Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 52 Issue 34

August 19, 2013

Volume 52, Issue 34

Pages 8755–9048

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: 125 Years of Liquid Crystals—A Scientific Revolution in the Home (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 34/2013) (page 8755)

      Dr. Thomas Geelhaar, Prof. Dr. Klaus Griesar and Dr. Bernd Reckmann

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201305679

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      A scientific revolution in the home began 125 years ago. The biologist Friedrich Reinitzer investigated cholesteryl benzoate, which he had extracted from carrots, under the polarizing microscope and observed the characteristic textures of cholesteric (and blue) phases. In their Essay on page 8798 ff., T. Geelhaar et. al. describe the development of liquid crystals from their discovery to their development and application in television screens and computer displays.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Synthesis of Mg2C: A Magnesium Methanide (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 34/2013) (page 9049)

      Dr. Oleksandr O. Kurakevych, Dr. Timothy A. Strobel, Dr. Duck Young Kim and Dr. George D. Cody

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201305785

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      Magnesium carbide (Mg2C) was first suggested 20 years ago by ab initio calculations. In their Communication on page 8930 ff., T. A. Strobel and co-workers describe the first synthesis of this methanide through the use of high-pressure and high-temperature methods. The ionic binary compound contains C4− ions, which have an extremely negative charge for carbon.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Bacterial Growth and Adaptation in Microdroplet Chemostats (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 34/2013) (page 9050)

      Dr. Slawomir Jakiela, Tomasz S. Kaminski, Dr. Olgierd Cybulski, Prof. Douglas B. Weibel and Prof. Piotr Garstecki

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201305723

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      High-throughput evolutionary studies are now possible with the technology introduced by P. Garstecki et al. in their Communication on page 8908 ff.. They demonstrate a microfluidic device for manipulating and monitoring hundreds of bacterial populations at the same time. They also study bacterial adaptation to changing chemical environments and track the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial: Conveying the Excitement of Chemistry on YouTube (pages 8758–8759)

      Brady Haran and Prof. Martyn Poliakoff

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304861

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
    1. Alexandra M. Z. Slawin (page 8786)

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301619

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      “My motto is keep on trying. My favorite time of day is the half-hour after I wake up, but before I get up. …” This and more about Alexandra M. Z. Slawin can be found on page 8786.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
    1. Self-Assembled Supramolecular Architectures. Lyotropic Liquid Crystals. Edited by Nissim Garti, Ponisseril Somasundaran and Raffaele Mezzenga. (page 8789)

      Céline Baguenard and C. Allan Guymon

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306362

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      John Wiley and Sons, Hoboken, 2012. 392 pp., hardcover, € 119.00.—ISBN 978-0470281758

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
    1. High-Nitrogen Compounds

      Growing Catenated Nitrogen Atom Chains (pages 8792–8794)

      Dr. Qinghua Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jean'ne M. Shreeve

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303297

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      Aiming high: In the pursuit of new high-nitrogen structures, researchers have synthesized some interesting compounds with highly catenated chains of nitrogen atoms through a strategy of oxidative azo coupling of N[BOND]NH2 moieties. This strategy opens opportunities for developing longer nitrogen chains in the field of high-nitrogen compounds.

    2. Asymmetric Hydrogenation

      Remotely Controlled Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Terminal 1,1-Diaryl Alkenes (pages 8795–8797)

      Dr. Tatiana Besset, Dr. Rafael Gramage-Doria and Prof. Dr. Joost N. H. Reek

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302942

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      Working together: The presence of a remote directing group on terminal 1,1-diaryl and 1,1-dialkyl alkenes led to high and unprecedented enantioselectivity in iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation (see scheme). This strategy offers efficient synthetic pathways towards valuable enantiomerically enriched 1,1-diaryl and 1,1-dialkyl alkanes. Moreover, the directing group can be further functionalized.

  9. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
    1. Liquid Crystals

      125 Years of Liquid Crystals—A Scientific Revolution in the Home (pages 8798–8809)

      Dr. Thomas Geelhaar, Prof. Dr. Klaus Griesar and Dr. Bernd Reckmann

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301457

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      Patterns of communication: Reinitzer's discovery of liquid crystals in 1888 was followed by 30 years of scholarly dispute. One hundred years later, Pierre-Gilles de Gennes was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his contribution to this scientific revolution. The commercial success of liquid crystals was achieved in display applications. Today more than 4 billion people use them in mobile communication devices. Painting: Detail from Raphael's School of Athens fresco.

  10. Reviews

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
    1. Liquid Crystals

      Liquid-Crystalline Ordering as a Concept in Materials Science: From Semiconductors to Stimuli-Responsive Devices (pages 8810–8827)

      Dr. Eva-Kristina Fleischmann and Prof. Dr. Rudolf Zentel

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300371

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      Activity from order: Liquid-crystalline materials (see picture; blue) are formed from anisotropic molecules. They are used in liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), the prototype of flat-panel displays. Moreover, the combination of order and mobility in these phases allows the realization of mechanical actuators (green) or the improvement of materials for organic electronics (red).

    2. Development of Structural Complexity by Liquid-Crystal Self-assembly (pages 8828–8878)

      Prof. Carsten Tschierske

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300872

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      Liquid crystals on the way to complexity: Recent developments in liquid-crystalline materials have lead to new structures with enhanced complexity, including honeycombs and multicompartment structures, vesicular phases, and periodic and quasiperiodic arrays. New properties emerge, such as ferroelctricity and spontaneous achiral symmetry-breaking.

    3. The TV in Your Pocket: Development of Liquid-Crystal Materials for the New Millennium (pages 8880–8896)

      Dr. Matthias Bremer, Prof. Dr. Peer Kirsch, Dr. Melanie Klasen-Memmer and Dr. Kazuaki Tarumi

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300903

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      Liquid refreshment: Over the past10 years liquid-crystal display (LCD) technology has been established as the leading display technology for televisions, PCs, and smartphones. The design of new materials to fulfill the stringent technical specifications with regard to electrooptical performance and reliability is getting more and more challenging, and the synthetic chemistry requires increasingly creative solutions.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Essay
    11. Reviews
    12. Communications
    1. Heteroporphyrins

      A Porphyrin Skeleton Containing a Palladacyclopentadiene (pages 8898–8903)

      Dr. Ewa Pacholska-Dudziak, Michał Szczepaniak, Aleksandra Książek and Prof. Lechosław Latos-Grażyński

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304493

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      Swinging palladaporphyrin: A palladacyclopentadiene has been incorporated into the porphyrinoid frame. A transformation of 21,23-ditelluraporphyrin triggered by coordination of palladium(II) resulted in the replacement of a tellurium atom by a palladium atom to form aromatic 21-pallada-23-telluraporphyrin. The nonplanar molecule is in equilibrium between two asymmetric forms.

    2. Ionic Liquids

      Probing a Gas/Liquid Acid–Base Reaction by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (pages 8904–8907)

      Inga Niedermaier, Dr. Nicola Taccardi, Prof. Dr. Peter Wasserscheid, Dr. Florian Maier and Prof. Dr. Hans-Peter Steinrück

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304115

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      A mechanistic study: In a Brønsted acid/base reaction, gaseous triflic acid (OTfH) transfers its proton to the basic Cl anion of the ionic liquid [C8C1Im]Cl forming volatile HCl and the IL [C8C1Im][TfO]. This anion exchange reaction is monitored in the near-surface region quantitatively by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a function of time (see picture; BE=binding energy).

    3. Microfluidics

      Bacterial Growth and Adaptation in Microdroplet Chemostats (pages 8908–8911)

      Dr. Slawomir Jakiela, Tomasz S. Kaminski, Dr. Olgierd Cybulski, Prof. Douglas B. Weibel and Prof. Piotr Garstecki

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301524

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      Getting your bugs in a row: A microfluidic device for manipulating and monitoring the continuous growth of populations of bacteria within microdroplets was developed (see scheme). This device allows for monitoring hundreds of populations of bacteria to study changes in growth rates and the effects of antibiotics, including the evolution of antibiotic resistance in real time.

    4. Chiral Nematic Hydrogels

      Responsive Photonic Hydrogels Based on Nanocrystalline Cellulose (pages 8912–8916)

      Dr. Joel A. Kelly, Amber M. Shukaliak, Clement C. Y. Cheung, Kevin E. Shopsowitz, Dr. Wadood Y. Hamad and Prof. Mark J. MacLachlan

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302687

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      All in order: The self-assembly of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) with hydrogel precursors leads to nanocomposites with long-range chiral nematic order. The combination of chiral structure and hydrogel swelling behavior gives rise to iridescence that rapidly responds to various stimuli.

    5. Molecular Dynamics

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Probing Columnar Discotic Liquid Crystals by EPR Spectroscopy with a Rigid-Core Nitroxide Spin Probe (pages 8917–8920)

      Dr. Hemant Gopee, Prof. Andrew N. Cammidge and Dr. Vasily S. Oganesyan

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303194

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      Discotics studied by EPR: The application of EPR spectroscopy to columnar discotic liquid crystals using a novel rigid-core nitroxide spin probe (see picture) is possible. EPR spectra measured at different temperatures across three phases of hexakis(n-hexyloxy)triphenylene show a strong sensitivity to the phase composition, molecular rotational dynamics, and columnar order.

    6. Mesoporous Materials

      Flexible Mesoporous Photonic Resins with Tunable Chiral Nematic Structures (pages 8921–8924)

      Dr. Mostofa K. Khan, Dr. Michael Giese, Marcus Yu, Dr. Joel A. Kelly, Dr. Wadood Y. Hamad and Prof. Mark J. MacLachlan

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303829

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      Colors of nature: Mimicking of the structural colors of nature was achieved by the preparation of easily accessible chiral nematic polymer composites based on phenol–formaldehyde resins templated by cellulose nanocrystals. Removal of the template led to mesoporous polymer films with unique optical and physical properties. The potential application of these materials in optical sensors was also demonstrated.

    7. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Azoarenes with Opposite Chiral Configurations: Light-Driven Reversible Handedness Inversion in Self-Organized Helical Superstructures (pages 8925–8929)

      Dr. Yannian Li, Mengfei Wang, Dr. Timothy J. White, Dr. Timothy J. Bunning and Prof. Quan Li

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303786

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      On the other hand: Azoarene compounds with axially chiral binaphthyl units of the same and opposite chiral configurations were doped into achiral liquid crystals (LCs). They were found to efficiently induce self-organized helical superstructures, which could be reversibly tuned by light irradiation using transcis photoisomerization to change the handedness of the helix (see scheme) in LC hosts.

    8. Magnesium Carbide

      Synthesis of Mg2C: A Magnesium Methanide (pages 8930–8933)

      Dr. Oleksandr O. Kurakevych, Dr. Timothy A. Strobel, Dr. Duck Young Kim and Dr. George D. Cody

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303463

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      Ionic carbon: When magnesium and carbon combine in a 2:1 ratio above 15 GPa, a new antifluorite structure is formed. The compound, with composition Mg2C (see picture), is highly ionic, with carbon in a very unusual C4− methanide state.

    9. Liquid Crystals

      A Lyotropic Chiral Smectic C Liquid Crystal with Polar Electrooptic Switching (pages 8934–8937)

      Johanna R. Bruckner, Dr. Jan H. Porada, Clarissa F. Dietrich, Dr. Ingo Dierking and Prof. Dr. Frank Giesselmann

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303344

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      A lyotropic analogue of the ferroelectric smectic C* phase has been found. The lyotropic smectic C* phase shows macroscopic chirality effects, such as a helical ground state and polarity-dependent electrooptic switching, thus indicating the presence of a spontaneous electric polarization. The helicity implies communication of the chiral director twist across the achiral solvent layers separating adjacent layers of the chiral mesogens.

    10. Gated Materials

      Selective, Highly Sensitive, and Rapid Detection of Genomic DNA by Using Gated Materials: Mycoplasma Detection (pages 8938–8942)

      Dr. Estela Climent, Dr. Laura Mondragón, Prof. Ramón Martínez-Máñez, Dr. Félix Sancenón, Dr. M. Dolores Marcos, Prof. Jose Ramón Murguía, Prof. Pedro Amorós, Dr. Knut Rurack and Prof. Enrique Pérez-Payá

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302954

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      Come and gate it: DNA-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles loaded with a dye are used to detect the common contaminate Mycoplasma in real contaminated cell-culture media without needing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, at a detection limit in the range of 70 DNA genome copies μL−1.

    11. Aβ-Monomers

      Distinct Conformational States of the Alzheimer β-Amyloid Peptide Can Be Detected by High-Pressure NMR Spectroscopy (pages 8943–8947)

      Prof. Dr. Claudia Elisabeth Munte, Markus Beck Erlach, Prof. Dr. Werner Kremer, Joerg Koehler and Prof. Dr. Hans Robert Kalbitzer

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301537

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      Folding under pressure: High-pressure NMR spectroscopy detects three different conformational states of the Aβ-peptide in solution: a compactly folded state 1, a partially folded state 2′, and a random-coil like state 2′′ (see plot, p=population). At ambient pressure the folded state 1 dominates which probably has a high affinity to fibrils and thus may promote fibril formation.

    12. Fluorescence Microscopy

      Improved Super-Resolution Microscopy with Oxazine Fluorophores in Heavy Water (pages 8948–8951)

      Dr. Steven F. Lee, Quentin Vérolet and Dr. Alexandre Fürstenberg

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302341

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      Brighter dyes in heavy water: A simple and cost-effective method increases the brightness of a whole class of commonly used red-emitting fluorophores, including ATTO655, ATTO680, and ATTO700. Replacing water (H2O) by heavy water (D2O) in the imaging buffer doubles the fluorescence quantum yield of these dyes and significantly improves the localization precision in super-resolution imaging.

    13. Selenium Catalysis

      Direct Oxidative Allylic and Vinylic Amination of Alkenes through Selenium Catalysis (pages 8952–8956)

      M. Sc. Johanna Trenner, B. Sc. Christian Depken, B. Sc. Thomas Weber and Dr. Alexander Breder

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303662

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      Bringing “N” into the game: The direct chemoselective nitrogenation of unactivated alkenes can be achieved through oxidative selenium catalysis (see scheme). This method provides a broad variety of allylic imides in yields of up to 89 % using N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide (NFSI) as the terminal oxidant and nitrogen source. Furthermore, an unprecedented selenium-catalyzed vinylic C(sp2)–H nitrogenation was discovered.

    14. Peptidomimetics

      1,2,3-Triazoles as Amide Bond Mimics: Triazole Scan Yields Protease-Resistant Peptidomimetics for Tumor Targeting (pages 8957–8960)

      Dr. Ibai E. Valverde, Dr. Andreas Bauman, Christiane A. Kluba, Sandra Vomstein, Dr. Martin A. Walter and Prof. Dr. Thomas L. Mindt

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303108

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      The triazole makes the difference: Replacement of amide bonds in the backbone of peptides by 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole isosteres affords peptidomimetics with retained receptor affinity and cell-internalization properties, enhanced proteolytic stability, and improved tumor-targeting capabilities.

    15. Smart Hydrogels

      Supramolecular Controlled Water Uptake of Macroscopic Materials by a Cyclodextrin-Induced Hydrophobic-to-Hydrophilic Transition (pages 8961–8963)

      Oliver Peters and Prof. Dr. Helmut Ritter

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301286

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      A swell memory: Samples of adamantyl-modified cross-linked hydrophilic polymers were swollen in water or aqueous cyclodextrin solution. The cyclodextrin dramatically enhanced the swelling (see picture). If the materials were twisted after heating above their glass-transition temperature and swollen in aqueous cyclodextrin solution, a shape-memory effect was observed.

    16. Gold Complexes

      Isolation of Neutral Mono- and Dinuclear Gold Complexes of Cyclic (Alkyl)(amino)carbenes (pages 8964–8967)

      David S. Weinberger, Dr. Mohand Melaimi, Dr. Curtis E. Moore, Prof. Arnold L. Rheingold, Prof. Gernot Frenking, Paul Jerabek and Prof. Guy Bertrand

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304820

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      The smallest pieces of gold! Thanks to the presence of two π-accepting cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbenes (CAACs),complexes featuring one and two atoms of gold in the formal oxidation state of zero can be isolated.

    17. Natural Product Synthesis

      A Convergent and Stereoselective Synthesis of the Glycolipid Components Phthioceranic Acid and Hydroxyphthioceranic Acid (pages 8968–8972)

      Dipl.-Chem. Matthias C. Pischl, Dr. Christian F. Weise, M. Sc. Marc-André Müller, Prof. Dr. Andreas Pfaltz and Prof. Dr. Christoph Schneider

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303776

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      Simply convergent: The polydeoxypropionates 1 and 2 are important constituents of the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Key steps in their total synthesis include two Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reactions and two highly diastereoselective iridium-catalyzed hydrogenations. The trideoxypropionates employed as central building blocks were prepared by sequential oxy-Cope rearrangement, hydrogenation, and enolate methylation.

    18. Mass Spectrometry

      ESI Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Can Count Chemical Forms of Heteroatom-Bound Hydrogen (pages 8973–8975)

      Sebastian Tittebrandt, Dr. Marina Edelson-Averbukh, Prof. Dr. Bernhard Spengler and Prof. Dr. Wolf D. Lehmann

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304249

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      Out for the count: Hydrogen–deuterium exchange (HDX) performed in ESI droplets can distinguish chemically distinct forms of labile hydrogen. NanoESI exchanged mainly O-bound hydrogen atoms, whereas ESI also exchanged a subset of N-bound hydrogen atoms. The exchange behavior could be predicted. Thus, the combined use of nanoESI- and ESI-HDX can be applied to count chemically different forms of labile hydrogen atoms.

    19. Photoelectron Spectroscopy

      Observation of Mode-Specific Vibrational Autodetachment from Dipole-Bound States of Cold Anions (pages 8976–8979)

      Dr. Hong-Tao Liu, Prof. Dr. Chuan-Gang Ning, Dao-Ling Huang, Phuong Diem Dau and Prof. Dr. Lai-Sheng Wang

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304695

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      Dipole-bound states: Electron autodetachment of vibrationally excited dipole-bound states of phenoxide anions is observed by photoelectron spectroscopy. The wave function of a dipole-bound state and the observed normal modes are shown. The blue lobe of the orbital indicates that the electron is weakly bound to the dipole.

    20. Main-Group Chemistry

      A Base-Stabilized Sila-β-Lactone and a Donor/Acceptor-Stabilized Silanoic Acid (pages 8980–8983)

      Dr. Ricardo Rodriguez, Dr. David Gau, Dr. Thibault Troadec, Dr. Nathalie Saffon-Merceron, Prof. Vicenç Branchadell, Dr. Antoine Baceiredo and Dr. Tsuyoshi Kato

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304482

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      A stable base-stabilized sila-β-lactone was successfully synthesized and fully characterized. Interestingly, this sila-β-lactone shows a very unique reactivity toward ethanol, leading to the formation of an isolable donor/acceptor-stabilized silanoic acid.

    21. C[BOND]H Functionalization

      Iridium-Catalyzed, Diastereoselective Dehydrogenative Silylation of Terminal Alkenes with (TMSO)2MeSiH (pages 8984–8989)

      Chen Cheng, Dr. Eric M. Simmons and Prof. John F. Hartwig

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304084

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      Ligands' choice: The title reaction was achieved under mild conditions with low catalyst loading. The diastereoselectivity of the reaction can be controlled by choosing the appropriate ancillary ligand (see scheme; coe=cyclooctene). The silylation products undergo further transformation such as oxidation or cross-coupling.

    22. Phosphinine Lipids

      Phosphinine Lipids: A Successful Marriage between Electron-Acceptor and Self-Assembly Features (pages 8990–8994)

      Dr. Xiaoming He, Dr. Jian-Bin Lin, Wang Hay Kan and Prof. Dr. Thomas Baumgartner

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303729

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      A push in the right direction: An electron-accepting organophosphorus system has been combined with self-assembly features to create a strongly electron-accepting liquid-crystalline material (see picture). The stability and behavior of the self-assembled liquid crystal could be controlled by adjusting weak intermolecular forces, such as hydrogen bonding and π–π interactions.

    23. C[BOND]H Activation

      Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Coupling of Arenes with 7-Oxa/Azabenzonorbornadienes by C[BOND]H Activation (pages 8995–9000)

      Zisong Qi and Prof. Dr. Xingwei Li

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303507

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      Under chelation assistance, rhodium(III) complexes can catalyze the redox-neutral coupling of arenes with 7-oxabenzonorbornadienes and the oxidative coupling of arenes with 7-azabenzonorbornadienes (see scheme; Cp*=C5Me5). A seven-membered rhodacycle containing a Rh[BOND]C(alkyl) bond has been established as the key intermediate.

    24. Olefin Metathesis

      Alkene Chemoselectivity in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Z-Selective Olefin Metathesis (pages 9001–9004)

      Dr. Jeffrey S. Cannon and Prof. Robert H. Grubbs

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302724

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      Chelated ruthenium catalysts can facilitate highly chemoselective olefin metathesis. Terminal and internal Z olefins reacted selectively to form new Z olefins in the presence of internal E olefins. Chemoselectivity for terminal olefins was also observed over both sterically hindered and electronically deactivated alkenes.

    25. Ethanol Upgrading

      Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol into an Advanced Biofuel: Unprecedented Selectivity for n-Butanol (pages 9005–9008)

      Dr. George R. M. Dowson, Dr. Mairi F. Haddow, Jason Lee, Dr. Richard L. Wingad and Prof. Duncan F. Wass

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303723

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      Taming the beast: Unprecedented selectivity of over 94 % at good (20 %+) conversion was observed for the upgrade of ethanol to the advanced biofuel 1-butanol with a ruthenium diphosphine catalyst (see picture; P orange, Ru blue). Preliminary mechanistic studies indicate that control over the notoriously uncontrolled acetaldehyde aldol condensation is critical for the high selectivity, and evidence was found for an on-metal condensation step.

    26. Cycloaddition

      Synthesis of Aminocyclobutanes by Iron-Catalyzed [2+2] Cycloaddition (pages 9009–9013)

      Florian de Nanteuil and Prof. Dr. Jérôme Waser

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303803

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      Fab Four: An iron-catalyzed [2+2] cycloaddition furnishes aminocyclobutanes with a broad range of substituents in excellent yields and diastereoselectivities. The products can be obtained on a gram scale and can be further converted to β-peptide derivatives in a few steps. Furthermore, a [4+2] cycloaddition between an aminocyclobutane and an olefin leads to the corresponding cyclohexylamines.

    27. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Gold-Catalyzed Tandem Cycloisomerization/Cope Rearrangement: An Efficient Access to the Hydroazulenic Motif (pages 9014–9018)

      Dr. Ziping Cao and Dr. Fabien Gagosz

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304497

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      Simply complex: The title reaction proceeds at a low loading of catalyst (1 mol %) and allows an efficient and stereoselective access to the hydroazulenic motif, which is found in numerous natural products having significant biological activities. Tf=trifluoromethanesulfonyl, XPhos=2-dicyclohexylphosphino-2′,4′,6′-triisopropylbiphenyl.

    28. Total Synthesis

      Synthesis of ent-Kaurane and Beyerane Diterpenoids by Controlled Fragmentations of Overbred Intermediates (pages 9019–9022)

      Emily C. Cherney, Dr. Jason C. Green and Prof. Dr. Phil S. Baran

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304609

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      Efficient access to minimally oxidized members of the ent-kaurane and beyerane class of terpenes has been achieved by using a polyene cyclization precursor designed to directly yield oxidation at the axial C19-methyl group. Construction of the [3.2.1]bicyclic system found in the ent-kaurane skeleton was realized with two overbred intermediates. Wagner–Meerwein rearrangement of the [3.2.1]bicyclic system yields the beyerane skeleton of isosteviol.

    29. Gold Clusters

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A Hexanuclear Gold Cluster Supported by Three-Center–Two-Electron Bonds and Aurophilic Interactions (pages 9023–9026)

      Ekaterina S. Smirnova and Prof. Antonio M. Echavarren

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303336

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      A heart of gold: The first hexanuclear gold cluster formed exclusively by gold(I) centers (see picture; Au yellow, C black, P purple) has been shown to be catalytically active for the activation of alkynes under homogeneous conditions.

    30. Self-Assembly

      A Self-Assembled [FeII12L12] Capsule with an Icosahedral Framework (pages 9027–9030)

      Rana A. Bilbeisi, Dr. Tanya K. Ronson and Dr. Jonathan R. Nitschke

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302976

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      How about a different geometry? Depending on the reaction conditions, a threefold-symmetric triamine is observed to assemble into either the novel icosahedral [FeII12L12] capsule 1, or tetrahedral [FeII4L4] capsule 2. The two capsules have radically different cavity volumes and shapes, and are able to encapsulate guests of different size, shape, and charge.

    31. Unidirectional Scaffold-Strand Arrangement in DNA Origami (pages 9031–9034)

      Dr. Dongran Han, Shuoxing Jiang, Anirban Samanta, Prof. Yan Liu and Prof. Hao Yan

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302177

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      In a parallel universe: DNA origami structures based on modified parallel double-crossover tiles (see scheme) were constructed and a unidirectional (parallel) arrangement of the scaffold strand (gray lines) was used in the assembly of a variety of 2D and 3D DNA origami structures. This will greatly expand the diversity of DNA origami and enable their assembly into larger structures.

    32. Gold Nanoclusters

      Superatom Networks in Thiolate-Protected Gold Nanoparticles (pages 9035–9039)

      Prof. Longjiu Cheng, Yuan Yuan, Xiuzhen Zhang and Prof. Jinlong Yang

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302926

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      The next super model: The Au84+ core of [Au20(SR)16] can be viewed as two non-conjugate 4 center–2 electron (4c–2e) tetrahedral Au4 superatoms. The four valence electrons are delocalized in each Au4 unit as 4c–2e σ bonds. Chemical bonding analysis confirms that a 2e-superatom network exists in [Au20(SR)16] (see picture: Au yellow, SR purple, superatoms tetrahedra/red), this model explains the properties of this species.

    33. Bacterial Alkaloids

      Regiodivergent N[BOND]C and N[BOND]N Aryl Coupling Reactions of Indoloterpenes and Cycloether Formation Mediated by a Single Bacterial Flavoenzyme (pages 9040–9043)

      Martin Baunach, Dr. Ling Ding, Dr. Torsten Bruhn, Prof. Dr. Gerhard Bringmann and Prof. Dr. Christian Hertweck

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201303733

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      Radical diversification: Through the discovery of diverse indolosesquiterpene dimers in a strain heterologously expressing the xiamycin biosynthesis genes, the analysis of mutants, and biotransformation studies, it has been inferred that a single flavoprotein mediates N[BOND]C and N[BOND]N aryl coupling reactions, as well as the formation of a cyclic ether (oxiamycin). Synthetic emulation of this unusual transformation provides evidence for a radical-based mechanism.

    34. Probes for Membrane Potential

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Porphyrins for Probing Electrical Potential Across Lipid Bilayer Membranes by Second Harmonic Generation (pages 9044–9048)

      Dr. James E. Reeve, Dr. Alex D. Corbett, Igor Boczarow, Wojciech Kaluza, Dr. William Barford, Prof. Hagan Bayley, Prof. Tony Wilson and Prof. Harry L. Anderson

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201304515

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      Feeling the field! The intensity of second harmonic generation (SHG) from a porphyrin in a lipid bilayer is exceptionally sensitive to electric field, thus indicating that these dyes may be useful probes for electrical signals in excitable cells such as neurons. The porphyrin-based membrane probe (see picture, not to scale) gives a fast electro-optic response which is about 5–10 times greater than those of conventional styryl dyes.

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