Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 2

January 9, 2012

Volume 51, Issue 2

Pages 279–556, 305a–307

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Self-Assembled Light-Harvesting Peptide Nanotubes for Mimicking Natural Photosynthesis (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2/2012) (page 279)

      Jae Hong Kim, Minah Lee, Joon Seok Lee and Prof. Chan Beum Park

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107507

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light-harvesting peptide nanotubes that integrate photosynthetic units through self-assembly are presented by C. B. Park and co-workers in their Communication on page 517 ff. Structure and electrochemical properties of the peptide nanotubes are similar to those of photosystem I in natural photosynthesis and thus allow the peptide nanotubes to mimick natural photosynthesis.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Production and NMR Characterization of Hyperpolarized 107,109Ag Complexes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2/2012) (page 280)

      Dr. Lloyd Lumata, Prof. Dr. Matthew E. Merritt, Zohreh Hashami, Dr. S. James Ratnakar and Prof. Dr. Zoltan Kovacs

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107488

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      107Ag and 109Ag undergo simultaneous dynamic nuclear polarization as described by Z. Kovacs et al. in their Communication on page 525 ff. The large liquid-state NMR enhancements achieved allow the Ag NMR spectroscopic characterization of Ag+ complexes in the mM concentration range. Both hyperpolarized isotopes have long T1 relaxation times, enabling NMR experiments to be performed in which the signal from the 107Ag nuclei can be detected after destroying the 109Ag magnetization by radio-frequency excitation.

  3. Inside Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Inside Back Cover: Cyclodextrin-Induced Auto-Healing of Hybrid Polyoxometalates (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2/2012) (page 557)

      Dr. Guillaume Izzet, Dr. Mickaël Ménand, Benjamin Matt, Séverine Renaudineau, Lise-Marie Chamoreau, Prof. Matthieu Sollogoub and Prof. Anna Proust

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108285

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Auto-healing of a polyoxometalate hybrid was induced by a cyclodextrin. In their Communication on page 487 ff., G. Izzet, M. Ménand, M. Sollogoub, A. Proust, and co-workers describe the first host–guest complex involving a cyclodextrin and polyoxometalate hybrid containing an organic moiety. The encapsulation of the organic moiety prevents its degradation when it is released by a basic stress and allows complete restoration of the hybrid upon neutralization.

  4. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Back Cover: Sticky Nanoparticles: A Platform for siRNA Delivery by a Bis(zinc(II) dipicolylamine)-Functionalized, Self-Assembled Nanoconjugate (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2/2012) (page 558)

      Dr. Gang Liu, Dr. Ki Young Choi, Dr. Ashwinkumar Bhirde, Magdalena Swierczewska, Dr. Juan Yin, Sang Wook Lee, Prof. Jae Hyung Park, Prof. Jong In Hong, Prof. Jin Xie, Dr. Gang Niu, Dr. Dale O. Kiesewetter, Dr. Seulki Lee and Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107924

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new platform for delivering siRNA is described by S. Lee, X. Chen, et al. in their Communication on page 445 ff. Multifunctional, self-assembled, polymeric nanoparticles composed of biodegradable hyaluronic acid, for selectively targeting tumors and cell penetration, and a phosphate-binding ZnII dipicolylamine analogue, for high siRNA binding affinity, provide simultaneous delivery of small-molecule drugs along with siRNA. This system offers additive and synergistic therapeutic effects.

  5. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2/2012 (pages 283–295)

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201290000

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  7. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Nicolai Cramer (page 302)

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106649

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “If I won the lottery, I would wonder how on earth my name appeared on the ticket. The greatest scientific advance in the next decade will be the discovery of a second habitable earth …” This and more about Nicolai Cramer can be found on page 302.

  8. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  9. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Privileged Chiral Ligands and Catalysts. Edited by Qi-Lin Zhou. (page 305)

      Clément Mazet

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106819

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2011. 462 pp., hardcover, € 139.00.—ISBN 978-3527327041

    2. Modern Inorganic Synthetic Chemistry. Edited by Ruren Xu, Wenqin Pang and Qisheng Huo. (pages 305a–307)

      Wolfgang Bensch

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106444

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2010. 610 pp., hardcover, € 230.00.—ISBN 978-0444535993

  10. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Polyoxometalates

      Ionothermal Synthesis of Polyoxometalates (pages 308–309)

      Ejaz Ahmed and Prof. Dr. Michael Ruck

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An emerging approach: In the ionothermal synthesis of transition-metal-oxide clusters an ionic liquid acts as a solvent, structure-directing agent, and charge-compensating species. The method may open new convenient routes for the synthesis of polyoxometalate-based materials.

    2. Genetic Code

      Genetically Encoded Photocrosslinkers as Molecular Probes To Study G-Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) (pages 310–312)

      Prof. Dr. Annette G. Beck-Sickinger and Prof. Dr. Nediljko Budisa

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The genetic code was expanded with orthogonal pairs to introduce photoactivatable amino acids into G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in a noninvasive manner. In this way the receptor surface could be mapped by searching for specific ligand interaction sites and the complex dynamics could be studied. This method is also useful for probing the structure of GPCR complexes in living cells.

  11. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Domino Reactions

      N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalyzed Domino Reactions (pages 314–325)

      Dipl.-Chem. André Grossmann and Prof. Dr. Dieter Enders

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105415

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Every Jack will find his Jill: Uniting unique activation modes of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysts with the concept of domino reactions (see picture, EWG=electron-withdrawing group), a new fast-growing field came into the spotlight in last three years. The state of the art of this field is presented and the definition of the domino reactions for the NHC catalysis is re-considered.

  12. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Mixed-Valence Compounds

      Organic Mixed-Valence Compounds: A Playground for Electrons and Holes (pages 326–392)

      Dipl.-Chem. Alexander Heckmann and Prof. Dr. Christoph Lambert

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100944

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mix and match: Organic mixed-valence compounds are excellent model systems to study fundamental electron- and charge-transfer phenomena, as well as offering numerous perspectives for application. Particularly attractive is the possibility to systematically change the properties, since such compounds can be synthesized with a number of different redox centers and bridging units.

  13. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Asymmetric Hydroamination

      A Chiral Phenoxyamine Magnesium Catalyst for the Enantioselective Hydroamination/Cyclization of Aminoalkenes and Intermolecular Hydroamination of Vinyl Arenes (pages 394–398)

      Dr. Xiaoming Zhang, Dr. Thomas J. Emge and Prof. Dr. Kai C. Hultzsch

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105079

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      If Grignard had only known! A chiral magnesium complex catalyzes the intramolecular hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes with high efficiency at temperatures as low as −20 °C and enantioselectivities as high as 93 % ee. The high activity of this system also allows the catalytic intermolecular anti-Markovnikov addition of pyrrolidine and benzylamine to vinyl arenes.

    2. Hydrosilylation with Silicon(II)

      Hydrosilylation of Alkynes by Ni(CO)3-Stabilized Silicon(II) Hydride (pages 399–403)

      Miriam Stoelzel, Dr. Carsten Präsang, Dr. Shigeyoshi Inoue, Dr. Stephan Enthaler and Prof. Dr. Matthias Driess

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105722

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Not copy and paste: Although β-diketiminato ligands have been employed for the stabilization of GeII and SnII hydrides, the corresponding SiII hydride is not accessible. However, coordination of silicon(II) to a {Ni(CO)3} fragment allowed the isolation of the first SiII hydride metal complex 1. This complex was used for the first silicon(II)-based and Ni0-mediated, stereoselective hydrosilylation of alkynes. R=phenyl, tolyl.

    3. Thin Oxide Films

      The Atomic Structure of a Metal-Supported Vitreous Thin Silica Film (pages 404–407)

      Leonid Lichtenstein, Christin Büchner, Dr. Bing Yang, Dr. Shamil Shaikhutdinov, Dr. Markus Heyde, Dr. Marek Sierka, Radosław Włodarczyk, Prof. Joachim Sauer and Prof. Hans-Joachim Freund

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Clear as glass: The atomic structure of a metal-supported vitreous thin silica film was resolved using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Based on the STM image, a model was constructed and the atomic arrangement of the thin silica glass determined (see picture). The total pair correlation function of the structural model shows good agreement with diffraction experiments performed on vitreous silica.

    4. DNA Lesions

      Mechanism of UV-Induced Formation of Dewar Lesions in DNA (pages 408–411)

      Karin Haiser, Dr. Benjamin P. Fingerhut, Korbinian Heil, Dr. Andreas Glas, Teja T. Herzog, Bert M. Pilles, Dr. Wolfgang J. Schreier, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Zinth, Prof. Dr. Regina de Vivie-Riedle and Prof. Dr. Thomas Carell

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The importance of a backbone: The mechanism of formation of Dewar lesions (see scheme) has been investigated by using femtosecond IR spectroscopy and ab initio calculations of the exited state. The 4π electrocyclization is rather slow, occurs with an unusual high quantum yield, and—surprisingly—is controlled by the phosphate backbone.

    5. Protein Engineering

      Creation of a Lipase Highly Selective for trans Fatty Acids by Protein Engineering (pages 412–414)

      Dr. Henrike B. Brundiek, Dr. Andrew S. Evitt, Dr. Robert Kourist and Prof. Dr. Uwe T. Bornscheuer

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sorting out: Protein engineering of lipase CAL-A led to the discovery of mutants with excellent chemoselectivity for the removal of trans and saturated fatty acids from partially hydrogenated vegetable oil. These fatty acids, identified as a major risk factor for human health, can now be removed by enzyme catalysis.

    6. Peptide Synthesis

      Congeneric Lantibiotics from Ribosomal In Vivo Peptide Synthesis with Noncanonical Amino Acids (pages 415–418)

      Florian Oldach, Rashed Al Toma, Anja Kuthning, Tânia Caetano, Prof. Sónia Mendo, Prof. Nediljko Budisa and Prof. Roderich D. Süssmuth

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106154

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Expanded repetoire: Synthetic amino acids translated into propeptides dramatically increase the chemical diversity of the two-component lantibiotic lichenicidin. This opens new routes towards novel and unique peptide antibiotic sequences, which could display features important for medical applications.

    7. Selenenyl Fluorides

      Trip2C6H3SeF: The First Isolated Selenenyl Fluoride (pages 419–422)

      Dr. Helmut Poleschner, Stefan Ellrodt, Moritz Malischewski, Jun-ya Nakatsuji, Christian Rohner and Prof. Dr. Konrad Seppelt

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106708

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Joining the stable: The first examples of the highly instable selenenyl fluorides RSeF are prepared from the reaction on the tin selenide RSeSnMe3 with XeF2. Through the use of extremely large protecting groups (m-terphenyl ligands) which stabilizes the RSeF units against disproportionation, the compounds could be isolated and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal structure analysis (see structure).

    8. Water Oxidation

      High Photocurrent in Silicon Photoanodes Catalyzed by Iron Oxide Thin Films for Water Oxidation (pages 423–427)

      Kimin Jun, Yun Seog Lee, Tonio Buonassisi and Prof. Joseph M. Jacobson

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104367

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silicon splits: The application of silicon to water oxidation is limited due to unfavorable interface properties. However, these can be circumvented by using a high-performance silicon photoanode with a catalytically active iron oxide thin film (see picture). This approach results in photocurrents as high as 17 mA cm−2 under 1 sun and zero overpotential conditions.

    9. Tissue Engineering

      Arbitrary Self-Assembly of Peptide Extracellular Microscopic Matrices (pages 428–431)

      Angelo Bella, Dr. Santanu Ray, Michael Shaw and Dr. Maxim G. Ryadnov

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104647

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two faces for one matrix: A single bifaceted cyclopeptide block forms highly branched, porous, and intricate fibrillar networks, which span microscopic dimensions and mimic the extracellular matrix to support cell growth and proliferation (see picture). The peptide block has two domains connected with triglycine linkers (GGG); the domains consist of positively (blue) and negatively (red) charged heptads that provide interactions between different blocks.

    10. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

      Characterization of Membrane Proteins in Isolated Native Cellular Membranes by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy without Purification and Reconstitution (pages 432–435)

      Dr. Tomas Jacso, Dr. W. Trent Franks, Dr. Honor Rose, Uwe Fink, Dr. Jana Broecker, Prof. Dr. Sandro Keller, Prof. Dr. Hartmut Oschkinat and Prof. Dr. Bernd Reif

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201104987

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes are accessible by dynamic nuclear polarization magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy without the need of purification and reconstitution (see picture). Dynamic nuclear polarization is essential to achieve the required gain in sensitivity to observe the membrane protein of interest.

    11. White-Light Emitters

      Solution-Processable White-Light-Emitting Hybrid Semiconductor Bulk Materials with High Photoluminescence Quantum Efficiency (pages 436–439)

      Mojgan Roushan, Xiao Zhang and Prof. Jing Li

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Glowing white: Bulk hybrid semiconductor materials built from periodic nanostructured 2D layers of ZnS emit bright white light. Their emission intensity, quantum efficiency, and color quality can be systematically tuned by varying the composition of both the inorganic and organic components. The materials show great promise as a new type of single-phase white-light-emitting phosphors.

    12. Benzene Hydroxylation

      Electrochemical Oxidation of Benzene to Phenol (pages 440–444)

      Byungik Lee, Hiroto Naito and Dr. Takashi Hibino

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105229

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gas-phase electrochemistry: The direct hydroxylation of benzene to phenol was investigated using an electrochemical cell. The production of phenol over a VOx anode was found to be significant at 50 °C. The resultant current efficiency for phenol production and selectivity toward phenol reached 76.5 and 94.7 %, respectively.

    13. Drug Delivery

      Sticky Nanoparticles: A Platform for siRNA Delivery by a Bis(zinc(II) dipicolylamine)-Functionalized, Self-Assembled Nanoconjugate (pages 445–449)

      Dr. Gang Liu, Dr. Ki Young Choi, Dr. Ashwinkumar Bhirde, Magdalena Swierczewska, Dr. Juan Yin, Sang Wook Lee, Prof. Jae Hyung Park, Prof. Jong In Hong, Prof. Jin Xie, Dr. Gang Niu, Dr. Dale O. Kiesewetter, Dr. Seulki Lee and Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105565

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Delivering the goods: Multifunctional, self-assembled, polymeric nanoparticles for the simultaneous delivery of small-molecule drugs and siRNA have been synthesized. The nanoparticles are composed of biodegradable hyaluronic acid, for tumor targeting and cellular delivery, and a high siRNA binding affinity is provided by a ZnII-dipicolylamine analogue as an artificial phosphate-binding receptor (see scheme).

    14. Cell Labeling

      Supramolecular Host–Guest Interaction for Labeling and Detection of Cellular Biomarkers (pages 450–454)

      Dr. Sarit S. Agasti, Dr. Monty Liong, Dr. Carlos Tassa, Dr. Hyun Jung Chung, Prof. Stanley Y. Shaw, Prof. Hakho Lee and Prof. Ralph Weissleder

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105670

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Be my guest: A supramolecular host–guest interaction is utilized for highly efficient bioorthogonal labeling of cellular targets. Antibodies labeled with a cyclodextrin host molecule bind to adamantane-labeled magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (see picture) and provide an amplifiable strategy for biomarker detection that can be adapted to different diagnostic techniques such as molecular profiling or magnetic cell sorting.

    15. Sensors

      A General Strategy To Construct Fluorogenic Probes from Charge-Generation Polymers (CGPs) and AIE-Active Fluorogens through Triggered Complexation (pages 455–459)

      Changhua Li, Tao Wu, Prof. Dr. Chunyan Hong, Prof. Dr. Guoqing Zhang and Prof. Dr. Shiyong Liu

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105735

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Trip the light of plastic: An aqueous fluorogenic sensing system consisting of selective and specific analyte-triggerable charge-generation polymers (CGPs) and a negatively charged aggregation-induced emission active fluorogen (TPE-COOH4) is presented. In the presence of a triggering analyte of interest, the CGPs undergo electrostatic complexation with TPE-COOH4 leading to intense fluorescence emission due to the aggregation of TPE-COOH4.

    16. Therapeutic Carriers

      Engineered Bacterially Expressed Polypeptides: Assembly into Polymer Particles with Tailored Degradation Profiles (pages 460–464)

      Denison H. C. Chang, Dr. Angus P. R. Johnston, Dr. Kim L. Wark, Kerry Breheney and Prof. Frank Caruso

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In nature, the sequence of amino acids in a protein is determined by the genetic code. Biosynthesis of polypeptides by bacteria can be used to exploit this natural process to afford exact control over properties such as molecular weight, chemical functionality, and structure. It is demonstrated how control over the positioning of functional groups can be used to tune the degradation of assembled polypeptide particles (see scheme).

    17. Antibiotic Resistance

      A Structural Basis for the Antibiotic Resistance Conferred by an A1408G Mutation in 16S rRNA and for the Antiprotozoal Activity of Aminoglycosides (pages 465–468)

      Dr. Jiro Kondo

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106084

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Resistance explained: The crystal structures of the ribosomal decoding A site with an A1408G antibiotic-resistance mutation were solved in the presence and absence of the aminoglycoside geneticin (see structure, geneticin carbon framework in yellow). These structures show how bacteria acquire high-level resistance against aminoglycosides by the mutation.

    18. Protein Dynamics

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Noncovalent Dimerization of Ubiquitin (pages 469–472)

      Zhu Liu, Prof. Wei-Ping Zhang, Qiong Xing, Dr. Xuefeng Ren, Prof. Maili Liu and Prof. Chun Tang

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106190

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Another kind of dynamics: Ubiquitin noncovalently dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 5 mM. The two subunits adopt an array of relative orientations, utilizing an interface also for binding to other proteins (see picture). Quaternary fluctuation among members of the dimer ensemble constitutes a different kind of dynamics that complements the tertiary dynamics of each ubiquitin subunit.

    19. Foldamer–DNA Recognition

      Deciphering Aromatic Oligoamide Foldamer–DNA Interactions (pages 473–477)

      Dr. Laurence Delaurière, Dr. Zeyuan Dong, Dr. Katta Laxmi-Reddy, Dr. Frédéric Godde, Dr. Jean-Jacques Toulmé and Dr. Ivan Huc

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106208

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Finest selection: Side-chain selective, end-group selective, diastereoselective, and RNA- vs. DNA-selective interactions have been revealed between multiturn helical aromatic amide foldamers having cationic side chains and G-quadruplex aptamers.

    20. Lewis Acids

      Sensing of Aqueous Fluoride Anions by Cationic Stibine–Palladium Complexes (pages 478–481)

      Casey R. Wade, Iou-Sheng Ke and Prof. Dr. François P. Gabbaï

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106242

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Turn on the lantern! The stibine donor ligand of a cationic palladium complex acts as a Lewis acid and reacts with a fluoride anion to afford the corresponding fluorostiboranyl–palladium species (see scheme). Bindung of the fluoride anion to the antimony center induces a change in denticity of the triphosphine unit and leads to a bright-orange trigonal-bipyramidal d8 lantern complex.

    21. Enzyme Catalysis

      Mechanism-Inspired Engineering of Phenylalanine Aminomutase for Enhanced β-Regioselective Asymmetric Amination of Cinnamates (pages 482–486)

      Dr. Bian Wu, Dr. Wiktor Szymański, Gjalt G. Wybenga, Matthew M. Heberling, Dr. Sebastian Bartsch, Dr. Stefaan de Wildeman, Dr. Gerrit J. Poelarends, Prof. Ben L. Feringa, Prof. Bauke W. Dijkstra and Prof. Dick B. Janssen

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106372

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Turn to switch: A mutant of phenylalanine aminomutase was engineered that can catalyze the regioselective amination of cinnamate derivatives (see scheme, red) to, for example, β-amino acids. This regioselectivity, along with the X-ray crystal structures, suggests two distinct carboxylate binding modes differentiated by Cβ[BOND]Cipso bond rotation, which determines if β- (see scheme) or α-addition takes place.

    22. Polyoxometalate–cyclodextrin assembly

      Cyclodextrin-Induced Auto-Healing of Hybrid Polyoxometalates (pages 487–490)

      Dr. Guillaume Izzet, Dr. Mickaël Ménand, Benjamin Matt, Séverine Renaudineau, Lise-Marie Chamoreau, Prof. Matthieu Sollogoub and Prof. Anna Proust

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106727

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      You'll never walk alone: An auto-healing process of the first host–guest complex involving a polyoxometalate hybrid and a cyclodextrin is reported. Indeed, this inclusion complex allows the complete restoration of the anchored organic moiety released by a basic stress, a process otherwise not fully reversible.

    23. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Syntheses of Lycopodium Alkaloids (+)-Fawcettimine, (+)-Fawcettidine, and (−)-8-Deoxyserratinine (pages 491–495)

      Houhua Li, Xiaoming Wang and Prof. Dr. Xiaoguang Lei

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106753

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A shared story: Three fawcettimine- and serratinine-type Lycopodium alkaloids are prepared from a common tetracyclic spirodiketone intermediate in concise total syntheses (see scheme). The intermediate was constructed by a remarkable biosynthesis-inspired transannular N[BOND]C bond formation to the spiro-configured carbon center and a hydroxy-directed pinacol coupling promoted by SmI2.

    24. Protein Nanoconjugation

      Site-Specific Conjugation of ScFvs Antibodies to Nanoparticles by Bioorthogonal Strain-Promoted Alkyne–Nitrone Cycloaddition (pages 496–499)

      Miriam Colombo, Dr. Silvia Sommaruga, Dr. Serena Mazzucchelli, Dr. Laura Polito, Paolo Verderio, Dr. Patrizia Galeffi, Prof. Fabio Corsi, Prof. Paolo Tortora and Dr. Davide Prosperi

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106775

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Particularly suitable: An N-terminal serine mutant of anti-HER2 scFv antibody was conjugated to polymer-coated magnetofluorescent nanoparticles by strain-promoted alkyne–nitrone cycloaddition. The resulting nanoparticles (see scheme) proved effective in targeting and labeling HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

    25. Impure Graphene

      Metallic Impurities in Graphenes Prepared from Graphite Can Dramatically Influence Their Properties (pages 500–503)

      Dr. Adriano Ambrosi, Sze Yin Chee, Bahareh Khezri, Prof. Richard D. Webster, Prof. Zdeněk Sofer and Prof. Martin Pumera

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106917

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All at C? Graphenes prepared by the top-down exfoliation of graphite are shown to contain metallic impurities (see scheme, metal impurities shown as black dots). These impurities may dominate their properties and can have a negative influence on their potential applications.

    26. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Combined Cation–π and Anion–π Interactions for Zwitterion Recognition (pages 504–508)

      Olivier Perraud, Prof. Vincent Robert, Prof. Heinz Gornitzka, Dr. Alexandre Martinez and Dr. Jean-Pierre Dutasta

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106934

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Brothers and enemies: Anion–π and cation–π interactions act in a synergistic way when gathered in the molecular cavity of a hemicryptophane host, affording an efficient contribution (−170 kJ mol−1) in zwitterion recognition. NMR titration experiments and calculations reveal the positioning of the guest in the cavity of the heteroditopic receptor. This study emphasizes the importance of anion–π bonds in host–guest chemistry.

    27. Protein–Protein Interactions

      Phosphopeptide-Dependent Labeling of 1433 ζ Proteins by Fusicoccin-Based Fluorescent Probes (pages 509–512)

      Michiko Takahashi, Akie Kawamura, Prof. Nobuo Kato, Prof. Tsuyoshi Nishi, Prof. Itaru Hamachi and Prof. Junko Ohkanda

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106995

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorescent combination: Cell-penetrating probes derived from the diterpene fusicoccin can form ternary complexes with 14–3–3 proteins and phosphopeptide ligands, whereupon the probes site-specifically attach a fluorescent tag onto the surface of the 14–3–3 proteins.

    28. Reaction Mechanisms

      The Mechanism of the α-Ketoacid–Hydroxylamine Amide-Forming Ligation (pages 513–516)

      Ivano Pusterla and Prof. Dr. Jeffrey W. Bode

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107198

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three-ring circus! Surprisingly complex molecular acrobatics are observed in the mechanism of the α-ketoacid–hydroxylamine amide-forming ligation reaction. Although this remarkable reaction can already be used for the chemoselective union of large, unprotected peptide fragments the elucidated mechanism provides important clues to extending its application to larger and more complex biological targets.

    29. Artificial Photosynthesis

      Self-Assembled Light-Harvesting Peptide Nanotubes for Mimicking Natural Photosynthesis (pages 517–520)

      Jae Hong Kim, Minah Lee, Joon Seok Lee and Prof. Chan Beum Park

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103244

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light-harvesting peptide nanotubes are synthesized by the self-assembly of diphenylalanine with THPP and platinum nanoparticles (nPt; see picture; TEOA=triethanolamine). The light-harvesting peptide nanotubes are suitable for mimicking photosynthesis because of their structure and electrochemical properties that are similar to the ones of photosystem I in natural photosynthesis.

    30. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Catalytic Enantioselective 1,2-Diboration of 1,3-Dienes: Versatile Reagents for Stereoselective Allylation (pages 521–524)

      Laura T. Kliman, Scott N. Mlynarski, Grace E. Ferris and Prof. Dr. James P. Morken

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201105716

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      More with boron: The development of catalytic enantioselective 1,2-diboration of 1,3-dienes enables a new strategy for enantioselective carbonyl allylation reactions (see scheme). These reactions occur with outstanding levels of stereoselection and can be applied to both monosubstituted and 1,1-disubstituted dienes. The carbonyl allylation reactions provide enantiomerically enriched functionalized homoallylic alcohol products.

    31. Silver NMR Spectroscopy

      Production and NMR Characterization of Hyperpolarized 107,109Ag Complexes (pages 525–527)

      Dr. Lloyd Lumata, Prof. Dr. Matthew E. Merritt, Zohreh Hashami, Dr. S. James Ratnakar and Prof. Dr. Zoltan Kovacs

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106073

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Both isotopes of silver, 107Ag and 109Ag, were simultaneously polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), thus allowing large signal enhancements and the NMR characterization of Ag complexes in the millimolar concentration range. Since both isotopes have long relaxation times T1, the hyperpolarized NMR signal of one isotope could still be observed even after the magnetization of the other isotope had been destroyed by radio-frequency pulses.

    32. Cross-Coupling

      Alkylboronic Esters from Copper-Catalyzed Borylation of Primary and Secondary Alkyl Halides and Pseudohalides (pages 528–532)

      Chu-Ting Yang, Zhen-Qi Zhang, Hazmi Tajuddin, Chen-Cheng Wu, Jun Liang, Jing-Hui Liu, Yao Fu, Maria Czyzewska, Dr. Patrick G. Steel, Prof. Dr. Todd B. Marder and Prof. Dr. Lei Liu

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106299

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Easy access: An unprecedented copper-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of the title compounds with diboron reagents is described (see scheme; Ts=4-toluenesulfonyl). This reaction can be used to prepare both primary and secondary alkylboronic esters having diverse structures and functional groups. The resulting products would be difficult to access by other means.

    33. Stereochemical Elucidation

      Spectroscopic Evidence for the Unusual Stereochemical Configuration of an Endosome-Specific Lipid (pages 533–535)

      Hui-Hui Tan, Dr. Asami Makino, Dr. Kumar Sudesh, Dr. Peter Greimel and Dr. Toshihide Kobayashi

      Article first published online: 1 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106470

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      At a glance: The stereochemical configuration of the diglycerophosphate backbone of the endosome-specific lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP, see picture) was determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Enantiomeric discrimination was facilitated by introduction of D-camphor ketals as chiral shift reagents, and enantiopure synthetic BMP analogues were prepared as reference materials. Natural BMP exhibited the unusual sn-1,1′ diglycerophosphate backbone.

    34. Trifluoromethylation

      A General Strategy for the Perfluoroalkylation of Arenes and Arylbromides by Using Arylboronate Esters and [(phen)CuRF] (pages 536–539)

      Dr. Nichole D. Litvinas, Patrick S. Fier and Prof. Dr. John F. Hartwig

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106668

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A versatile method for the synthesis of aryl perfluoroalkanes from arenes and aryl bromides is described. Substituted arenes or aryl bromides are converted in situ to an aryl boronate ester that readily undergoes perfluoroalkylation in air with [(phen)CuRF]. A broad range of aryl bromide substrates were perfluoroalkylated in good yield for the first time. [(phen)CuCF3] is now commercially available and has been prepared on 20 g scale.

    35. C[BOND]H Activation

      Highly Selective Trifluoromethylation of 1,3-Disubstituted Arenes through Iridium-Catalyzed Arene Borylation (pages 540–543)

      Tianfei Liu, Xinxin Shao, Dr. Yaming Wu and Prof. Dr. Qilong Shen

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201106673

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The old one two: A sequential iridium-catalyzed borylation and copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of arenes is described (see scheme; Pin=pinacol). The reaction is conducted under mild reaction conditions and tolerates a variety of functional groups. The advantages of this tandem procedure are demonstrated by the late-stage trifluoromethylation of a number of biologically active molecules.

    36. Catalytic Amide Synthesis

      Heterogeneously Catalyzed Synthesis of Primary Amides Directly from Primary Alcohols and Aqueous Ammonia (pages 544–547)

      Dr. Kazuya Yamaguchi, Hiroaki Kobayashi, Takamichi Oishi and Prof. Dr. Noritaka Mizuno

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the presence of a manganese oxide based octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2), a range of primary amides could be synthesized directly from primary alcohols and ammonia (see scheme). The observed catalysis was heterogeneous, and the recovered catalyst could be reused many times without an appreciable loss of its catalytic performance.

    37. Amide Solvolysis

      Switching Pathways: Room-Temperature Neutral Solvolysis and Substitution of Amides (pages 548–551)

      Dr. Marc Hutchby, Dr. Chris E. Houlden, Dr. Mairi F. Haddow, Dr. Simon N. G. Tyler, Prof. Dr. Guy C. Lloyd-Jones and Prof. Dr. Kevin I. Booker-Milburn

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107117

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stick or twist: By introducing steric hindrance at the nitrogen atom, stable linear amides bearing an electron-withdrawing α-substituent (Z=Ar, PhSO2, P(O)(OR)2, CN, or CO2R) can be induced to undergo solvolysis and substitution reactions through an elimination–addition mechanism (see picture). Key to this process is a low barrier to rotation around the amide bond and the α-substituent Z.

    38. Nanoplates

      Monitoring the Shape Evolution of Silver Nanoplates: A Marker Study (pages 552–555)

      James Goebl, Qiao Zhang, Le He and Prof. Yadong Yin

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107240

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Out of the frame: A marker study using gold frames was designed to reveal that silver nanoplates undergo a shape transition during their seeded growth from triangular to circular to hexagonal plates before ultimately returning to triangular structures with an orientation 180° relative to that of the original triangular seeds (see picture, the original gold triangular frame is visible at the center of the silver nanoplate).

  14. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Author Profile
    9. News
    10. Book Reviews
    11. Highlights
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 3/2012 (page 556)

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201290001

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION