Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 35

August 27, 2012

Volume 51, Issue 35

Pages 8667–8899

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Molecular Composition of Sub-stoichiometrically Labeled α-Synuclein Oligomers Determined by Single-Molecule Photobleaching (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 35/2012) (page 8667)

      Niels Zijlstra, Dr. Christian Blum, Dr. Ine M. J. Segers-Nolten, Dr. Mireille M. A. E. Claessens and Prof. Dr. Vinod Subramaniam

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205691

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In amyloid diseases, monomeric proteins self-assemble into supramolecular aggregates. In their Communication on page 8821 ff. V. Subramaniam et al. describe a new method that combines single-molecule photobleaching approaches with sub-stoichiometric labeling with fluorophores to determine the molecular composition of these large protein aggregates. The cover picture shows the aggregation of combinations of labeled and unlabeled monomers and the subsequent photobleaching analysis of single aggregates.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Freestanding Tin Disulfide Single-Layers Realizing Efficient Visible-Light Water Splitting (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 35/2012) (page 8668)

      Dr. Yongfu Sun, Hao Cheng, Shan Gao, Dr. Zhihu Sun, Dr. Qinghua Liu, Qin Liu, Fengcai Lei, Dr. Tao Yao, Dr. Jingfu He, Prof. Shiqiang Wei and Prof. Yi Xie

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205557

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Effective visible-light water splitting has been achieved on a photoelectrode based on SnS2 monolayers with three atom thickness. In their Communication on page 8727 ff., S. Q. Wei, Y. Xie, et al. describe the first synthesis of freestanding SnS2 monolayers through a scalable exfoliation strategy. The photoelectrode realizes a visible-light conversion efficiency of 38.7 %, which is superior to most reported electrodes.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Control of a Living Radical Polymerization of Methacrylates by Light (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 35/2012) (page 8901)

      Dr. Brett P. Fors and Prof. Dr. Craig J. Hawker

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206022

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Living radical polymerizations can be regulated with an external stimulus, thus dramatically increasing their utility and facilitating a range of applications. In their Communication on page 8850 ff. B. P. Fors and C. J. Hawker report a living radical polymerization that can be activated and deactivated in a dynamic manner with visible light. The picture illustrates the activation of a polymer chain end by an iridium-based catalyst in the presence of light and shows the dormant chain end in the absence of irradiation.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Self-Assembly of Vertically Aligned Gold Nanorod Arrays on Patterned Substrates (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 35/2012) (page 8902)

      Thibaut Thai, Dr. Yuanhui Zheng, Soon Hock Ng, Dr. Stephen Mudie, Dr. Matteo Altissimo and Prof. Udo Bach

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205559

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The self-assembly of gold nanorods into standing arrays was achieved with precise placement over large areas. In their Communication on page 8732 ff., U. Bach et al. report on a nanofabrication process based on convective and capillary forces. The functionalization of the nanorods can be used to fine-tune the interparticle and particle–substrate interaction energies, leading to high hexagonal close-packed ordering.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      The Future of Medicinal Chemistry (pages 8670–8671)

      Dr. Torsten Hoffmann and Prof. Dr. Rainer Metternich

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201677

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 35/2012 (pages 8673–8686)

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201290063

  4. Flashback

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. 50 Years Ago ... (page 8684)

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205472

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
  6. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. Ayyappanpillai Ajayaghosh (page 8692)

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201268

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “When I was eighteen I wanted to be a medical doctor. Looking back over my career, I am fortunate to be a chemist. …” This and more about Ayyappanpillai Ajayaghosh can be found on page 8692.

  7. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
  8. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. Handbook of Carbon Nano Materials. Vol. 1: Synthesis and Supramolecular Systems. Vol. 2: Electron Transfer and Applications. Edited by Francis D'Souza and Karl M. Kadish. (page 8695)

      Lothar Dunsch

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204518

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      World Scientific, Singapore, 2011. 972 pp., hardcover, $ 380.00.—ISBN 978-9814327817

  9. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. Lewis Base Catalysis

      β-Lactones through Catalytic Asymmetric Heterodimerization of Ketenes (pages 8696–8698)

      Prof. Eugenia Marqués-López and Prof. Mathias Christmann

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Simple, but effective: The asymmetric heterodimerization of two different ketenes (see scheme) has been developed 65 years after the first seminal studies on ketene dimerization. The key to sufficiently suppressing the competing homodimerization of the monosubstituted ketene donor (shown in blue) is its slow addition to the disubstituted acceptor (shown in red).

    2. Inhibitors

      Reversible Covalent Inhibition of a Protein Target (pages 8699–8700)

      M. Sc. Chang-Uk Lee and Dr. Tom N. Grossmann

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203341

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electron-deficient Michael acceptors can be used in reversible addition/elimination reactions with thiols. These electrophiles were used to convert a known irreversible kinase inhibitor into a covalent and reversible inhibitor. Such an approach might provide high-affinity binders with increased selectivity without the toxicological risks associated with irreversible protein modifications.

  10. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. Drug Discovery

      Does Chemistry Have a Future in Therapeutic Innovations? (pages 8702–8706)

      Dr. Bernard Meunier

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202506

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A bright future for small molecules: Drugs based on molecules made by chemists are far from old-fashioned. Although biopharmaceuticals developed during the last two decades may have caught the public's imagination, traditional drugs remain a strong force in the pharmaceutical industry. Effective, inexpensive small-molecule drugs are crucial in fighting diseases and maintaining cost-effective health care.

  11. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. Immunoproteasomes

      Inhibitors for the Immuno- and Constitutive Proteasome: Current and Future Trends in Drug Development (pages 8708–8720)

      Eva Maria Huber and Prof. Dr. Michael Groll

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201616

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Under arrest: The first immunoproteasome-specific inhibitors were recently developed. The most potent one shows promise in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, thus opening the door for new clinical applications. Structure–affinity studies with the available immuno- and constitutive proteasome crystal structures will facilitate future drug development efforts.

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Flashback
    6. News
    7. Author Profile
    8. News
    9. Book Review
    10. Highlights
    11. Essay
    12. Review
    13. Communications
    1. Synthetic Methods

      Retention of Stereochemistry in Gold-Catalyzed Formal [4+3] Cycloaddition of Epoxides with Arenynamides (pages 8722–8726)

      Somnath Narayan Karad, Dr. Sabyasachi Bhunia and Prof. Dr. Rai-Shung Liu

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203723

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Golden opportunity: [4+3] Cycloaddition reactions of arenynamides and epoxides are enabled under gold catalysis and have a broad substrate scope (see scheme; Ms=methanesulfonyl). An SN2-type front-side attack of phenyl at the oxiranyl ring is expected to cause the retention of stereochemistry.

    2. Water Splitting

      Freestanding Tin Disulfide Single-Layers Realizing Efficient Visible-Light Water Splitting (pages 8727–8731)

      Dr. Yongfu Sun, Hao Cheng, Shan Gao, Dr. Zhihu Sun, Dr. Qinghua Liu, Qin Liu, Fengcai Lei, Dr. Tao Yao, Dr. Jingfu He, Prof. Shiqiang Wei and Prof. Yi Xie

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204675

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Manipulation at the atomic level: Freestanding SnS2 single-layers with three atom thickness were synthesized through an exfoliation strategy (see picture). The SnS2 single-layers have an increased density of states at the valence band edge. A photoelectrode made from this material shows a visible-light conversion efficiency of 38.7 % that is superior to most existing reports.

    3. Nanofabrication

      Self-Assembly of Vertically Aligned Gold Nanorod Arrays on Patterned Substrates (pages 8732–8735)

      Thibaut Thai, Dr. Yuanhui Zheng, Soon Hock Ng, Dr. Stephen Mudie, Dr. Matteo Altissimo and Prof. Udo Bach

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204609

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanorods standing at attention! A self-assembly technique based on convective and capillary forces was used for the direct fabrication of standing arrays of gold nanorods on lithographically predefined areas (see picture). The hexagonal close-packed structure of gold nanorods creates an ideal substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    4. Hybrid Peptide Helices

      Structural Characterization of Backbone-Expanded Helices in Hybrid Peptides: (αγ)n and (αβ)n Sequences with Unconstrained β and γ Homologues of L-Val (pages 8736–8739)

      Krishnayan Basuroy, Bhimareddy Dinesh, Prof. Narayanaswamy Shamala and Prof. Padmanabhan Balaram

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204436

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Learning your αβγ′s: The diversity of hydrogen-bonding patterns in backbone-expanded hybrid helices is shown by crystal-structure determination of several oligomeric peptides (see scheme; C=gray; H=white; O=red; N=blue). C12 helices were observed in the αγ peptide series for n=2–8. In comparison, the αα peptide and αβ peptide sequences show C10 and mixed C14/C15 helices, respectively.

    5. Drug Delivery

      Dual-Function CXCR4 Antagonist Polyplexes To Deliver Gene Therapy and Inhibit Cancer Cell Invasion (pages 8740–8743)

      Jing Li, Yu Zhu, Dr. Stuart T. Hazeldine, Prof. Chunying Li and Prof. David Oupický

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203463

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Giving a one-two punch: A bicyclam-based biodegradable polycation with CXCR4 antagonistic activity shows potential for combining cancer chemotherapy with gene therapy or siRNA therapy. This dual-function polycation prevents cancer cell invasion by inhibiting CXCL12-stimulated CXCR4 activation (see scheme), while at the same time efficiently and safely delivering therapeutic DNA into cancer cells.

    6. Biomimetic Synthesis

      DNA/Polymeric Micelle Self-Assembly Mimicking Chromatin Compaction (pages 8744–8747)

      Kaka Zhang, Prof. Ming Jiang and Prof. Daoyong Chen

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203483

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Get your daily (nano)fiber: Assemblies of DNA and polymeric core–shell micelles evolve from longer beads-on-a-string structures to shorter monodisperse solenoidal core–shell nanofibers (see picture). This self-assembly method allows for synthesis of one-dimensional nanomaterials with controlled dimensions and compositions, overcoming a limitation of existing nanomaterial synthesis.

    7. Nanoparticles

      Carbon-Coated Single-Crystal LiMn2O4 Nanoparticle Clusters as Cathode Material for High-Energy and High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 8748–8752)

      Sanghan Lee, Yonghyun Cho, Prof. Hyun-Kon Song, Prof. Kyu Tae Lee and Prof. Jaephil Cho

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203581

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electric results: The rate capability can be improved in lithium ion batteries (LIBs) by reducing the dimensions of the active material; however, the LIBs would then have insufficient electrode density. To overcome this problem, carbon-coated single-crystal LiMn2O4 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized as a cathode material for LIBs; this material can be densely packed on the current collector.

    8. Porphyrinoids

      Unique Interaction between Directly Linked Laminated π Planes in the Benzonorrole Dimer (pages 8753–8756)

      Dr. Motoki Toganoh, Yasunori Kawabe, Prof. Dr. Hidemitsu Uno and Prof. Dr. Hiroyuki Furuta

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203712

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Direct link: Two directly linked benzonorrole dimers were prepared and characterized, and both have short interplane distances less than 3.5 Å. While a strong π–π interaction was recognized in the oxidized form (left), only a negligible π–π interaction was observed in the reduced form (right) in spite of its shorter π–π distance.

    9. Photochemistry

      Probing the Barrier for Internal Rotation of the Retinal Chromophore (pages 8757–8761)

      Dr. Yoni Toker, Dr. Annette Svendsen, Dr. Anastasia V. Bochenkova and Prof. Lars H. Andersen

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203746

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molecular ion calorimetry: A technique for measuring the heat capacity of an isolated gas-phase chromophore is presented and applied to the retinal protonated Schiff base (see picture). The potential use of this technique for studying barriers for internal rotations is discussed.

    10. Anode Materials

      A Highly Cross-Linked Polymeric Binder for High-Performance Silicon Negative Electrodes in Lithium Ion Batteries (pages 8762–8767)

      Bonjae Koo, Hyunjung Kim, Younghyun Cho, Prof. Kyu Tae Lee, Prof. Nam-Soon Choi and Prof. Jaephil Cho

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201568

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A support bandage for electrodes: A cross-linked polymeric binder (see picture, red) inhibits mechanical fracture of silicon negative electrodes during cycling. Nanosized silicon powder with a 3D interconnected network of poly(acrylic acid) and sodium carboxymethylcellulose as binder exhibits high reversible capacity of over 2000 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles at 30 °C while maintaining a high capacity and high current density.

    11. Directed Assembly

      Signatures of the Rayleigh-Plateau Instability Revealed by Imposing Synthetic Perturbations on Nanometer-Sized Liquid Metals on Substrates (pages 8768–8772)

      Dr. Jason Fowlkes, Scott Horton, Dr. Miguel Fuentes-Cabrera and Prof. Philip D. Rack

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202113

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multiscale patterning must be realized to harness the action of precisely arrayed nanoscale ensembles at practical meso- and microscales. Self- and directed assembly methods hold promise toward achieving arrays of nanoparticles with both precise interparticle spacing and tailored nanoparticle shape. Nanometer scale dewetting of 10 Å thick liquid copper films supported on graphite were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    12. Bio-Nanotechnology

      Nonblinking Plasmonic Quantum Dot Assemblies for Multiplex Biological Detection (pages 8773–8777)

      Dr. Fayi Song, Peter S. Tang, Holly Durst, Prof. Dr. David T. Cramb and Prof. Dr. Warren C. W. Chan

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201872

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nonblinking nanosystems are prepared by layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition, which precisely controls the stoichiometry and the distance between quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Conjugation of biorecognition molecules to these nanobarcodes enables cell targeting and entry with prolonged retention and minimal toxicity.

    13. Atomic Force Microscopy

      Direct Visualization of the Movement of a Single T7 RNA Polymerase and Transcription on a DNA Nanostructure (pages 8778–8782)

      Dr. Masayuki Endo, Koichi Tatsumi, Kosuke Terushima, Yousuke Katsuda, Kumi Hidaka, Prof. Yoshie Harada and Prof. Hiroshi Sugiyama

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201890

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Snapshots of transcription: Movement of a single molecule of T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP) along a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) template attached to a DNA origami platform (green, see scheme) was recorded using high-speed AFM. A one kilobase template dsDNA containing the T7 promoter was used to record AFM images of transcription of the template dsDNA by RNAP and the resulting biotinylated RNA product was detected by streptavidin-labeling.

    14. Cluster Compounds

      High-Nuclearity Silver Ethynide Clusters Assembled with Phosphonate and Metavanadate Precursors (pages 8783–8786)

      Dr. Yun-Peng Xie and Prof. Thomas C. W. Mak

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202195

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Giant mixed-metal clusters have been assembled with the multinuclear silver(I) tert-butylethynide supramolecular synthon and phosphonate-functionalized oxovanadate building blocks as surface components. Various anionic species can be used as their encapsulated templates. (Picture: Ag36 cluster anion encapsulating a chloride (sphere) and two [(O2)(V2O6)]4− template anions (dark green); Ag blue, O red, P yellow, V green).

    15. Biocatalysis

      Facilitated Substrate Channeling in a Self-Assembled Trifunctional Enzyme Complex (pages 8787–8790)

      Dr. Chun You, Suwan Myung and Y.-H. Percival Zhang

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202441

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three enzymes, triosephosphate isomerase (orange in picture), aldolase (cyan), and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (purple), which contained dockerins (red), self-assembled into a static trifunctional enzyme complex through interaction with a mini-scaffoldin protein consisting of three different cohesins (green). The synthetic enzyme complex exhibited an enhanced reaction rate compared to the noncomplexed three-enzyme mixture at the same enzyme concentration.

    16. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Reversible Interpenetration in a Metal–Organic Framework Triggered by Ligand Removal and Addition (pages 8791–8795)

      Sang Beom Choi, Dr. Hiroyasu Furukawa, Dr. Hye Jin Nam, Prof. Duk-Young Jung, Dr. Young Ho Jhon, Dr. Allan Walton, Dr. David Book, Prof. Michael O'Keeffe, Prof. Omar M. Yaghi and Prof. Jaheon Kim

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202925

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Caging cages: Crystals of a metal-organic framework, MOF-123 [Zn7O2(NBD)5(DMF)2] have a three-dimensional porous structure in which DMF ligands (see picture, pink) protrude into small channels. Removal of these ligands triggers the transformation of this MOF to the doubly interpenetrating form, MOF-246 [Zn7O2(NBD)5]. Moreover, addition of DMF into MOF-246 triggers reverse transformation to give MOF-123. NBD=2-nitrobenzene-1,4-dicarboxylate.

    17. Selective Heteroepitaxy

      Selective Heteroepitaxial Nanocrystal Growth of Rare Earth Fluorides on Sodium Chloride: Synthesis and Density Functional Calculations (pages 8796–8799)

      Dr. Feng Wang, Prof. Dr. Ling-Dong Sun, Jun Gu, Ye-Fu Wang, Dr. Wei Feng, Yi Yang, Prof. Dr. Jianfang Wang and Prof. Dr. Chun-Hua Yan

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203069

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Selective growth: Instead of forming core–shell structures with NaCl, NaYF4 was found to grow at the eight corners of the NaCl nanocubes, thereby forming an eight-in-one cage structure. Density functional calculations reveal that facet selectivity is determined by the interfacial energy, which is decided by anion compulsion and the coordination numbers of interfacial Y3+ ions.

    18. Functionalized Nanoparticles

      Imageable Antigen-Presenting Gold Nanoparticle Vaccines for Effective Cancer Immunotherapy In Vivo (pages 8800–8805)

      In-Hyun Lee, Ho-Keun Kwon, Sukyung An, Daejin Kim, Sunghyun Kim, Mi Kyung Yu, Prof. Jae-Hyuk Lee, Dr. Tae-Sup Lee, Prof. Sin-Hyeog Im and Prof. Sangyong Jon

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203193

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Delivery tracking: Goldnanoparticles (AuNPs) were functionalized with a red fluorescent protein (RFP, pink shapes in picture) as model antigen and an oligonucleotide (CpG) that stimulates the immune response. These functionalized AuNPs were used as cancer vaccines in a tumor model, where they enabled efficient delivery of an antigen to target sites, tracking of the vaccines using noninvasive clinical imaging, and cancer prevention and therapy.

    19. Drug Delivery

      Photocontrolled Targeted Drug Delivery: Photocaged Biologically Active Folic Acid as a Light-Responsive Tumor-Targeting Molecule (pages 8806–8810)

      Nien-Chu Fan, Prof. Fong-Yu Cheng, Prof. Ja-an Annie Ho and Prof. Chen-Sheng Yeh

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203339

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light-controlled: Biodegradable nanoparticles encapsulating an anticancer drug (red dots in picture) have been synthesized that carry photocaged folate groups on the surface. Upon irradiation the photocaging group (green) is removed and the free folate group, a tumor-homing agent, binds to folate receptors on cell surfaces, thus leading to specific targeting and cellular uptake.

    20. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Organocatalytic Asymmetric Direct Cmath image[BOND]H Functionalization of Ethers: A Highly Efficient Approach to Chiral Spiroethers (pages 8811–8815)

      Zhi-Wei Jiao, Dr. Shu-Yu Zhang, Prof. Chuan He, Prof. Yong-Qiang Tu, Prof. Shao-Hua Wang, Prof. Fu-Min Zhang, Dr. Yong-Qiang Zhang and Hui Li

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204274

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spiro compounds: An organocatalytic asymmetric method for the Cmath image[BOND]H functionalization of the α position of racemic cyclic ethers has been developed. The transformation, mediated by catalytic amounts of an imidazolidinone and strong acid, involves a tandem 1,5-hydride transfer/cyclization and provides access to a structurally diverse series of chiral spiroethers with high levels of enantioselectivity (see scheme).

    21. Cyclization

      Oxime Radical Promoted Dioxygenation, Oxyamination, and Diamination of Alkenes: Synthesis of Isoxazolines and Cyclic Nitrones (pages 8816–8820)

      Prof. Dr. Bing Han, Xiu-Long Yang, Dr. Ran Fang, Prof. Dr. Wei Yu, Chao Wang, Xiao-Yong Duan and Shuai Liu

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203799

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Up the tempo: The intramolecular addition of oxime radicals to C[DOUBLE BOND]C bonds was achieved by using DEAD and TEMPO to give 4,5-dihydroisoxazoles as a result of a C[BOND]O bond-forming, 5-exo-trig cyclization. γ,δ-Unsaturated ketoximes also reacted to afford cyclic nitrones through C[BOND]N bond formation. The reactions offer a metal-free approach for the vicinal difunctionalization of unactivated alkenes.

    22. Single-Molecule Studies

      Molecular Composition of Sub-stoichiometrically Labeled α-Synuclein Oligomers Determined by Single-Molecule Photobleaching (pages 8821–8824)

      Niels Zijlstra, Dr. Christian Blum, Dr. Ine M. J. Segers-Nolten, Dr. Mireille M. A. E. Claessens and Prof. Dr. Vinod Subramaniam

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201200813

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bleaching proteins: Single-molecule photobleaching approaches and sub-stoichiometric labeling with fluorophores give insight into the number of monomers that form a specific α-synuclein oligomer. The results show that this α-synuclein oligomer is present as a single, well-defined species consisting of 31 monomers.

    23. Electrostatic Caging

      Temporary Electrostatic Impairment of DNA Recognition: Light-Driven DNA Binding of Peptide Dimers (pages 8825–8829)

      Adrián Jiménez-Balsa, Dr. Elena Pazos, Borja Martínez-Albardonedo, Prof. José L. Mascareñas and Prof. M. Eugenio Vázquez

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201627

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Appending negatively charged Glu8 tails to a peptide dimer derived from the GCN4 transcription factor leads to an effective suppression of its DNA binding. The specific DNA recognition can be restored by irradiation with UV light by using a photolabile linker between the acidic tail and the DNA binding peptide.

    24. H2 Activation

      Hydrogen Activation by an Intramolecular Boron Lewis Acid/Zirconocene Pair (pages 8830–8833)

      Dr. Santhosh Kumar Podiyanachari, Dr. Roland Fröhlich, Dr. Constantin G. Daniliuc, Prof. Dr. Jeffrey L. Petersen, Dr. Christian Mück-Lichtenfeld, Dr. Gerald Kehr and Prof. Dr. Gerhard Erker

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202218

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let's split: Reaction of the zirconium complex A with Piers' borane [HB(C6F5)2] yields the unusual borylalkyne zirconocene complex B which reacts with dihydrogen, activating it to give the doubly hydrido bridged alkyne zirconium complex C.

    25. Cross-Coupling

      Iron-Catalyzed Alkyl–Alkyl Suzuki–Miyaura Coupling (pages 8834–8837)

      Dr. Takuji Hatakeyama, Toru Hashimoto, Dr. Kalum K. A. D. S. Kathriarachchi, Takeshi Zenmyo, Dr. Hirofumi Seike and Prof. Masaharu Nakamura

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202797

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chemoselective Suzuki–Miyaura coupling of primary and secondary alkyl halides is realized by using an iron/Xantphos catalyst. Primary and secondary alkyl bromides undergo the reaction to give the coupling products in good yields. Application to the synthesis of long-chain fatty acid derivatives is also described (see scheme).

    26. Asymmetric Cyclopropanation

      Highly Diastereo- and Enantioselective Cyclopropanation of 1,2-Disubstituted Alkenes (pages 8838–8841)

      Jun Li, Dr. Sai-Hu Liao, Hu Xiong, Dr. You-Yun Zhou, Dr. Xiu-Li Sun, Yue Zhang, Xiao-Guang Zhou and Prof. Dr. Yong Tang

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203218

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A helping hand: A series of bis(oxazoline) ligands, which contain pendant C2-symmetry-breaking groups, for the Cu-catalyzed asymmetric cyclopropanation of 1,2-disubstituted alkenes has been developed. Under mild reaction conditions, both cis- and trans-1,2-substituted alkenes can be converted into the corresponding 1,2,3-trisubstituted cyclopropanes with high levels of diastereo- and enantioselectivity (see scheme).

    27. Nanostructures

      Morphology- and Phase-Controlled Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Stabilized with Maleic Anhydride Grafted Polypropylene (pages 8842–8845)

      Qingliang He, Dr. Tingting Yuan, Prof. Dr. Suying Wei, Neel Haldolaarachchige, Dr. Zhiping Luo, Prof. Dr. David P. Young, Dr. Airat Khasanov and Prof. Dr. Zhanhu Guo

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203347

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      About phase: Ferromagnetic γ-Fe2O3 nanowires (left in the figure) with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 54.0 emu g−1 and coercivity of 518 Oe at room temperature, and superparamagnetic hollow α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (right) with a room-temperature Ms of 2.9 emu g−1 were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of [Fe(CO)5] but with the stabilizing action of maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene.

    28. Organometallic Compounds

      Binding of Molecular Magnesium Hydrides to a Zirconocene–Enyne Template (pages 8846–8849)

      Dipl.-Chem. Georg Bender, Dipl.-Chem. Thomas Wiegand, Prof. Hellmut Eckert, Dr. Roland Fröhlich, Dr. Constantin G. Daniliuc, Dr. Christian Mück-Lichtenfeld, Sylvester Ndambuki, Prof. Dr. Tom Ziegler, Dr. Gerald Kehr and Prof. Dr. Gerhard Erker

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203372

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An enyne–zirconium complex stabilizes molecular magnesium hydride (MgH2) and even a molecular hydride, nC4H9MgH. These systems feature magnesium olefin π complexation.

    29. Polymerization

      Control of a Living Radical Polymerization of Methacrylates by Light (pages 8850–8853)

      Dr. Brett P. Fors and Prof. Dr. Craig J. Hawker

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203639

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On–off: A living radical polymerization procedure, which utilizes ppm levels of an iridium-based photoredox catalyst, affords control over chain growth through mediation by visible light (see scheme; Pn=polymer chain, X=halogen, M=monomer). This process can be activated and deactivated by light, enables control over the molecular weight and molecular weight distributions, and tolerates different functional groups.

    30. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of α-Quaternary Proline Derivatives by 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition of α-Silylimines (pages 8854–8858)

      Jorge Hernández-Toribio, Silvia Padilla, Dr. Javier Adrio and Prof. Dr. Juan C. Carretero

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203828

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going pro: The title reaction between α-silylimines and activated olefins proceeds in the presence of a CuI/DTBM-Segphos catalyst system with excellent diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity. This process provides straightforward access to highly enantioenriched 5-unsubstituted α-quaternary proline derivatives. TMS=trimethylsilyl, DTBM-Segphos=5,5′-bis[di(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenyl)phosphino]-4,4′-bi-1,3-benzodioxole.

    31. Highly Enantioselective Hetero-Diels–Alder Reaction of 1,3-Bis(silyloxy)-1,3-dienes with Aldehydes Catalyzed by Chiral Disulfonimide (pages 8859–8863)

      Dr. Joyram Guin, Dr. Constantinos Rabalakos and Prof. Dr. Benjamin List

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204262

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bulking up with F: The title reaction proceeds using 1 mol % of the new perfluoroisopropyl chiral disulfonimide catalyst 1 to deliver several 2,6-disubstituted and 2,5,6-trisubstituted dihydropyrones in good yields and with excellent enantiomeric ratios. The utility of this methodology is illustrated with the first enantioselective synthesis of a potent aromatase inhibitor.

    32. Organocatalysis

      Enantioselective Synthesis of Tertiary α-Hydroxy Phosphonates Catalyzed by Carbohydrate/Cinchona Alkaloid Thiourea Organocatalysts (pages 8864–8867)

      Shasha Kong, Weidong Fan, Guiping Wu and Prof. Dr. Zhiwei Miao

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204287

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A pinch of sugar: The new bifunctional carbohydrate/cinchonine-based thiourea 1 has been designed for the asymmetric addition reaction of α-ketophosphonates and trimethylsilyl cyanide, the product of which can be hydrolyzed to afford tertiary α-hydroxy phosphonates with excellent enantioselectivities.

    33. Synthetic Methods

      A Versatile Synthesis of Meyers’ Bicyclic Lactams from Furans: Singlet-Oxygen-Initiated Reaction Cascade (pages 8868–8871)

      Dr. Dimitris Kalaitzakis, Dr. Tamsyn Montagnon, Ioanna Alexopoulou and Prof. Dr. Georgios Vassilikogiannakis

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204419

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All in one: Meyers' bicyclic lactams were synthesized in high yield from furans using a new and powerful method that involves a one-pot singlet-oxygen-initiated reaction cascade (see scheme; TFA=trifluoroacetic acid). This method has broad synthetic potential because of the ease of access to a wide range of furans with a variety of substituents.

    34. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Enantioselective Hydrogenation of α-Substituted Acrylic Acids Catalyzed by Iridium Complexes with Chiral Spiro Aminophosphine Ligands (pages 8872–8875)

      Prof. Shou-Fei Zhu, Yan-Bo Yu, Shen Li, Li-Xin Wang and Prof. Qi-Lin Zhou

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204363

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly active: Iridium complexes with chiral spiro aminophosphine ligands were synthesized and applied as catalysts for the asymmetric hydrogenation of α-substituted acrylic acids (see scheme). The complexes were highly active catalysts, showing turnover frequencies of up to 6000 h−1, and catalyst loadings could be reduced to 0.01 mol %.

    35. Synthetic Methods

      Iridium-Catalyzed Oxidant-Free Dehydrogenative C[BOND]H Bond Functionalization: Selective Preparation of N-Arylpiperidines through Tandem Hydrogen Transfers (pages 8876–8880)

      Kedong Yuan, Fan Jiang, Zeyneb Sahli, Dr. Mathieu Achard, Dr. Thierry Roisnel and Dr. Christian Bruneau

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204582

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Relay to the finish: The atom-economical tandem hydrogen autotransfer catalyzed by iridium(III) has been efficiently applied for the preparation of N-arylpiperidines starting from easily accessible anilines, diols, and aldehydes (see scheme). This protocol is also compatible with the use of diethyl carbonate as an ecofriendly solvent.

    36. N-Heterocyclic Carbenes

      C[BOND]N Bond Cleavage and Ring Expansion of N-Heterocyclic Carbenes using Hydrosilanes (pages 8881–8885)

      David Schmidt, Johannes H. J. Berthel, Sabrina Pietsch and Prof. Dr. Udo Radius

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204333

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ring expansion of NHCs! The reaction of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) with hydrosilanes Ph4−nSiHn (n=1, 2, 3) results in complete rupture of the heterocycle and silylene insertion into one of the C[BOND]N bonds of the carbene (see scheme; R=alkyl, aryl).

    37. Gold Catalysis

      Gold-Catalyzed Synthesis of Furans and Furanones from Sulfur Ylides (pages 8886–8890)

      Dr. Xueliang Huang, Dr. Bo Peng, Dr. Marco Luparia, Luis F. R. Gomes, Prof. Dr. Luís F. Veiros and Dr. Nuno Maulide

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203637

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A golden switch: Doubly stabilized sulfonium ylides can be coupled with alkynes in a gold-catalyzed synthesis of heterocycles. This method hinges on a switch in the reactivity of the sulfur ylide resulting from the simple modification of the electron-withdrawing moieties and leads to either furans or furanones bearing a quaternary center (see scheme).

    38. Radical Chemistry

      Catalytic Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT) for Sustainable and Diastereoselective Radical Reduction (pages 8891–8894)

      Prof. Dr. Andreas Gansäuer, Max Klatte, Gerhard M. Brändle and Prof. Dr. Joachim Friedrich

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202818

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going cyclic! A catalytic cycle and cyclic transition states enable a novel sustainable and catalytic hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) for highly diastereoselective radical reductions. Readily available nontoxic silanes are the terminal reductants for epoxides that are opened by bifunctional titanocene(III) hydride catalysts.

    39. Bioorganometallic Chemistry

      On the Biological Properties of Alkynyl Phosphine Gold(I) Complexes (pages 8895–8899)

      Andreas Meyer, Prof. Dr. Christoph P. Bagowski, Dr. Malte Kokoschka, Dr. Maria Stefanopoulou, Dr. Hamed Alborzinia, Suzan Can, M. Sc. Danielle H. Vlecken, Prof. Dr. William S. Sheldrick, Prof. Dr. Stefan Wölfl and Prof. Dr. Ingo Ott

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202939

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Golden times for metal-based drugs? Alkynyl triphenylphosphine gold(I) complexes display interesting biological properties and show high potential for future drug development. They are strong inhibitors of the enzyme thioredoxin reductase, trigger antiproliferative effects in tumor cells, and influence tumor cell metabolism, mitochondrial respiration, and angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION