two-dimensional antiferromagnet [Cu(HF2)2(pyz)]n (pyz=pyrazine) has a rectangular lattice (see picture) displaying two types of FHF bridging modes. The spin exchange through Cu-(FHF)2-Cu is about 90 % stronger than through Cu-pyz-Cu, and the μ1,1-coordinated FHF, which is close in nature to F⋅⋅⋅HF, is largely responsible for the exchange. C black, Cu red, F green, H cyan.

    6. Hydrogels

      Zinc-Triggered Hydrogelation of a Self-Assembling β-Hairpin Peptide (pages 1577–1579)

      Dr. Christopher M. Micklitsch, Patrick J. Knerr, Dr. Monica C. Branco, Dr. Radhika Nagarkar, Dr. Darrin J. Pochan and Dr. Joel P. Schneider

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006652

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zinc-chronized gelling: Selective zinc-triggered hydrogel formation is realized by the self-assembly of a de novo designed peptide (see picture). A non-natural, zinc-binding aminocarboxylate residue is incorporated into the peptide and is used to trigger folding, assembly, and subsequent gelation.

    7. Asymmetric Synthesis

      An Asymmetric Organocatalytic One-Pot Strategy to Octahydroacridines (pages 1580–1583)

      Gustav Dickmeiss, Kim L. Jensen, Dr. Dennis Worgull, Dr. Patrick T. Franke and Prof. Dr. Karl Anker Jørgensen

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006608

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An elegant sequence: An efficient method for the formation of octahydroacridines provides high yields and a high level of stereogenic control, and displays great tolerance towards different aldehydes, anilines, and nucleophiles (see scheme; TMS=trimethylsilyl; EWG=electron-withdrawing group). The use of different nucleophiles verifies an endo transition state in which π–π overlap of the aromatic rings plays an important role in the reactivity and selectivity.

    8. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      On the Surface Chemistry of Iron Oxides in Reactive Gas Atmospheres (pages 1584–1588)

      Emiel de Smit, Matti M. van Schooneveld, Dr. Fabrizio Cinquini, Dr. Hendrik Bluhm, Prof. Dr. Phillippe Sautet, Prof. Dr. Frank M. F. de Groot and Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005282

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      How details come to surface: The surface chemistry of small and large iron oxide crystallites was investigated in CO and H2 by in situ XPS. Small particles reacted more dynamically to the changing experimental conditions than larger ones. Ab initio atomistic thermodynamics helped shed light on the enigmatic iron/carbon chemistry.

    9. Amino Acid Semiconductor

      (Pro2H+)2(TCNQ.−)2⋅TCNQ: An Amino Acid Derived Semiconductor (pages 1589–1592)

      Dr. Xiaohu Qu, Dr. Jinzhen Lu, Dr. Chuan Zhao, Dr. John F. Boas, Dr. Boujemaa Moubaraki, Prof. Keith S. Murray, Dr. Amal Siriwardana, Prof. Alan M. Bond and Prof. Lisandra L. Martin

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005406

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An attractive couple: (Pro2H+)2(TCNQ.−)2⋅TCNQ (TCNQ=tetracyanoquinodimethane) contains an H-bonding network that supports a layered structure, composed of alternating TCNQ anions and proline cations (see picture). The cation is formed by two zwitterionic proline amino acids supported by a proton bridge between the carboxylates, whereas the anionic component involves a neutral TCNQ molecule sandwiched between two TCNQ.−.

    10. Nanostructures

      Superstructures and SERS Properties of Gold Nanocrystals with Different Shapes (pages 1593–1596)

      Zhening Zhu, Dr. Haifeng Meng, Wenjing Liu, Xinfeng Liu, Jianxiao Gong, Prof. Xiaohui Qiu, Prof. Lei Jiang, Prof. Dan Wang and Prof. Zhiyong Tang

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005493

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Keeping in shape: The shapes of gold nanocrystals determine their self-assembly behavior—rhombic dodecahedral nanocrystals form triangular multilayers (see picture), whereas cubic and octahedral nanocrystals form monolayers or multilayers without well-defined contours. The three superstructures exhibit different optical properties, and the rhombic dodecahedral gold nanocrystals display strong anisotropic SERS effects.

    11. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Soluble Prussian Blue Nanoworms from the Assembly of Metal–Organic Block Ionomers (pages 1597–1602)

      Xavier Roy, Joseph K.-H. Hui, Muhammad Rabnawaz, Prof. Guojun Liu and Prof. Mark J. MacLachlan

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005537

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The nanoworm that turned: The self-assembly of a novel charged metal-containing diblock copolymer gives soluble nanoworms, which pack into two-dimensional arrays to form nanopatterned surfaces (see picture; M′,M′′=Fe, Zn, Cu, Co). The propensity of nanostructured metal–organic frameworks to form bulk crystals is thus overcome.

    12. Nanoporous Materials

      Anodization of Gold in Oxalate Solution To Form a Nanoporous Black Film (pages 1603–1607)

      Prof. Dr. Kazuyuki Nishio and Prof. Dr. Hideki Masuda

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005700

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Black gold, but no oil: A nanoporous black gold film was formed by the anodization of gold in oxalate solution. The film had a spongelike porous configuration with a uniform hole size of approximately 20 nm (see picture). The formation mechanism has not yet been clarified, but carbonaceous matter produced by the anodic reaction of oxalate ions likely contributes to the growth of numerous nanopores on the gold anode.

    13. Bioconjugates

      Effects of Neighboring Glycans on Antibody–Carbohydrate Interaction (pages 1608–1612)

      Dr. Chi-Hui Liang, Dr. Sheng-Kai Wang, Chin-Wei Lin, Dr. Cheng-Chi Wang, Prof. Chi-Huey Wong and Prof. Chung-Yi Wu

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003482

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Who can? Glycan! Heterogeneous glycan microarrays were prepared for the study of antibody binding specificity and affinity. It was found that heterogeneous glycans provide better binding affinity compared to their individual components (see picture), thereby suggesting a new strategy for carbohydrate-based vaccine design.

    14. Organocatalysis

      On the Roles of Protic Solvents in Imidazolidinone-Catalyzed Transformations (pages 1613–1616)

      Dr. John B. Brazier, Dr. Kevin M. Jones, Dr. James A. Platts and Dr. Nicholas C. O. Tomkinson

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005892

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Step by step: The effect of protic solvents on the rate and stereochemical outcome of the imidazolidinone-catalyzed Diels–Alder cycloaddition was rationalized. The following picture emerges: the solvent accelerates iminium ion formation (step 1), the Diels–Alder cycloaddition is reversible (step 2), and the solvent intercepts the iminium ion adduct (step 3).

    15. Nanoparticle Assembly

      Silica-Nanoparticle Coatings by Adsorption from Lysine–Silica-Nanoparticle Sols on Inorganic and Biological Surfaces (pages 1617–1621)

      Nicole Atchison, Dr. Wei Fan, Damien D. Brewer, Dr. Manickam A. Arunagirinathan, Prof. Bernhard J. Hering, Prof. Satish Kumar, Prof. Klearchos K. Papas, Prof. Efrosini Kokkoli and Prof. Michael Tsapatsis

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Deposition under control: Silica nanoparticles with finely controllable size and surface charge were synthesized under benign conditions. By adjusting the electrostatic interactions, the silica nanoparticles can be assembled onto inorganic and biological surfaces in a controllable fashion. Potential uses for cell encapsulation are demonstrated.

    16. Self-Seeding Micelles

      Self-Seeding in One Dimension: An Approach To Control the Length of Fiberlike Polyisoprene–Polyferrocenylsilane Block Copolymer Micelles (pages 1622–1625)

      Jieshu Qian, Dr. Gerald Guerin, Yijie Lu, Graeme Cambridge, Prof. Ian Manners and Prof. Mitchell A. Winnik

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006223

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Do it yourself: When short fragments (ca. 50 nm) of rodlike PI-PFS block copolymer micelles in decane are heated above a characteristic temperature (60 °C) and then cooled to room temperature, a smaller number of longer micelles with a narrow length distribution are obtained. This process resembles self-seeding of polymer crystals, involving selective dissolution of the fragments of the lowest degree of crystallinity with the surviving submicroscopic seeds acting as nuclei for the growth of micelles upon cooling.

    17. Photochemistry

      Ruthenium(II) Polyimine Complexes with a Long-Lived 3IL Excited State or a 3MLCT/3IL Equilibrium: Efficient Triplet Sensitizers for Low-Power Upconversion (pages 1626–1629)

      Shaomin Ji, Wanhua Wu, Wenting Wu, Dr. Huimin Guo and Prof. Jianzhang Zhao

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006192

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Up, up, and away! The long-lived 3IL excited states of RuII polyimine complexes were found to be more efficient in sensitizing upconversion based on triplet–triplet annihilation (TTA) and energy transfer (TTET) than the shorter-lived 3MLCT excited states (see picture). Upconversion occurs with an anti-Stokes shift of up to 0.77 eV.

    18. Polyketides

      Divergolides A–D from a Mangrove Endophyte Reveal an Unparalleled Plasticity in ansa-Macrolide Biosynthesis (pages 1630–1634)

      Dr. Ling Ding, Dr. Armin Maier, Prof. Dr. Heinz-Herbert Fiebig, Dr. Helmar Görls, Prof. Dr. Wen-Han Lin, Dr. Gundela Peschel and Prof. Dr. Christian Hertweck

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In-built diversification: Four ansa macrolides, divergolides A–D (14), with intriguing structures were isolated from a bacterial endophyte of the mangrove tree Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. These compounds are generated by a common biogenesis from a linear precursor that undergoes various reactions to give the multicyclic structures. This remarkable plasticity results in metabolites with different antibacterial and cytotoxic properties.

    19. Glycopeptide Vaccines

      Self-Adjuvanting Multicomponent Cancer Vaccine Candidates Combining Per-Glycosylated MUC1 Glycopeptides and the Toll-like Receptor 2 Agonist Pam3CysSer (pages 1635–1639)

      Dr. Brendan L. Wilkinson, Dr. Stephanie Day, Lara R. Malins, Prof. Dr. Vasso Apostolopoulos and Dr. Richard J. Payne

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      More sugar with your “T”: The title candidates comprising per-glycosylated MUC1 peptides, a T-cell helper peptide, and an immunoadjuvant were assembled in high yields using iterative pentafluorophenyl ester-mediated fragment condensations. Following immunological evaluation, a tricomponent vaccine bearing clustered glycosylation with the T-antigen was identified (see structure) which elicited high IgG antibody titers in murine models without an external adjuvant.

    20. Foldamers

      Reversible and Quantitative Denaturation of Amphiphilic Oligo(azobenzene) Foldamers (pages 1640–1643)

      M. Sc. Zhilin Yu and Prof. Dr. Stefan Hecht

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006084

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light-driven spring: Smart photoswitchable foldamers composed entirely of azobenzene repeat units adopt stable helical structures in the dark and can be readily and reversibly unfolded upon UV irradiation as indicated by vanishing circular dichroism signals (see picture). Variation of the oligomer length leads to optimization of the performance of the foldamers and hence quantitative light-induced unfolding and re-folding.

    21. Imaging Agents

      A Smart Polysaccharide/Drug Conjugate for Photodynamic Therapy (pages 1644–1647)

      So Young Park, Hye Jung Baik, Prof. Dr. Young Taik Oh, Prof. Dr. Kyung Taek Oh, Prof. Dr. Yu Seok Youn and Prof. Dr. Eun Seong Lee

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sharper image: A newly developed polysaccharide/drug conjugate (see picture) responds to changes in pH value and was shown to penetrate HeLa tumors in mice as determined by fluorescence imaging. It has the potential to be used in photodynamic therapy, thereby targeting the tumor while having no detrimental effects on the surrounding tissue.

    22. Polymer Vesicles

      Multicompartment Polymersomes from Double Emulsions (pages 1648–1651)

      Dr. Ho Cheung Shum, Yuan-jin Zhao, Dr. Shin-Hyun Kim and Prof. David A. Weitz

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Versatile chambers: A microfluidic technique is used to generate polymersomes with multiple compartments using double emulsions with different morphology as templates (see scheme). The polymersomes could be utilized for encapsulation of multiple substances and as reaction vessels that enable triggered reaction with controlled stoichometry of the reactants.

    23. Radical Ligands

      Hidden Noninnocence: Theoretical and Experimental Evidence for Redox Activity of a β-Diketiminate(1−) Ligand (pages 1652–1655)

      Dr. Marat M. Khusniyarov , Dr. Eckhard Bill, Dr. Thomas Weyhermüller, Dr. Eberhard Bothe and Prof. Dr. Karl Wieghardt

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005953

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      End of innocence: A β-diketiminate(1−) ligand, formerly thought to be innocent, is shown to be redox-active: It can undergo one-electron oxidation to form a neutral π radical stabilized by coordination to a high-spin NiII ion (see scheme). However, since the change in oxidation state of the ligand does not significantly change intraligand bond lengths, its noninnocence is hidden from X-ray crystallography.

    24. Synthetic Ion Channels

      Solid-State Ion Channels for Potentiometric Sensing (pages 1656–1659)

      Gyula Jágerszki, Ágoston Takács, Prof. István Bitter and Prof. Róbert E. Gyurcsányi

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003849

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pretty choosy: The selectivity filters of biological ion channels serve as inspiration for the development of ionophore-modified solid-state nanopores exhibiting extraordinary ion selectivity (see picture). Potentiometric transduction is introduced as a simple means to demonstrate the ion-sensing capability of such nanopores.

    25. Self-Healing Materials

      Repeatable Photoinduced Self-Healing of Covalently Cross-Linked Polymers through Reshuffling of Trithiocarbonate Units (pages 1660–1663)

      Yoshifumi Amamoto, Jun Kamada, Prof. Hideyuki Otsuka, Prof. Atsushi Takahara and Prof. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003888

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Well-healed: Polymers cross-linked with trithiocarbonate (TTC) units were prepared by a RAFT polymerization. The repeatable self-healing systems or macroscopic fusions were accomplished by UV irradiation of the cross-linked polymer in solution and in the bulk state. The macroscopic fusion of completely separated parts was successful (see pictures, BA=n-butyl acrylate).

    26. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Enantioselective Construction of Bridged Multicyclic Skeletons: Intermolecular [2+2+2] Cycloaddition/Intramolecular Diels–Alder Reaction Cascade (pages 1664–1667)

      Masayuki Kobayashi, Takeshi Suda, Prof. Dr. Keiichi Noguchi and Prof. Dr. Ken Tanaka

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004150

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bridging a gap: A cationic rhodium(I)/ligand complex catalyzes the title reaction of alkynes and amide-linked 1,5-dienes, leading to bridged multicyclic compounds, with high chemo-, regio-, and enantioselectivity (see scheme; Bn=benzyl).

    27. Multinuclear Complexes

      Trinucleating Copper: Synthesis and Magnetostructural Characterization of Complexes Supported by a Hexapyridyl 1,3,5-Triarylbenzene Ligand (pages 1668–1672)

      Emily Y. Tsui, Dr. Michael W. Day and Prof. Theodor Agapie

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005232

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Copper threesome: A hexapyridyl ligand based upon a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene framework coordinates three metal centers in a constrained environment (see picture). The tricopper(I) complex reduces dioxygen to form a tricopper(II) cluster. The capping anions affect the magnetism and EPR spectra of these species and reveal a linear dependence between the antiferromagnetic exchange parameter and the Cu-O-Cu angles.

    28. N-Heterocyclic Carbenes

      α,β-Unsaturated Acyl Azoliums from N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalyzed Reactions: Observation and Mechanistic Investigation (pages 1673–1677)

      Jessada Mahatthananchai, Dr. Pinguan Zheng and Prof. Dr. Jeffrey W. Bode

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005352

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Caught in the act: Acyl azoliums have long been thought to be key reactive intermediates in N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis, but they have never been observed under catalytic conditions. Now, this has been successfully achieved by the characterization of α,β-unsaturated acyl azoliums (see scheme) using different spectroscopic techniques. Kinetic studies revealed the origin of their unexpected chemoselectivity in acylation and annulation reactions.

    29. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Lewis Acid Activated Synthesis of Highly Substituted Cyclopentanes by the N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalyzed Addition of Homoenolate Equivalents to Unsaturated Ketoesters (pages 1678–1682)

      Daniel T. Cohen, Dr. Benoit Cardinal-David and Prof. Karl A. Scheidt

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005908

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A great team: Cyclopentanes with four contiguous stereogenic centers were assembled with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity from simple β,γ-unsaturated α-ketoesters and enals in a reaction catalyzed by an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and mediated by a titanium(IV) Lewis acid (see scheme). The presence of a Lewis acid was essential for the desired transformation to occur.

    30. Fiber Supercapacitors

      Fiber Supercapacitors Made of Nanowire-Fiber Hybrid Structures for Wearable/Flexible Energy Storage (pages 1683–1687)

      Dr. Joonho Bae, Min Kyu Song, Dr. Young Jun Park, Dr. Jong Min Kim, Prof. Meilin Liu and Prof. Zhong Lin Wang

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Current clothing trends: A wearable and flexible fiber supercapacitor with a fully encapsulated electrolyte is formed by wrapping a plastic wire covered with ZnO nanowires (NWs; see SEM image) around a Kevlar fiber covered with gold-coated ZnO NWs. This supercapacitor shows promise as a highly efficient, wearable energy storage device.

    31. Synthetic Methods

      Deacylative Allylation of Nitroalkanes: Unsymmetric Bisallylation by a Three-Component Coupling (pages 1688–1691)

      Alexander J. Grenning and Jon A. Tunge

      Version of Record online: 29 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006273

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Use it and lose it! Allylic alcohols were used directly for the synthesis of diallylated nitroalkanes in a three-component coupling based on the strategy of deacylative allylation for the in situ generation of a nucleophile and an allyl electrophile (see scheme).

    32. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Tetrasubstituted Olefins through the Stereoselective Catalytic Intermolecular Conjugate Addition of Simple Alkenes to α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Compounds (pages 1692–1695)

      Ki-Hyeok Kwon, Dr. Do W. Lee and Prof. Dr. Chae S. Yi

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006411

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Branching out: The cationic ruthenium–hydride complex [Ru]+ was found to be a highly effective catalyst precursor for the conjugate addition of unactivated olefins to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds to yield tetrasubstituted olefins. A kinetic analysis provides support for the mechanism involving a regioselective olefin insertion and rapid alkene isomerization steps.

    33. Actinide Magnetochemistry

      Magnetic Memory Effect in a Transuranic Mononuclear Complex (pages 1696–1698)

      Dr. Nicola Magnani, Dr. Christos Apostolidis, Dr. Alfred Morgenstern, Dr. Eric Colineau, Dr. Jean-Christophe Griveau, Dr. Hélène Bolvin , Dr. Olaf Walter and Prof. Roberto Caciuffo

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006619

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Selective memory: Using actinides in designing molecular nanomagnets could provide better performance and higher anisotropy barriers, owing to the peculiar properties of the 5f electron shell. Neptunocene is found to display an open magnetic hysteresis cycle at low temperatures (see picture), and interaction with the hyperfine degrees of freedom determines whether the magnetic relaxation is fast or slow at a given field value.

    34. Energy Storage

      Towards a Further Generation of High-Energy Carbon-Based Capacitors by Using Redox-Active Electrolytes (pages 1699–1701)

      Silvia Roldán, Dr. Clara Blanco, Dr. Marcos Granda, Prof. Rosa Menéndez and Dr. Ricardo Santamaría

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006811

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An active contribution: The specific capacitance of carbon-based supercapacitors can be significantly improved by the addition of an electrochemically active compound (hydroquinone) to the supporting electrolyte. The strong contribution of the redox-active electrolyte to the pseudocapacitance of the system results in the largest capacitance values obtained for an activated carbon-based supercapacitor.

    35. Heterocyclic Synthesis

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Rhodium-Catalyzed Synthesis of 2,3-Disubstituted Indoles from β,β-Disubstituted Stryryl Azides (pages 1702–1706)

      Ke Sun, Sheng Liu, Patryk M. Bec and Prof. Tom G. Driver

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006917

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rings à la carte: Rhodium carboxylate complexes catalyze selective cascade reactions to produce a range 2,3-disubstituted indoles from β,β-disubstituted stryryl azides. The selective migration of aryl groups appears to originate from a putative phenonium ion reactive intermediate (see scheme).

    36. Aminocatalysis

      The Catalytic Asymmetric Knoevenagel Condensation (pages 1707–1710)

      Anna Lee, Dr. Anna Michrowska, Dr. Sarah Sulzer-Mosse and Prof. Dr. Benjamin List

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006319

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      116 years after the discovery of the Knoevenagel condensation, the first catalytic asymmetric variant has been developed. Dynamic kinetic resolution in the reaction of α-branched aldehydes with malonates in the presence of a newly designed and readily available modified cinchona amine catalyst gives the corresponding alkylidene malonates in high enantioselectivity (see scheme).

    37. Bioinorganic Chemistry

      An Oxocobalt(IV) Complex Stabilized by Lewis Acid Interactions with Scandium(III) Ions (pages 1711–1715)

      Florian Felix Pfaff, Subrata Kundu, Marcel Risch, Dr. Shanthi Pandian, Florian Heims, Dr. Iweta Pryjomska-Ray, Peter Haack, Ramona Metzinger, Dr. Eckhard Bill, Prof. Dr. Holger Dau, Prof. Dr. Peter Comba and Dr. Kallol Ray

      Version of Record online: 29 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005869

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An elusiveS=3/2 oxocobalt(IV) complex is stabilized by a Lewis acid interaction with a scandium(III) ion. The {CoIV-O-Sc}3+ unit, characterized by spectroscopic and DFT methods, is a stronger electron-transfer and H-atom abstraction agent but weaker oxo-transfer agent than the corresponding {FeIV[DOUBLE BOND]O} complex (see scheme; L=tris[2-(N-tetramethylguanidyl)ethyl]amine).

    38. Gas-Phase MgO Clusters

      Structural Diversity and Flexibility of MgO Gas-Phase Clusters (pages 1716–1719)

      Karolina Kwapien, Dr. Marek Sierka, Dr. Jens Döbler, Prof. Dr. Joachim Sauer, Marko Haertelt, Dr. André Fielicke and Prof. Dr. Gerard Meijer

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004617

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Working out the gas charge: Only one structure type is known for bulk MgO. In contrast, quantum chemical calculations combined with infrared multiple photon dissociation experiments demonstrate that neutral and cationic gas-phase clusters of MgO display unusual structural diversity and flexibility (see picture).

    39. Diazirinone

      Elusive Diazirinone, N2CO (pages 1720–1723)

      Dr. Xiaoqing Zeng, Dr. Helmut Beckers, Prof. Dr. Helge Willner and Prof. John F. Stanton

      Version of Record online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006745

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a flash: Diazirinone, N2CO, a mixed dimer of the two most strongly bonded diatomic molecules N2 and CO, has been prepared by low-pressure pyrolysis of carbonyl diazide, OC(N3)2, and trapped at 77 K as a yellow solid. It was characterized by IR (gas-phase and matrix-isolation) spectroscopy, and its structure, which retains the N[BOND]N and C[BOND]O bonds, was unambiguously confirmed by the vibrational pattern of the two distinct 15N isotopologues.

  11. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
  12. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Minireview
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    12. Preview
    13. Back Cover
    1. Back Cover: [Cu(HF2)2(pyrazine)]n: A Rectangular Antiferromagnetic Lattice with a Spin Exchange Path Made Up of Two Different FHF Bridges (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2011) (page 1726)

      Prof. Jamie L. Manson, Michelle L. Warter, Dr. John A. Schlueter, Dr. Tom Lancaster, Andrew J. Steele, Prof. Stephen J. Blundell, Dr. Francis L. Pratt, Dr. John Singleton, Dr. Ross D. McDonald, Dr. Changhoon Lee, Prof. Myung-Hwan Whangbo and Alex Plonczak

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000461

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two types of HF2bridges are found in the rectangular polymeric network formed from CuII, FHF, and pyrazine (pyz). The resulting linear Cu-(FHF)2-Cu chains are linked into 2D sheets by pyz units. The FHF coordination in the Cu-(FHF)2-Cu chains mimics motifs found in transition metal/azide systems. In their Communication on page 1573 ff. J. L. Manson et al. also show that stronger spin exchange occurs along the HF2 bridges than the Cu-pyz-Cu bridges.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION