Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Angewandte Chemie International Edition

March 5, 2012

Volume 51, Issue 10

Pages 2255–2511

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Toward Wearable Sensors: Fluorescent Attoreactor Mats as Optically Encoded Cross-Reactive Sensor Arrays (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2012) (page 2255)

      Pavel Anzenbacher Jr., Fengyu Li and Manuel A. Palacios

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200099

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorescent probes have been synthesized on a zeptomole (10-21 mol) scale by overlaying polymer nanofibers that are doped with nonfluorescent probe precursors. In their Communication on page 2345 ff., P. Anzenbacher, Jr. et al. show that the nanoscopic fiber junctions generate the fluorescent probes in situ, and that multiple fibers, each loaded with a different reagent, can be used to form a multiprobe sensor array that is capable of recognizing heavy-metal ions.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Programmed Dynamic Topologies in DNA Catenanes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2012) (page 2256)

      Johann Elbaz, Dr. Zhen-Gang Wang, Dr. Fuan Wang and Prof. Itamar Willner

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201109053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two-ring and three-ring DNA catenane systems undergo programmed and reversible dynamic transitions between predesigned topologies by a strand-displacement mechanism. In their Communication on page 2349 ff., I. Willner and co-workers outline how the catenated DNA nanostructures hold great promise as nanomachines for the dynamic, programmed transport and arrangement of cargoes at the nanoscale.

  3. Inside Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Inside Back Cover: An Autonomous and Controllable Light-Driven DNA Walking Device (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2012) (page 2511)

      Mingxu You, Dr. Yan Chen, Prof. Dr. Xiaobing Zhang, Dr. Haipeng Liu, Dr. Ruowen Wang, Dr. Kelong Wang, Dr. Kathryn R. Williams and Prof. Dr. Weihong Tan

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108871

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanorobot is able to perform autonomous locomotion and control the initiation, termination, and velocity by light. In their Communication on page 2457 ff., X. Zhang, W. Tan, and co-workers report the design of a DNA walking device by incorporating photosensitive moieties within DNA enzyme analogue structures. Based on the phenomenon of pyrene-assisted photolysis of disulfide bonds, this nanorobot shows the operational freedom and mechanical speed reminiscent of protein motors.

  4. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Controlling the Nucleation and Growth of Silver on Palladium Nanocubes by Manipulating the Reaction Kinetics (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2012) (page 2512)

      Dr. Jie Zeng, Cun Zhu, Dr. Jing Tao, Mingshang Jin, Dr. Hui Zhang, Dr. Zhi-Yuan Li, Dr. Yimei Zhu and Prof. Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108842

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Feeding your face In their Communication on page 2354 ff., Y. Xia and co-workers show that it is possible to shape-selectively grow bimetallic palladium–silver nanocrystals. By limiting the supply of silver atoms (red) nucleation and growth occurs on only one, or a few, of the six equivalent faces of a cubic palladium seed, as represented by the presence of hungry and feeding frogs.

  5. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2012 (pages 2259–2272)

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201290016

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
  7. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Uwe Rosenthal (page 2280)

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108213

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      My motto is “We are condemned to hope!” (Manès Sperber). When I was eighteen I wanted to be a chemist, mathematician, or aircraft designer. …” This and more about Uwe Rosenthal can be found on page 2280.

  8. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Molecular Switches. Second Edition. Edited by Ben L. Feringa and Wesley R. Browne. (page 2281)

      Hermann A. Wegner

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108931

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2011. 2 Volumes, 792 pp., hardcover, € 249.00.—ISBN 978-3527313655

  9. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Fluorescent Probes

      Fluorescent Probes for the Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Biological Systems (pages 2282–2284)

      Weimin Xuan, Prof. Dr. Chunquan Sheng, Yanting Cao, Wenhan He and Prof. Dr. Wei Wang

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Detective work: Three highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probes for the detection of H2S have been developed. Two of the probes detect H2S by the reduction of an azide moiety to an amine group, which changes the probes into their fluorescent forms and generates a fluorescent signal. In the third method, the fluorescent signal is created by using H2S as a nucleophile in a reaction that unmasks fluorescein.

    2. Light-Driven Muscle

      Deforming Materials With Light: Photoresponsive Materials Muscle In On the Action (pages 2285–2287)

      Prof. Geoffrey M. Spinks

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108831

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pump it: Materials that show intriguing shape changes induced by simple light exposure are emerging as candidates for artificial muscles. Recent examples are highlighted to illustrate the various molecular conformational changes induced by irradiation. Assemblies of these photoresponsive molecules are now being prepared that show functions that resemble real muscle.

  10. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Protein Design

      Reprogramming the Genetic Code: From Triplet to Quadruplet Codes (pages 2288–2297)

      Dr. Kaihang Wang, Mag. Wolfgang H. Schmied and Dr. Jason W. Chin

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On all fours: Recent work has used quadruplet codons to encode unnatural amino acids. Multiple unnatural amino acids have been incorporated into proteins through orthogonal protein translation using a quadruplet decoding ribosome (see figure; mutations to ribosome are shown in red).

  11. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Synthetic Methods

      Dendralenes Branch Out: Cross-Conjugated Oligoenes Allow the Rapid Generation of Molecular Complexity (pages 2298–2338)

      Prof. Dr. Henning Hopf and Prof. Michael S. Sherburn

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102987

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      From significant primary properties through to unparalleled complexity-generating synthetic transformations, the fundamental oligoalkene family known as the dendralenes is coming of age. Synthetic approaches to acyclic and cyclic dendralenes are analyzed and classified in this Review. The most powerful synthetic transformations of the dendralenes, diene-transmissive Diels–Alder reactions, are surveyed in detail.

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. Polysilanes

      Persilastaffanes: Design, Synthesis, Structure, and Conjugation between Silicon Cages (pages 2340–2344)

      Prof. Dr. Takeaki Iwamoto, Daisuke Tsushima, Dr. Eunsang Kwon, Dr. Shintaro Ishida and Prof. Dr. Hiroyuki Isobe

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106422

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By stepwise catenation of bicyclo[1.1.1]pentasilane units persila[n]staffanes (n=1, 2, and 3) were synthesized as air-stable colorless crystals. A remarkable red-shift of the UV/Vis absorption bands with increasing number of bicyclo[1.1.1]pentasilane units suggests remarkable interactions between bridgehead Si[BOND]Si σ orbitals and between cage Si[BOND]Si σ orbitals (see picture).

    2. Sensor Arrays

      Toward Wearable Sensors: Fluorescent Attoreactor Mats as Optically Encoded Cross-Reactive Sensor Arrays (pages 2345–2348)

      Pavel Anzenbacher Jr., Fengyu Li and Manuel A. Palacios

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105629

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultrasmall fluorescent sensors and their application for fabrication of wavelength-addressable virtual sensor arrays capable of sensing metal cations are described. The fluorescent probes generated in situ within the fiber mats can be used as wearable sensors for identifying heavy metal ions in a qualitative and quantitative fashion.

    3. Nanodevices

      Programmed Dynamic Topologies in DNA Catenanes (pages 2349–2353)

      Johann Elbaz, Dr. Zhen-Gang Wang, Dr. Fuan Wang and Prof. Itamar Willner

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107591

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Linking in: Two-ring and three-ring catenane nanostructures that are made from sequences of DNA have been shown to undergo programmed and reversible reconfiguration across defined topologies by using strand displacement. The switchable nature of the configurations may enable a more flexible approach to the transport and delivery of molecular cargoes, or for the use of such structures as labels in an intracellular environment.

    4. Nanocrystals

      Controlling the Nucleation and Growth of Silver on Palladium Nanocubes by Manipulating the Reaction Kinetics (pages 2354–2358)

      Dr. Jie Zeng, Cun Zhu, Dr. Jing Tao, Mingshang Jin, Dr. Hui Zhang, Dr. Zhi-Yuan Li, Dr. Yimei Zhu and Prof. Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107061

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tell the atoms where to go: By manipulating the rate at which Ag atoms were generated from a precursor, the nucleation and growth of Ag on Pd nanocubes with six equivalent {100} facets were controlled to generate three different types of bimetallic nanocrystals: Pd–Ag hybrid dimers, Pd–Ag eccentric nanobars, and Pd@Ag core–shell nanocrystals (see scheme).

    5. Enzyme Structures

      Inferential NMR/X-ray-Based Structure Determination of a Dibenzo[a,d]cycloheptenone Inhibitor–p38α MAP Kinase Complex in Solution (pages 2359–2362)

      Dr. Valerie S. Honndorf, Dr. Nicolas Coudevylle, Prof. Dr. Stefan Laufer, Dr. Stefan Becker, Prof. Dr. Christian Griesinger and Dr. Michael Habeck

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105241

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Complex problem: The crystal structure of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase in complex with a dibenzo[a,d]cycloheptenone inhibitor was found to be incompatible with NMR data of the same complex in solution. By using inferential structure determination (ISD) with restraints from X-ray crystallography and NMR spectra, a structure that is compatible with both data sets and very close to the X-ray crystal structure was generated (see picture).

    6. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Observing Oxygen Storage and Release at Work during Cycling Redox Conditions: Synergies between Noble Metal and Oxide Promoter (pages 2363–2367)

      Dr. Mark A. Newton, Dr. Marco Di Michiel, Dr. Anna Kubacka, Dr. Ana Iglesias-Juez and Prof. Marcos Fernández-García

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105790

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intimacy promotes good chemistry: Time-resolved hard X-ray diffraction (see picture) and dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled to time-resolved IR spectroscopy allows direct observation and quantification of the ability of materials to store and release gases under specific conditions. The nanoscale Pd/CeZrO4 interface plays a reactively deterministic role in inducing a superior performance in these catalysts.

    7. Natural Products

      Evidence for the Natural Toxins from the Mushroom Trogia venenata as a Cause of Sudden Unexpected Death in Yunnan Province, China (pages 2368–2370)

      Dr. Zhong-Yu Zhou, Dr. Guo-Qing Shi, Dr. Robert Fontaine, Kun Wei, Tao Feng, Fang Wang, Gang-Qiang Wang, Yan Qu, Zheng-Hui Li, Ze-Jun Dong, Hua-Jie Zhu, Zhu-Liang Yang, Prof. Guang Zeng and Prof. Dr. Ji-Kai Liu

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106502

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Life saver: Two unusual and toxic amino acids, 2R-amino-4S-hydroxy-5-hexynoic acid (red, see scheme) and 2R-amino-5-hexynoic acid (blue) have been isolated from the fruiting bodies of the mushroom Trogia venenata. Toxicology studies suggest that these compounds may be the cause of Sudden Unexplained Death (SUD) in Yunnan Province, China.

    8. Lanthanide Complexes

      A Single Sensitizer for the Excitation of Visible and NIR Lanthanide Emitters in Water with High Quantum Yields (pages 2371–2374)

      Dr. Ga-Lai Law, Tiffany A. Pham, Dr. Jide Xu and Prof. Kenneth N. Raymond

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106748

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Eight makes a happy Ho(l)me: The versatile octadentate TIAM ligand forms lanthanide complexes (Ln=Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho) with high quantum yields in water. This ligand is an efficient sensitizer, and also shields the metal center from solvent quenching, as shown by an X-ray diffraction study of the Ho complex.

    9. Triphase Microfluidics

      Triphase Microfluidic-Directed Self-Assembly: Anisotropic Colloidal Photonic Crystal Supraparticles and Multicolor Patterns Made Easy (pages 2375–2378)

      Ziyi Yu, Dr. Cai-Feng Wang, Luting Ling, Prof. Li Chen and Prof. Su Chen

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three not of a kind: A triphasic microfluidic route provides a flexible and promising way to fabricate colloidal photonic crystal supraparticles that are anisotropic in both geometry and function. These supraparticles are promising for applications including novel color displays (see scheme).

    10. Molecular Capsules

      Reagent-Installed Capsule Network: Selective Thiocarbamoylation of Aromatic Amines in Crystals with Preinstalled CH3NCS (pages 2379–2381)

      Dr. Yasuhide Inokuma, Guo-Hong Ning and Prof. Dr. Makoto Fujita

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107190

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crystalline reagent capsules were prepared by installing CH3NCS into networked molecular capsules. While the tight encapsulation completely prevented leaching of reagent molecules into the supernatant, introduction of amines into the interstitial pores triggered reagent delivery. As a result, enhanced substrate selectivity was observed in crystalline-state thiocarbamoylation (see picture; 86:14 in favor of 2- vs. 1-naphthylamine).

    11. Organocatalysis

      Enantiodivergent and γ-Selective Asymmetric Allylic Amination (pages 2382–2386)

      Jianmin Wang, Jie Chen, Choon Wee Kee and Prof. Dr. Choon-Hong Tan

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107317

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Double agent: The title reaction using the guanidine catalyst 1 can deliver both enantiomers of the product with excellent enantioselectivity by judicious choice of the double bond geometry of the the β,γ-unsaturated carbonyl compound. Computational studies reveal the possible origin of the inversed enantioselectivity, and the potential for enantiodivergent synthesis chiral amine-containing substrates is attractive.

    12. Nanoparticles

      Highly Luminescent Nanocrystals From Removal of Impurity Atoms Residual From Ion-Exchange Synthesis (pages 2387–2390)

      Dr. Prashant K. Jain, Brandon J. Beberwyck, Lam-Kiu Fong, Dr. Mark J. Polking and Prof. A. Paul Alivisatos

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107452

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pure crystals: Ion exchange of semiconductor nanocrystals yielded materials with poor optoelectronic properties such as low photoluminescence quantum yields. The reason for the low quantum yields of these nanocrystals are impurities at the level of a few atoms per nanocrystal. Cation-exchanged nanostructures, however, could be purified post exchange from such impurities resulting in high-quality nanocrystals (see picture).

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Highly Luminescent Nanocrystals From Removal of Impurity Atoms Residual From Ion-Exchange Synthesis

      Vol. 51, Issue 29, 7069, Article first published online: 11 JUL 2012

    13. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Catalytic Asymmetric Intermolecular Stetter Reactions of Enolizable Aldehydes with Nitrostyrenes: Computational Study Provides Insight into the Success of the Catalyst (pages 2391–2394)

      Daniel A. DiRocco, Elizabeth L. Noey, Prof. K. N. Houk and Prof. Tomislav Rovis

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107597

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorine helps: A fluorinated triazolium salt precatalyst has been developed that efficiently promotes the asymmetric intermolecular Stetter reaction of enolizable aldehydes and nitrostyrenes (see scheme). Trans fluorination of the catalyst architecture results in unparalleled reactivity and enantioselectivity in the desired transformation. A DFT study provides evidence of an electrostatic interaction as the source of the increased enantio-induction.

    14. Nanostructures

      Ultrathin W18O49 Nanowires with Diameters below 1 nm: Synthesis, Near-Infrared Absorption, Photoluminescence, and Photochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide (pages 2395–2399)

      Dr. Guangcheng Xi, Dr. Shuxin Ouyang, Peng Li, Prof. Jinhua Ye, Dr. Qiang Ma, Ning Su, Prof. Hua Bai and Prof. Chao Wang

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107681

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Open vacancies: A facile one-pot synthesis of oxygen-vacancy-rich ultrathin W18O49 nanowires up to several micrometers long is described. In addition to unique optical properties, such as NIR absorption and blue-light emission, the nanowires show an unexpected ability to photochemically reduce carbon dioxide to methane (see picture) as a result of its defect structure caused by large quantities of oxygen vacancies.

    15. Microfluidic Pumps

      Self-Powered Microscale Pumps Based on Analyte-Initiated Depolymerization Reactions (pages 2400–2404)

      Hua Zhang, Kimy Yeung, Jessica S. Robbins, Ryan A. Pavlick, Meng Wu, Ran Liu, Prof. Ayusman Sen and Prof. Scott T. Phillips

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107787

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pump it up: Insoluble polymer films that depolymerize to release soluble monomeric products when exposed to a specific analyte act as a microscale pump. Products formed as a result of depolymerization amplify the signal and create a concentration gradient that pumps fluids and insoluble particles away from the bulk polymer by a diffusiophoretic mechanism. These pumps can respond to a variety of analytes, from small molecules to enzymes.

    16. Protein Purification

      Temperature-Responsive “Catch and Release” of Proteins by using Multifunctional Polymer-Based Nanoparticles (pages 2405–2408)

      Dr. Keiichi Yoshimatsu, Benjamin K. Lesel, Dr. Yusuke Yonamine, Dr. John M. Beierle, Dr. Yu Hoshino and Prof. Kenneth J. Shea

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107797

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catch me if you can: Multifunctional, polymer-based nanoparticles that are capable of temperature-responsive “catch-and-release” of a target protein have been synthesized. The process is reversible and does not denature the proteins. An optimized combination of functional monomers imparts binding selectivity toward a target protein over other proteins.

    17. Lithium Storage

      Reversible Lithium-Ion Storage in Silver-Treated Nanoscale Hollow Porous Silicon Particles (pages 2409–2413)

      Dongyun Chen, Xiao Mei, Ge Ji, Meihua Lu, Prof. Jianping Xie, Prof. Jianmei Lu and Prof. Jim Yang Lee

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107885

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Easy to hollow: A hollow porous Si nanocomposite with Ag nanoparticles (NPs) is prepared (see scheme; PS=polystyrene, HP=hollow porous). The free volume in the HPSi structure effectively cushioned the volume change in Li–Si alloying and de-alloying reactions, giving an impressive performance as a high-capacity anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    18. Magnetic Surfactants

      Magnetic Control over Liquid Surface Properties with Responsive Surfactants (pages 2414–2416)

      Paul Brown, Alexey Bushmelev, Dr. Craig P. Butts, Dr. Jing Cheng, Prof. Julian Eastoe, Dr. Isabelle Grillo, Dr. Richard K. Heenan and Prof. Annette M. Schmidt

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Droplet attraction: Surfactants responsive to magnetic fields are reported for the first time. This new class of magnetic ionic liquid surfactants (MILSs; see picture) shows remarkable effects on surface and interfacial tension and allows access to magneto-responsive emulsions and new methods of separation, recovery, catalysis, and potential magnetophoretic applications.

    19. Water Splitting

      Towards A Solar Fuel Device: Light-Driven Water Oxidation Catalyzed by a Supramolecular Assembly (pages 2417–2420)

      Dr. Fei Li, Yi Jiang, Biaobiao Zhang, Fang Huang, Dr. Yan Gao and Prof. Licheng Sun

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108051

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Time to split: Supramolecular assemblies containing both photosensitizers and a ruthenium water-oxidation catalyst were prepared and characterized. The pictured assembly exhibits, for the first time, enhanced visible-light-driven water oxidation activity.

    20. DNA Nanotechnology

      Zinc-Finger Proteins for Site-Specific Protein Positioning on DNA-Origami Structures (pages 2421–2424)

      Dr. Eiji Nakata, Dr. Fong Fong Liew, Chisana Uwatoko, Dr. Shigeki Kiyonaka, Prof. Dr. Yasuo Mori, Yousuke Katsuda, Dr. Masayuki Endo, Prof. Dr. Hiroshi Sugiyama and Prof. Dr. Takashi Morii

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108199

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Point the finger: Zinc-finger proteins are convenient and site-selective adaptors for targeting specific locations within DNA-origami structures. Orthogonal targeting of the specific locations in the structures was demonstrated by using two adaptors, and the application of Escherichia coli lysate that contained the adaptor-fused proteins successfully afforded the expected protein–DNA assembly.

    21. Natural Products

      Antiterminator-Mediated Unveiling of Cryptic Polythioamides in an Anaerobic Bacterium (pages 2425–2428)

      Dipl.-Biochem. Swantje Behnken, Dr. Thorger Lincke, Dipl.-Chem. Florian Kloss, Dr. Keishi Ishida and Prof. Dr. Christian Hertweck

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anti-Terminator: Rise of the Molecules: Overexpression of an antiterminator gene (nusG) in Clostridium cellulolyticum induced the biosynthesis of the novel antibiotic closthioamide and related thioamides. This is the first successful genetic engineering of an anaerobe to trigger a cryptic pathway. Furthermore, synthetic probes provide valuable insights into the biogenetic relationship of the rare thioamide metabolites.

    22. Nanoparticle Biodegradation

      Enzymatic Regioselection for the Synthesis and Biodegradation of Porphysome Nanovesicles (pages 2429–2433)

      Jonathan F. Lovell, Cheng S. Jin, Elizabeth Huynh, Thomas D. MacDonald, Prof. Weiguo Cao and Prof. Gang Zheng

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108280

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A select few: An enzyme screen is used to identify two enzymes that selectively cleave porphyrin–lipid regioisomers (see picture). Either of the isomerically pure conjugates assembles into physically similar porphysome nanovesicles. Although porphysomes formed from both regioisomers are stable in serum in vivo, only one regioisomer rapidly degrades upon uptake in the liver.

    23. Polyoxometalates

      Diamond-Shaped [Ag4]4+ Cluster Encapsulated by Silicotungstate Ligands: Synthesis and Catalysis of Hydrolytic Oxidation of Silanes (pages 2434–2437)

      Dr. Yuji Kikukawa, Dr. Yoshiyuki Kuroda, Dr. Kazuya Yamaguchi and Prof. Dr. Noritaka Mizuno

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108372

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An Ag4diamond is encapsulated by silicotungstate ligands in TBA8[Ag4(DMSO)2(γ-H2SiW10O36)2]2 DMSO2 H2O (Ag4; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide, TBA=tetra-n-butylammonium), which was obtained by reaction of TBA4H4[γ-SiW10O36] with AgOAc in an organic medium. Polyoxometalate Ag4 (see picture) selectively catalyzes hydrolytic oxidation of various silanes to the corresponding silanols in high yields (72–96 %).

    24. Propylene Synthesis

      Transformation of Methane to Propylene: A Two-Step Reaction Route Catalyzed by Modified CeO2 Nanocrystals and Zeolites (pages 2438–2442)

      Jieli He, Ting Xu, Zhihui Wang, Prof. Dr. Qinghong Zhang, Dr. Weiping Deng and Prof. Dr. Ye Wang

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Propylene from methane: The transformation of methane to propylene has been realized in a two-step route via CH3Cl or CH3Br. CeO2 serves as an efficient and stable catalyst for the oxidative chlorination and bromination of methane to CH3Cl and CH3Br. In the second step, a modified zeolite is highly a selective and stable catalyst for the conversion of CH3Cl or CH3Br into propylene.

    25. Bioorthogonal Reagents

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Thiacycloalkynes for Copper-Free Click Chemistry (pages 2443–2447)

      Gabriela de Almeida, Ellen M. Sletten, Hitomi Nakamura, Krishnan K. Palaniappan and Prof. Carolyn R. Bertozzi

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106325

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The heteroatom helps! The introduction of an endocyclic sulfur atom enables fine-tuning of the reactivity and stability of thiacycloalkynes for copper-free click chemistry. The stabilizing effect of the endocyclic sulfur atom allows the use of highly activated seven-membered rings as reagents for bioorthogonal copper-free click chemistry.

    26. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Asymmetric Synthesis of Allenyl Oxindoles and Spirooxindoles by a Catalytic Enantioselective Saucy–Marbet Claisen Rearrangement (pages 2448–2451)

      Trung Cao, Joshua Deitch, Dr. Elizabeth C. Linton and Prof. Marisa C. Kozlowski

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107417

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Saucy selection: The first catalytic, enantioselective Saucy–Marbet Claisen rearrangement has been achieved. Palladium(II) (R)-binap or tBuphox catalysts L*Pd(SbF6)2 were employed to generate allenyl oxindoles or spirolactones bearing a quaternary center with up to 98 % ee.

    27. Gold Catalysis

      Strong Electronic and Counterion Effects on Geminal Digold Formation and Reactivity as Revealed by Gold(I)–Aryl Model Complexes (pages 2452–2456)

      Dieter Weber, T. David Jones, Laura L. Adduci and Prof. Dr. Michel R. Gagné

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107659

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Geminal diauration of [Ph3PAu(aryl)] complexes has been investigated to model the intermediacy of geminally diaurated gold(I)–vinyl complexes in catalysis (see scheme). The results advance our understanding of the factors influencing the stability, reactivity, and dynamics of these organometallic intermediates.

    28. Molecular Devices

      An Autonomous and Controllable Light-Driven DNA Walking Device (pages 2457–2460)

      Mingxu You, Dr. Yan Chen, Prof. Dr. Xiaobing Zhang, Dr. Haipeng Liu, Dr. Ruowen Wang, Dr. Kelong Wang, Dr. Kathryn R. Williams and Prof. Dr. Weihong Tan

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107733

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Regulatable nanorobots: A DNA-based walking device was designed that is capable of autonomous locomotion, with light control of initiation, termination, and velocity (see picture). This device is reminiscent of cellular protein motors in nature, especially those of green plants.

    29. CC Agostic Interactions

      An Unsymmetrical bis C[BOND]C Agostic Heterobimetallic Lithium Yttrium Complex (pages 2461–2464)

      Yannick Escudié, Dr. Chiara Dinoi, Dr. Olivia Allen, Dr. Laure Vendier and Prof. Michel Etienne

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107870

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two better than one! The structural distortions in a bis(cyclopropyl) heterobimetallic lithium yttrium complex can be interpreted as two types of C[BOND]C agostic interactions (see structure), one with a more covalent character with Y, the other with a more electrostatic character with Li. The C[BOND]C agostic interaction with Y is reinforced by a C[BOND]H agostic interaction.

    30. Organopolymerization

      Conjugate-Addition Organopolymerization: Rapid Production of Acrylic Bioplastics by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes (pages 2465–2469)

      Dr. Yuetao Zhang and Prof. Dr. Eugene Y.-X. Chen

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108019

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It's rapid and selective: In contrast to the dimerization of α,β-unsaturated esters (acrylics) by carbene 3, the more nucleophilic carbene 2 selectively forms the single-addition product, and 1, the most nucleophilic carbene of the series, polymerizes acrylics. The biomass-derived methylene butyrolactones are quantitatively polymerized to produce medium- to high-molecular-weight bioplastics in less than one minute at ambient temperature. Mes=2,4,6-trimethylphenyl, TOF=turnover frequency.

    31. Aluminophosphate Membranes

      Oriented CoSAPO-5 Membranes by Microwave-Enhanced Growth on TiO2-Coated Porous Alumina (pages 2470–2473)

      Jared A. Stoeger, Miguel Palomino, Kumar Varoon Agrawal, Xueyi Zhang, Georgios N. Karanikolos, Susana Valencia, Prof. Avelino Corma and Prof. Michael Tsapatsis

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108042

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microwaving plates: A facile method was developed for the fabrication of preferentially c-oriented cobalt-substituted silicoaluminophosphate-5 (CoSAPO-5) membranes on porous alumina supports. In situ microwave growth using a slip-coated TiO2 layer on the support surface resulted in an oriented CoSAPO-5 crystal layer, which was evolved into a defect-free membrane by improving crystalline intergrowth through secondary hydrothermal microwave growth.

    32. Carbon Nanostructures

      Synthesis, Characterization, and Crystal Structure of [6]Cycloparaphenylene (pages 2474–2476)

      Dr. Jianlong Xia and Prof. Ramesh Jasti

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Strained: [6]Cycloparaphenylene, a molecule with 97 kcal mol−1 of strain energy, was synthesized. The synthetic strategy relied on two sequential oxidative dearomatization/addition sequences and a final reductive aromatization reaction (see scheme). The optoelectronic properties of [6]cycloparaphenylene were measured, and the analysis of the X-ray crystal structure revealed a linear packing geometry reminiscent of a carbon nanotube.

    33. Hydroformylation

      An Asymmetric Hydroformylation Catalyst that Delivers Branched Aldehydes from Alkyl Alkenes (pages 2477–2480)

      Dr. Gary M. Noonan, Dr. José A. Fuentes, Dr. Christopher J. Cobley and Dr. Matthew L. Clarke

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108203

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surprising selectivity: The first enantioselective hydroformylations of simple alkenes of type RCH2CH[DOUBLE BOND]CH2 to preferentially deliver the branched aldehyde product have been discovered using a new chiral ligand, named bobphos (see scheme). Established ligands are unselective in this reaction or show a slight preference towards the linear aldehyde.

    34. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of the Galbulimima Alkaloid (−)-GB17 (pages 2481–2484)

      Reed T. Larson, Michael D. Clift and Prof. Regan J. Thomson

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A tale of two Michaels: The first enantioselective total synthesis of (−)-GB17 is reported. Construction of this unique naphthoquinolizinone skeleton was achieved by two stereoselective intramolecular Michael additions, one under catalyst control and the other under substrate control.

    35. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Atom- and Step-Economical Pathway to Chiral Benzobicyclo[2.2.2]octenones through Carbon–Carbon Bond Cleavage (pages 2485–2488)

      Dr. Lantao Liu, Dr. Naoki Ishida and Prof. Dr. Masahiro Murakami

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108446

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the nick of time: A nickel-catalyzed asymmetric intramolecular alkene insertion reaction into cyclobutanones (1) has been developed. The reaction significantly reduces the number of steps required for the synthesis of chiral benzobicyclo[2.2.2]octenones (2).

    36. Metal-Free Activation

      Activation of CO2 and SO2 by Boryl(phosphino)carbenes (pages 2489–2491)

      Dr. Florie Lavigne, Dr. Eddy Maerten, Dr. Gilles Alcaraz, Prof. Vicenç Branchadell, Dr. Nathalie Saffon-Merceron and Dr. Antoine Baceiredo

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108452

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dismembering molecules: The stable boryl(phosphino)carbene 1 can cleave small organic dioxide molecules. With CO2 and SO2, 1 gives, respectively, the phosphacumulene ylide [Mes(iPr2N)B-O-P(CCO)(NiPr2)Mes] (see scheme and structure) and boryl(phosphoryl)sulfine [Mes(iPr2N)B-C(SO)-P(O)(NiPr2)Mes] which have been structurally and spectroscopically characterized.

    37. Thioether Synthesis

      Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Trifluoromethylthiolation of Aryl Boronic Acids with TMSCF3 and Elemental Sulfur (pages 2492–2495)

      Chao Chen, Yan Xie, Lingling Chu, Dr. Ruo-Wen Wang, Prof. Dr. Xingang Zhang and Prof. Dr. Feng-Ling Qing

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108663

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorinated functionality: The copper-catalyzed oxidative trifluoromethylthiolation of aryl boronic acids with TMSCF3 and elemental sulfur at room temperature is described for the first time. This reaction provides a concise and efficient method for the synthesis of aryl trifluoromethyl thioethers (ArSCF3) under mild conditions. Phen=Phenanthroline.

    38. Synthetic Methods

      Intramolecular Fischer Indole Synthesis and its Combination with an Aromatic [3,3]-Sigmatropic Rearrangement for the Preparation of Tricyclic Benzo[cd]indoles (pages 2496–2499)

      In-Keol Park, Jun Park and Prof. Cheon-Gyu Cho

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108970

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      At the end of the tether: Aryl hydrazides that have carbonyl groups tethered at the para position of the aromatic ring undergo an intramolecular Fischer indolization reaction to give the corresponding indolophanes. Strategic insertion of a double bond in the tether enables a tandem aromatic [3,3] sigmatropic rearrangement reaction to occur to give tricyclic benzo[cd]indoles.

    39. Rearrangements

      From 21,23-Dioxaporphyrin to a 3-Pyranone Dioxacorrole Skeleton: The Achmatowicz Rearrangement in the Porphyrin Frame (pages 2500–2504)

      Dr. Miłosz Pawlicki, Dominik Bykowski, Dr. Ludmiła Szterenberg and Prof. Lechosław Latos-Grażyński

      Article first published online: 26 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201109038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Be independent: Under basic conditions a furan ring entrapped in an aromatic macrocycle readily recovered the properties characteristic for a free molecule and assimilated a water molecule forming the Achmatowicz rearrangement product with a 3-pyranone subunit built in. Coordination of palladium(II) created a complex stabilizing the second tautomer with two sp3 carbon atoms (oxygen red, water green, palladium purple, and the aryl group blue).

    40. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Syntheses of All the Amathaspiramides (pages 2505–2508)

      Koji Chiyoda, Dr. Jun Shimokawa and Prof. Dr. Tohru Fukuyama

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201109221

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Six in one blow: Total syntheses of all the amathaspiramide alkaloids have been accomplished. Rapid construction of the diazaspiro[3.3]nonane core combined with regio- and diastereoselective reduction of the cyclic imide moiety with DIBAL established the route to the common structural motif. The late-stage reduction of the lactam to an imine functionality mediated by Schwartz's reagent was the key to the streamlined syntheses.

  13. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Minireview
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    14. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 11/2012 (page 2511)

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201290017

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION