Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 18

April 27, 2012

Volume 51, Issue 18

Pages 4241–4490

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Trienamine Catalysis with 2,4-Dienones: Development and Application in Asymmetric Diels–Alder Reactions (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 18/2012) (page 4241)

      Xiao-Feng Xiong, Quan Zhou, Jing Gu, Dr. Lin Dong, Dr. Tian-Yu Liu and Prof. Dr. Ying-Chun Chen

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202102

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An asymmetric Diels-Alder cycloaddition of δ,δ-disubstituted 2,4-dienones by trienamine catalysis with cinchona-based primary amines has been developed. In their Communication on page 4401 ff., Y.-C. Chen and co-workers show that a wide range of electron-deficient dienophiles were tolerated in this reaction to afford multifunctional cyclohexene derivatives with excellent stereoselectivity.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Formation and Evolution of Chemical Gradients and Potential Differences Across Self-Assembling Inorganic Membranes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 18/2012) (page 4242)

      Dr. Fabian Glaab, Dr. Matthias Kellermeier, Prof. Dr. Werner Kunz, Prof. Dr. Emilia Morallon and Prof. Dr. Juan Manuel García-Ruiz

      Article first published online: 5 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202308

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chemical garden are beautiful structures that show fascinating membrane and diaphragm properties. In their Communication on page 4317 ff., W. Kunz, J. M. García-Ruiz, and co-workers reveal that, beyond beauty, this purely inorganic biomimetic phenomenon constitutes a complex out-of-equilibrium physicochemical system of two compartmentalized distinct solutions that creates measurable potential differences over extended periods of time (cover design: M. Wyrwoll).

  3. Inside Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Inside Back Cover: The Most Stable Protein–Ligand Complex: Applications for One-Step Affinity Purification and Identification of Protein Assemblies (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 18/2012) (page 4491)

      Christoph Giese, Franziska Zosel, Dr. Chasper Puorger and Prof. Rudi Glockshuber

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The thermodynamically most stable protein–ligand complex known to date is formed by sections of protein subunits derived from type 1 pili of E. coli. R. Glockshuber and co-workers have developed a new method based on this noncovalent interaction for the single-step affinity purification of protein assemblies from E. coli cell extracts. They describe their insights and the new application in their Communication on page 4474 ff.

  4. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Automated Solid-Phase Synthesis of β-Mannuronic Acid Alginates (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 18/2012) (page 4492)

      Dr. Marthe T. C. Walvoort, Dr. Hans van den Elst, Dr. Obadiah J. Plante, Dr. Lenz Kröck, Prof. Dr. Peter H. Seeberger, Prof. Dr. Herman S. Overkleeft, Prof. Dr. Gijsbert A. van der Marel and Dr. Jeroen D. C. Codée

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201338

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The automated solid-phase assembly of oligomannuronic acid alginates, key exopolysaccharides of the opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been achieved through the use of mannuronic acid building blocks in a fully automated carbohydrate synthesizer. G. A. van der Marel, J. D. C. Codée, and co-workers report in their Communication on page 4393 ff. how mannuronic acid alginate fragments with up to 12 cis-mannosidic linkages have been assembled by this method.

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      International Scientific Cooperation Is Key for The Chinese Academy of Sciences (pages 4244–4246)

      Prof. Chunli Bai

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200422

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “...The past 30 years have seen an enormous effort to develop science and scientific institutions in China, and the last 20 years in particular have seen an active engagement in international cooperation Read more...” in the Editorial by Chunli Bai.

  6. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
  7. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
  8. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Kazuaki Ishihara (page 4268)

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200570

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “My favorite saying is “Simple is best” (Occam's razor). When I was eighteen I wanted to be a great chemist!” This and more about Kazuaki Ishihara can be found on page 4269.

  9. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
  10. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Organic Reactions. Volume 75 (Diamond Volume). Edited by Scott E. Denmark. (page 4270)

      Martin Oestreich

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201525

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken 2011. 880 pp., hardcover, $ 175.00.—ISBN 978-0470889077

  11. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Adaptable Materials

      Covalent Adaptable Networks: Reversible Bond Structures Incorporated in Polymer Networks (pages 4272–4274)

      Prof. Christopher N. Bowman and Prof. Christopher J. Kloxin

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200708

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Smart and responsive: Reversible transesterification reactions were recently used within a polymer network to create a covalently crosslinked material that is capable of being processed as well as mended and recycled. This work is highlighted in the context of the covalent adaptable network approach and illustrates the bond cleavage and reformation mechanism that enable the adaptability of these materials (see picture).

    2. Coordination Numbers

      What Is the Maximum Coordination Number in a Planar Structure? (pages 4275–4276)

      Prof. Dr. Thomas Heine and Prof. Dr. Gabriel Merino

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201166

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On a higher plane: The combination of theoretical and experimental methods has been used to predict, produce, and detect systems with the highest coordination numbers so far known in planar clusters. With these planar MB10 wheels (M=Nb, Ta; see picture), the world record for the highest coordination number is now set at ten.

    3. Molecular Machines

      Electric Nanocar Equipped with Four-Wheel Drive Gets Taken for its First Spin (pages 4277–4278)

      Prof. E. Charles H. Sykes

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108783

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      King of the (nano)road: Electrically powered unidirectional molecular motion across a metal surface has been demonstrated by using a unique design of molecule with multiple motor units. A scanning tunneling microscope tip is used to electrically excite the single molecule “nanocar”, driving it forward through vibrational and electronic excitation of its four chiral motor wheels. Helix inversion and double bond isomerization of the four motors leads to paddle-wheel like motion.

  12. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Rare-Earth Metal Hydrides

      Oxidation by Hydrogen in the Chemistry and Physics of the Rare-Earth Metals (pages 4280–4286)

      Prof. Dr. Arndt Simon

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108558

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Some do, some don't: How do rare earth metals react with hydrogen? Some, such as LaI, don't, because electronic and electrostatic conditions mean they cannot take up hydrogen. Others use a trick: When LaI2, for example, is treated with hydrogen, its quadratic net structure collapses into a densely packed triangular layer structure which can accommodate hydrogen (see picture).

  13. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Total Synthesis

      Is There No End to the Total Syntheses of Strychnine? Lessons Learned in Strategy and Tactics in Total Synthesis (pages 4288–4311)

      Jeffrey S. Cannon and Prof. Dr. Larry E. Overman

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107385

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Strychnine thrillers beyond Agatha Christie: The complex indole alkaloid strychnine has engaged the chemical community since the 19th century. This Review examines why strychnine has been and still remains an important target for directed synthesis efforts. Selected syntheses of strychnine are discussed with the aim of identifying their influence on the evolution of the strategy and tactics of organic synthesis.

  14. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. Enzyme Models

      Significant Increase of Oxidase Activity through the Genetic Incorporation of a Tyrosine–Histidine Cross-Link in a Myoglobin Model of Heme–Copper Oxidase (pages 4312–4316)

      Xiaohong Liu, Yang Yu, Cheng Hu, Wei Zhang, Prof. Dr. Yi Lu and Prof. Dr. Jiangyun Wang

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108756

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Top model: Heme–copper oxidase (HCO) contains a histidine–tyrosine cross-link in its heme a3/CuB oxygen reduction center. A functional model of HCO was obtained through the genetic incorporation of the unnatural amino acid imiTyr, which mimics the Tyr–His cross-link, and of the CuB site into myoglobin (see picture). Like HCO, this small soluble protein exhibits selective O2-reduction activity while generating little reactive oxygen species.

    2. Chemical Gardens

      Formation and Evolution of Chemical Gradients and Potential Differences Across Self-Assembling Inorganic Membranes (pages 4317–4321)

      Dr. Fabian Glaab, Dr. Matthias Kellermeier, Prof. Dr. Werner Kunz, Prof. Dr. Emilia Morallon and Prof. Dr. Juan Manuel García-Ruiz

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107754

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silica gardens are well-known examples for the self-assembly of inorganic material (see figure). The growth of hollow tubes results in the spontaneous formation of two compartments with highly dissimilar pH and ion concentrations, which cause electrochemical potential differences across the membrane. Initially generated gradients are relieved over time through dynamic diffusion and precipitation processes.

    3. Molecular Machines

      A Dynamically Programmed DNA Transporter (pages 4322–4326)

      Dr. Zhen-Gang Wang, Dr. Johann Elbaz and Prof. Itamar Willner

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107855

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fuel for thought: A DNA nanostructure consisting of a central axis and three footholds has been developed that acts as a dynamically programmed DNA nanotransporter in the presence of appropriate nucleic acids, fuel strands, and anti-fuel strands (see picture). The device consists of three interconvertible programs, where each program includes eight distinct states.

    4. Systemic Chemistry

      Selective Coordination Bonding in Metallo-Supramolecular Systems on Surfaces (pages 4327–4331)

      Alexander Langner, Prof. Dr. Steven L. Tait, Prof. Dr. Nian Lin, Prof. Dr. Rajadurai Chandrasekar, Dr. Velimir Meded, Dr. Karin Fink, Prof. Dr. Mario Ruben and Prof. Dr. Klaus Kern

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108530

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Programmed: A combination of chemical synthesis and scanning tunneling microscopy has demonstrated high selectivity in the formation of coordination nano-architectures from instructed metal–ligand mixtures under surface-confined conditions. Processing of the molecular information, here the coordination preferences of the two ligands and two metals, leads to the formation of two different regular networks (see picture).

    5. Bioadhesion

      Bioinspired Underwater Bonding and Debonding on Demand (pages 4332–4335)

      Dr. Zahid Shafiq, Dr. Jiaxi Cui, Dr. Lourdes Pastor-Pérez, Dr. Verónica San Miguel, Dr. Radu A. Gropeanu, Dr. Cristina Serrano and Dr. Aránzazu del Campo

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108629

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mussel glue: Bioinspired underwater chemical bonding with the possibility of phototriggered debonding is reported. A four-arm star-poly(ethyleneglycol) end-functionalized by nitrodopamine was synthesized. The nitrodopamine offered the reactivity of catechol and the chemistry of the photocleavable o-nitrophenyl ethyl group (see picture).

    6. Protein Structures

      Protein Subunits Released by Surface Collisions of Noncovalent Complexes: Nativelike Compact Structures Revealed by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry (pages 4336–4339)

      Mowei Zhou, Dr. Shai Dagan and Prof. Vicki H. Wysocki

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108700

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crash survival: Several noncovalent protein complexes were dissociated by surface collision and studied using ion mobility mass spectrometry. Most of the resulting monomer products and some undissociated precursors maintain the overall size and shape of their native fold after surface impact. This result is in contrast to the unfolding of the structures observed for the commonly used activation involving neutral gas collisions.

    7. Synthetic Methods

      Synthetic (±)-Axinellamines Deficient in Halogen (pages 4340–4343)

      Dr. Hui Ding, Andrew G. Roberts and Prof. Dr. Patrick G. Harran

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200205

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hiding in plain sight: Tailored synthetic dimers of the natural product dispacamide exist as a dynamic set of structural isomers. These materials isomerize readily to unveil a spirocyclic glycocyamidine from which ring systems common to complex pyrrole/imidazole alkaloids can be derived. Fully synthetic axinellamine congeners have been prepared in this way (see scheme), wherein a host of unusual and unanticipated reactions are employed.

    8. Enzyme Catalysis

      Thermal Bifunctionality of Bacterial Phenylalanine Aminomutase and Ammonia Lyase Enzymes (pages 4344–4348)

      Dr. Christopher Chesters, Dr. Matthew Wilding, Mark Goodall and Prof. Jason Micklefield

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200669

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Enzymatic thermal switch: The bacterial 4-methylideneimidazol-5-one (MIO) dependent enzymes AdmH and EncP are shown to display remarkable thermal bifunctionality: they act as mutases (blue graph) at lower temperatures but with lyase (red graph) activity predominant at higher temperatures. This temperature-dependent switch in enzyme class also explains how these two similar enzymes can fulfill different catalytic functions in secondary metabolisms.

    9. Microfluidics

      Fully Integrated Thermoplastic Genosensor for the Highly Sensitive Detection and Identification of Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (pages 4349–4353)

      Dr. Hong Wang, Dr. Hui-Wen Chen, Dr. Mateusz L. Hupert, Dr. Pin-Chuan Chen, Dr. Proyag Datta, Tana L. Pittman, Dr. Jost Goettert, Prof. Michael C. Murphy, Prof. Diana Williams, Prof. Francis Barany and Prof. Steven A. Soper

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200732

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A modular system for the reporting of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in less than 30 min with full process automation was developed (see picture; MDR-TB=multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis). The fluidic cartridge uses a polymer chain reaction (PCR)/ligase detection reaction (LDR)/universal array assay that can detect, with high reliability, resistant strains that are a minority (less than 1 %) from a mixed population.

    10. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

      Selective Excitation of Concomitant Electrochemiluminophores: Tuning Emission Color by Electrode Potential (pages 4354–4357)

      Egan H. Doeven, Elizabeth M. Zammit, Dr. Gregory J. Barbante, Dr. Conor F. Hogan, Prof. Neil W. Barnett and Dr. Paul S. Francis

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200814

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      ECL in 3D: Selective electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of several ruthenium and iridium complexes simultaneously in solution can be controlled by electrode potential (see picture; λem=emission wavelength). These luminescent redox systems create a range of new possibilities for multi-analyte ECL detection, assessment of interdependent electrochemical/spectroscopic properties, and color tuning in light-emitting devices.

    11. Bioassays

      Significantly Improved Analytical Sensitivity of Lateral Flow Immunoassays by Using Thermal Contrast (pages 4358–4361)

      Zhenpeng Qin, Prof. Warren C. W. Chan, Prof. David R. Boulware, Prof. Taner Akkin, Elissa K. Butler and Prof. John C. Bischof

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200997

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Heat beyond visual: The thermal contrast from the heating of gold nanoparticles upon laser stimulation can improve the analytical sensitivity of lateral flow assays (LFAs; see picture). A 32-fold improvement in sensitivity of an approved LFA for cryptococcal antigen (purple diamond) was shown, with the potential for further improvement by optimizing the backing material and the properties of the antibody-coated nanoparticles (red circle with blue Y).

    12. Click Polymerization

      Topochemical Click Reaction: Spontaneous Self-Stitching of a Monosaccharide to Linear Oligomers through Lattice-Controlled Azide–Alkyne Cycloaddition (pages 4362–4366)

      Atchutarao Pathigoolla, Dr. Rajesh G. Gonnade and Prof. Dr. Kana M. Sureshan

      Article first published online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No activation needed: A topochemical click reaction that dispenses with catalyst, solvent, or other modes of activation takes place in crystals of a sugar derivative. The spontaneous, regiospecific azide–alkyne cycloaddition gives linear polymers that are difficult to synthesize by conventional solution-state chemistry (see picture).

    13. Bistable Materials

      Reversible Electron Transfer in a Linear {Fe2Co} Trinuclear Complex Induced by Thermal Treatment and Photoirraditaion (pages 4367–4370)

      Prof. Tao Liu, Dr. Da-Peng Dong, Dr. Shinji Kanegawa, Dr. Soonchul Kang, Prof. Osamu Sato, Dr. Yoshihito Shiota, Prof. Kazunari Yoshizawa, Prof. Shinya Hayami, Prof. Shuo Wu, Prof. Cheng He and Prof. Chun-Ying Duan

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201305

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A light change: A linear cyanido-bridged Fe2Co compound (see picture) exhibits a reversible, thermally induced cooperative charge transfer transition accompanying spin transition and polar–nonpolar transformation in the trinuclear cluster. The change in magnetic properties and polarity could also be induced by irradiation with light.

    14. Energy Conversion

      Dye Molecules for Simple Co-Sensitization Process: Fabrication of Mixed-Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 4371–4374)

      Prof. Mutsumi Kimura, Hirotaka Nomoto, Dr. Naruhiko Masaki and Prof. Shogo Mori

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108610

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sensitive kind of dye: Co-sensitization of the TiO2 electrode using PcS15 and the dye D131 results in a dramatic enhancement of the photocurrent response for the entire visible-light region. This method provides a simple design for accessing dye-sensitized solar cells.

    15. Electron Transfer

      Carboxyethynyl Anchoring Ligands: A Means to Improving the Efficiency of Phthalocyanine-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 4375–4378)

      Dr. Maria-Eleni Ragoussi, Dr. Juan-José Cid, Dr. Jun-Ho Yum, Dr. Gema de la Torre, Dr. Davide Di Censo, Prof. Michael Grätzel, Dr. Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin and Prof. Tomás Torres

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108963

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bridge the gap: Rigid π-conjugated bridges such as the ethynyl spacers, are effective for connecting the phthalocyanine π system to the conduction band of TiO2. A series of zinc phthalocyanine photosensitizers with carboxyethynyl anchoring groups have been synthesized. Solar cells sensitized with the pictured compound exhibit record efficiencies of 5.5 % and 6.1 % under 100 (1 sun irradiation) and 9.5 mW cm−2, respectively.

    16. Synthetic Methods

      An Expeditious and Atom-Economical Synthesis of a New Generation of Substituted [4.6.4.6]Fenestradienes (pages 4379–4382)

      Mélanie Charpenay, Aïcha Boudhar, Dr. Gaëlle Blond and Dr. Jean Suffert

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107934

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      With finesse and strain: Highly strained derivatives of fenestranes, [4.6.4.6]fenestradienes, have been prepared using a remarkable reaction cascade featuring a 4-exo-dig cyclocarbopalladation, a Sonogashira-type coupling, a regioselective alkynylation, and an 8π/6π electrocyclization sequence.

    17. Ruthenium/C5Me5/Bisphosphine- or Bisphosphite-Based Catalysts for normal-Selective Hydroformylation (pages 4383–4387)

      Kohei Takahashi, Dr. Makoto Yamashita, Dr. Yoshiyuki Tanaka and Prof. Dr. Kyoko Nozaki

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108396

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A way into normality: By using [Cp*Ru] complexes with bisphosphite or bisphosphine ligands, selective hydroformylation of propene and 1-decene to homologated normal aldehydes was accomplished with the highest levels of activity and selectivity ever reported for ruthenium catalyst systems (see scheme). The reaction mechanism was investigated using stoichiometric amounts of [Cp*Ru(Xantphos)H] and [D2]-1-decene.

    18. Hydrogels

      Rational Design of a Tetrameric Protein to Enhance Interactions between Self-Assembled Fibers Gives Molecular Hydrogels (pages 4388–4392)

      Xiaoli Zhang, Xinlei Chu, Dr. Ling Wang, Huaimin Wang, Prof. Gaolin Liang, Jinxiu Zhang, Prof. Jiafu Long and Prof. Zhimou Yang

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108612

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Styling gels: The fusion protein ULD-TIP-1 (ULD=ubiquitin-like domain, TIP-1=Tax-interacting protein-1) enhances the interactions between self-assembled fibers formed by small molecules bearing a peptide that specifically binds to the ULD-TIP-1. The mechanical properties of the resulting hydrogels (see picture) are tuned by using peptides with different dissociation constants for the protein.

    19. Carbohydrates

      Automated Solid-Phase Synthesis of β-Mannuronic Acid Alginates (pages 4393–4396)

      Dr. Marthe T. C. Walvoort, Dr. Hans van den Elst, Dr. Obadiah J. Plante, Dr. Lenz Kröck, Prof. Dr. Peter H. Seeberger, Prof. Dr. Herman S. Overkleeft, Prof. Dr. Gijsbert A. van der Marel and Dr. Jeroen D. C. Codée

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108744

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A big step towards routine: The title synthesis provides mannuronic acid alginate fragments featuring up to 12 cis-mannosidic linkages, in multi-milligram quantities (see scheme; Bn=benzyl, Lev=levulinoyl). Mannuronic acid building blocks were used in a second-generation carbohydrate synthesizer to secure the stereoselective introduction of the β-mannosidic bonds in a fully automated fashion.

    20. Ionothermal Synthesis

      Ionothermal Synthesis of Aluminophosphate Molecular Sieve Membranes through Substrate Surface Conversion (pages 4397–4400)

      Keda Li , Prof. Zhijian Tian, Xiaolei Li, Dr. Renshun Xu, Prof. Yunpeng Xu, Dr. Lei Wang, Dr. Huaijun Ma, Dr. Bingchun Wang and Prof. Liwu Lin

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200101

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A dual role as a support and a source of Al is played by the alumina substrate in an ionothermal method for ambient-pressure synthesis of aluminophosphate molecular sieve membranes through substrate-surface conversion (see picture; IL: ionic liquid, SDA: structure-directing agent). Aluminophosphate membranes with CHA, AEL, AFI, and LTA structure types could be obtained.

    21. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Trienamine Catalysis with 2,4-Dienones: Development and Application in Asymmetric Diels–Alder Reactions (pages 4401–4404)

      Xiao-Feng Xiong, Quan Zhou, Jing Gu, Dr. Lin Dong, Dr. Tian-Yu Liu and Prof. Dr. Ying-Chun Chen

      Article first published online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200248

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A tri-ing reaction: An asymmetric Diels–Alder cycloaddition of δ,δ-disubstituted 2,4-dienones is possible through the trienamine catalysis of cinchona-based primary amines (see scheme). An array of electron-deficient dienophiles, such as N-substituted maleimides and 3-alkenyl oxindoles, were tolerated, and multifunctional cyclohexene derivatives were obtained in excellent stereoselectivity and with high diastereomer ratios.

    22. Photochemistry

      An Efficient Flow-Photochemical Synthesis of 5H-Furanones Leads to an Understanding of Torquoselectivity in Cyclobutenone Rearrangements (pages 4405–4408)

      Prof. David C. Harrowven, Mubina Mohamed, Théo P. Gonçalves, Prof. Richard J. Whitby, David Bolien and Dr. Helen F. Sneddon

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Go with the flow: 4-Hydroxycyclobutenones were efficiently transformed into 5H-furanones using an inexpensive flow-photochemical setup. The results challenge the notion that this and the related thermochemical rearrangement display torquoselectivity in their electrocyclic opening to a vinylketene intermediate. Selectivity in the photochemical rearrangement is due a dichotomous reactivity of the (E)- and (Z)-vinylketene intermediates (see scheme).

    23. C[BOND]H Activation

      C[BOND]H Activation of Isobutylene Using Frustrated Lewis Pairs: Aluminum and Boron σ-Allyl Complexes (pages 4409–4412)

      Gabriel Ménard and Prof. Dr. Douglas W. Stephan

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200328

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Activation frustration: The frustrated Lewis pairs derived from the Lewis base, tBu3P, and the Lewis acids, Al(C6F5)3 and B(C6F5)3, react with isobutylene to give complexes 1 and 2, respectively. Compound 1 reacts with ethylene to give the insertion product, CH2[DOUBLE BOND]C(CH3)(CH2)3Al(C6F5)2, and [tBu3PH][Al(C6F5)4] as the major products, and the zwitterion tBu3PCH2CH2Al(C6F5)3 and residual Al(C6F5)3 as the minor products.

    24. Synthetic Methods

      Electrochemical Fluorination Using Alkali-Metal Fluorides (pages 4413–4416)

      Dr. Takahiro Sawamura, Kohta Takahashi, Dr. Shinsuke Inagi and Prof. Dr. Toshio Fuchigami

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200438

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Charged up: The selective electrochemical fluorination of organic compounds using the alkali-metal fluoride KF under very mild reaction conditions has been accomplished (see scheme). The long-standing problems of low solubility of metal fluorides in organic solvent and low nucleophilicity of fluoride ions for fluorination have been overcome by the use of of poly(ethylene glycol).

    25. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Enantioselective Synthesis of 4-Hydroxytetrahydropyridine Derivatives by Intramolecular Addition of Tertiary Enamides to Aldehydes (pages 4417–4420)

      Shuo Tong, Dr. De-Xian Wang, Dr. Liang Zhao, Prof. Dr. Jieping Zhu and Prof. Dr. Mei-Xiang Wang

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200459

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stable tertiary enamides and enecarbamates undergo highly enantioselective intramolecular nucleophilic addition to aldehyde units catalyzed by chiral binol–Ti complexes under mild conditions to produce the title compounds in up to 99.5 % or greater enantiomeric excess. A positive nonlinear effect was detected and the formation of binol–Ti aggregates suggests an intricate asymmetric catalytic pathway.

    26. Ligand Effects

      The Origins of Dramatic Axial Ligand Effects: Closed-Shell MnVO Complexes Use Exchange-Enhanced Open-Shell States to Mediate Efficient H Abstraction Reactions (pages 4421–4425)

      Dr. Deepa Janardanan, Dr. Dandamudi Usharani and Prof. Dr. Sason Shaik

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200689

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spin-state effects: In [(Cz)MnVO] complexes, even with singlet closed-shell ground states, the reactive state is the open-shell triplet B state (SB=1) that has a high oxyl radical character and a transition state (TS) stabilized by exchange-enhanced reactivity (EER; see picture). The dramatic axial ligand effect originates in the EER of this state.

    27. Anion Transport

      Squaramides as Potent Transmembrane Anion Transporters (pages 4426–4430)

      Nathalie Busschaert, Isabelle L. Kirby, Sarah Young, Dr. Simon J. Coles, Dr. Peter N. Horton, Dr. Mark E. Light and Prof. Dr. Philip A. Gale

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200729

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Square peg in a round ball: Squaramides are shown to be potent transmembrane anion transporters for both chloride and bicarbonate, performing better than the thiourea and urea analogues. Studies into the nature of this transport point to a mobile carrier mechanism, where the squaramide delivers the anion cargo across the lipid bilayer (see scheme, green sphere=anion). These drug-like molecules provide a platform for the development of a new generation of anion-transport systems.

    28. Activity-Based Profiling

      Triple Bioorthogonal Ligation Strategy for Simultaneous Labeling of Multiple Enzymatic Activities (pages 4431–4434)

      Lianne I. Willems, Nan Li, Dr. Bogdan I. Florea, Mark Ruben, Prof. Gijsbert A. van der Marel and Prof. Herman S. Overkleeft

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200923

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three at the same time: A ligation strategy combining tetrazine–norbornene cycloaddition, Staudinger–Bertozzi ligation, and copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction was used to label the three catalytic activities of the proteasome simultaneously in a single experiment. The orthogonality of the three ligation reactions enables selective monitoring of multiple targets at the same time in complex biological samples.

    29. Fullerene Peapods

      Hydrogen-Driven Collapse of C60 Inside Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 4435–4439)

      Dr. Alexandr V. Talyzin, Serhiy M. Luzan, Dr. Ilya V. Anoshkin, Dr. Albert G. Nasibulin, Dr. Hua Jiang and Prof. Esko I. Kauppinen

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200946

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A small intruder: The reaction of C60 peapods with hydrogen was studied at elevated pressure and temperature and compared with the reaction of bulk C60 powder. At temperatures above 500 °C the reaction results in a collapse of the fullerene cage structure and formation of various hydrocarbon molecules. Direct evidence was given for the surprising ability of hydrogen to penetrate into the inner space of C60 peapods and to react with the fullerenes (see picture).

    30. Synthetic Methods

      Synthesis of Sulfondiimines by N-Chlorosuccinimide-Mediated Oxidative Imination of Sulfiliminium Salts (pages 4440–4443)

      Dr. Mathieu Candy, Carole Guyon, Stefanie Mersmann, Prof. Dr. Jia-Rong Chen and Prof. Dr. Carsten Bolm

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Access to sulfondiimines: The oxidative one-pot chlorination–imination sequence of in situ generated free sulfilimines by N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS) allows the preparation of N-monosubstituted sulfondiimines under mild reaction conditions with excellent functional-group tolerance (see scheme; Mes=2,4,6-trimethylphenylsulfonyl)

    31. Oxygen Activation

      Activation of Molecular Oxygen by Anionic Gold Clusters (pages 4444–4447)

      Alex P. Woodham, Prof. Dr. Gerard Meijer and Dr. André Fielicke

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108958

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A golden opportunity: Molecular oxygen is found to be converted into a superoxo (O2) species upon complexation to gold-cluster anions containing an even number of Au atoms. Vibrational spectra (see scheme) reveal small variations in the extent of O[BOND]O bond activation dependent upon the electron affinity of the parent cluster.

    32. Nanoreactors

      Synthetic Bio-nanoreactor: Mechanical and Chemical Control of Polymersome Membrane Permeability (pages 4448–4451)

      Jens Gaitzsch, Dr. Dietmar Appelhans, Dr. Linge Wang, Prof. Giuseppe Battaglia and Prof. Brigitte Voit

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108814

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      pH-sensitive polymersomes have been stabilized by UV cross-linking after incorporation of an enzyme in a synthetic bio-nanoreactor without transmembrane proteins. This stabilization allows the reversible swelling and deswelling of the polymersomes upon changes in the pH value. The controlled reaction of the enclosed enzyme could be monitored selectively at pH 6, when the substrate could penetrate the membrane.

    33. Calcium Hydrides

      A Cationic Calcium Hydride Cluster Stabilized by Cyclen-Derived Macrocyclic N,N,N,N Ligands (pages 4452–4455)

      Dr. Phillip Jochmann, Julien P. Davin, Dr. Thomas P. Spaniol, Prof. Dr. Laurent Maron and Prof. Dr. Jun Okuda

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200690

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cationic calcium hydride complexes with a [Ca33-H)2] core were prepared from different organocalcium precursors and Ph2SiH2. The hydride complexes were found to be active in the catalytic hydrosilylation and hydrogenation of 1,1-diphenylethene.

    34. Gold Catalysis

      Simple Gold-Catalyzed Synthesis of Benzofulvenes—gem-Diaurated Species as “Instant Dual-Activation” Precatalysts (pages 4456–4460)

      Prof. Dr. A. Stephen K. Hashmi, Dipl.-Chem. Ingo Braun, Dipl.-Chem. Pascal Nösel, Dipl.-Chem. Johannes Schädlich, M. Sc. Marcel Wieteck, Dr. Matthias Rudolph and Dr. Frank Rominger

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201109183

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alkyl-substituted diynes deliver benzofulvenes in a unique gold-catalyzed reaction. The catalytic cycle involves the formation of gold acetylides by alkynyl C–H activation, the formation of vinylidene gold(I) intermediates by dual activation, and alkyl C–H activation by the vinylidene gold(I) species. gem-Diaurated species obtained from the catalysis reactions prove to be highly active catalysts for these conversions.

    35. Boryl Complexes

      Organoaluminum Boryl Complexes (pages 4461–4465)

      Nicole Dettenrieder, Dr. H. Martin Dietrich, Christoph Schädle, Dr. Cäcilia Maichle-Mössmer, Prof. Dr. Karl W. Törnroos and Prof. Dr. Reiner Anwander

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200954

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Al B there for Lu: Boryllithium (THF)2Li{B(NArCH)2} (Ar=C6H3iPr2-2,6) reacts with excess AlMe3 to give dimeric {Me2Al[B(NArCH)2]}2, which readily adds to [LnMe3]n forming homoleptic Ln[AlMe3B(NArCH)2]3 (Ln=Y, Lu, see picture). The reaction with [LnMe3]n underlines the high methyl mobility and strong Al[BOND]B bonding in heteroleptic {Me2Al[B(NArCH)2]}2, which is also evidenced by NMR spectroscopy.

    36. Protein Labeling

      A Genetically Encoded Norbornene Amino Acid for the Mild and Selective Modification of Proteins in a Copper-Free Click Reaction (pages 4466–4469)

      Dipl.-Ing. Emine Kaya, Dr. Milan Vrabel, M. Sc. Christian Deiml, M. Sc. Stefan Prill, Dr. Viviana S. Fluxa and Prof. Dr. Thomas Carell

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201109252

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Built in for clicks: A specially evolved pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase from Methanosarcina mazei was used to incorporate a norbornene amino acid into proteins in E. coli. This unit can be site-selectively modified under mild physiological conditions using a [3+2] cycloaddition reaction with nitrile imines (see scheme).

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: A Genetically Encoded Norbornene Amino Acid for the Mild and Selective Modification of Proteins in a Copper-Free Click Reaction

      Vol. 51, Issue 22, 5277, Article first published online: 23 MAY 2012

    37. Heme Complexes

      Guanidine-Ferroheme Coordination in the Mutant Protein Nitrophorin 4(L130R) (pages 4470–4473)

      Chunmao He, Dr. Martin R. Fuchs, Dr. Hideaki Ogata and Dr. Markus Knipp

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108691

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Prestidigitation: In a mutant of the heme protein nitrophorin 4, the first binding of guanidine to iron in a porphyrin is observed (see structure). The protein pocket has two effects that aid this binding: its overall structure holds the ligands together providing binding energy from the chelate effect and it facilitates the deprotonation of the highly basic guanidine residue.

    38. Protein Purification

      The Most Stable Protein–Ligand Complex: Applications for One-Step Affinity Purification and Identification of Protein Assemblies (pages 4474–4478)

      Christoph Giese, Franziska Zosel, Dr. Chasper Puorger and Prof. Rudi Glockshuber

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108747

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An alternative to tagging: The thermodynamically most stable protein–ligand complex known to date (KD=1.5×10−20M) consists of the two components FimGt and DsF, portions of two different subunits of the type 1 pilus protein complex. The first technical applications of this new complex are the single-step purification and identification of multiprotein complexes from cell extracts.

    39. DNA-Templated Reactions

      Consecutive Signal Amplification for DNA Detection Based on De Novo Fluorophore Synthesis and Host–Guest Chemistry (pages 4479–4483)

      Dr. Xiao-Hua Chen, Dipl.-Chem. Alexander Roloff and Prof. Dr. Oliver Seitz

      Article first published online: 22 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108845

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two is more than one: A method has been developed in which a DNA template triggers a Wittig reaction that leads to transfer of a benzylidene group from a DNA-linked phosphonium salt to a DNA-linked benzaldehyde. A synthetic receptor such as α-cyclodextrin then encapsulates the newly formed stilbene and triggers further signal increases.

    40. Homochirality

      Anisotropy Spectra of Amino Acids (pages 4484–4487)

      Dr. Cornelia Meinert, Dr. Jan Hendrik Bredehöft, Dr. Jean-Jacques Filippi, Prof. Dr. Yannick Baraud, Dr. Laurent Nahon, Dr. Frank Wien, Dr. Nykola C. Jones, Dr. Søren V. Hoffmann and Prof. Dr. Uwe J. Meierhenrich

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108997

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light on chirality: To predict the enantiomeric enrichment that can be induced into racemic organic molecules with the help of circularly polarized light, the anisotropy factor g is essential. Anisotropy spectra g=f(λ) recorded for proteinaceous amino acids provide crucial information on the transfer of chirality from light to matter.

  15. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Editorial
    7. Graphical Abstract
    8. News
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    16. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 19/2012 (page 4490)

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201290033

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION