Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 52 Issue 25

June 17, 2013

Volume 52, Issue 25

Pages 6341–6544

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. Book Review
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Photosensitization of DNA by 5-Methyl-2-Pyrimidone Deoxyribonucleoside: (6-4) Photoproduct as a Possible Trojan Horse (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 25/2013) (page 6341)

      Victoria Vendrell-Criado, Dr. Gemma M. Rodríguez-Muñiz, Dr. M. Consuelo Cuquerella, Dr. Virginie Lhiaubet-Vallet and Prof. Miguel A. Miranda

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303646

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      (6-4) DNA photoproducts as potential intrinsic DNA photosensitizers are discussed by V. Lhiaubet-Vallet, M. A. Miranda, et al. in their Communication on page 6476 ff. 5-Methyl-2-pyrimidone deoxyribonucleoside was shown to photosensitize the DNA damage, acting as a Trojan horse. This concept is illustrated using images of Valencia, taken from the Fallas Festival and the Science Museum.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Tetrameric Cyclic Double Helicates as a Scaffold for a Molecular Solomon Link (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 25/2013) (page 6342)

      Dr. Jonathon E. Beves, Christopher J. Campbell, Prof. David A. Leigh and Dr. Robin G. Pritchard

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304198

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doubly-entwined interlocked rings also known as Solomon's knots, are a common motif in Celtic art and stonework, such as the examples from St Magnus Cathedral, Orkney, shown in the picture. In their Communication on page 6464 ff., D. A. Leigh and co-workers report on the use of a tetrameric circular helicate to synthesize a molecular Solomon's knot. The one-pot synthesis assembles four iron(II) cations and four bis(aldehyde) and four bis(amine) building blocks to generate the two interwoven 68-membered-ring macrocycles in 75 % yield.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Macroscale Plasmonic Substrates for Highly Sensitive Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 25/2013) (page 6545)

      Maria Alba, Dr. Nicolas Pazos-Perez, Dr. Belén Vaz, Dr. Pilar Formentin, Moritz Tebbe, Prof. Miguel A. Correa-Duarte, Pedro Granero, Dr. Josep Ferré-Borrull, Prof. Rosana Alvarez, Prof. Josep Pallares, Prof. Andreas Fery, Prof. Angel R. de Lera, Prof. Lluis F. Marsal and Prof. Ramón A. Alvarez-Puebla

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304231

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles into controlled and spatially organized macrofeatures could be applicable to diverse fields such as metamaterial properties, environmental monitoring, and biomedicine. In their Communication on page 6459 ff., A. Fery, A. R. de Lera, L. F. Marsal, R. A. Alvarez-Puebla, et al. create large-area patterns of micropyramids composed of gold nanoparticles as building blocks. These pyramids provide an ultraintense electric field at their surface upon illumination with light.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Bottom-Up Formation of Dodecane-in-Water Nanoemulsions from Hydrothermal Homogeneous Solutions (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 25/2013) (page 6546)

      Dr. Shigeru Deguchi and Nao Ifuku

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304232

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the deep oceans at tectonically active areas, hot and compressed water, sometimes in the supercritical state, gushes out from the sea floor. The water is rapidly cooled to near-freezing temperature by surrounding cold water. Such a unique environment in the deep ocean inspired S. Deguchi and N. Ifuku to develop a novel bottom-up emulsification process, described in their Communication on page 6409 ff. The photograph (© JAMSTEC) shows a hydrothermal activity at the depth of 1492 m near Ryukyu Islands, Japan.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. Book Review
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 25/2013 (pages 6345–6356)

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201390025

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. Book Review
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
  4. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. Book Review
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    1. Manuel Alcarazo (page 6362)

      Article first published online: 10 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209931

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “My greatest achievement has still not been published … I hope! My biggest motivation is curiosity …” This and more about Manuel Alcarazo can be found on page 6358.

  5. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. Book Review
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    1. Redox Biocatalysis. Fundamentals and Applications. By Daniela Gamenara, Gustavo A. Seoane, Patricia Saenz-Méndez and Pablo Domínguez de María. (pages 6363–6364)

      Vlada Urlacher

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303335

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2012. 548 pp., hardcover, € 120.00.—ISBN 978-0470874202

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. Book Review
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    1. G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

      A Brief History of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (Nobel Lecture) (pages 6366–6378)

      Prof. Robert J. Lefkowitz

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301924

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The idea of receptors has fascinated scientists for more than a century. Today it is known that the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent by far the largest, most versatile and most ubiquitous of the several families of plasma membrane receptors. The Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2012 was awarded for studies on GPCRs.

    2. The Structural Basis of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling (Nobel Lecture) (pages 6380–6388)

      Prof. Brian Kobilka

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cells from different parts of our bodies communicate with each other using chemical messengers in the form of hormones and neurotransmitters. They process information encoded in these chemical messages using G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) located in the plasma membrane. The Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2012 was awarded for studies on GPCRs.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. Book Review
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    1. Main Group Chemistry

      Controlled Growth of Dichlorogermanium Oligomers from Lewis Basic Hosts (pages 6390–6395)

      Dr. S. M. Ibrahim Al-Rafia, Mohammad R. Momeni, Dr. Robert McDonald, Dr. Michael J. Ferguson, Prof. Dr. Alex Brown and Prof. Dr. Eric Rivard

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302767

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To branch or not to branch: A mild stepwise route to various linear and branched (GeCl2)x oligogermylenes supported by Lewis bases is reported, including the carbene-bound Ge4 complex NHC⋅GeCl2Ge(GeCl3)2 (see picture). Dipp=2,6-iPr2C6H3, NHC=N-heterocyclic carbene.

    2. Natural Products

      Synthesis of (+)-Schisanwilsonene A by Tandem Gold-Catalyzed Cyclization/1,5-Migration/Cyclopropanation (pages 6396–6399)

      Morgane Gaydou, Dr. Ricarda E. Miller, Nicolas Delpont, Dr. Julien Ceccon and Prof. Antonio M. Echavarren

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302411

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Going (anti)viral: The first total synthesis of the antiviral (+)-schisanwilsonene A has been completed using a fully stereoselective tandem cyclization/1,5-migration/intermolecular cyclopropanation. The key reaction sequence is catalyzed by gold.

    3. Photochemistry

      An n-Type to p-Type Switchable Photoelectrode Assembled from Alternating Exfoliated Titania Nanosheets and Polyaniline Layers (pages 6400–6403)

      Brian Seger, Jonathan McCray, Aniruddh Mukherji, Xu Zong, Zheng Xing and Lianzhou Wang

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multifunctional nanomaterials: A new type of multilayer thin film containing alternating polyaniline layers and titania nanosheets was self-assembled (see picture). The film was used as photoelectrode which has n-type to p-type switchable semiconducting properties.

    4. Interfaces

      Behavior of an Adsorbed Phospholipid Monolayer Submitted to Prolonged Periodical Surface Density Variations (pages 6404–6408)

      Phuc Nghia Nguyen, Dr. Gilles Waton, Prof. Thierry Vandamme and Dr. Marie Pierre Krafft

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301974

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Prolonged periodical variations of the surface density of a film of phospholipids adsorbed on the surface of an air bubble and in contact with a dispersion of phospholipid vesicles (orange) lead to accelerated phospholipid adsorption and lowering of the interfacial tension. The phenomenon is assigned to a coupling between the periodical variation of the surface density of the phospholipid at the interface and its dilute-to-condensed (LE-to-LC) phase transition.

    5. Nanoemulsions

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Bottom-Up Formation of Dodecane-in-Water Nanoemulsions from Hydrothermal Homogeneous Solutions (pages 6409–6412)

      Dr. Shigeru Deguchi and Nao Ifuku

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301403

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Only 10 seconds: Hydrocarbons and water do not mix under standard conditions, but they do mix freely at high temperature and high pressure near the gas/liquid critical point of water (Tc=374 °C, Pc=22.1 MPa). Quenching of homogeneous solutions of dodecane and water at such extreme conditions in the presence of a surfactant results in bottom-up formation of nanosized oil droplets in water in only 10 seconds.

    6. Luminescence

      Chameleon Luminophore for Sensing Temperatures: Control of Metal-to-Metal and Energy Back Transfer in Lanthanide Coordination Polymers (pages 6413–6416)

      Kohei Miyata, Yuji Konno, Dr. Takayuki Nakanishi, Dr. Atsushi Kobayashi, Prof. Dr. Masako Kato, Prof. Dr. Koji Fushimi and Prof. Dr. Yasuchika Hasegawa

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301448

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A chameleon luminophore: A temperature-sensing material is reported that has a high thermostability (see picture). The material is composed of color-changing luminescent coordination polymers containing EuIII and TbIII ions. The coordination polymer exhibits a high emission quantum yield Φ of 40 % at room temperature and a temperature-sensing ability over a wide range of 200–500 K.

    7. Lithium-Ion Batteries

      Accurate Control of Multishelled Co3O4 Hollow Microspheres as High-Performance Anode Materials in Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 6417–6420)

      Jiangyan Wang, Nailiang Yang, Hongjie Tang, Zhenghong Dong, Quan Jin, Mei Yang, Prof. David Kisailus, Prof. Huijun Zhao, Prof. Zhiyong Tang and Prof. Dan Wang

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301622

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      More than just an empty shell: Multishelled Co3O4 microspheres were synthesized as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries in high yield and purity. As their porous hollow multishell structure guarantees a shorter Li+ diffusion length and sufficient void space to buffer the volume expansion, their rate capacity, cycling performance, and specific capacity were excellent (1615.8 mA h g−1 in the 30th cycle for triple-shelled Co3O4; see graph).

    8. Structure Elucidation

      Evidence for Multicenter Bonding in Dianionic Tetracyanoethylene Dimers by Raman Spectroscopy (pages 6421–6425)

      Prof. Juan Casado, Paula Mayorga Burrezo, Prof. Francisco J. Ramírez, Prof. Juan T. López Navarrete, Dr. Saul H. Lapidus, Prof. Peter W. Stephens, Hoa-Lan Vo, Prof. Joel S. Miller, Prof. Fernando Mota and Prof. Juan J. Novoa

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207813

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Long C[BOND]C bonds: Analysis of the 1064 nm Raman vibrational spectrum of K2[TCNE]2 possessing isolated π-[TCNE]22− (TCNE=tetracyanoethylene) dimers shows several low-energy symmetric intradimer breathing modes at 198, 173, 155, 131, 107, and 85 cm−1. These data confirm the presence of a long two-electron/four-center C[BOND]C bond (see picture).

    9. Host–Guest Systems

      Switchable Nanoporous Sheets by the Aqueous Self-Assembly of Aromatic Macrobicycles (pages 6426–6429)

      Yongju Kim, Suyong Shin, Taehoon Kim, Dongseon Lee, Prof. Chaok Seok and Prof. Myongsoo Lee

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201210373

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Slim guests are welcome: Aromatic macrobicyclic amphiphiles underwent self-assembly through a face-to-face interaction to form dimeric micelles, which further associated laterally to form porous sheets with nanometer-sized pores. The resulting sheets efficiently intercalated planar aromatic guest molecules, whereupon the porous sheets were reversibly transformed into closed sheets (see picture).

    10. Membrane-Peptide Mimetics

      β-Hairpin Peptides: Heme Binding, Catalysis, and Structure in Detergent Micelles (pages 6430–6434)

      Mukesh Mahajan and Prof. Dr. Surajit Bhattacharjya

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300241

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Autonomously folded designed β-hairpin peptides in detergent micelles show peroxidase activity with heme binding. Aromatic–aromatic cross-strand packing interactions that stabilize β-hairpin structures in solution are not strictly required for the structure and activity of a β-hairpin folded in a micelle environment.

    11. Polymer–Drug Conjugates

      Chain-Shattering Polymeric Therapeutics with On-Demand Drug-Release Capability (pages 6435–6439)

      Yanfeng Zhang, Qian Yin, Lichen Yin, Liang Ma, Li Tang and Prof. Dr. Jianjun Cheng

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300497

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Trigger happy: Trigger-responsive chain-shattering polymeric therapeutics (CSPTs) were prepared by condensation polymerization of a UV- or hydrogen peroxide-responsive domain and a drug as co-monomers. Drug release can be started and stopped by starting and stopping the trigger treatment. Chemotherapeutic-containing CSPTs showed trigger-responsive in vitro and in vivo antitumor efficacy.

    12. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Synergy between XANES Spectroscopy and DFT to Elucidate the Amorphous Structure of Heterogeneous Catalysts: TiO2-Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts (pages 6440–6444)

      Dr. Asma Tougerti, Dr. Elise Berrier, Dr. Anne-Sophie Mamede, Dr. Camille La Fontaine, Dr. Valérie Briois, Dr. Yves Joly, Prof. Edmond Payen, Prof. Jean-François Paul and Prof. Sylvain Cristol

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300538

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Active phase of a catalyst: Using the 3D structural characterization of the environment around Mo atoms provided by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (left; spectrum of the MoK edge) and DFT calculations, the molecular-scale structure of a TiO2-supported molybdenum oxide catalyst was defined. The structure consists of Mo octahedra arranged in a six-membered ring.

    13. Counteranion Control

      Investigation of the Carboxylate Position during the Acylation Reaction Catalyzed by Biaryl DMAP Derivatives with an Internal Carboxylate (pages 6445–6449)

      Reiko Nishino, Dr. Takumi Furuta, Dr. Keizo Kan, Dr. Makoto Sato, Prof. Dr. Masahiro Yamanaka, Dr. Takahiro Sasamori, Prof. Dr. Norihiro Tokitoh and Prof. Dr. Takeo Kawabata

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300665

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Location of the carboxylate ion: A series of biaryl DMAP catalysts with an internal carboxylate was prepared, and the catalytic activities of the derivatives were evaluated to determine the carboxylate position that most accelerated the DMAP-catalyzed acylation. The carboxylate ion proximal to the pyridine ring in a face-to-face geometry was found to act as an effective general base for the acylation reaction.

    14. Cell Signaling

      Rapidly Reversible Manipulation of Molecular Activity with Dual Chemical Dimerizers (pages 6450–6454)

      Dr. Yu-Chun Lin, Yuta Nihongaki, Tzu-Yu Liu, Shiva Razavi, Prof. Moritoshi Sato and Prof. Takanari Inoue

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tell it where to go: Rapamycin induced the relocation of an FRB-fused protein of interest (POI) to the plasma membrane (labeled with the fusion protein GAIs–FKBP–C2(LACT)) to activate a signaling event (see picture). Subsequent treatment with a gibberellic acid ester led to the relocation of the whole GAIs–FKBP–C2(LACT)/rapamycin/FRB–POI complex to the Tom20–GID1-labeled mitochondria with the termination of POI-dependent signaling.

    15. Polymer Capsules

      Preparation of Nano- and Microcapsules by Electrophoretic Polymer Assembly (pages 6455–6458)

      Joseph J. Richardson, Dr. Hirotaka Ejima, Samuel L. Lörcher, Kang Liang, Philipp Senn, Dr. Jiwei Cui and Prof. Frank Caruso

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302092

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Slipping into a comfortable routine: Multilayered polymer thin films were assembled on particles immobilized in agarose by electrophoresis on the basis of various interactions. Core removal then led to robust capsules with different polymer compositions (see fluorescence image). This approach enables the versatile and routine assembly of nanometer- and micron-sized capsules and coated particles with very few processing steps.

    16. Optical Sensors

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Macroscale Plasmonic Substrates for Highly Sensitive Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 6459–6463)

      Maria Alba, Dr. Nicolas Pazos-Perez, Dr. Belén Vaz, Dr. Pilar Formentin, Moritz Tebbe, Prof. Miguel A. Correa-Duarte, Pedro Granero, Dr. Josep Ferré-Borrull, Prof. Rosana Alvarez, Prof. Josep Pallares, Prof. Andreas Fery, Prof. Angel R. de Lera, Prof. Lluis F. Marsal and Prof. Ramón A. Alvarez-Puebla

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302285

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Modern-day wonders of the world: Nanostructured films of plasmonic pyramid arrays (see picture) were prepared by the simple stamping of preformed homogeneous nanocolloids. These materials show very high efficiency as optical enhancers and can be exploited for the design of quantitative, cheap, portable, and ultrasensitive optical sensors with excellent reversibility.

    17. Catenanes

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tetrameric Cyclic Double Helicates as a Scaffold for a Molecular Solomon Link (pages 6464–6467)

      Dr. Jonathon E. Beves, Christopher J. Campbell, Prof. David A. Leigh and Dr. Robin G. Pritchard

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302634

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let's twist again: The one-pot synthesis of a molecular Solomon link assembles four iron(II) cations, four bis(aldehyde) molecules, and four bis(amine) building blocks. The process generates two interwoven 68-membered-ring macrocycles, which feature four crossing points, in 75 % yield.

    18. Crystal Engineering

      Two Isostructural Explosive Cocrystals with Significantly Different Thermodynamic Stabilities (pages 6468–6471)

      Dr. Kira B. Landenberger, Dr. Onas Bolton and Prof. Adam J. Matzger

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302814

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Irreconcilable differences: Electron-rich diacetone diperoxide is paired with the electron-deficient rings of trichloro- and tribromotrinitrobenzene to form energetic cocrystals by design. Though the two cocrystals are isostructural, the former is very stable while the later exhibits a rare metastability and favors separation.

    19. Biosynthetic Pathway

      LovG: The Thioesterase Required for Dihydromonacolin L Release and Lovastatin Nonaketide Synthase Turnover in Lovastatin Biosynthesis (pages 6472–6475)

      Wei Xu, Dr. Yit-Heng Chooi, Jin W. Choi, Prof. Shuang Li, Prof. John C. Vederas, Prof. Nancy A. Da Silva and Prof. Yi Tang

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302406

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No Lov lost: The cryptic thioesterase LovG was found to be responsible for product release from the lovastatin nonaketide synthase (LNKS or LovB; see scheme). LovG also helped improve the turnover of LovB through hydrolysis of incorrectly made intermediates, freeing LovB for another round of catalysis.

    20. DNA Photodamage

      Photosensitization of DNA by 5-Methyl-2-Pyrimidone Deoxyribonucleoside: (6-4) Photoproduct as a Possible Trojan Horse (pages 6476–6479)

      Victoria Vendrell-Criado, Dr. Gemma M. Rodríguez-Muñiz, Dr. M. Consuelo Cuquerella, Dr. Virginie Lhiaubet-Vallet and Prof. Miguel A. Miranda

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A (photo)sensitive subject: Combined agarose gel electrophoresis and photochemical studies show that 5-methyl-2-pyrimidone (see picture), the main chromophore of (6-4) photoproducts, behaves as a DNA photosensitizer. These results raise the question of whether the (6-4) lesions can act as Trojan horses, enhancing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation and oxidative damage.

    21. Nanotube Functionalization

      An Atom-Economical Approach to Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Reaction with Disulfides (pages 6480–6483)

      Dr. Zois Syrgiannis, Dr. Valeria La Parola, Dr. Caroline Hadad, Maribel Lucío, Prof. Ester Vázquez, Dr. Francesco Giacalone and Prof. Dr. Maurizio Prato

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301617

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Simple and effective exterior decorating: Single-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with disulfides, including cystamine-core polyamidoamine dendrimers, simply upon heating in toluene (see picture). One advantage of this method is that any unreacted disulfide can be recovered by filtration.

    22. Organophosphorus Chemistry

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Mechanism of the Phospha-Wittig–Horner Reaction (pages 6484–6487)

      Anna I. Arkhypchuk, Dr. Yurii V. Svyaschenko, Dr. Andreas Orthaber and Dr. Sascha Ott

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301469

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doing the phosphate dance: The phospha-Wittig–Horner reaction proceeds through stepwise P[BOND]P cleavage of an oxadiphosphetane intermediate, followed by a [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement that paves the way for the final E2 elimination to form 1-phosphaallenes. The mechanism is thus greatly different to that of its carbon analogue, that is, the Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons reaction.

    23. Heterogeneous Photocatalysis

      Oxidation of Water under Visible-Light Irradiation over Modified BaTaO2N Photocatalysts Promoted by Tungsten Species (pages 6488–6491)

      Prof. Dr. Kazuhiko Maeda, Dr. Daling Lu and Prof. Dr. Kazunari Domen

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301357

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Water splitting: In heterogeneous photocatalysis, it has been believed that doping transition-metal cations having partly filled d orbitals into semiconductor photocatalysts results in a significant drop in photocatalytic activity. Nevertheless, it was found that the activity for the water oxidation of BaTaO2N could be improved by seven times upon modification by pentavalent W species (see picture).

    24. Azulene Synthesis

      Azulenophenanthrenes from 2,2′-Di(arylethynyl)biphenyls through C[BOND]C Bond Cleavage of a Benzene Ring (pages 6492–6495)

      Dr. Takanori Matsuda, Tsuyoshi Goya, Dr. Lantao Liu, Yusuke Sakurai, Shoichi Watanuki, Dr. Naoki Ishida and Prof. Dr. Masahiro Murakami

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300570

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      From six to seven: 2,2′-Di(arylethynyl)biphenyls undergo a skeletal rearrangement in the presence of a platinum(II) catalyst to afford polycyclic aromatic compounds containing an azulene unit. The reaction involves C[BOND]C bond cleavage of a benzene ring, which expands into a seven-membered ring.

    25. Functional Materials

      Hybrid Nanoscale Organic Molecular Crystals Assembly as a Photon-Controlled Actuator (pages 6496–6500)

      Tian Lan and Prof. Wei Chen

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300856

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molecule deformation to macroactuation: In a novel hybrid assembly photoisomerization causes microscale deformation of molecules that is amplified to macroscale bending of a composite membrane. The nanoscale molecular crystals, which are unevenly distributed in a functional polymer matrix, provide a new strategy for designing higher performance actuators that combine the advantages of both molecular crystals and liquid crystal elastomers.

    26. siRNA Modification

      Highly Potent and Stable Capped siRNAs with Picomolar Activity for RNA Interference (pages 6501–6503)

      Lv Wei, Liqiang Cao and Prof. Dr. Zhen Xi

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301122

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Put a cap on it: Hairpin-shaped RNAs and dumbbell-shaped RNAs were prepared using a thiol–maleimino Michael addition and exhibited good serum and thermal stability. These capped structures were shown to be cleaved by Dicer and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments showed that RhpRNA (see picture, top right) was highly efficient at RNAi with an IC50 value of 6 pM.

    27. Amino Acids

      Design, Synthesis, and Application of a Trifluoromethylated Phenylalanine Analogue as a Label to Study Peptides by Solid-State 19F NMR Spectroscopy (pages 6504–6507)

      Anton N. Tkachenko, Dr. Dmytro S. Radchenko, Dr. Pavel K. Mykhailiuk, Dr. Sergii Afonin, Prof. Anne S. Ulrich and Prof. Igor V. Komarov

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301344

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Designer label: A novel α-amino acid was designed as a conformationally restricted analogue of phenylalanine. It was synthesized and incorporated into the representative membrane-active peptide Magainin 2, to demonstrate its suitablility for structure analysis in oriented membranes by solid-state 19F NMR spectroscopy.

    28. Ligand Design

      Optimizing P,N-Bidentate Ligands for Oxidative Gold Catalysis: Efficient Intermolecular Trapping of α-Oxo Gold Carbenes by Carboxylic Acids (pages 6508–6512)

      Dr. Kegong Ji, Dr. Yulong Zhao and Prof. Dr. Liming Zhang

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301601

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Control confirmed: Optimization of P,N-bidentate ligands (L) reveals the importance of conformation control for intermolecular trapping of reactive α-oxo gold carbene intermediates. As a result, the highly efficient and broadly applicable synthesis of carboxymethyl ketones from readily available carboxylic acids and terminal alkynes proceeds under mild reaction conditions.

    29. Pyroelectricity

      Water-Induced Pyroelectricity from Nonpolar Crystals of Amino Acids (pages 6513–6516)

      Dr. Silvia Piperno, Elena Mirzadeh, Eran Mishuk, Dr. David Ehre, Dr. Sidney Cohen, Dr. Miriam Eisenstein, Prof. Meir Lahav and Prof. Igor Lubomirsky

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301836

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Surface pyroelectricity: Centrosymmetric crystals of α-glycine display an anomalous quadrupole-like pyroelectric current. This observation implies the formation of water–glycine hybrid polar layers at the (010) faces of the α-glycine crystals (see picture).

    30. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of (−)-Rhizopodin (pages 6517–6521)

      Dr. Stephen M. Dalby, Jake Goodwin-Tindall and Prof. Dr. Ian Paterson

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301978

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Core assembly: The total synthesis of the myxobacterial metabolite rhizopodin, a potent actin-binding anticancer agent, has been achieved. The modular synthesis utilizes a common C1–C22 monomeric unit to assemble the dimeric 38-membered macrodiolide core, which was elaborated by a bidirectional boron-mediated aldol reaction to install the characteristic side-chains. The final global deprotection was critically dependent on the correct choice of silyl protecting groups at C16/C16′.

    31. Organometallobiochemistry

      Isoprenoid Biosynthesis: Ferraoxetane or Allyl Anion Mechanism for IspH Catalysis? (pages 6522–6525)

      Jikun Li, Dr. Ke Wang, Prof. Dr. Tatyana I. Smirnova, Rahul L. Khade, Prof. Dr. Yong Zhang and Prof. Dr. Eric Oldfield

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302343

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The catalytic mechanism of the enzyme IspH, involved in formation of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, was investigated by using HYSCORE spectroscopy combined with DFT. The results indicate the formation of an allyl anion bound to a HiPIP-like oxidized 4Fe–4S cluster, rather than formation of a cyclic, ferraoxetane intermediate, as has been proposed elsewhere.

    32. Gold Catalysis

      Gold(I)-Catalyzed Cascade Cycloadditions between Allenamides and Carbonyl-Tethered Alkenes: An Enantioselective Approach to Oxa-Bridged Medium-Sized Carbocycles (pages 6526–6530)

      Hélio Faustino, Isaac Alonso, Prof. José L. Mascareñas and Dr. Fernando López

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302713

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold standard: Allenamides react with aldehydes or ketones having γ, δ, or ε alkenyl groups, upon activation with suitable gold catalysts, to provide oxa-bridged systems containing seven- to nine-membered carbocycles, in a formal cascade cycloaddition. By using chiral phosphoramidite/gold or bisphosphine/gold catalysts it is possible to obtain the oxa-bridged seven- and eight-membered rings with good to high enantioselectivity.

    33. Metastable Materials

      Orthorhombic In2O3: A Metastable Polymorph of Indium Sesquioxide (pages 6531–6535)

      Maged F. Bekheet, Dr. Marcus R. Schwarz, Dr. Stefan Lauterbach, Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Kleebe, Prof. Dr. Peter Kroll, Prof. Dr. Ralf Riedel and Priv.-Doz. Dr. Aleksander Gurlo

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300644

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The way is open for the physical and chemical characterization and single-crystal growth of the orthorhombic o′-In2O3 polymorph. Orthorhombic In2O3 is synthesized from rhombohedral corundum-type rh-In2O3 under moderately high-pressure and high-temperature conditions (8–9 GPa, 600–1100 °C) followed by recovery to ambient pressure and temperature. The crystal-structure data at ambient conditions confirm unambiguously the Rh2O3(II)-type structure.

    34. Catalyst Design

      The Role of the Oxide Component in the Development of Copper Composite Catalysts for Methanol Synthesis (pages 6536–6540)

      Dr. Stefan Zander, Dr. Edward L. Kunkes, Dr. Manfred E. Schuster, Julia Schumann, Gisela Weinberg, Dr. Detre Teschner, Dr. Nikolas Jacobsen, Prof. Robert Schlögl and Dr. Malte Behrens

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301419

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The design of solid catalysts for industrial processes remains a major challenge in synthetic materials chemistry. Based on the investigation of the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, a modular concept is introduced that helps to develop novel methanol synthesis catalysts that operate in different feed gas mixtures. SA=surface area, SMSI=strong metal–support interaction.

    35. Polymer Friction

      Nanoscale Friction Mechanisms at Solid–Liquid Interfaces (pages 6541–6544)

      Bizan N. Balzer, Dr. Markus Gallei, Moritz V. Hauf, Markus Stallhofer, Lorenz Wiegleb, Prof. Dr. Alexander Holleitner, Prof. Dr. Matthias Rehahn and Prof. Dr. Thorsten Hugel

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301255

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      There's the rub: Friction of single polymers on solid bodies in a liquid environment was investigated. Apart from expected mechanisms, such as slip and stick, a third nanoscale friction mechanism exists that is independent of normal force, velocity, and adsorbed polymer length. A model is proposed for this mechanism that is based on measurements with various polymers on topographically and chemically nanostructured surfaces.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION