Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Angewandte Chemie International Edition

January 21, 2013

Volume 52, Issue 4

Pages 1057–1332

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: MRI Visualization of Melanoma Cells by Targeting Overexpressed Sialic Acid with a GdIII-dota-en-pba Imaging Reporter (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 4/2013) (page 1057)

      Dr. Simonetta Geninatti Crich, Diego Alberti, Ibolya Szabo, Prof. Silvio Aime and Dr. Kristina Djanashvili

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209491

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      The recognition of tumors is possible through the dynamic formation of cyclic boronate esters between the diol moiety of the overexpressed marker sialic acid and a phenylboronic acid (pba) targeting vector. In their Communication on page 1161 ff., K. Djanashvili et al. demonstrate an MRI signal intensity enhancement at the tumor site as a result of the accumulation and prolonged retention of a GdIII-dota-en-pba targeting contrast agent after its intravenous injection into a melanoma mouse xenograft.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Room Temperature Magnetic Detection of Spin Switching in Nanosized Spin-Crossover Materials (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 4/2013) (page 1058)

      Dr. Tran Quang Hung, Dr. Ferial Terki, Dr. Souleymane Kamara, Mourad Dehbaoui, Prof. Salam Charar, Brajalal Sinha, Prof. CheolGi Kim, Dr. Philippe Gandit, Il'ya A. Gural'skiy, Dr. Gabor Molnar, Dr. Lionel Salmon, Dr. Helena J. Shepherd and Dr. Azzedine Bousseksou

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209859

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      Spin transitions in nanosized materials can be detected using a highly sensitive hybrid sensor, which combines anisotropic magnetoresistive and planar Hall effects. In their Communication on page 1185 ff., F. Terki, C. G. Kim, A. Bousseksou, and co-workers describe a prototype of the sensor and discuss its use for nanoscale magnetic measurements around room temperature. The picture shows an artistic view of the sensor, on which nanoparticles of a ferrous spin-crossover complex have been deposited.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Quantum-Dot Fluorescence Lifetime Engineering with DNA Origami Constructs (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 4/2013) (page 1333)

      Dr. Seung Hyeon Ko, Kan Du and Dr. J. Alexander Liddle

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209648

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      The lifetime of quantum dots has been controlled by varying the geometrical configuration of quantum-dot–gold nanoparticle (AuNP) conjugates on DNA origami templates. In their Communication on page 1193 ff., J. A. Liddle et al. describe a strategy to manipulate quantum-dot lifetimes. Making measurements with a 3D single-molecule tracking system, which enables the DNA construct to be kept in its native state in solution, the size, number, and spacing of the AuNPs are found to be the critical factors.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: A Multispectroscopic Study of 3 d Orbitals in Cobalt Carboxylates: The High Sensitivity of 2p3d Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to the Ligand Field (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 4/2013) (page 1334)

      Matti M. van Schooneveld, Robert W. Gosselink, Tamara M. Eggenhuisen, Mustafa Al Samarai, Dr. Claude Monney, Dr. Kejin J. Zhou, Dr. Thorsten Schmitt and Prof. Dr. Frank M. F. de Groot

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209561

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      3d transition-metal-ion coordination is crucial in many chemical processes and in the understanding of their reaction mechanisms. In their Communication on page 1170 ff. M. M. van Schooneveld, F. M. F. de Groot et al. show for cobalt(II) carboxylates that synchrotron-based 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) allows for a far more judicious determination of the metal-ion coordination environment than benchmark ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) and 2p X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopy do.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 4/2013 (pages 1061–1076)

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201390001

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  4. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Chao-Jun Li (page 1082)

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206331

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      “My favorite author is Lao Tzu. What I look for first in a publication is the ‘flash’ that makes me think ‘a-ha’ …” This and more about Chao-Jun Li can be found on page 1082.

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Discovering Chemistry with Natural Bond Orbitals. By Frank Weinhold and Clark E. Landis. (page 1085)

      Jeremy Harvey

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208492

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      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2012. 336 pp., softcover, € 69.90.—ISBN 978-1118119969

  7. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Photoelectrochemistry

      On the Way to Artificial Photosynthesis: Simple Materials and System Designs for Photoelectrodes (pages 1086–1087)

      Prof. Dr. Markus Antonietti

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207937

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      For commercial viability new technologies for the sustainable generation of energy should be simple and efficient. Photoelectrodes made of boron arsenide are the latest advance: they can be synthesized easily directly from the elements and convert sunlight into electric current.

  8. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Microwave Chemistry

      Microwave Effects in Organic Synthesis: Myth or Reality? (pages 1088–1094)

      Prof. Dr.  C. Oliver Kappe, Bartholomäus Pieber and Dr. Doris Dallinger

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204103

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      It's not magic! The effects observed in microwave-irradiated chemical transformations can in most cases be rationalized by purely bulk thermal phenomena associated with rapid heating to elevated temperatures. As discussed in this Essay, the existence of so-called nonthermal or specific microwave effects is highly doubtful.

  9. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Nanostructures

      Biopolymers as a Flexible Resource for Nanochemistry (pages 1096–1108)

      Dr. Zoe Schnepp

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206943

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      Biomass is an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules. Much current effort is focused on the breakdown of these molecules into fuels or platform molecules. However, there is growing interest in using biopolymers directly to create nanostructured materials. It is highlighted how biopolymers are providing new directions in the synthesis of nanostructured materials.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Medicinal Chemistry

      Alzheimer’s Disease, Cholesterol, and Statins: The Junctions of Important Metabolic Pathways (pages 1110–1121)

      Tiago Silva, José Teixeira, Prof. Fernando Remião and Prof. Fernanda Borges

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204964

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      Cholesterol (left-hand structure) is an essential component of lipid rafts, in which the biosynthesis of neurotoxic β-amyloid occurs. By blocking the synthesis of cholesterol, statins (right-hand structure: lovastatin) are able to decrease the amyloid load in the central nervous system and lower the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. This behavior is strongly supported by the pleiotropic effects of statins on isoprenylation and neuroinflammation.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Author Profile
    6. News
    7. Book Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Essay
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Hierarchically Ordered Structures

      An Unconventional Route to Hierarchically Ordered Block Copolymers on a Gradient Patterned Surface through Controlled Evaporative Self-Assembly (pages 1122–1127)

      Dr. Myunghwan Byun, Dr. Wei Han, Bo Li, Dr. Xukai Xin and Prof. Zhiqun Lin

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208421

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      A chemically patterned surface was formed by controlled evaporative self-assembly of concentric polymer stripes, followed by the removal of weakly deposited polymer, giving ultrathin polymer stripes with a width gradient on the Si substrate (see picture). A thin film of diblock copolymer hierarchically self-assembled on the ultrathin polymer stripes, giving arrays of nanocylinders perpendicular to the surface of the film.

    2. Lanthanides

      Breakdown of Crystallographic Site Symmetry in Lanthanide-Doped NaYF4 Crystals (pages 1128–1133)

      Dr. Datao Tu, Dr. Yongsheng Liu, Dr. Haomiao Zhu, Renfu Li, Dr. Liqin Liu and Prof. Dr. Xueyuan Chen

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208218

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      High-resolution photoluminescence spectroscopy employing Eu3+ as the structural probe unambiguously revealed a universal breakdown of crystallographic site symmetry in lanthanide-doped disordered crystals. The spectroscopic site symmetries of Eu3+ descend from crystallographic Oh to Cs (or C2) in α-NaYF4, and from crystallographic C3h to Cs in β-NaYF4, which were further verified by crystal-field level fitting.

    3. Photochemistry

      Hole Trapping of G-Quartets in a G-Quadruplex (pages 1134–1138)

      Dr. Jungkweon Choi, Jongjin Park, Atsushi Tanaka, Dr. Man Jae Park, Dr. Yoon Jung Jang, Dr. Mamoru Fujitsuka, Prof. Dr. Seog K. Kim and Prof. Dr. Tetsuro Majima

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208149

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      Hole trapping: The hole transfer and trapping in a G-quadruplex has been investigated using laser flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis. The results show that the charge separation in the G-quadruplex takes place efficiently between riboflavin and G-bases because of the excellent hole-trapping ability of planar G-quartets.

    4. Copper Amyloid Peptide

      34 GHz Pulsed ENDOR Characterization of the Copper Coordination of an Amyloid β Peptide Relevant to Alzheimer’s Disease (pages 1139–1142)

      Donghun Kim, Nam Hee Kim and Dr. Sun Hee Kim

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208108

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      The copper(II) ion coordination mode of CuII-Aβ(1–16) at physiological pH was characterized by 34 GHz pulsed ENDOR spectroscopy. 1H/2H ENDOR and 14N ENDOR demonstrate the NH2 terminus of aspartic acid is an equatorial ligand of CuII, and 17O ENDOR together with 1H ENDOR suggest that water is an axial ligand (see picture; Cu pink, O red, N blue).

    5. Polyketide Biosynthesis

      Substrate Specificity in Ketosynthase Domains from trans-AT Polyketide Synthases (pages 1143–1147)

      Matthew Jenner, Sarah Frank, Annette Kampa, Christoph Kohlhaas, Petra Pöplau, Dr. Geoff S. Briggs, Prof. Dr. Jörn Piel and Dr. Neil J. Oldham

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207690

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      Branching out: The substrate specificity profiles for a range of ketosynthase (KS) domains from trans-AT PKSs are reported. Evidence is provided that a sterically demanding amino acid residue adjacent to the active-site Cys residue confers specificity towards non-β-methyl-branched substrates (see scheme).

    6. Nanostructures

      Multifunctional Gold Nanorods with Ultrahigh Stability and Tunability for In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging, SERS Detection, and Photodynamic Therapy (pages 1148–1151)

      Yuan Zhang, Dr. Jun Qian, Dan Wang, Yalun Wang and Prof. Sailing He

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207909

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      Multimodal: Gold nanorods are coated with silica/polymer mutilayers, doped with surface-enhance Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence agents as well as photosensitizers. The structural and optical properties are tunable and stable in solutions and in living bodies. A real-time and specific in vivo SERS and fluorescence detection method using this structure is applied for tumor detection and subsequent photodynamic therapy (PDT).

    7. Nanoparticles

      Quantitative Analysis of the Fate of Gold Nanocages In Vitro and In Vivo after Uptake by U87-MG Tumor Cells (pages 1152–1155)

      Dr. Eun Chul Cho, Yu Zhang, Xin Cai, Christine M. Moran, Prof. Lihong V. Wang and Prof. Younan Xia

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208096

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      Not always equal: When a mother cell that contains Au nanocages divides, the nanoparticles are unequally distributed between the two daughter cells. This unequal distribution of nanoparticles as well as their clearance from the cells (see picture) is quantitatively analyzed both in vitro and in vivo using two-photon microscopy and photoacoustic microscopy, respectively.

    8. Nanocomposite Hydrogels

      Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica-Based Nanocomposite Hydrogels as Three-Dimensional Scaffolds (pages 1156–1160)

      Dr. Nermin Seda Kehr, Eko Adi Prasetyanto, Kathrin Benson, Bahar Ergün, Anzhela Galstyan and Prof. Hans-Joachim Galla

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206951

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      Dye-loaded periodic mesoporous organosilica particles functionalized with bioactive molecules were used for the generation of a nanocomposite alginate hydrogel. The affinity of cells was up to four times higher with the embedded particles than with simple alginate hydrogel, caused by both the nanometer-scale particle itself and its bioactive functionalization.

    9. Imaging Agents

      MRI Visualization of Melanoma Cells by Targeting Overexpressed Sialic Acid with a GdIII-dota-en-pba Imaging Reporter (pages 1161–1164)

      Dr. Simonetta Geninatti Crich, Diego Alberti, Ibolya Szabo, Prof. Silvio Aime and Dr. Kristina Djanashvili

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207131

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      By design: The novel MRI reporter GdIII-dota-en-pba (see picture) selectively binds to sialic acid residues, which are overexpressed on tumors. This imaging reporter accumulates in a murine melanoma B16-F10 mice xenograft and from the MRI signal intensity it is possible to quantify the sialic acid concentration that is directly associated with tumor malignancy.

    10. Nanocrystal Sensors

      Conformational Control of Energy Transfer: A Mechanism for Biocompatible Nanocrystal-Based Sensors (pages 1165–1169)

      Dr. Euan R. Kay, Jungmin Lee, Prof. Daniel G. Nocera and Prof. Moungi G. Bawendi

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207181

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      Know when to fold 'em: Combination of a pH-triggered oligonucleotide conformational switch with fluorescent nanocrystals gives a sensitive pH nanosensor (see scheme). Analyte-dependent conformational changes control the distance between the nanocrystal energy donor (green) and a FRET acceptor (red), which results in a reporter for pH values in individual endosomes of living cells.

    11. X-ray Spectroscopy

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A Multispectroscopic Study of 3 d Orbitals in Cobalt Carboxylates: The High Sensitivity of 2p3d Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to the Ligand Field (pages 1170–1174)

      Matti M. van Schooneveld, Robert W. Gosselink, Tamara M. Eggenhuisen, Mustafa Al Samarai, Dr. Claude Monney, Dr. Kejin J. Zhou, Dr. Thorsten Schmitt and Prof. Dr. Frank M. F. de Groot

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204855

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      d–d excitations in detail: High-resolution 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) allows the observation of more as well as more intense d–d excitations than UV/Vis spectroscopy does as demonstrated on cobalt(II) carboxylates. Together with ligand field multiplet (LFM) calculations this allows their detailed electronic structure description, while 2p X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) cannot discriminate these transition metal compounds.

    12. Bioluminescence

      Rational Design and Development of Near-Infrared-Emitting Firefly Luciferins Available In Vivo (pages 1175–1179)

      Ryosuke Kojima, Dr. Hideo Takakura, Prof. Takeaki Ozawa, Yukio Tada, Prof. Tetsuo Nagano and Prof. Yasuteru Urano

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205151

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      Shine on: A new rational design strategy for near-infrared-emitting firefly luciferins that are available in vivo has been developed using intramolecular bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The emission wavelength could be freely tuned by the choice of BRET acceptor, and NIR bioluminescence could be detected in living cells and mice without the need for luciferase manipulation.

    13. Color Modulation

      Reversible Full-Color Generation with Patterned Yellow Electrochromic Polymers (pages 1180–1184)

      Dr. Thiruvelu Bhuvana, Byeonggwan Kim, Xu Yang, Haijin Shin and Prof. Eunkyoung Kim

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205206

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      A different light: The yellow electrochromic copolymer, propylenedioxythiophene phenylene P(ProDOT-Ph) is patterned by the micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC) process to fabricate line gratings. Under illumination by white light, colors are generated by diffraction and can be changed by applying an external voltage (see picture). The diffracted color is blue shifted by electrochemical doping, a process that is completely reversible.

    14. Spin Crossover

      Room Temperature Magnetic Detection of Spin Switching in Nanosized Spin-Crossover Materials (pages 1185–1188)

      Dr. Tran Quang Hung, Dr. Ferial Terki, Dr. Souleymane Kamara, Mourad Dehbaoui, Prof. Salam Charar, Brajalal Sinha, Prof. CheolGi Kim, Dr. Philippe Gandit, Il'ya A. Gural'skiy, Dr. Gabor Molnar, Dr. Lionel Salmon, Dr. Helena J. Shepherd and Dr. Azzedine Bousseksou

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205952

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      Building a better SQUID: A prototype for a SQUID-like magnetometry device for the indirect detection of room-temperature switching in spin-crossover nanoparticles has been developed and used in the study of [Fe(hptrz)3](OTs)2 (hptrz=4-heptyl-1,2,4-triazole, OTs=p-toluenesulfonyl) nanoparticles, as a proof of concept for this novel micromagnetometry approach. The method provides significant benefits over conventional SQUID and nano-SQUID techniques.

    15. DNA Nanotechnology

      Combinatorial Displacement of DNA Strands: Application to Matrix Multiplication and Weighted Sums (pages 1189–1192)

      Dr. Anthony J. Genot, Dr. Jonathan Bath and Prof. Andrew J. Turberfield

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206201

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      DNA multiplication tables: A combinatorial mechanism for DNA strand displacement shares the same structure as matrix multiplication (see scheme). This system can be used to perform linear operations on DNA concentrations, such as the calculation of a weighted sum.

    16. Quantum-Dot Fluorescence Lifetime Engineering with DNA Origami Constructs (pages 1193–1197)

      Dr. Seung Hyeon Ko, Kan Du and Dr. J. Alexander Liddle

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206253

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      Single-molecule GPS: The average photon count rate and lifetime of a quantum dot (Qdot) have been controlled by varying the geometrical configuration of Qdot–gold nanoparticle (AuNP) conjugates on DNA origami. With a 3D real-time single-molecule tracking system, which allows the DNA templates to be kept in their native state in solution, the influence of AuNPs on the Qdot lifetime is determined (see picture).

    17. Spin Crossover

      The Effect of an Active Guest on the Spin Crossover Phenomenon (pages 1198–1202)

      Xin Bao, Dr. Helena J. Shepherd, Dr. Lionel Salmon, Dr. Gábor Molnár, Prof. Dr. Ming-Liang Tong and Dr. Azzedine Bousseksou

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207218

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      Throw the switch: A new strategy for regulating spin crossover (SCO) properties by the control of an active guest molecule is proposed. As a proof of concept, maleic anhydride was incorporated into a microporous {Fe(pyrazine)[Pt(CN)4]} framework material and chemically switched to maleic acid, thus modifying the SCO properties (see picture).

    18. Post-Translational Modification

      Probing the Function of the Tyr-Cys Cross-Link in Metalloenzymes by the Genetic Incorporation of 3-Methylthiotyrosine (pages 1203–1207)

      Qing Zhou, Dr. Meirong Hu, Dr. Wei Zhang, Dr. Li Jiang, Prof. Dr. Sarah Perrett, Juanzuo Zhou and Prof. Dr. Jiangyun Wang

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207229

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      Efficient multiple-electron redox reactions are performed by galactoase oxidase, cysteine dioxygenase, sulfite reductase, and cytochrome c nitrite reductase. A post-translationally modified tyrosine–cysteine cross-link (Tyr-Cys) in their active sites is essential for their functions.

    19. Analytical Methods

      A Gel-Encapsulated Bioreactor System for NMR Studies of Protein–Protein Interactions in Living Mammalian Cells (pages 1208–1211)

      Satoshi Kubo, Dr. Noritaka Nishida, Yuko Udagawa, Osamu Takarada, Dr. Shinji Ogino and Prof. Dr. Ichio Shimada

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207243

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      Staying alive: The major limitation of in-cell NMR spectroscopy methods is the occurrence of cell death during the NMR measurement. To overcome this problem, a bioreactor was utilized that can perfuse the cells in the NMR tube, thereby maintaining the conditions for more than 5 h. By using the bioreactor, the binding site of an externally introduced protein for an endogenous molecule in HeLa S3 cells was identified.

    20. DNA Structures

      Metal-Locked DNA Three-Way Junction (pages 1212–1216)

      Dr. Jean-Louis H. A. Duprey, Dr. Yusuke Takezawa and Prof. Dr. Mitsuhiko Shionoya

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207338

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      Three-way split: A postsynthetic click reaction has resulted in the conjugation of three bipyridine ligands at the core of a DNA three-way junction structure (see picture). Melting curve analyses revealed that NiII ions significantly stabilize the junction structure through the formation of a [Ni(bpy)3]2+ complex which cross-links three strands. The metal complex shows a diastereomeric preference, thus indicating a chirality transfer from the DNA.

    21. Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

      Thousand-fold Enhancement of Single-Molecule Fluorescence Near a Single Gold Nanorod (pages 1217–1221)

      Haifeng Yuan, Saumyakanti Khatua, Peter Zijlstra, Mustafa Yorulmaz and Michel Orrit

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208125

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      Single molecules: Large enhancements of single-molecule fluorescence up to 1100 times by using synthesized gold nanorods are reported (see picture). This high enhancement is achieved by selecting a dye with its adsorption and emission close to the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanorods.

    22. NMR Spectroscopy

      Improved Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface-Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy through Controlled Incorporation of Deuterated Functional Groups (pages 1222–1225)

      Alexandre Zagdoun, Dr. Aaron J. Rossini, Dr. Matthew P. Conley, Wolfram R. Grüning, Martin Schwarzwälder, Dr. Moreno Lelli, Dr. W. Trent Franks, Prof. Dr. Hartmut Oschkinat, Prof. Dr. Christophe Copéret, Prof. Dr. Lyndon Emsley and Dr. Anne Lesage

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208699

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      In a spin: The use of deuterated surface passivation agents is shown to restore dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced NMR signals that are reduced in substrates containing methyl groups, while still protecting sensitive sites on the surface (see picture). Furthermore, apolar groups such as [D9]-trimethylsiloxy (TMS) repel radicals (yellow) away from the surface, thus diminishing detrimental paramagnetic effects induced by radical proximity.

    23. Gas-Phase Reactions

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      On the Origin of the Surprisingly Sluggish Redox Reaction of the N2O/CO Couple Mediated by [Y2O2]+. and [YAlO2]+. Cluster Ions in the Gas Phase (pages 1226–1230)

      Jia-Bi Ma, Dr. Zhe-Chen Wang, Dr. Maria Schlangen, Prof. Dr. Sheng-Gui He and Prof. Dr. Helmut Schwarz

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208559

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      Kinetic energy barriers that have entirely different origins are the reasons for the impedance of the catalytic N2O/CO redox cycle mediated by both [YAlO2]+. and [Y2O2]+. clusters (see scheme). While oxidation with N2O is the bottleneck for [YAlO2]+., oxidation of [Y2O2]+. with N2O is possible, but reduction of [Y2O3]+. by CO is prevented. This arises because of “doping” effects which can control local charges and spin distributions.

    24. Antitubercular Prodrugs

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Abyssomicins from the South China Sea Deep-Sea Sediment Verrucosispora sp.: Natural Thioether Michael Addition Adducts as Antitubercular Prodrugs (pages 1231–1234)

      Qian Wang, Assoc. Prof. Fuhang Song, Dr. Xue Xiao, Pei Huang, Assoc. Prof. Li Li, Prof. Aaron Monte, Dr. Wael M. Abdel-Mageed, Dr. Jian Wang, Hui Guo, Dr. Wenni He, Feng Xie, Dr. Huanqin Dai, Miaomiao Liu, Dr. Caixia Chen, Hao Xu, Assoc. Prof. Mei Liu, Dr. Andrew M. Piggott, Assoc. Prof. Xueting Liu, Prof. Robert J. Capon and Prof. Lixin Zhang

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208801

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      From the deep: The title actinomycete yielded three new abyssomicins J–L. The dimeric thioether J (see scheme) represents a unique example of a masked Michael acceptor with anti-TB properties. Mechanistic insights into the biosynthesis, biomimetic synthesis, stability, and biological mechanism of action of abyssomicins aid our understanding of, and prospects for the development of Michael-acceptor-based drugs.

    25. Nanoporous Materials

      Bottom-Up Synthesis of Monodispersed Single-Crystalline Cyano-Bridged Coordination Polymer Nanoflakes (pages 1235–1239)

      Dr.  Ming Hu, Dr. Shinsuke Ishihara and Prof. Dr. Yusuke Yamauchi

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208501

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      A two-dimensional morphology characterizes the nanoflakes that are obtained in the bottom-up synthesis of a single-crystalline coordination polymer, Ni(H2O)2[Ni(CN)4]⋅x H2O. The 10 nm-thick nanoflakes are well-dispersed in solution and have a very high accessible surface area (240 m2 g−1). Thermal treatment leads to nanoporous NiO with retention of the original flake morphology.

    26. C[BOND]H Functionalization

      Aldimine-Directed Branched-Selective Hydroarylation of Styrenes (pages 1240–1244)

      Pin-Sheng Lee and Prof. Naohiko Yoshikai

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207958

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      Branching out: A simple and inexpensive cobalt/triarylphosphine catalyst promotes aldimine-directed hydroarylation of styrene with high branched regioselectivity to afford 1,1-diarylethane derivatives in good yields under mild reaction conditions. The ortho-formyl group in the hydroarylation products is amenable to dehydrative cyclization, to give fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as decarbonylative removal.

    27. C–H Activation

      Ether-Directed ortho-C–H Olefination with a Palladium(II)/Monoprotected Amino Acid Catalyst (pages 1245–1247)

      Dr. Gang Li, Dr. Dasheng Leow, Li Wan and Prof. Dr. Jin-Quan Yu

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207770

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      Weak coordination is powerful! A PdII-catalyzed olefination of ortho-C[BOND]H bonds of arenes directed by weakly coordinating ethers is developed by using monoprotected amino acid (MPAA) ligands. This finding provides a method for chemically modifying ethers, which are abundant in natural products and drug molecules. HFIP=hexafluoroisopropanol.

    28. Photoanodes

      A Three-Dimensional Branched Cobalt-Doped α-Fe2O3 Nanorod/MgFe2O4 Heterojunction Array as a Flexible Photoanode for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation (pages 1248–1252)

      Dr. Yang Hou, Dr. Fan Zuo, Alex Dagg and Prof. Dr. Pingyun Feng

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207578

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      Hitting water with nanotrees: A three-dimensional branched heterojunction array for water oxidation based on cobalt-doped α-Fe2O3 nanorod cores and MgFe2O4 shells has been synthesized. Such an architecture not only has a large surface area and excellent light absorption properties, and shows fast charge transport, but also exhibits a very high photoelectrochemical activity for water oxidation and a high stability.

    29. Composite Membranes

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Nanoporous Organic Polymer/Cage Composite Membranes (pages 1253–1256)

      Alexandra F. Bushell, Prof. Peter M. Budd, Dr. Martin P. Attfield, Dr. James T. A. Jones, Dr. Tom Hasell, Prof. Andrew I. Cooper, Dr. Paola Bernardo, Fabio Bazzarelli, Dr. Gabriele Clarizia and Dr. Johannes C. Jansen

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206339

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      Organic–organic composite membranes are prepared by in situ crystallization of cage molecules in a polymer of intrinsic microporosity. This allows a direct one-step route to mixed-matrix membranes, starting with a homogeneous molecular solution. Extremely high gas permeabilities are achieved, even after ageing for more than a year, coupled with good selectivity for applications such as CO2 recovery.

    30. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Palladium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation of Cyclic Dienol Carbonates: Efficient Route to Enantioenriched γ-Butenolides Bearing an All-Carbon α-Quaternary Stereogenic Center (pages 1257–1261)

      Jeremy Fournier, Dr. Oscar Lozano, Dr. Candice Menozzi, Dr. Stellios Arseniyadis and Prof. Dr. Janine Cossy

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206368

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      Alpha, beta, gamma: Allyl dienol carbonates (1) served as substrates for the title reaction to afford the furanones 2 in both high yields and high enantioselectivities. These furanones were eventually converted into valuable building blocks including γ-tertiary and γ-quaternary furanones (3) as well as β-quaternary butyrolactones (4). This method was used as a key step in the total synthesis of (−)-nephrosteranic acid and (−)-roccellaric acid.

    31. Photodynamic Therapy

      Red-Light-Induced Inhibition of DNA Replication and Amplification by PCR with an Os/Rh Supramolecule (pages 1262–1265)

      Jing Wang, Jerry Newman Jr., Dr. Samantha L. H. Higgins, Kaitlyn M. Brewer, Prof. Brenda S. J. Winkel and Prof. Karen J. Brewer

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207083

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      Bimetallic: Upon irradiation with light in the phototherapeutic window, the bimetallic complex [(bpy)2Os(dpp)RhCl2(phen)]3+ binds to and cleaves DNA through an oxygen-independent mechanism. PCR is used as a model for in vitro DNA replication. The results show that the metal complex does not interfere with DNA amplification in the dark without O2, but completely inhibits DNA amplification in samples exposed to red light. Taq=polymerase, PS=photosensitizer.

    32. Heterocycles

      Formation of Enehydrazine Intermediates through Coupling of Phenylhydrazines with Vinyl Halides: Entry into the Fischer Indole Synthesis (pages 1266–1269)

      Fuxu Zhan and Prof. Guangxin Liang

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207173

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      Cut to the chase: Direct formation of an enehydrazine, an intermediate in the classic Fischer indole synthesis, solves the regioselectivity problem associated with indolization. This approach not only achieves selective synthesis of indoles through proper selection of the vinyl halide, but also leads to quick construction of desoxyeseroline and esermethole, as well as the key structural motif in the Akuammiline alkaloid vincorine.

    33. Biomass

      Conversion of Hemicellulose into Furfural Using Solid Acid Catalysts in γ-Valerolactone (pages 1270–1274)

      Elif I. Gürbüz, Dr. Jean Marcel R. Gallo, Dr. David Martin Alonso, Dr. Stephanie G. Wettstein, Wee Y. Lim and Prof. James A. Dumesic

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207334

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      Hold the water: The hemicellulose fraction of lignocellulose can be converted into furfural in high yields (80 %) using solid acid catalysts (H-mordenite) in a monophasic system with γ-valerolactone (GVL) as the solvent. Furfural degradation reactions are decreased significantly when the water concentration in GVL is minimized, thus resulting in high furfural yields.

    34. Chiral Nanocrystals

      Enantioselective Synthesis of Intrinsically Chiral Mercury Sulfide Nanocrystals (pages 1275–1279)

      Assaf Ben-Moshe, Prof. Alexander O. Govorov and Prof. Gil Markovich

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207489

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      Equal and opposite: A chiral surfactant molecule was used to induce high enantioselectivity in the transformation from the achiral phase of mercury sulfide, probably through binding of the surfactant thiolate groups to Hg ions in the forming crystal. The generation of truly chiral inorganic nanocrystals of tailored size and shape should be useful for many applications, such as enantioselective catalysis and sensing.

    35. Oxidation of Methane

      Oxidation of Methane to Methanol with Hydrogen Peroxide Using Supported Gold–Palladium Alloy Nanoparticles (pages 1280–1284)

      Dr. Mohd Hasbi Ab Rahim, Dr. Michael M. Forde, Dr. Robert L. Jenkins, Dr. Ceri Hammond, Dr. Qian He, Dr. Nikolaos Dimitratos, Dr. Jose Antonio Lopez-Sanchez, Dr. Albert F. Carley, Dr. Stuart H. Taylor, Dr. David J. Willock, Dr. Damien M. Murphy, Prof. Christopher J. Kiely and Prof. Graham J. Hutchings

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207717

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      Direct and selective: Supported gold–palladium nanoparticles are active for the oxidation of methane, giving a high selectivity for the formation of methyl hydroperoxide and methanol, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant (see picture). The optimal methanol selectivity is achieved by performing the reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide that has been generated in situ from hydrogen and oxygen.

    36. Iron catalysis

      Simplifying Iron–Phosphine Catalysts for Cross-Coupling Reactions (pages 1285–1288)

      Prof. Dr. Robin B. Bedford, Dr. Emma Carter, Paul M. Cogswell, Nicholas J. Gower, Dr. Mairi F. Haddow, Prof. Dr. Jeremy N. Harvey, Dr. Damien M. Murphy, Emily C. Neeve and Joshua Nunn

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207868

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      Any old iron? Iron catalysts based on the widely available diphosphine ligand bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane have not previously fared particularly well in iron-catalyzed cross-coupling processes. However, this turns out not to be due to any inherently poor performance associated with the ligand, but rather the need to form a bis-chelate complex, either before or during the formation of an active FeI species.

    37. Buckybowls

      Bowl-Shaped Fragments of C70 or Higher Fullerenes: Synthesis, Structural Analysis, and Inversion Dynamics (pages 1289–1293)

      Dr. Tsun-Cheng Wu, Min-Kuan Chen, Yen-Wei Lee, Prof. Ming-Yu Kuo and Prof. Yao-Ting Wu

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208200

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      Super bowl: Fragments of C70 or higher fullerenes were easily prepared from 1,8-bis(arylethynyl)naphthalenes. The curved structures were identified by X-ray crystallography. These rigid bowl-shaped molecules have a deep bowl depth (approximately 2.30 Å) and their bowl inversions proceed via an S-shaped transition structure with a very high inversion barrier (approximately 80 kcal mol−1).

    38. Bioinorganic Chemistry

      Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy and DFT study of Peroxo-Bridged Biferric Complexes: Structural Insight into Peroxo Intermediates of Binuclear Non-heme Iron Enzymes (pages 1294–1298)

      Dr. Kiyoung Park, Tomohiro Tsugawa, Prof. Dr. Hideki Furutachi, Yeonju Kwak, Lei V. Liu, Dr. Shaun D. Wong, Dr. Yoshitaka Yoda, Prof. Dr. Yasuhiro Kobayashi, Dr. Makina Saito, Masayuki Kurokuzu, Prof. Dr. Makoto Seto, Prof. Dr. Masatatsu Suzuki and Prof. Dr. Edward I. Solomon

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208240

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      Low-frequency vibrational modes of peroxo-bridged high-spin biferric complexes have been observed using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS; see picture, PVDOS=partial vibrational density-of-states) and assigned using DFT calculations. Correlations between the spectral features and the structure of peroxo-bridged cores form a basis for structural elucidation of enzyme–peroxo intermediates.

    39. Synthetic Methods

      Pd-Catalyzed C–H Olefination of (Hetero)Arenes by Using Saturated Ketones as an Olefin Source (pages 1299–1303)

      Dr. Yaping Shang, Xiaoming Jie, Jun Zhou, Peng Hu, Shijun Huang and Prof. Dr. Weiping Su

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208627

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      Tolerant: By using Pd(OAc)2/PCy3 as a catalyst, both electron-rich aromatic heterocycles and electron-deficient fluorobenzenes undergo the dehydrogenative cross-coupling with (hetero)aryl ethyl ketones in good yields. A broad range of functional groups is tolerated, thus providing a general method for the facile syntheses of chalcones or heterocyclic chalcone analogues. Furthermore, dialkyl ketones can also participate in this transformation.

    40. Biosynthesis

      An Alternative Isovaleryl CoA Biosynthetic Pathway Involving a Previously Unknown 3-Methylglutaconyl CoA Decarboxylase (pages 1304–1308)

      Dr. Yanyan Li, Eva Luxenburger and Prof. Dr. Rolf Müller

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207984

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      Take a detour: An alternative pathway to synthesize isovaleryl coenzyme A (CoA) has recently been suggested in myxobacteria, which is highly active when leucine is limited. Each enzymatic step of this unprecedented route has now been characterized and a novel 3-methylglutaconyl CoA decarboxylase identified that has apparently evolved from CoA transferases.

    41. Protein Synthesis

      Reconstitution of the Catalytic Core of F-ATPase (αβ)3γ from Escherichia coli Using Chemically Synthesized Subunit γ (pages 1309–1313)

      Frank Wintermann and Siegfried Engelbrecht

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206744

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      Hooking up: Subunit γ of an F-ATPase with 11 point mutations was ligated chemically from six peptides and then reconstituted with further subunits of the (αβ)3γ catalytic core complex. The biologically active protein with 286 residues currently represents the longest nonredundant polypeptide chain synthesized by chemical means. The yields of the five consecutive ligations, especially the last three, dropped the total yield to only 0.005 %.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Reconstitution of the Catalytic Core of F-ATPase (αβ)3γ from Escherichia coli Using Chemically Synthesized Subunit γ

      Vol. 52, Issue 18, 4715, Article first published online: 21 APR 2013

    42. Transition-Metal Hydrides

      Open-Shell First-Row Transition-Metal Polyhydride Complexes Based on the fac-[RuH3(PR3)3] Building Block (pages 1314–1318)

      Markus Plois, Waldemar Hujo, Prof. Dr. Stefan Grimme, Christian Schwickert, Dr. Eckhard Bill, Dr. Bas de Bruin, Prof. Dr. Rainer Pöttgen and Prof. Dr. Robert Wolf

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205209

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      High-spin hydrides: A new class of stable paramagnetic polyhydride complexes [M{Ru(μ-H)3(PTol3)3}2] (M=Cr–Ni) with an unprecedented trinuclear arrangement has been synthesized. The high-spin central 3d metal ion is sandwiched between six hydride ligands in a distorted octahedral fashion.

    43. Photoswitching

      Light-Triggered Guest Uptake and Release by a Photochromic Coordination Cage (pages 1319–1323)

      Muxin Han, Reent Michel, Dr. Bice He, Dr. Yu-Sheng Chen, Prof. Dr. Dietmar Stalke, Dr. Michael John and Prof. Dr. Guido H. Clever

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207373

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      A guiding light is sufficient to switch back and forth between the flexible and the stretched, rigid form of a self-assembled coordination cage based on two square-planar-coordinated PdII ions and four ligands with a photochromic dithienylethene (DTE) backbone. The light-driven interconversion is clean and reversible and allows to control the encapsulation and release of the guest [B12F12]2−.

    44. Hypervalent Iodine Reagents

      Defined Hypervalent Iodine(III) Reagents Incorporating Transferable Nitrogen Groups: Nucleophilic Amination through Electrophilic Activation (pages 1324–1328)

      Dr. José A. Souto, Dr. Claudio Martínez, Dr. Irene Velilla and Prof. Dr. Kilian Muñiz

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206420

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      Only I and N: Hypervalent iodine(III) reagents with two reactive I[BOND]N single bonds have been isolated for the first time. Their solid-state and solution structures provide evidence for enhanced electrophilicity at iodine and nucleophilic character of the imine. As a result, improved reactivity in amination reactions and unprecedented nitrogen-transfer reactions under metal-free conditions are realized.

    45. Gold Catalysis

      Gold-Catalyzed Formal 1,6-Acyloxy Migration Leading to 3,4-Disubstituted Pyrrolidin-2-ones (pages 1329–1332)

      Prof. Dr. A. Stephen K. Hashmi, M. Sc. Weibo Yang, M. Sc. Yang Yu, Max M. Hansmann, Dr. Matthias Rudolph and Dr. Frank Rominger

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207287

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      Mobile: The title reaction affords diastereomerically pure 3,4-disubstituted pyrrolidin-2-ones, which are important structural motifs in natural products, in good to high yields. Mechanistic investigations suggest the transformation proceeds through a tandem 1,3-acyloxy migration and a subsequent 1,5-acyloxy migration. DCE=1,2-dichloroethane, IPr=1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene.

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