Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 30

July 23, 2012

Volume 51, Issue 30

Pages 7335–7600

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Reactions of Hypervalent Iodonium Alkynyl Triflates with Azides: Generation of Cyanocarbenes / 1-Azido-1-Alkynes: Synthesis and Spectroscopic Characterization of Azidoacetylene (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2012) (page 7335)

      Dr. I. F. Dempsey Hyatt, Prof. Mitchell P. Croatt, Prof. Dr. Klaus Banert, René Arnold, Dr. Manfred Hagedorn, Philipp Thoss and Prof. Dr. Alexander A. Auer

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204825

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      Access to elusive alkynyl azides was accomplished with good yields by the key reaction of alkynyliodonium salts with azide salts; this synthesis opens a door not only to isolate and characterize azidoacetylene but also to prepare a variety of products via short-lived azidovinylidene and cyanocarbene intermediates. These two main aspects are reported in back-to-back Communications by I. F. D. Hyatt and M. P. Croatt on page 7511 ff. and K. Banert, A. Auer et al. page 7515 ff. Cover picture: Lauren Nichols.

    2. Inside Cover: Nanoparticle Core/Shell Architectures within MOF Crystals Synthesized by Reaction Diffusion (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2012) (page 7336)

      Dr. Yanhu Wei, Dr. Shuangbing Han, David A. Walker, Patrick E. Fuller and Prof. Dr. Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204560

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      Large MOF crystals constitute a porous matrix for the reaction-diffusion synthesis of monodisperse metal nanoparticles. B. A. Grzybowski et al. show in their Communication on page 7435 ff. that by appropriately timing the transport of metal salt precursors through the MOF against the kinetics of nanoparticle formation, it is possible to deposit different nanoparticles at different locations, including forming core and shell arrangements. When dissolved, these MOF/nanoparticle composites liberate the nanoparticles sequentially.

    3. Inside Back Cover: A Multicolor Nanoprobe for Detection and Imaging of Tumor-Related mRNAs in Living Cells (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2012) (page 7601)

      Dr. Na Li, Chenyang Chang, Wei Pan and Prof. Bo Tang

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204826

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      A multicolor nanoprobe has been developed to detect and image three tumor mRNAs in living cells. In their Communication on page 7426 ff., B. Tang et al. show that the multicolor nanoprobe can effectively distinguish breast cancer and liver cancer cells from normal cells, and also identify changes in the expression levels of mRNA. This approach could provide comprehensive and reliable information for early cancer detection, and avoid false positive results.

    4. Back Cover: Characterizing the Kinetics of Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Reactions by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2012) (page 7602)

      Virginia Joseph, Christian Engelbrekt, Prof. Dr. Jingdong Zhang, Dr. Ulrich Gernert, Prof. Dr. Jens Ulstrup and Prof. Dr. Janina Kneipp

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204787

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      Determining catalytic activity and reaction kinetics are key issues in catalysis research and analytical applications. In their Communication on page 7592 ff., J. Kneipp et al. describe the mapping of the kinetics of a catalytic reaction using surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The proximity of gold and platinum nanoparticles simultaneously immobilized on a glass surface enables interaction of the molecules with the platinum nanoparticles while they reside in the local optical fields of the gold nanoparticles.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
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      Editorial: Assessing Academic Researchers (pages 7338–7339)

      Prof. Dr. Richard N. Zare

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201011

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  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 30/2012 (pages 7341–7355)

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201290056

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Karl Anker Jørgensen (page 7364)

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201019

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      “The word “scientist” means to be creative and innovative. My secret/not-so-secret passion is art in the form of modern paintings, graphics, and rock music. …” This and more about Karl Anker Jørgensen can be found on page 7364.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
  7. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Arnim Henglein (1926–2012) (pages 7366–7367)

      Horst Weller

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204692

  8. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Metal–Fluorocarbon Based Energetic Materials. By Ernst-Christian Koch. (page 7368)

      Stanisław Cudzilo

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203249

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2012. 342 pp., hardcover, € 139.00.—ISBN 978-3527329205

  9. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Biofuel Cells

      From In Vitro to In Vivo—Biofuel Cells Are Maturing (pages 7370–7372)

      Prof. Dr. Uwe Schröder

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203259

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      Insects and molluscs as future biological drones for military purposes or environmental monitoring systems (see picture)? Two research groups have demonstrated the successful implantation and operation of biofuel cells in snails, clams, and cockroaches. Owing to their simple circulatory systems, these invertebrates could be used in implantation studies without serious physical damage.

    2. Vibrational Spectroscopy

      Jahn–Teller Distortion of Hydrocarbon Cations Probed by Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy (pages 7373–7375)

      Prof. Dr. Maria Elisa Crestoni and Prof. Dr. Simonetta Fornarini

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201650

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      Frozen distortion or fluxional system? The IR spectrum of ionized adamantane probes the distorted geometry predicted by the Jahn–Teller theorem, testifying the potential of infrared photon dissociation action spectroscopy in revealing fundamental vibrational and electronic features of isolated charged molecules (see picture).

  10. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. History of Science

      Victor Grignard and Paul Sabatier: Two Showcase Laureates of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry (pages 7376–7382)

      Prof. Dr. Henri B. Kagan

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201849

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      Looking back one hundred years: The two 1912 Nobel Laureates of Chemistry are featured within the context of the academic world in France. Grignard discovered the preparation and use of organomagnesium reagents (see scheme). Sabatier established the addition of hydrogen to unsaturated compounds in the presence of catalytic amounts of nickel.

  11. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Nitrenes

      Nitrene Chemistry in Organic Synthesis: Still in Its Infancy? (pages 7384–7395)

      Geoffroy Dequirez, Dr. Valérie Pons and Dr. Philippe Dauban

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201945

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      Long regarded as highly reactive but poorly selective species, nitrenes have recently emerged as useful tools for C[BOND]N bond-forming reactions. Their capacity to insert into various bonds has led to the development of efficient catalytic C[BOND]H amination and alkene aziridination reactions. In recent work several click-type reactions using nitrenes have been developed.

  12. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Biorecognition

      Smart Self-Assembled Hybrid Hydrogel Biomaterials (pages 7396–7417)

      Prof. Dr. Jindřich Kopeček and Prof. Dr. Jiyuan Yang

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201040

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      Hybrid biomaterials: The self-assembly of macromolecules composed of two or more distinct classes of molecules by biorecognition results in new materials with high degree of organization. This Review focuses on synthetic macromolecules and peptide motifs. Approaches to the design of hybrid systems are evaluated, followed by a discussion on similarity of designs of biomaterials and nanomedicines.

  13. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Obituary
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Minireview
    13. Review
    14. Communications
    15. Preview
    1. Nanotechnology

      Macroscale Ordered Ultrathin Telluride Nanowire Films, and Tellurium/Telluride Hetero-Nanowire Films (pages 7420–7425)

      Jian-Wei Liu, Jie Xu, Hai-Wei Liang, Kai Wang and Prof. Dr. Shu-Hong Yu

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201608

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      Films to order: Macroscale ordered ultrathin telluride nanowire films and tellurium/telluride hetero-nanowire films can be rapidly fabricated using more reactive nanowire patterns as a template. This method provides a new route to nanowire films with tailored properties.

    2. Cancer Cell Detection

      A Multicolor Nanoprobe for Detection and Imaging of Tumor-Related mRNAs in Living Cells (pages 7426–7430)

      Dr. Na Li, Chenyang Chang, Wei Pan and Prof. Bo Tang

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203767

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      Multidetector: A novel nanoprobe, based on multicolor nanoflares, for the simultaneous detection and imaging of three tumor-related mRNAs in living cells has been developed. The nanoprobe possesses high specificity, nuclease stability, and good biocompatibility. It can also effectively distinguish cancer cells from normal cells and identify changes in the levels of mRNA expression.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: A Multicolor Nanoprobe for Detection and Imaging of Tumor-Related mRNAs in Living Cells

      Vol. 51, Issue 44, 10922, Article first published online: 24 OCT 2012

    3. Photocatalysis

      Photoinduced Hydrogen Evolution from Water by a Simple Platinum(II) Terpyridine Derivative: A Z-Scheme Photosynthesis (pages 7431–7434)

      Dr. Masayuki Kobayashi, Dr. Shigeyuki Masaoka and Prof. Ken Sakai

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202720

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      Mimicking nature: The photochemical H2 evolution from water catalyzed by a platinum(II)-based metalloviologen (PV2+) proceeds via the photoexcited state of the one-electron-reduced species (PV+.; see picture, EDTA=ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid). This artificial photosynthesis is reminiscent of the “Z-scheme photosynthesis” in green plants.

    4. Nanoparticles in MOFs

      Nanoparticle Core/Shell Architectures within MOF Crystals Synthesized by Reaction Diffusion (pages 7435–7439)

      Dr. Yanhu Wei, Dr. Shuangbing Han, David A. Walker, Patrick E. Fuller and Prof. Dr. Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202549

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      Location, location, location: The combination of reaction and diffusion has been used to deposit nanoparticles (red and blue) inside of cyclodextrin MOFs (black), either uniformly or in a core/shell manner. Such processes can also be combined with galvanic exchange reactions to provide a flexible route to the location-specific post-processing of MOFs. When dissolved, the core/shell MOFs liberate nanoparticles of different types sequentially.

    5. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      A Water-Stable Porphyrin-Based Metal–Organic Framework Active for Visible-Light Photocatalysis (pages 7440–7444)

      Dr. Alexandra Fateeva, Dr. Philip A. Chater, Christopher P. Ireland, Dr. Asif A. Tahir, Prof. Yaroslav Z. Khimyak, Paul V. Wiper, Prof. James R. Darwent and Prof. Matthew J. Rosseinsky

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202471

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      Light-harvesting MOFs: A new porous porphyrinic metal–organic framework (MOF; see picture) was obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. The chemical and thermal stability of the material allows a postsynthetic insertion of zinc in the center of the porphyrin. The visible-light photocatalytic activity of this porphyrin-based material is shown for the sacrificial hydrogen evolution from water.

    6. Bioinorganic Chemistry

      A Sulfur Tripod Glycoconjugate that Releases a High-Affinity Copper Chelator in Hepatocytes (pages 7445–7448)

      Dr. Anaïs M. Pujol, Dr. Martine Cuillel, Anne-Solène Jullien, Colette Lebrun, Dr. Doris Cassio, Dr. Elisabeth Mintz, Dr. Christelle Gateau and Dr. Pascale Delangle

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203255

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      Released in the cell: Three N-acetylgalactosamine units, which recognize the asialoglycoprotein receptor, were tethered through disulfide bonds to the three coordinating thiol functions of a sulfur tripod ligand that has a high affinity for CuI (see scheme). The resulting glycoconjugate can be considered as a prodrug, because after uptake by hepatic cells the intracellular reducing glutathione (GSH) releases the high-affinity intracellular CuI chelator.

    7. Biocatalysts

      Creation of an α-Mannosynthase from a Broad Glycosidase Scaffold (pages 7449–7453)

      Keisuke Yamamoto and Prof. Benjamin G. Davis

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201081

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      α-Mannosides made easy: Mutation of a family-GH31 α-glucosidase that displays plasticity to alterations at the 2-OH position of donor substrates created an efficient α-mannoside-synthesizing biocatalyst. A simple fluoride donor reagent was used for the synthesis of a range of mono-α-mannosylated conjugates using the α-mannosynthase displaying low (unwanted) oligomerization activity.

    8. Biosynthetic Pathways

      A Sweet Origin for the Key Congocidine Precursor 4-Acetamidopyrrole-2-carboxylate (pages 7454–7458)

      Dr. Sylvie Lautru, Dr. Lijiang Song, Dr. Luc Demange, Thomas Lombès, Prof. Hervé Galons, Prof. Gregory L. Challis and Dr. Jean-Luc Pernodet

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201445

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      Feeding (Streptomyces) frenzy: Natural products belonging to the pyrrolamide family are defined by their pyrrole-2-carboxamide moiety. 4-acetamidopyrrole-2-carboxylate is identified as the key pyrrolamide congocidine precursor (see scheme) through feeding studies using Streptomyces ambofaciens. The biosynthetic pathway of congocidine starts with the carbohydrate N-acetylglucosamine and involves carbohydrate-processing enzymes.

    9. Ultrafast Lithium Insertion

      Nanoscale Porous Framework of Lithium Titanate for Ultrafast Lithium Insertion (pages 7459–7463)

      Johann M. Feckl, Ksenia Fominykh, Dr. Markus Döblinger, Dr. Dina Fattakhova-Rohlfing and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bein

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201463

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      Mesoporous lithium titanate has been prepared with a titanate morphology that leads to the fastest insertion of lithium. It features a gravimetric capacity of about 175 mA h g−1 and delivers up to 73 % of the maximum capacity at up to 800 C (4.5 s) without deterioration over 1000 cycles. A key feature is a fully crystalline interconnected porous framework composed of spinel nanocrystals of only a few nanometers in size. Scale bar: 10 nm.

    10. Artificial Receptors

      Signal Transduction Using an Artificial Receptor System that Undergoes Dimerization Upon Addition of a Bivalent Leucine-Zipper Ligand (pages 7464–7467)

      Dr. Ikuhiko Nakase, Shinya Okumura, Dr. Gen Tanaka, Katsuhiro Osaki, Dr. Miki Imanishi and Prof. Dr. Shiroh Futaki

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201805

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      Examine your zipper: An artificial receptor system composed of an extracellular leucine-zipper domain (red helices) fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is shown (see scheme). Dimerization and activation of the receptor is induced by a bivalent leucine-zipper ligand (blue helices), leading to phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, and eliciting a signaling cascade.

    11. Nanostructures

      How Water Dissolves in Protic Ionic Liquids (pages 7468–7471)

      Robert Hayes, Dr. Silvia Imberti, Prof. Gregory G. Warr and Dr. Rob Atkin

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201973

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      Water in ionic liquids: When equal masses of water and the protic ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate are mixed a bicontinuous nanostructure results. This nanostructure resembles aqueous surfactant mesophases but has length scales at least an order of magnitude smaller. The local structure of both the water and the ionic liquid are strikingly similar to that found in the pure liquids (see picture).

    12. Artificial Metalloenzymes

      Enantioselective Artificial Metalloenzymes by Creation of a Novel Active Site at the Protein Dimer Interface (pages 7472–7475)

      Jeffrey Bos, Dr. Fabrizia Fusetti, Prof. Dr. Arnold J. M. Driessen and Dr. Gerard Roelfes

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202070

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      A game of two halves: Artificial metalloenzymes are generated by forming a novel active site on the dimer interface of the transcription factor LmrR. Two copper centers are incorporated by binding to ligands in each half of the dimer. With this system up to 97 % ee was obtained in the benchmark CuII catalyzed Diels–Alder reaction (see scheme).

    13. Fluorogenic Mini-Tags

      Live-Cell Imaging of Cyclopropene Tags with Fluorogenic Tetrazine Cycloadditions (pages 7476–7479)

      Dr. Jun Yang, Dr. Jolita Šečkutė, Christian M. Cole and Prof. Neal K. Devaraj

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202122

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      Spotlight on lipids: One of the major limitations of tetrazine bioorthogonal cycloadditions is the requirement of bulky dienophile reaction partners. Methylcyclopropene tags were designed capable of reacting rapidly with tetrazines while maintaining stability in aqueous solution. The suitability of these probes for bioconjugation is shown by imaging cyclopropene-modified phospholipids in live human cancer cells (see picture).

    14. CO2 Capture

      Polyamine-Tethered Porous Polymer Networks for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas (pages 7480–7484)

      Dr. Weigang Lu, Julian P. Sculley, Prof. Dr. Daqiang Yuan, Prof. Dr. Rajamani Krishna, Zhangwen Wei and Prof. Dr. Hong-Cai Zhou

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202176

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      Gas guzzler: The introduction of polyamines in porous polymer networks results in significant enhancement of CO2-uptake capacities at low pressures. The best substituted network was found to exhibit high adsorption enthalpies for CO2 and the largest selectivity (see graph) of any porous material reported to date. It also had outstanding physicochemical stability and could be regenerated under mild conditions.

    15. Ultrafast Photoswitching

      Femtosecond Spin-State Photoswitching of Molecular Nanocrystals Evidenced by Optical Spectroscopy (pages 7485–7489)

      Roman Bertoni, Dr. Maciej Lorenc, Dr. Antoine Tissot, Dr. Marina Servol, Dr. Marie-Laure Boillot and Prof. Eric Collet

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202215

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      Quick change: Femtosecond optical pump–probe spectroscopy is used to study the photoswitching dynamics of FeIII spin-crossover nanocrystals. Results indicate that up to 10 % of the molecules can be photoswitched from low-spin to high-spin states within less than one picosecond.

    16. Controlled Under Pressure

      Pressure-Driven Orbital Reorientations and Coordination-Sphere Reconstructions in [CuF2(H2O)2(pyz)] (pages 7490–7494)

      Dr. Alessandro Prescimone, Chelsey Morien, Dr. David Allan, Dr. John A. Schlueter, Dr. Stan W. Tozer, Dr. Jamie L. Manson, Prof. Simon Parsons, Prof. Euan K. Brechin and Prof. Stephen Hill

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202367

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      Successive reorientations of the Jahn–Teller axes associated with the CuII ions accompany a series of pronounced structural transitions in the title compound, as is shown by X-ray crystallography and high-frequency EPR measurements. The second transition forces a dimerization involving two thirds of the CuII sites due to ejection of one of the water molecules from the coordination sphere.

    17. Conjugated Polymers

      Color Tuning in Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes with Lewis Acids (pages 7495–7498)

      Peter Zalar, Zachary B. Henson, Dr. Gregory C. Welch, Prof. Dr. Guillermo C. Bazan and Prof. Dr. Thuc-Quyen Nguyen

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202570

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      The right mix: By mixing a Lewis basic polymer with a Lewis acid, the optical properties of the polymer can be tuned. The formation of an adduct results in red-shifted absorbance and photoluminescence spectra, increase in the emission yield, and a longer excited-state lifetime. This strategy was successfully implemented to modulate the electroluminescence of a polymer light-emitting diode.

    18. Hydrogenation of CO2

      Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol by Using a Homogeneous Ruthenium–Phosphine Catalyst (pages 7499–7502)

      Sebastian Wesselbaum, Thorsten vom Stein, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Klankermayer and Prof. Dr. Walter Leitner

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202320

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      Simply efficient: The homogenously catalyzed hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol is achieved by using a ruthenium phosphine complex under relatively mild conditions (see scheme; HNTf2=bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide). This is the first example of CO2 hydrogenation to methanol by using a single molecularly defined catalyst.

    19. Cyclobutanes

      Stereoselective Preparation of Cyclobutanes with Four Different Substituents: Total Synthesis and Structural Revision of Pipercyclobutanamide A and Piperchabamide G (pages 7503–7506)

      Renhe Liu, Dr. Min Zhang, Thomas P. Wyche, Gabrielle N. Winston-McPherson, Prof. Dr. Tim S. Bugni and Prof. Dr. Weiping Tang

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203379

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      Squared away: A general strategy was developed for the diastereo- and enantioselective synthesis of cyclobutanes having four different substituents (see scheme). The strategy involves a RhII-catalyzed cyclopropanation, a AgI-catalyzed regioselective and stereospecific ring expansion, and a RhI-catalyzed addition reaction. The structures of pipercyclobutanamide A and piperchabamide G were synthesized and revised.

    20. Natural Products

      Sequential Cmath image[BOND]H Arylation and Olefination: Total Synthesis of the Proposed Structure of Pipercyclobutanamide A (pages 7507–7510)

      Will R. Gutekunst, Ryan Gianatassio and Prof. Dr. Phil S. Baran

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203897

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      Hip to be square: A strategy for assembling tetrasubstituted cyclobutanes is reported in the context of a short, protecting-group-free synthesis of the proposed structure of pipercyclobutanamide A. The route features sequential C[BOND]H functionalizations on an unactivated cyclobutane wherein C[BOND]C bonds to aryl and styryl groups are made one by one in a stereocontrolled fashion. DG=directing group.

    21. Synthetic Methods

      Reactions of Hypervalent Iodonium Alkynyl Triflates with Azides: Generation of Cyanocarbenes (pages 7511–7514)

      Dr. I. F. Dempsey Hyatt and Prof. Mitchell P. Croatt

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203062

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      HIAT me, baby, one more time: Cyanocarbenes have been formed by the reaction of azides with hypervalent iodonium alkynyl triflates (HIATs). Experimental evidence supports the potential intermediacy of an azide-substituted vinylidene or alkynyl azide, both of which could form a cyanocarbene. Trapping of the vinylidene and cyanocarbene includes O[BOND]H insertion, dimethyl sulfoxide coordination, and cyclopropanation reactions.

    22. Ethynyl Azides

      1-Azido-1-Alkynes: Synthesis and Spectroscopic Characterization of Azidoacetylene (pages 7515–7518)

      Prof. Dr. Klaus Banert, René Arnold, Dr. Manfred Hagedorn, Philipp Thoss and Prof. Dr. Alexander A. Auer

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203626

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      Sleeping Beauty awakes: After 102 years of unsuccessful attempts to synthesize azidoacetylene, spectroscopic evidence for this compound has been shown. This highly explosive compound was synthesized by the treatment of ethynyliodonium salts with azide (QN3=n-C16H33Bu3PN3). Azidoacetylene can be trapped by a cycloaddition reaction to yield a stable triazole, otherwise cleavage to generate cyanocarbene dominates.

    23. Micromachines

      Acoustic Droplet Vaporization and Propulsion of Perfluorocarbon-Loaded Microbullets for Targeted Tissue Penetration and Deformation (pages 7519–7522)

      Dr. Daniel Kagan, Michael J. Benchimol, Dr. Jonathan C. Claussen, Dr. Erdembileg Chuluun-Erdene, Dr. Sadik Esener and Dr. Joseph Wang

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201902

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      Bullets and rockets: Ultrasound-triggered vaporization of a perfluorocarbon compound loaded into microbullets provides the necessary force for the microbullets to penetrate, cleave, and deform cellular tissue for potential targeted drug delivery and precision nanosurgery. The microbullets have an inner Au layer that allows conjugation of a monolayer of thiolated cysteamine (green in picture) for electrostatic attachment of perfluorocarbon droplets (purple droplets).

    24. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Highly Diastereo- and Enantioselective Synthesis of α-Alkyl Norstatine Derivatives: Catalytic Asymmetric Mannich Reactions of 5H-Oxazol-4-ones (pages 7523–7527)

      Dr. Depeng Zhao, Linqing Wang, Dongxu Yang, Yixin Zhang and Prof. Dr. Rui Wang

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201804

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      Going Mannich: The title reaction results in the first catalytic asymmetric synthesis of syn-α-alkyl norstatine derivatives. Excellent enantioselectivities and diastereoselectivities were achieved with a series of N-diphenylphosphinoyl-protected imines and 5H-oxazol-4-ones by using the catalyst 1/Zn. Importantly, the involvement of the diethyl phosphoramidate 2 was critical to achieve good enantioselectivities in the present Mannich reaction.

    25. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

      Cyclometalated Ruthenium(II) Complexes as Near-IR Sensitizers for High Efficiency Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 7528–7531)

      Dr. Takashi Funaki, Hiromi Funakoshi, Dr. Osamu Kitao, Dr. Nobuko Onozawa-Komatsuzaki, Dr. Kazuyuki Kasuga, Dr. Kazuhiro Sayama and Dr. Hideki Sugihara

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201108738

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      Efficient light harvesting: Cyclometalated ruthenium complexes were synthesized and evaluated in a dye-sensitized solar cell as near-IR sensitizers. Tuning of the HOMO energy level by structural modifications of the ligand improved the conversion efficiency of the cells based on these complexes to up to 10.7 %.

    26. Lithiation Chemistry

      Exploiting the Lithiation-Directing Ability of Oxetane for the Regioselective Preparation of Functionalized 2-Aryloxetane Scaffolds under Mild Conditions (pages 7532–7536)

      Dr. Donato Ivan Coppi, Dr. Antonio Salomone, Dr. Filippo Maria Perna and Prof. Vito Capriati

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201109113

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      Oxetane nudges in the DoM direction! Regioselective ortho-lithiation induced by an oxetane ring has been achieved. The reaction provides easy access to ortho-functionalized 2-aryloxetanes also through a lithiation/borylation Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling. The lithiation-directing ability of oxetane and the proton transfer mechanism have been investigated by competitive metalation and kinetic isotope effect studies.

    27. Aryl Ether Formation

      Catalytic Aerobic Synthesis of Aromatic Ethers from Non-Aromatic Precursors (pages 7537–7540)

      Dr. Marc-Olivier Simon, Simon A. Girard and Prof. Dr. Chao-Jun Li

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200698

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      Only little waste: Aryl ether formation is accomplished by oxidative condensation of alcohols and 2-cyclohexenones. The reaction complements the existing methods used by synthetic chemists to obtain aryl ethers, and allows a straightforward access to a wide range of functionalized products. In addition, the catalytic reaction with O2 as the oxidant generates water as the only by-product and provides a “greener” approach to aryl ethers.

    28. DNA Binding Dynamics

      Single-Molecule Approach to DNA Minor-Groove Association Dynamics (pages 7541–7544)

      Jorge Bordello, Mateo I. Sánchez, Prof. Dr. M. Eugenio Vázquez, Prof. Dr. José L. Mascareñas, Prof. Dr. Wajih Al-Soufi and Prof. Dr. Mercedes Novo

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201099

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      Getting in the groove: Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy reveals that the dynamics of the association process of the bisbenzamidine minor-groove binder BBA-OG (blue with green star, see scheme) to dsDNA is not controlled by diffusion, but by the insertion of the binder into the groove at the specific site (red), as shown by the rate constants for each step of the binding event.

    29. Phosphorus Compounds

      One-Pot Syntheses of Cationic Polyphosphorus Frameworks with Two-, Three-, and Four-Coordinate Phosphorus Atoms by One-Pot Multiple P[BOND]P Bond Formations from a P1 Source (pages 7545–7549)

      Kai-Oliver Feldmann and Dr. Jan J. Weigand

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201414

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      Accessible complexity: Polyphosphorus frameworks [R4P4pyr]+ and [R6P7]+ (R=Cy, Ph; pyr=3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl) were prepared from a P1 source, R2PH. In a one-pot reaction, eight P[BOND]P bonds are formed via a unique combination of substitution and base-induced reductive P[BOND]P coupling.

    30. Single-Molecule Magnets

      Coexistence of Distinct Single-Ion and Exchange-Based Mechanisms for Blocking of Magnetization in a CoII2DyIII2 Single-Molecule Magnet (pages 7550–7554)

      Dr. Kartik Chandra Mondal, Alexander Sundt, Dr. Yanhua Lan, Dr. George E. Kostakis, Prof. Oliver Waldmann, Dr. Liviu Ungur, Prof. Dr. Liviu F. Chibotaru, Dr. Christopher E. Anson and Prof. Dr. Annie K. Powell

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201478

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      Two ways to relax: A defect-dicubane Co2Dy2 single-molecule magnet (SMM) displays slow relaxation of magnetization with a blocking temperature of 22 K (at 1500 Hz), the highest reported for a 3d–4f-based SMM. Analysis of the relaxation reveals two distinct blocking regimes, one of which is intraionic, localized on the DyIII ions, while the other is exchange-based.

    31. Dihydrogen Catalysis

      Dihydrogen-Catalyzed Reversible Carbon–Hydrogen and Nitrogen–Hydrogen Bond Formation in Organometallic Iridium Complexes (pages 7555–7557)

      Dr. José E. V. Valpuesta, Dr. Nuria Rendón, Dr. Joaquín López-Serrano, Prof. Manuel L. Poveda, Dr. Luis Sánchez, Dr. Eleuterio Álvarez and Prof. Ernesto Carmona

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201811

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      Dihydrogen at work! H2 catalyzes with high efficiency a prototropic rearrangement of aminopyridinate ligands bound to a {(η5-C5Me5)IrIII} unit. The catalytic isomerization implies reversible formation and cleavage of H[BOND]H, C[BOND]H, and N[BOND]H bonds.

    32. Electron Transport in DNA

      Transporting Excess Electrons along Potential Energy Gradients Provided by 2-Deoxyuridine Derivatives in DNA (pages 7558–7561)

      Dr. Takeo Ito, M. Sc. Yuta Hamaguchi, Dr. Kazuhito Tanabe, Dr. Hisatsugu Yamada and Prof. Dr. Sei-ichi Nishimoto

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202141

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      LUMO-level dependent: Chemically modified DNA molecules containing 2-deoxyuridine (dU) derivatives with various LUMO energy levels have been synthesized to manipulate electron-transfer efficiencies. By arranging thymidine, the dU derivatives, and 5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine in order of their LUMO levels, the efficiency and the directionality of photoinduced electron transport in DNA could be regulated.

    33. Furan Synthesis

      A Modular and Scalable One-Pot Synthesis of Polysubstituted Furans (pages 7562–7566)

      Jeremy Fournier, Dr. Stellios Arseniyadis and Prof. Dr. Janine Cossy

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202486

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      One four all: Allyl dienol carbonates can be readily converted into diversely substituted furans by a one-pot four-step sequence featuring a palladium-catalyzed decarboxylative allylic alkylation, a microwave-mediated Cope rearrangement, a nucleophilic addition, and a dehydration reaction (see scheme). The protocol is operationally simple, highly flexible, and provides di-, tri-, and tetrasubstituted furans starting from readily available materials.

    34. C[BOND]C Activation

      Rhodium-Catalyzed Regioselective Carboacylation of Olefins: A C[BOND]C Bond Activation Approach for Accessing Fused-Ring Systems (pages 7567–7571)

      Dr. Tao Xu and Prof. Dr. Guangbin Dong

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202771

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      Cut and sew: A rhodium-catalyzed regioselective carboacylation reaction of benzocyclobutenones was developed (see scheme). Directed by the pendant olefins, the C1[BOND]C2 bond is selectively cleaved rather than the C1[BOND]C8 bond. Subsequent alkene insertion leads to complex fused-ring systems. This reaction provides facile access to natural-product-like polycyclic structures in a chemoselective and atom-economic fashion.

    35. Natural Product Synthesis

      A Synthesis of Echinopine B (pages 7572–7576)

      Dr. Theo D. Michels, Dr. Matthew S. Dowling and Prof. Dr. Christopher D. Vanderwal

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203147

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      In a short synthesis of echinopine B, a guaiane-like intermediate was generated through a methylenecyclopentane annulation onto a substituted cycloheptenone. The resulting bicyclic compound was converted into the natural product by a PtCl2-catalyzed enyne cycloisomerization (see scheme). Several late-stage polycyclic rearrangement products were isolated and characterized.

    36. Porous Materials

      Carbide-Derived Carbon Monoliths with Hierarchical Pore Architectures (pages 7577–7580)

      Martin Oschatz, Lars Borchardt, Dr. Matthias Thommes, Dr. Katie A. Cychosz, Dr. Irena Senkovska, Nicole Klein, Dr. Robert Frind, Matthias Leistner, Dr. Volker Presser, Prof. Dr. Yury Gogotsi and Prof. Dr. Stefan Kaskel

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200024

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      Sierpinski carbon: Macroporous carbide-derived carbon monoliths (DUT-38) were synthesized starting from SiC-PolyHIPEs, resulting in a hierarchical micro-, meso-, and macroporous structure. The high specific surface area and high macropore volume renders PolyHIPE-CDC an excellent adsorbent combining high storage capacity with excellent adsorption rates in gas storage and air filtration.

    37. Nanocarbon Synthesis

      Spherical Structures Composed of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes: Formation Mechanism and Catalytic Performance (pages 7581–7585)

      Prof. Dr. Jian Zhang, Dr. Rui Wang, Dr. Enze Liu, Xufeng Gao, Dr. Zhenhua Sun, Prof. Feng-Shou Xiao, Dr. Frank Girgsdies and Prof. Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200969

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      Structured catalyst: A new strategy was used to produce carbon nanotube monoliths by a solid-phase process that was well characterized by in situ techniques. The synthesized spherical nanoparticles display extremely high selectivity in the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethylbenzene (see scheme).

    38. DNA Nanowires

      Surface “Click” Reaction of DNA followed by Directed Metalization for the Construction of Contactable Conducting Nanostructures (pages 7586–7588)

      Dipl.-Chem. Jan Timper, Dr. Katrin Gutsmiedl, Dr. Christian Wirges, Dipl.-Chem. Janine Broda, Dr. Michael Noyong, Prof. Dr. Joachim Mayer, Prof. Dr. Thomas Carell and Prof. Dr. Ulrich Simon

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202401

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      Investment in copper, silver, and gold: A difunctional DNA template is first immobilized on a functionalized substrate by a copper-catalyzed reaction, modified with silver nucleation centers, and then metalized by gold deposition. The diameter of the resulting metallically conductive nanowires can be adjusted.

    39. Gold Clusters

      Separation of Enantiomers and CD Spectra of Au40(SCH2CH2Ph)24: Spectroscopic Evidence for Intrinsic Chirality (pages 7589–7591)

      Stefan Knoppe, Dr. Igor Dolamic, Amala Dass and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bürgi

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202369

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      Chirality unveiled: Thiolate-protected Au40(SR)24 clusters were enantioenriched using an HPLC approach. CD spectra show strong mirror-image responses, indicating the intrinsic chirality of a cluster of unknown structure protected with achiral ligands.

    40. Reaction Kinetics

      Characterizing the Kinetics of Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Reactions by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 7592–7596)

      Virginia Joseph, Christian Engelbrekt, Prof. Dr. Jingdong Zhang, Dr. Ulrich Gernert, Prof. Dr. Jens Ulstrup and Prof. Dr. Janina Kneipp

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203526

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      Separate gold and platinum nanoparticles simultaneously immobilized on a glass surface were used to study the kinetics of a catalytic reaction directly. Owing to the proximity of the platinum and gold nanoparticles, the analyte molecules can interact with the platinum nanoparticles whilst they reside in the local optical fields of the gold nanoparticles.

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      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201290057

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