Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 52 Issue 10

March 4, 2013

Volume 52, Issue 10

Pages 2613–3033

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: 125 Years of Chemistry in the Mirror of “Angewandte” (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2013) (page 2613)

      Prof. Dr. François Diederich

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201390007

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      Quality through diversity has been a hallmark of Angewandte Chemie from the beginning, and this is no doubt also the case in the 125th year. This jubilee will be celebrated by a symposium on March 12, 2013 in Berlin, and the program is part of the current issue. The diversity of topics that appear in Angewandte Chemie is illustrated by the tag cloud in the cover picture. The diversity of countries from which manuscripts come is shown by the top-ten list of countries of the Communications accepted in 2012, which is represented by the size of the spheres in the cover picture. The various sections are also diverse: Reviews and Communications, Highlights and Essays, Author Profiles and News, Obituaries and occasionally Correspondences. The history of Angewandte Chemie is presented in this Issue by the Chairman of the Editorial Board, François Diederich, in a major Review (pp. 2714 ff.), which brings to life the development of the journal and indeed of chemistry since 1888.

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      Inside Back Cover: Ultralight, Flexible, and Fire-Resistant Carbon Nanofiber Aerogels from Bacterial Cellulose (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2013) (page 3035)

      Zhen-Yu Wu, Chao Li, Dr. Hai-Wei Liang, Prof. Dr. Jia-Fu Chen and Prof. Dr. Shu-Hong Yu

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301125

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      Carbon nanofiber aerogels can be fabricated on a large scale by using a low-cost biomass, bacterial cellulose, as a precursor, which can be produced industrially in a microbial fermentation process (see picture). As described by S. H. Yu and co-workers in their Communication on page 2925 ff., the aerogels are ultralight (a small piece can sit on a clover leaf), flexible, fire-resistant, and have a superior absorption capacity for organic solvents. Picture design: M.-R. Gao.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
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  3. Miscellaneous

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
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    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
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      Program: Anniversary Symposium 125 Years of Angewandte Chemie

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301554

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      Let's have a party! The 125th-anniversary symposium of Angewandte Chemie offers eleven first-class speakers, among them three Nobel laureates. On March 12, in Berlin, or on the internet through ChemistryViews.

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
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  5. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 10/2013 (pages 2619–2637)

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201390008

  6. News

    1. Top of page
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    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
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    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
  7. Miscellaneous

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
  8. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. Paul Knochel (pages 2646–2647)

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208431

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      “If I won the lottery, I would buy a Steinway for me and a house for my Steinway. My favorite place on earth is Paris …” This and more about Paul Knochel can be found on page 2646.

  9. News

    1. Top of page
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    7. News
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    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
  10. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. Catalysis. From Principles to Applications. By Matthias Beller, Albert Renken and Rutger A. van Santen. (page 2650)

      Fritz E. Kühn

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201210089

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      Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2012. 642 pp., hardcover, € 69.00.—ISBN 978-3527323494

  11. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
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    9. Author Profile
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    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. On-Chip Biosynthesis

      On-Chip Protein Biosynthesis (pages 2652–2654)

      M. Sc. Christopher Timm and Prof. Dr. Christof M. Niemeyer

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208880

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      Spot on! Cell-free protein expression on surfaces can be implemented in biosensors and in microfluidic devices like that shown in the picture. Proteins are generated and immobilized successively on separated spots in a microfluidic reactor. This approach opens up novel opportunities for basic and applied biomedical research.

    2. Reactive Intermediates

      A “Hot, Energized” Benzyne (pages 2655–2656)

      Prof. Dr. Reinhard W. Hoffmann and Prof. Dr. Keisuke Suzuki

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209041

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      Fundamental aspects of chemically activated reactive intermediates can possibly be learned from the novel generation of arynes. The intramolecular [4+2] cycloaddition between a diyne and an (electronically activated) alkyne also provides a new route to generate arynes (see scheme).

  12. Essays

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
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    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. Protein science

      The Importance of Additive and Non-Additive Mutational Effects in Protein Engineering (pages 2658–2666)

      Prof. Dr. Manfred T. Reetz

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207842

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      Additive or non-additive, that is the question: The increasing awareness of non-additive cooperative mutational effects in protein engineering is currently providing new theoretical and practical insights. In particular, the directed evolution of stereoselective enzymes as catalysts in organic chemistry and biotechnology profits from this intriguing development.

    2. Unpredictability of Science

      Gloomy Forecast for the Prophets of Apocalypse and Bright Forecast for Chemists (pages 2667–2672)

      Prof. Ehud Keinan

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209383

      The human population, doubling every 50 years, creates global problems, including limitations on energy, raw materials, food, water, health, and air. However, the future of humankind seems bright thanks to the even faster growth of human knowledge, doubling every 18 months, and the unpredictability of science. Our global challenges are likely to be met by yet unknown technologies, mostly invented by chemists.

    3. Exhaust Emission

      Emission of Highly Activated Soot Particulate—The Other Side of the Coin with Modern Diesel Engines (pages 2673–2677)

      Dr. Benjamin Frank, Dr. Manfred E. Schuster, Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl and Prof. Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206093

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      Soot toxification: The increasing chemical activity of the emitted soot particulate produced by modern diesel engines is an unwanted side effect of modification of the motors. This makes Euro IV and VI soots chemically and biologically highly active and hazardous. Taking these factors into consideration, the question arises whether the reduced net mass of diesel soot particulate emitted overcompensates for the induced micro- and nanostructure.

    4. Nanoscience

      From Chemistry to Nanoscience: Not Just a Matter of Size (pages 2678–2683)

      Prof. Dr. Chunli Bai and Prof. Dr. Minghua Liu

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201210058

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      Size matters: Chemistry has contributed strongly to the rapid development of nanoscience resulting in an ever-growing amount of nanosized systems and materials. The properties of these systems do not only arise from their size, but also surface modifications and structures. Nanomaterials thus have unique properties and can contribute to the development of chemistry, including nanocatalysts and nanomedicine.

    5. Drug Development

      “Collaborative Innovation”—Regaining the Edge in Drug Discovery (pages 2684–2687)

      Prof. Dr. Hanno Wild, Dr. Christoph Huwe and Dr. Monika Lessl

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208734

      Sharers are winners: The concept of “Collaborative Innovation” has the potential to overcome the significant challenges the pharmaceutical industry faces in its effort to improve the lives of patients by fighting increasingly complex diseases. In order to succeed, it is crucial to join forces on a global level and to combine different approaches in a flexible way, requiring the right mindset of all involved parties, a combination of internal excellence and external openness, and the right organizational setup.

  13. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
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    4. Miscellaneous
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    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. Proton-Conducting Materials

      Proton Conduction in Metal–Organic Frameworks and Related Modularly Built Porous Solids (pages 2688–2700)

      Dr. Minyoung Yoon, Kyungwon Suh, Prof. Dr. Srinivasan Natarajan and Prof. Dr. Kimoon Kim

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206410

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      Pores and protons: Development of new types of proton-conducting materials is important in fuel-cell technology. Newly developed proton-conducting materials formed from modularly built porous solids, including coordination polymers (CPs) or metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are discussed (see scheme).

    2. Crystal Engineering

      Nanoindentation in Crystal Engineering: Quantifying Mechanical Properties of Molecular Crystals (pages 2701–2712)

      Dr. Sunil Varughese, Dr. M. S. R. N. Kiran, Prof. Upadrasta Ramamurty and Prof. Gautam R. Desiraju

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205002

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      Poking crystals: The application of nanoindentation in crystal engineering provides an important breakthrough in establishing links between microscopic structures and macroscopic properties. This Minireview highlights some of the advantages of this technique for studying the mechanical behavior of organic crystals.

  14. Reviews

    1. Top of page
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    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. History of Chemistry

      125 Years of Chemistry in the Mirror of “Angewandte” (pages 2714–2742)

      Prof. Dr. François Diederich

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300056

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      The development of Angewandte Chemie and the changes in chemical research over the first 125 years of its existence are the topic of this Review. Even from the content of its first 50 years, the journal offers numerous milestones in chemical research, and today, with its attractive layout and successful mix of articles, it covers chemical research worldwide in its full breadth.

    2. Drug Discovery

      Target Identification for Small Bioactive Molecules: Finding the Needle in the Haystack (pages 2744–2792)

      Dr. Slava Ziegler, Dr. Verena Pries, Dr. Christian Hedberg and Prof. Dr. Herbert Waldmann

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208749

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      How to solve the riddle? When phenotypic screens are performed, mostly there are missing pieces (of information) that would explain the link between a biologically active compound and the appearance of a certain phenotype. The interplay of organic synthesis, cell biology, proteomics, genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, informatics, and biophysics is required to find the missing pieces and to assemble the whole puzzle of a compound's cellular activity.

    3. Catalysis for Synthesis

      Alkyne Metathesis on the Rise (pages 2794–2819)

      Prof. Alois Fürstner

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204513

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      Making connections: The latest generation of alkyne metathesis catalysts holds considerable promise for synthesis, as they are exceptionally active, remarkably tolerant, and, in the form of their phenanthroline adducts, bench stable (see scheme). Numerous applications to material science and natural product synthesis illustrate the excellent performance and structural scope of this method.

    4. Computational Chemistry

      Multi-Resolution Simulation of Biomolecular Systems: A Review of Methodological Issues (pages 2820–2834)

      Katharina Meier, Alexandra Choutko, Jozica Dolenc, Andreas P. Eichenberger, Sereina Riniker and Wilfred F. van Gunsteren

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205408

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      Various levels of resolution, for example, electronic, atomic, supramolecular, are combined in one model in multi-resolution simulations. The basic choices when setting up a multi-resolution model are reviewed. As an illustration the differential catalytic properties of two enzymes with similar folds are explored using multi-resolution simulation at three different levels of resolution.

    5. Towards Complex Matter

      Perspectives in Chemistry—Steps towards Complex Matter (pages 2836–2850)

      Prof. Dr. Jean-Marie Lehn

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208397

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      Chemistry is key for understanding the fundamental processes that underlie the evolution of matter towards states of increasing complexity through self-organization. It has developed from the molecular to the supramolecular level and has, through constitution dynamic systems, acquired the features of adaptive chemistry. Hence, chemistry opens the door towards complex matter.

    6. Homogeneous Hydroformylation

      Alternative Metals for Homogeneous Catalyzed Hydroformylation Reactions (pages 2852–2872)

      Jola Pospech, Dr. Ivana Fleischer, Prof. Dr. Robert Franke, Prof. Dr. Stefan Buchholz and Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208330

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      New possibilities: There is a growing awareness that organometallic complexes based on ruthenium, iridium, palladium, and even iron as the central metal offer new opportunities for catalytic hydroformylations (see scheme; TM=transition metal). Research from the past few decades is critically summarized in this Review.

  15. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    11. Book Review
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    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. Organic Electronics

      Transferable Graphene Oxide by Stamping Nanotechnology: Electron-Transport Layer for Efficient Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells (pages 2874–2880)

      Dr. Dong Hwan Wang, Jung Kyu Kim, Prof. Jung Hwa Seo, Dr. Insun Park, Prof. Byung Hee Hong, Prof. Jong Hyeok Park and Prof. Alan J. Heeger

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209999

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      Layer by layer: Electron-transport layers (ETLs) of transferable graphene oxide (GO) inserted by using a stamping nanotechnology (see picture) result in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells with enhanced power conversion efficiency because of enhanced electron-charge transport and reduced electronic charge barrier with low series resistance. The GO ETL also increases the stability of the device in air.

    2. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Highly Selective Detection of Nitro Explosives by a Luminescent Metal–Organic Framework (pages 2881–2885)

      Sanjog S. Nagarkar, Biplab Joarder, Abhijeet K. Chaudhari, Soumya Mukherjee and Dr. Sujit K. Ghosh

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208885

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      TNP can't hide from MOF: A three-dimensional fluorescent metal–organic framework (MOF), [Cd(NDC)0.5(PCA)]⋅Gx, can be used for the detection of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP). The MOF exhibits high selectivity towards TNP, even in the presence of other nitro explosives in aqueous and organic solutions, owing to electron- and energy-transfer mechanisms and electrostatic interactions.

    3. Nanoparticle Separation

      Bypassing the Limitations of Classical Chemical Purification with DNA-Programmable Nanoparticle Recrystallization (pages 2886–2891)

      Matthew R. Jones and Prof. Chad A. Mirkin

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209504

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      And then there was one: Anisotropic nanoparticle syntheses often contain impurity nanostructures. Functionalization of the products of such syntheses with DNA (see scheme (1)) allows the relative interaction strengths between particles to be tailored. The desired nanoparticle component can then be crystallized selectively (2) and separated to arrive at samples of significantly improved purity (3).

    4. Soft Robots

      Using Explosions to Power a Soft Robot (pages 2892–2896)

      Dr. Robert F. Shepherd, Dr. Adam A. Stokes, Jacob Freake, Dr. Jabulani Barber, Dr. Phillip W. Snyder, Dr. Aaron D. Mazzeo, Dr. Ludovico Cademartiri, Dr. Stephen A. Morin and Prof. George M. Whitesides

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209540

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      Combustion causes a soft robot to jump: Rapid actuation of a soft robot (composed of silicone elastomers) was achieved using high-temperature chemical reactions. Computer-controlled electrical sparks triggered the combustion of premixed CH4 and O2 gases inside the robot, which pressurized the pneumatic channels of the robot and caused it to jump (see figure). The heat from the explosions dissipated quickly and did not damage the robot even over many jumps.

    5. Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

      Environmental Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy: Structural Dynamics of Solvation at Interfaces (pages 2897–2901)

      Dr. Ding-Shyue Yang, Dr. Omar F. Mohammed and Prof. Dr. Ahmed H. Zewail

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205093

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      On the surface: CdSe surfaces have been used as a prototype for the investigation of the spatiotemporal characteristics of solvation by environmental scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (see picture, GSED=gaseous secondary electron detector). This study has shown that the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of polar molecules, such as water, in the adsorbate layers exhibit a striking dependence on the CdSe surface structure.

    6. Metal–Organic Materials

      The asc Trinodal Platform: Two-Step Assembly of Triangular, Tetrahedral, and Trigonal-Prismatic Molecular Building Blocks (pages 2902–2905)

      Alexander Schoedel, Dr. Amy J. Cairns, Dr. Youssef Belmabkhout, Dr. Lukasz Wojtas, Mona Mohamed, Zhenjie Zhang, Prof. Davide M. Proserpio, Prof. Dr. Mohamed Eddaoudi and Prof. Dr. Michael J. Zaworotko

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206042

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      The self-assembly of triangular, tetrahedral, and trigonal-prismatic molecular building blocks affords the first example of a trinodal family of metal–organic materials. Four examples of isoreticular expanded and functionalized frameworks are detailed. Gas adsorption experiments validated the permanent porosity of the parent structure.

    7. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Consequences of Folding a Water-Soluble Polymer Around an Organocatalyst (pages 2906–2910)

      Dr. Elisa Huerta, Patrick J. M. Stals, Prof. Dr. E. W. Meijer and Dr. Anja R. A. Palmans

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207123

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      Give 'em structure: The presence of structuring elements in polymers that were functionalized with catalytic units resulted in a new class of enzyme mimics, which are only active in the folded state (see picture). The conformationally adaptive hydrophobic environment that surrounds the catalytic site allows the very efficient catalysis of an aldol reaction in water with Michaelis–Menten kinetics.

    8. Nucleophilic Substitution

      Revisiting the Hammett ρ Parameter for the Determination of Philicity: Nucleophilic Substitution with Inverse Charge Interaction (pages 2911–2914)

      Prof. Dr. Giulia Licini and Dr. Cristiano Zonta

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208045

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      Too OT to handle? In oxygen transfer (OT) reactions the inversion of the ρ value is not representative of a change in mechanism. Substituents bonded to aromatic sulfoxides have the opposite effect on the rates of oxidation depending on whether the reaction is dominated by electrostatic or orbital-overlap effects (see picture).

    9. Host–Guest Chemistry

      Supramolecular Control of Enzyme Activity through Cucurbit[8]uril-Mediated Dimerization (pages 2915–2919)

      Dr. Dung T. Dang, Dr. Hoang D. Nguyen, Dr. Maarten Merkx and Prof. Dr. Luc Brunsveld

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208239

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      At the double: Cucurbit[8]uril-mediated protein dimerization enables reversible control over strong enzyme activation of caspases. Simple addition of a short N-terminal FGG motif allows for a supramolecular-mediated 50-fold enhancement of caspase-9 catalytic activity.

    10. Energy Transfer

      A Photoconductive Thienothiophene-Based Covalent Organic Framework Showing Charge Transfer Towards Included Fullerene (pages 2920–2924)

      Dr. Mirjam Dogru, Matthias Handloser, Florian Auras, Dr. Thomas Kunz, Dr. Dana Medina, Prof. Dr. Achim Hartschuh, Prof. Dr. Paul Knochel and Prof. Dr. Thomas Bein

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208514

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      Filling a honeycomb: The thienothiophene-based covalent organic framework (COF) can be loaded with a complementary semiconductor, such as a fullerene derivative, and electronic interactions are observed (see figure). The novel periodic interpenetrated donor–acceptor system shows the spectroscopic signatures of efficient charge transfer on the nanoscale. Photovoltaic activity was demonstrated upon integrating the COF:fullerene film into a device.

    11. Carbon Nanomaterials

      Ultralight, Flexible, and Fire-Resistant Carbon Nanofiber Aerogels from Bacterial Cellulose (pages 2925–2929)

      Zhen-Yu Wu, Chao Li, Dr. Hai-Wei Liang, Prof. Dr. Jia-Fu Chen and Prof. Dr. Shu-Hong Yu

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209676

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      Thirsty fibers: The aerogels described in the title can be fabricated in large scale by using a low-cost biomass, bacterial cellulose, as a precursor, which can be produced at industrial level in a microbial fermentation process. The carbon nanofiber aerogels (black pieces in picture) exhibit superior absorption capacity for organic solvents (red solution) and high potential for pressure sensing.

    12. In Vivo Gold Chemistry

      Gold(III) Complexes Containing N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligands: Thiol “Switch-on” Fluorescent Probes and Anti-Cancer Agents (pages 2930–2933)

      Taotao Zou, Dr. Ching Tung Lum, Dr. Stephen Sin-Yin Chui and Prof. Dr. Chi-Ming Che

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209787

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      Illuminating results: Activation of non-emissive [AuIII(N N N)(NHC)]+ complexes (such as 1) through reduction by intracellular glutathione gives active AuI–NHC complexes, which show promising anti-cancer properties, accompanied by release of the highly fluorescent ligand. The high fluorescence “switch-on” efficiency makes these AuIII complexes excellent probes for cellular thiol detection.

    13. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Fulvenes as Effective Dipolarophiles in Copper(I)-Catalyzed [6+3] Cycloaddition of Azomethine Ylides: Asymmetric Construction of Piperidine Derivatives (pages 2934–2938)

      Zhao-Lin He, Huai-Long Teng and Prof. Dr. Chun-Jiang Wang

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208799

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      As easy as π: Fulvenes serve as 6π dipolarophiles in the title reaction in the presence of the chiral CuI/(S)-L complex. The present system provides a unique and straightforward access to enantioenriched, highly functionalized piperidine derivatives in good yields and excellent diastereoselectivities and enantioselectivities.

    14. Stable Carbenes

      31P NMR Chemical Shifts of Carbene–Phosphinidene Adducts as an Indicator of the π-Accepting Properties of Carbenes (pages 2939–2943)

      Dr. Olivier Back, Martin Henry-Ellinger, Dr. Caleb D. Martin, Dr. David Martin and Prof. Guy Bertrand

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209109

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      Beyond the Tolman electronic parameter: The 31P NMR chemical shifts of easily synthesized carbene–phenylphosphinidene adducts allow the determination of the relative π-acceptor properties of carbenes. In combination with the Tolman electronic parameter value, the relative pure σ-donation of carbenes can also be evaluated.

    15. Synthetic Methods

      Practical and General Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Ketones from Internal Olefins (pages 2944–2948)

      Dr. Bill Morandi, Zachary K. Wickens and Prof. Dr. Robert H. Grubbs

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209541

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      Make it simple! A convenient and general palladium-catalyzed oxidation of internal olefins to ketones is reported. The transformation occurs at room temperature and shows wide substrate scope. Applications to the oxidation of seed-oil derivatives and a bioactive natural product (see scheme) are described, as well as intriguing mechanistic features.

    16. Carbonylation

      From Olefins to Alcohols: Efficient and Regioselective Ruthenium-Catalyzed Domino Hydroformylation/Reduction Sequence (pages 2949–2953)

      Dr. Ivana Fleischer, Dr. Katrin Marie Dyballa, Dr. Reiko Jennerjahn, Dr. Ralf Jackstell, Prof. Dr. Robert Franke, Dr. Anke Spannenberg and Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207133

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      Exploring the alternatives: Ruthenium imidazoyl phosphine complexes catalyze the domino hydroformylation/reduction of alkenes to alcohols in good yields and with good selectivities (see scheme). Linear aliphatic alcohols are synthesized under reaction conditions typically used in industrial hydroformylations.

    17. C[BOND]C Coupling

      Decarboxylative Cross-Coupling of Mesylates Catalyzed by Copper/Palladium Systems with Customized Imidazolyl Phosphine Ligands (pages 2954–2958)

      Bingrui Song, Dr. Thomas Knauber and Prof. Dr. Lukas J. Gooßen

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208025

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      The activation of the inert C[BOND]O bonds in mesylates through the use of a new class of imidazolyl phosphines allows the decarboxylative coupling of aryl mesylates as well as polysubstituted alkenyl mesylates. Variation of the ligands leads to two complementary methods providing the corresponding biaryls and polysubstituted olefins in good yields.

    18. C[BOND]H Activation

      Synthesis of Aryl Ethers from Benzoates through Carboxylate-Directed C[BOND]H-Activating Alkoxylation with Concomitant Protodecarboxylation (pages 2959–2962)

      Dr. Sukalyan Bhadra, Dr. Wojciech I. Dzik and Prof. Dr. Lukas J. Gooßen

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208755

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      One in, one out: In the presence of a copper/silver bimetallic catalyst system, aromatic carboxylate salts undergo ortho C[BOND]H alkoxylation with concomitant loss of the carboxylate directing group in a protodecarboxylation step (see scheme, FG=functional group). This process provides a convenient synthetic access to the important class of aromatic ethers from widely available carboxylic acids.

    19. Low-Valent Silicon

      A Stable Singlet Biradicaloid Siladicarbene: (L:)2Si (pages 2963–2967)

      Dr. Kartik Chandra Mondal, Prof. Herbert W. Roesky, Martin C. Schwarzer, Prof. Gernot Frenking, Benedikt Niepötter, Hilke Wolf, Dr. Regine Herbst-Irmer and Prof. Dietmar Stalke

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208307

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      A trapped silicon atom: The compound (L:)2Si with low-valent silicon was synthesized from its dichloride biradical precursor (L:)2SiCl2 by reduction with KC8. Theoretical analysis suggest that there are two donor–acceptor σ bonds L:→Si←:L. There is one σ lone-pair orbital at Si and one π orbital which features significant π-back-donation L:←Si→:L giving short Si[BOND]C bonds.

    20. Heterocycles

      Reactions of Arynes with Nitrosoarenes—An Approach to Substituted Carbazoles (pages 2968–2971)

      Shyamal Chakrabarty, Dr. Indranil Chatterjee, Dr. Ludger Tebben and Prof. Dr. Armido Studer

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209447

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      No transition metals are necessary in the reaction of in situ generated arynes with nitrosoarenes to give substituted carbazoles. Depending on the fluoride source and the solvent, either N-arylated carbazoles or NH-carbazoles are obtained (see scheme; DME=dimethoxyethane, OTf=trifluoromethanesulfonate). In these cascades a C[BOND]C and one or two C[BOND]N bonds are formed. The reactions are easy to conduct and proceed under mild conditions.

    21. Small-Molecule Activation

      Ferrocene and Pentaphosphaferrocene: A Comparative Study Regarding Redox Chemistry (pages 2972–2976)

      Dr. Mikhail V. Butovskiy, Dr. Gábor Balázs, Dr. Michael Bodensteiner, Dr. Eugenia V. Peresypkina, Dr. Alexander V. Virovets, Dr. Jörg Sutter and Prof. Dr. Manfred Scheer

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209329

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      Pentaphosphaferrocene redox chemistry: Unprecedented dianionic and P[BOND]P coupled and monomeric products are obtained by the reduction of pentaphosphaferrocene with KH or K metal, whereas by oxidation a P[BOND]P coupled P102+ ligand coordinated to two Cp*Fe units is obtained. The redox behavior clearly distinguishes pentaphosphaferrocene from its organometallic relative, ferrocene.

    22. Asymmetric Synthesis

      A Branched Domino Reaction: Asymmetric Organocatalytic Two-Component Four-Step Synthesis of Polyfunctionalized Cyclohexene Derivatives (pages 2977–2980)

      Dr. Xiaofei Zeng, M. Sc. Qijian Ni, Prof. Dr. Gerhard Raabe and Prof. Dr. Dieter Enders

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209581

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      Take two: By employing two equivalents of an aldehyde in an asymmetric organocatalytic domino reaction, the nucleophilic enamine intermediate is also converted into the corresponding iminium species through oxidation with o-iodoxybenzoic acid. Thus, polyfunctionalized cyclohexene derivatives are formed from two simple starting materials in good yields and stereoselectivities (see scheme; Bn=benzyl, EWG=electron-withdrawing group).

    23. Low-Coordinate Complexes

      Maximizing Coordinative and Electronic Unsaturation: Three-Coordinate Dicationic Platinum Complexes (pages 2981–2984)

      Prof. Dr. Holger Braunschweig, Dr. Peter Brenner, Dr. Rian D. Dewhurst, Dr. J. Oscar C. Jimenez-Halla, Dr. Thomas Kupfer, Dr. Daniela Rais and Dr. Katharina Uttinger

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209717

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      Halide abstraction from cationic base-stabilized borylene complexes led to extremely electronically and coordinatively unsaturated platinum complexes. The formally 14-electron borylene complexes show no agostic interactions with the phosphine ligands, and only small Lewis donor ligands could be added to the Pt center.

    24. Carbohydrate Mimics

      Flexible Synthesis of 2-Deoxy-C-Glycosides and (1→2)-, (1→3)-, and (1→4)-Linked C-Glycosides (pages 2985–2989)

      Dipl.-Chem. Dennis C. Koester, M. Sc. Ella Kriemen and Priv.-Doz. Dr. Daniel B. Werz

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209697

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      Link! Two, three, four! A rapid and flexible synthesis of native (1→n)-linked C-disaccharides (n=2, 3, 4; left) is possible. The configuration of the pseudoanomeric carbon was readily established by an epoxidation/ring-opening sequence. The synthesis of (1→n)-linked 2-deoxy-C-disaccharides (right) with high diastereoselectivity follows an even shorter route.

    25. Ion Pairs

      Ion Speciation of Protic Ionic Liquids in Water: Transition from Contact to Solvent-Separated Ion Pairs (pages 2990–2994)

      Peter Stange, Dr. Koichi Fumino and Prof. Dr. Ralf Ludwig

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209609

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      The fab four: Far-infrared difference spectra and DFT-calculated properties for mixtures of protic ionic liquids (PILs) and water clearly indicate that a minimum of four water molecules are needed to transfer contact (CIPs) into solvent-separated (SIPs) ion pairs. SIPs are favored over CIPs owing to additional H-bonds and cooperative effects. This enthalpic advantage overcompensates for the entropic penalty of separation by water.

    26. Nucleic Acid Chemistry

      Combinatorial Nucleoside-Deletion-Scanning Mutagenesis of Functional DNA (pages 2995–2999)

      Biswajit Samanta and Dr. Claudia Höbartner

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208103

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      Compact and informative: Individual nucleosides are statistically mutated by replacement with a non-nucleosidic spacer unit Δ that encodes the “deletion” in a single DNA library. This efficient mutagenesis approach enables minimization of functional DNA, identifying essential nucleotides, as demonstrated for two nucleic-acid ligating deoxyribozymes.

    27. Hydrogels

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Embedding of Active Proteins and Living Cells in Redox-Sensitive Hydrogels and Nanogels through Enzymatic Cross-Linking (pages 3000–3003)

      Smriti Singh, Fuat Topuz, Kathrin Hahn, Dr. Krystyna Albrecht and Prof. Jürgen Groll

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206266

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      Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) can be used for the enzymatic cross-linking of thiol-functionalized polymers under mild conditions to form hydrogels and nanogels without the need for added H2O2. Cells can be embedded in the hydrogels and proteins can be entrapped and released from the nanogels. These gels are fully degradable under mild and cytocompatible reductive conditions.

    28. Dinitrogen Species

      Dinitrogen as Double Lewis Acid: Structure and Bonding of Triphenylphosphinazine N2(PPh3)2 (pages 3004–3008)

      Nicole Holzmann, Deepak Dange, Prof. Dr. Cameron Jones and Prof. Dr. Gernot Frenking

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206305

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      Making Ns meet: Triphenylphosphinazine N2(PPh3)2 is a donor–acceptor complex between nitrogen in the highly excited 1Γg state and two anti-periplanar coordinated phosphine ligands (see structure). Although the dissociation into N2+2 PPh3 is calculated to be exergonic by 75 kcal mol−1, the compound is kinetically very stable as a result of the very large Lewis acidity of N2 in the excited 1Γg state.

    29. Enzyme Inhibitors

      The Mechanism of Caseinolytic Protease (ClpP) Inhibition (pages 3009–3014)

      Malte Gersch, Felix Gut, Dr. Vadim S. Korotkov, Johannes Lehmann, Dr. Thomas Böttcher, Dr. Marion Rusch, Dr. Christian Hedberg, Prof. Dr. Herbert Waldmann, Prof. Dr. Gerhard Klebe and Prof. Dr. Stephan A. Sieber

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204690

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      Catch me if you can: The ClpP protease mediates protein homeostasis and can be efficiently inhibited by β-lactones. A combination of molecular docking, mutagenesis, activity-based protein profiling, and kinetics studies now reveals the mechanism of ClpP inhibition. A hydrophobic pocket next to the active site allows binding of long aliphatic and aromatic residues. The preferred stereoisomer binds into the oxyanion hole.

    30. C[BOND]H Activation

      Reactivity of a Metastable Cobalt(III) Trisulfide Complex: Multiple C[BOND]H Functionalization of p-Xylene and Disulfides to Afford Photofunctional Cobalt Complexes (pages 3015–3018)

      Masashi Maruyama, Matthias König, Prof. Dr. Dirk M. Guldi, Prof. Dr. Eiichi Nakamura and Prof. Dr. Yutaka Matsuo

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209046

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      Unprecedented reactivity of a metastable cobalt trisulfide complex has been observed, and several direct C[BOND]S bond formation reactions by C[BOND]H functionalization were developed. These reactions produced a series of photofunctional motifs of sulfur-rich cobalt complexes (see picture). The measured photophysical properties of these complexes suggest promising molecular designs for photocurrent generating materials.

  16. And Finally

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Miscellaneous
    5. Editorial
    6. Graphical Abstract
    7. News
    8. Miscellaneous
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Book Review
    12. Highlights
    13. Essays
    14. Minireviews
    15. Reviews
    16. Communications
    17. And Finally
    1. Chemical Bonding

      One Molecule, Two Atoms, Three Views, Four Bonds? (pages 3020–3033)

      Prof. Dr. Sason Shaik, Prof. Dr. Henry S. Rzepa and Prof. Dr. Roald Hoffmann

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208206

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      What could be simpler than C2, a diatomic molecule that has the second strongest homonuclear bond? This molecule turns out to be a microcosm of the bonding issues that bother chemists, as is shown in this trialogue. Join the three authors in their lively debate, light a candle, as Faraday did, and see the excited states of C2!

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