Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 8

February 18, 2011

Volume 50, Issue 8

Pages 1727–1946

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Cover Picture: Soft Robotics for Chemists (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2011) (page 1727)

      Dr. Filip Ilievski, Dr. Aaron D. Mazzeo, Dr. Robert F. Shepherd, Dr. Xin Chen and Prof. George M. Whitesides

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000255

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The starfish-like … … gripping device shown uses pneumatic networks embedded in an elastomeric structure to be capable of picking up a live, anesthetized mouse without harming it. In their Communication on page 1890 ff., G. M. Whitesides et. al. describe the pneumatic actuation of elastomeric (soft) structures of the type used in this sort of device, and in soft robots, which have the potential to be uniquely useful in handling fragile objects (for example, the mouse, or an uncooked egg).

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Inside Cover: MoS2 Hybrid Nanostructures: From Octahedral to Quasi-Spherical Shells within Individual Nanoparticles (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2011) (page 1728)

      Dr. Ana Albu-Yaron, Prof. Dr. Moshe Levy, Prof. Dr. Reshef Tenne, Dr. Ronit Popovitz-Biro, Marc Weidenbach, Dr. Maya Bar-Sadan, Dr. Lothar Houben, Dr. Andrey N. Enyashin, Prof. Dr. Gotthard Seifert, Prof. Dr. Daniel Feuermann, Dr. Eugene A. Katz and Prof. Dr. Jeffrey M. Gordon

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000295

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A solar furnace that produces temperatures as high as 2500 °C is used to generate new hybrid fullerene-like nanostructures of MoS2. As J. M. Gordon, R. Tenne, and co-workers describe in their Communication on page 1810 ff., these particles are comprised of a nanoscale octahedral core with a smooth transition to quasi-spherical outer shells, and their structures were confirmed by modeling studies.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Didier Astruc (pages 1750–1752)

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “My favorite subjects at school were history and mathematics. When I was eighteen I wanted to be Professor in a scientific field. …” This and more about Didier Astruc can be found on page 1750.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Molecular Encapsulation. Organic Reactions in Constrained Systems. Edited by Udo H. Brinker and Jean-Luc Miesset. (page 1754)

      Kari Rissanen

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100485

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2010. 520 pp., hardcover € 132.00.—ISBN 978-0470998076

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Teranthene

      Towards Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with a Singlet Open-Shell Ground State (pages 1756–1758)

      Prof. Dr. Christoph Lambert

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006705

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Teranthene—a molecular section of graphene: The surprising stability of teranthene at ambient conditions allowed its characterization, which pointed toward a high biradical contribution in the singlet ground state (see scheme). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with high singlet biradical character show high third-order nonlinear optical properties, which makes them interesting candidates for (opto)electronic devices.

    2. Cascade Reactions

      Merging Metal and N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalysis: On the Way to Discovering Enantioselective Organic Transformations (pages 1759–1761)

      Dr. Nitin T. Patil

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006866

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A co-op: Recent examples on cooperative catalysis, involving metals (M) and N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs), delivered products with high enantioselectivity (see scheme). Such products are not possible to obtain by using either of the catalysts individually.

  9. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Molecular Recognition

      Allosteric, Chelate, and Interannular Cooperativity: A Mise au Point (pages 1762–1768)

      Prof. Gianfranco Ercolani and Dr. Luca Schiaffino

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004201

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vive la différence: The distinction between different types of cooperativity is essential for understanding the fundamentals involved. The three title cooperative effects arise from the interplay of intermolecular binding interactions, the presence of one or more intramolecular binding interactions, and, in the latter case, their possible interplay. A master equation for the stability of an assembly is outlined that takes into account all of the three possible types of cooperativity.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Carbohydrate Antigens

      The Tn Antigen—Structural Simplicity and Biological Complexity (pages 1770–1791)

      Tongzhong Ju, Vivianne I. Otto and Dr. Richard D. Cummings

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201002313

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An abnormal sugar: The expression of the abnormal O-glycan called Tn antigen (see structure) in animal glycoproteins typically represents a disease condition. This Review discusses a broad range of chemical and biological studies on the Tn antigen that could lead to new diagnostics and therapeutics.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Fuel Cells

      Electric Power and Synthesis Gas Co-generation From Methane with Zero Waste Gas Emission (pages 1792–1797)

      Prof. Zongping Shao, Chunming Zhang, Wei Wang, Chao Su, Dr. Wei Zhou, Prof. Zhonghua Zhu, Dr. Hee Jung Park and Dr. Chan Kwak

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006855

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A harmonic generator: Co-generation of electric power and synthesis gas from methane is achieved using a single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell (see picture; SDC=samarium-doped ceria, YSZ=yttrium-stabilized zirconia). The process utilizes methane completely with zero greenhouse gas emissions.

    2. Imaging Agents

      YbIII-HPDO3A: A Dual pH- and Temperature-Responsive CEST Agent (pages 1798–1800)

      Dr. Daniela Delli Castelli, Prof. Enzo Terreno and Prof. Silvio Aime

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007105

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multiple response: YbIII-HPDO3A has been used for the development of a magnetic resonance imaging method that is able to assess pH value and temperature simultaneously, irrespective of the concentration of the complex (see graph). This contrast agent has potential in a clinical setting as it shows the same stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic properties as GdIII-HPDO3A, which is already used in clinical practices under the trade name of ProHance.

    3. Glycan Arrays

      MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Enzyme Activity and Lectin Trapping on an Array of N-Glycans (pages 1801–1804)

      Dr. Antonio Sanchez-Ruiz, Dr. Sonia Serna, Dr. Nerea Ruiz, Prof. Dr. Manuel Martin-Lomas and Dr. Niels-Christian Reichardt

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006304

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Active arrays: Complex lipid-tagged oligosaccharides, including large multiantennary species, can be efficiently immobilized on self-assembled monolayers of alkyl mercaptans (see picture). These arrays can be used to follow the action of a galactosyltransferase (GalT) and a hydrolase. The utility of the system for the selective trapping and identification of a lectin from a complex mixture was also demonstrated.

    4. Molecular Machines

      Dual Stimulus Switching of a [2]Catenane in Water (pages 1805–1809)

      Lei Fang, Cheng Wang, Albert C. Fahrenbach, Ali Trabolsi, Dr. Youssry Y. Botros and Prof.  J. Fraser Stoddart

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006362

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The controllable mechanical movement of either the polyether macrocycle or the tetracationic cyclophane in a doubly bistable water-soluble [2]catenane can be accomplished by using orthogonal external stimuli—redox and amine/acid, respectively—in aqueous media (see picture).

    5. Inorganic Fullerenes

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      MoS2 Hybrid Nanostructures: From Octahedral to Quasi-Spherical Shells within Individual Nanoparticles (pages 1810–1814)

      Dr. Ana Albu-Yaron, Prof. Dr. Moshe Levy, Prof. Dr. Reshef Tenne, Dr. Ronit Popovitz-Biro, Marc Weidenbach, Dr. Maya Bar-Sadan, Dr. Lothar Houben, Dr. Andrey N. Enyashin, Prof. Dr. Gotthard Seifert, Prof. Dr. Daniel Feuermann, Dr. Eugene A. Katz and Prof. Dr. Jeffrey M. Gordon

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006719

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Seamless transition: New hybrid fullerene-like nanostructures of MoS2 are comprised of a nanoscale octahedral core with a smooth transition to quasi-spherical outer shells (see picture). The particles were generated by ultra-high irradiance solar ablation and their structures confirmed by modeling studies.

    6. Photovoltaics

      Flexible, Light-Weight, Ultrastrong, and Semiconductive Carbon Nanotube Fibers for a Highly Efficient Solar Cell (pages 1815–1819)

      Tao Chen, Shutao Wang, Zhibin Yang, Quanyou Feng, Xuemei Sun, Dr. Li Li, Prof. Zhong-Sheng Wang and Prof. Huisheng Peng

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003870

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tubes for sunlight: Solar cells with high short-circuit photocurrent, incident monochromatic photon-to-electron conversion efficiency, and power conversion efficiency have been made from flexible, light-weight, ultrastrong, and semiconductive nanotube fibers (see picture). The alignment of the nanotubes in the fiber is crucial for the excellent charge separation and charge transport properties observed.

    7. Energy Transfer in DNA

      Triplet–Triplet Energy Transfer in DNA: A Process that Occurs on the Nanosecond Timescale (pages 1820–1822)

      Dr. Carles Curutchet and Prof. Dr. Alexander A. Voityuk

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004732

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No will to wander: Triplet–triplet electronic energy transfer in polyA–polyT DNA sequences was studied by using semiempirical quantum-chemical methods coupled to classical molecular-dynamics simulations. Triplet excited states in DNA were found to be almost completely localized on single nucleobases; the characteristic time for their migration along the A–A and T–T stacks (see picture) was found to be 0.8 and 6.4 ns.

    8. Small-Molecule Binders

      Powerful Protein Binders from Designed Polypeptides and Small Organic Molecules—A General Concept for Protein Recognition (pages 1823–1827)

      Dr. Lotta T. Tegler, Dr. Guillaume Nonglaton, Dr. Frank Büttner, Prof. Karin Caldwell, Tony Christopeit, Prof. U. Helena Danielson, Dr. Karin Fromell, Dr. Thomas Gossas, Prof. Anders Larsson, Dr. Paola Longati, Prof. Thomas Norberg, Prof. Ramesh Ramapanicker, Dr. Johan Rydberg and Prof. Lars Baltzer

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005059

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-affinity binders for the C-reactive protein (CRP), with dissociation constants in the pM to nM range and selectivities in human serum comparable to those of antibodies, were obtained by conjugation of 16 designed polypeptides to phosphocholine, a small molecule that binds CRP with a KD value of 5 μM (see picture). The polypeptides were not designed specifically to recognize CRP and bind by an adapted fit mechanism.

    9. Bioanalytical Sensors

      Periplasmic Binding Proteins as Optical Modulators of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Fluorescence: Amplifying a Nanoscale Actuator (pages 1828–1831)

      Prof. Hyeonseok Yoon, Dr. Jin-Ho Ahn, Dr. Paul W. Barone, Dr. Kyungsuk Yum, Richa Sharma, Ardemis A. Boghossian, Dr. Jae-Hee Han and Prof. Michael S. Strano

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Glucose sensor: Glucose-binding protein (GBP) covalently conjugated to a fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is shown to act as an optical switch. Hinge-bending response to glucose causes a reversible exciton quenching of the SWNT fluorescence with high selectivity (see scheme).

    10. Molecular Dynamics

      Use of Metadynamics in the Design of isoDGR-Based αvβ3 Antagonists To Fine-Tune the Conformational Ensemble (pages 1832–1836)

      Dr. Andrea Spitaleri, Dr. Michela Ghitti, Dr. Silvia Mari, Luca Alberici, Dr. Catia Traversari, Dr. Gian-Paolo Rizzardi and Dr. Giovanna Musco

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A pretty pair: Metadynamics/docking proved itself as an innovative technique combination to improve the rational design of diagnostic and therapeutic agents based on the isoDGR motif (see picture; FES=free-energy surface). The coupling of these techniques might be exploited for other ligand–receptor systems following the identification of appropriate collective variables for the characterization of ligand conformational ensembles.

    11. Colorimetric Visualization

      Sensitive and Selective Colorimetric Visualization of Cerebral Dopamine Based on Double Molecular Recognition (pages 1837–1840)

      Biao Kong, Anwei Zhu, Yongping Luo, Prof. Yang Tian, Yanyan Yu and Dr. Guoyue Shi

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Seeing is believing: A direct, selective, and sensitive strategy for colorimetric visualization of cerebral dopamine has been developed for the first time using gold nanoparticles through the design of double molecular recognition (see picture). The simplicity of this method establishes a facile and reliable approach for monitoring cerebral species in brain chemistry, which may be related to physiological and pathological events.

    12. Biomimetic Switches

      Switching through Coordination-Coupled Proton Transfer (pages 1841–1844)

      Xin Su, Thomas F. Robbins and Prof. Dr. Ivan Aprahamian

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006982

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hold the protons! A hydrazone-based rotary switch underwent E/Z isomerization upon treatment with Zn2+ (see picture) through coordination-coupled proton transfer by a mechanism inspired by biological processes that take place in the reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria and in cation-diffusion facilitators. The process is fully reversible, as the initial E configuration can be reinstated by treatment of the zinc complex with cyanide.

    13. Anion Recognition

      A Bidentate Halogen-Bonding Bromoimidazoliophane Receptor for Bromide Ion Recognition in Aqueous Media (pages 1845–1848)

      Dr. Antonio Caballero, Nicholas G. White and Prof. Paul D. Beer

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006916

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bidentate halogen-bonding bromoimidazoliophane receptor selectively binds bromide ions in competitive aqueous media (see picture, gray=carbon, blue=nitrogen, brown=bromine). The bromide ions are bound by cooperative convergent bromine atom/halogen-bonding halide anion interactions.

    14. Metal–Organic Composites

      Cooperative Assembly of Three-Ring-Based Zeolite-Type Metal–Organic Frameworks and Johnson-Type Dodecahedra (pages 1849–1852)

      Dr. Shou-Tian Zheng, Fan Zuo, Tao Wu, Burcin Irfanoglu, Chengtsung Chou, Ruben A. Nieto, Prof. Dr. Pingyun Feng and Prof. Dr. Xianhui Bu

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006882

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two birds with one stone: Cooperative assembly of four-connected indium nodes with two symmetry-complementary ligands leads to both three-ring-based zeolite-type metal–organic frameworks (NPO-type) and the Johnson-type metal–organic polyhedra shown in the picture (gray C, green In, blue N, red O). The NPO-zeolite compounds behave as semiconductors and exhibit photocatalytic activity for the generation of dihydrogen from water under ultraviolet irradiation.

    15. Methanol Activation

      Evidence for a “Carbene-like” Intermediate during the Reaction of Methoxy Species with Light Alkenes on H-ZSM-5 (pages 1853–1856)

      Hiroshi Yamazaki, Hisashi Shima, Hiroyuki Imai, Toshiyuki Yokoi, Takashi Tatsumi and Junko N. Kondo

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007178

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Secrets revealed: IR spectroscopy shows that the recovered acidic hydroxy groups after the reaction of [D3]methoxy groups with light alkenes on zeolites are all deuterated (see scheme). The results indicate that the reaction occurs through methylene rather than methyl units.

    16. Rare-Earth Polyhydrides

      Rare-Earth Polyhydride Complexes Bearing Bis(phosphinophenyl)amido Pincer Ligands (pages 1857–1860)

      Dr. Jianhua Cheng, Dr. Takanori Shima and Prof. Dr. Zhaomin Hou

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006812

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      PNP downsizes hydride: Hydrogenolysis of dialkyl precursors results in trinuclear hexahydride complexes A (Me-PNPiPr= {4-Me-2-(iPr2P)-C6H3}2N). Treatment with [NEt3H][BPh4] gives the first cationic trinuclear polyhydrides B. Cationic binuclear trihydride complexes C (only the central structural units are shown in the picture; C black, H blue, O red, Y green) have also been obtained for the first time.

    17. Asymmetric Synthesis

      The Direct Asymmetric Vinylogous Aldol Reaction of Furanones with α-Ketoesters: Access to Chiral γ-Butenolides and Glycerol Derivatives (pages 1861–1864)

      Jie Luo, Haifei Wang, Xiao Han, Prof. Dr. Li-Wen Xu, Jacek Kwiatkowski, Prof. Dr. Kuo-Wei Huang and Prof. Dr. Yixin Lu

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006316

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Twice as good: The title reaction using the tryptophan-derived bifunctional organic catalyst 1 has been developed. The reported method led to the synthesis of chiral γ-substituted butenolides in excellent yields, with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Facile synthesis of chiral glycerol derivatives containing a tertiary hydroxy group has also been demonstrated.

    18. Asymmetric Hydroamination

      A Highly Enantioselective Zirconium Catalyst for Intramolecular Alkene Hydroamination: Significant Isotope Effects on Rate and Stereoselectivity (pages 1865–1868)

      Kuntal Manna, Songchen Xu and Prof. Aaron D. Sadow

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zirconium catalysts sparkle: A new chiral zirconium complex has been used to catalyze hydroamination reactions to cyclize aminopentenes into 2-methylpyrrolidines (see scheme). The rate law supports a mechanism involving a reversible substrate–catalyst interaction that precedes the rate-determining step. A new mechanism for zirconium-catalyzed hydroamination has been proposed based on kinetic isotope effects and the significant effect of isotopic substitution on enantioselectivity.

    19. C[BOND]H Carbonylation

      Atom-Economical Synthesis of Unsymmetrical Ketones through Photocatalyzed C[BOND]H Activation of Alkanes and Coupling with CO and Electrophilic Alkenes (pages 1869–1872)

      Prof. Ilhyong Ryu, Akihiro Tani, Dr. Takahide Fukuyama, Davide Ravelli, Prof. Maurizio Fagnoni and Prof. Angelo Albini

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004854

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A three-component coupling between alkanes, CO, and electron-deficient alkenes in the presence of a catalytic amount of (nBu4N)4W10O32 (TBADT) has resulted in the efficient formation of unsymmetrical ketones. This process is based on the carbonylation of alkyl radicals photocatalytically generated by C[BOND]H activation of alkanes and the subsequent addition to alkenes (see scheme; EWG=electron-withdrawing group).

    20. Cobalt Complexes

      Preparation of a Dihydrogen Complex of Cobalt (pages 1873–1876)

      Dr. Travis J. Hebden, Anthony J. St. John, Prof. Dmitry G. Gusev, Dr. Werner Kaminsky, Prof. Karen I. Goldberg and Prof.  D. Michael Heinekey

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      H2& Co.: A new pincer complex of CoII has been synthesized. Reduction of this complex in the absence of additional ligands results in the formation of a highly reactive mercury-bridged dicobalt species (1). Subsequent introduction of H2 at low temperature allows the observation of a rare dihydrogen complex of Co (2). Co blue, P yellow, O red, Hg dark gray.

    21. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Identification of a Valuable Kinetic Process in Copper-Catalyzed Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation (pages 1877–1881)

      Jean-Baptiste Langlois and Prof. Dr. Alexandre Alexakis

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005373

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Copper bottomed: The application of a previously described process of dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation to acyclic substrates allowed the identification of a relevant kinetic process in the title reaction (see scheme; CuTC= copper(I) thiophencarboxylate, Naphth= naphthyl). The optimization of the reaction conditions and generality of the method, as well as mechanistic considerations are disclosed.

    22. C[BOND]O Activation

      Insertion of an Alkene into an Ester: Intramolecular Oxyacylation Reaction of Alkenes through Acyl C[BOND]O Bond Activation (pages 1882–1884)

      Giang T. Hoang, Venkata Jaganmohan Reddy, Huy H. K. Nguyen and Prof. Christopher J. Douglas

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005767

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Atom economy and esters: compatible now! The first catalytic insertion of a C[DOUBLE BOND]C bond into an acyl C[BOND]O bond was achieved using rhodium catalysts (see scheme). The products are β-alkoxy ketones with a fully substituted carbon center. Quinoline chelating groups were employed to stabilize the Rh-alkoxide intermediate.

    23. C[BOND]O Bond Formation

      Inherent Oxygen Preference in Enolate Monofluoromethylation and a Synthetic Entry to Monofluoromethyl Ethers (pages 1885–1889)

      Yoshinori Nomura, Etsuko Tokunaga and Prof. Norio Shibata

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006218

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Expect the unexpected: The self-stable salts 1, X=OTf, PF6, x=2, y=1, developed for electrophilic monofluoromethylation showed inherent selectivity for the O-alkylation of enolates, thus providing access to monofluoromethyl ethers, which are difficult to obtain by the direct electrophilic fluoromethylation of alcohols. Salt 1, X=BF4, x=0, y=3, in contrast leads to C-alkylated products.

    24. Chemical Robotics

      Soft Robotics for Chemists (pages 1890–1895)

      Dr. Filip Ilievski, Dr. Aaron D. Mazzeo, Dr. Robert F. Shepherd, Dr. Xin Chen and Prof. George M. Whitesides

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006464

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Soft robots: A methodology based on embedded pneumatic networks (PneuNets) is described that enables large-amplitude actuations in soft elastomers by pressurizing embedded channels. Examples include a structure that can change its curvature from convex to concave, and devices that act as compliant grippers for handling fragile objects (e.g., a chicken egg).

    25. Synthetic Methods

      Copper-Mediated Trifluoromethylation of Heteroaromatic Compounds by Trifluoromethyl Sulfonium Salts (pages 1896–1900)

      Cheng-Pan Zhang, Zong-Ling Wang, Prof. Dr. Qing-Yun Chen, Chun-Tao Zhang, Dr. Yu-Cheng Gu and Prof. Dr. Ji-Chang Xiao

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006823

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Copper is king! A convenient method for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated heteroaromatic compounds under mild conditions has been developed based on the observation that 1 can be reduced by certain metals (see scheme). Substrate 1 is assumed to be reduced by copper via a single-electron transfer mechanism, and CuCF3 is the most probable intermediate in this reaction. DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide, Tf=triflate.

    26. Biomolecular Synthesis

      Access to Biomolecular Assemblies through One-Pot Triple Orthogonal Chemoselective Ligations (pages 1901–1904)

      Mathieu Galibert, Dr. Olivier Renaudet, Prof. Dr. Pascal Dumy and Dr. Didier Boturyn

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006867

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three into one will go: The consecutive combination of three orthogonal chemoselective reactions (oxime ligation, thioether addition, and copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne–azide cycloaddition (CuAAC)) in a sequential one-pot approach allows the syntheses of highly sophisticated biomolecular compounds without intervening isolations and protection schemes (see picture; ODN=oligodeoxynucleotide).

    27. Supramolecular Polymers

      A Dual-Responsive Supramolecular Polymer Gel Formed by Crown Ether Based Molecular Recognition (pages 1905–1909)

      Shengyi Dong, Yan Luo, Xuzhou Yan, Bo Zheng, Xia Ding, Prof. Dr. Yihua Yu, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Zhi Ma, Qiaoling Zhao and Prof. Dr. Feihe Huang

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006999

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A host–guest recognition motif based on a crown ether moiety was employed to construct a supramolecular polymer gel from a low molecular weight A–B monomer. Reversible thermo- and pH-induced gel–sol transitions of the dual-responsive gel are demonstrated for the controlled release of rhodamine B.

    28. Organocatalysis

      A Highly Regio- and Stereoselective Cascade Annulation of Enals and Benzodi(enone)s Catalyzed by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes (pages 1910–1913)

      Dr. Xinqiang Fang, Kun Jiang, Chong Xing, Lin Hao and Prof. Dr. Yonggui Robin Chi

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201007144

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three stereogenic centers in a row: The unconventional activation of enal compounds mediated by an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) has generated three consecutive reactive carbon centers that undergo highly regio- and stereoselective annulations with di(enone)s to generate benzotricyclic products containing multiple stereogenic centers (see scheme).

    29. Metalation of Alkenes

      Selective Magnesiation or Zincation of Highly Functionalized Alkenes and Cycloalkenes Using 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidyl Bases (pages 1914–1917)

      MSc. Tomke Bresser and Prof. Dr. Paul Knochel

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006641

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Smooth and mild: Mg or Zn TMP bases (TMP=2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidyl) allow the smooth metalation of various types of polyfunctional unsaturated substrates. Several sensitive functional groups such as ester, nitro, or trifluoromethylcarbonyl groups are tolerated. The new Zn or Mg intermediates undergo acylation, allylation, or cross-coupling reactions in satisfactory yields.

    30. Catalyst Recycling

      Suzuki Coupling Reactions in Three-Phase Microemulsions (pages 1918–1921)

      Henriette Nowothnick, Jochanan Blum and Prof. Dr. Reinhard Schomäcker

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005263

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The reaction medium in the Suzuki coupling shown is a three-phase surfactant system. This medium offers advantages over conventional solvents in the reaction conversion and also in catalyst recovery. The reuse of the catalyst substantially increases the overall turnover number of the catalyst, a desirable factor in cost-effective industrial applications. TPPTS=3,3′,3′′-phosphanetriyltris(benzenesulfonic acid) trisodium salt.

    31. Targeted PET Imaging

      Synthesis and In Vivo Imaging of a 18F-Labeled PARP1 Inhibitor Using a Chemically Orthogonal Scavenger-Assisted High-Performance Method (pages 1922–1925)

      Dr. Thomas Reiner, Dr. Edmund J. Keliher, Dr. Sarah Earley, Brett Marinelli and Prof. Ralph Weissleder

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006579

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pedal to the metal: The catalyst-free Diels–Alder cycloaddition of trans-cyclooctene and tetrazine was used to quickly and selectively generate an 18F-labeled AZD2281 derivative from a tetrazine-linked precursor. The probe was tested in biological assays, and its targeted accumulation was confirmed in vivo. This protocol allows the parallel synthesis of a library of potential PET imaging agents in a short time, thus increasing the efficiency of lead compound development.

    32. Electron Transfer

      Electron Transfer in Peptides: The Influence of Charged Amino Acids (pages 1926–1930)

      Dr. Jian Gao, Dr. Pavel Müller, Dr. Min Wang, Dr. Sonja Eckhardt, Dr. Miriam Lauz, Prof. Dr. Katharina M. Fromm and Prof. Dr. Bernd Giese

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201003389

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Charging off: The ammonium group in the peptide shown leads to a tenfold increase of the electron-transfer rate compared to that in a fully protected system. This is explained by Coulomb's law and the Marcus theory.

    33. Hybridization Probes

      Fluorescence Imaging of Influenza H1N1 mRNA in Living Infected Cells Using Single-Chromophore FIT-PNA (pages 1931–1934)

      Susann Kummer, Dr. Andrea Knoll, Dr. Elke Socher, Lucas Bethge, Prof. Dr. Andreas Herrmann and Prof. Dr. Oliver Seitz

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005902

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A message from the virus was detected by a peptide nucleic acid probe that contains thiazole orange as a fluorescent base surrogate (see picture). The high specificity and biostability of the probes lead to significant improvements to the signal-to-background ratio in imaging the mRNA from the influenza H1N1 virus in living infected cells.

    34. Base Pairing

      A Parallel Screen for the Discovery of Novel DNA Base Pairs (pages 1935–1938)

      Oezlem Yaren, Dr. Markus Mosimann and Prof. Christian J. Leumann

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201005300

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Speed dating: A combinatorial assay was developed for screening a library of aromatic heterocyclic amines for their propensity to act as a complementary base Z in a DNA duplex. This assay may prove useful in speeding up the process of base-pair discovery for potential applications in biotechnology and synthetic biology.

    35. IR Spectroscopy

      Spectroscopic Observation of Matrix-Isolated Carbonic Acid Trapped from the Gas Phase (pages 1939–1943)

      Jürgen Bernard, Markus Seidl, Dr. Ingrid Kohl, Prof. Dr. Klaus R. Liedl, Prof. Dr. Erwin Mayer, Dr. Óscar Gálvez, Prof. Dr. Hinrich Grothe and Prof. Dr. Thomas Loerting

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201004729

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Against all odds: Carbonic acid molecules were trapped from the gas phase in a solid noble-gas matrix at <10 K and studied by IR spectroscopy. The 2H and and 13C isotopologues were also examined. Gas-phase carbonic acid is thought to exist as a 1:10:1 mixture of two monomeric conformers and the cyclic dimer (H2CO3)2. This data is vital in the search for gas-phase carbonic acid in astrophysical environments.

  12. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 9/2011 (page 1945)

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201190013

  13. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    13. Preview
    14. Back Cover
    1. Back Cover: Spectroscopic Observation of Matrix-Isolated Carbonic Acid Trapped from the Gas Phase (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2011) (page 1946)

      Jürgen Bernard, Markus Seidl, Dr. Ingrid Kohl, Prof. Dr. Klaus R. Liedl, Prof. Dr. Erwin Mayer, Dr. Óscar Gálvez, Prof. Dr. Hinrich Grothe and Prof. Dr. Thomas Loerting

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201008066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The tail of comets such as Hale-Bopp may contain gas-phase carbonic acid. In their Communication on page 1939 ff., Grothe, Loerting, and co-workers report the IR spectra of carbonic acid molecules trapped from the gas phase, information critical in identifying this compound in astrophysical environments. The comet image was provided by E. Kolmhofer and H. Raab, Johannes-Kepler-Observatory, Linz (Austria).

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION