Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 52 Issue 7

February 11, 2013

Volume 52, Issue 7

Pages 1841–2125

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Continuous Multistep Microfluidic Assisted Assembly of Fluorescent, Plasmonic, and Magnetic Nanostructures (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2013) (page 1841)

      Dr. Natalia Hassan, Prof. Valérie Cabuil and Dr. Ali Abou-Hassan

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300341

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      Assembly of different nanostructures occurs with perfection in nature (such as in trees) under laminar flows because these flows are symmetrical and continuous. In their Communication on page 1994 ff., A. Abou-Hassan and co-workers use laminar flow microreactors for the self-assembly of fluorescent, plasmonic, and magnetic nanoparticles for the preparation of different categories of assemblies with dual or triple functionalities.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Two-Way Nanopore Sensing of Sequence-Specific Oligonucleotides and Small-Molecule Targets in Complex Matrices Using Integrated DNA Supersandwich Structures (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2013) (page 1842)

      Nannan Liu, Yanan Jiang, Yahong Zhou, Prof. Fan Xia, Dr. Wei Guo and Prof. Lei Jiang

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300426

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      DNA supersandwich structures work as gatekeepers for solid-state nanopores as part of a target-specific nanofluidic sensor for both oligonucleotides and small molecules, as shown by F. Xia, W. Guo et al. in their Communication on page 2007 ff. The DNA superstructures enhance the sensitivity and reduce the background signal, so that the biohybrid nanodevice also works well in complex mixtures, such as mammalian serum.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Charge Dynamics in A Donor–Acceptor Covalent Organic Framework with Periodically Ordered Bicontinuous Heterojunctions (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2013) (page 2127)

      Shangbin Jin, Xuesong Ding, Xiao Feng, Mustafa Supur, Dr. Ko Furukawa, Seiya Takahashi, Dr. Matthew Addicoat, Prof. Dr. Mohamed E. El-Khouly, Prof. Dr. Toshikazu Nakamura, Prof. Dr. Stephan Irle, Prof. Dr. Shunichi Fukuzumi, Dr. Atsushi Nagai and Prof. Dr. Donglin Jiang

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300346

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      Aligned donor and acceptor columns of a covalent organic framework offer excellent n/p-heterojunctions for ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer with an intriguing ability of long-distance charge delocalization and exceptional long-term charge separation. In their Communication on page 2017 ff., D. Jiang and co-workers investigate the photochemical events and charge dynamics in the donor–acceptor covalent organic framework by using time-resolved spectroscopic methods.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Chirality Transfer in a Methyl Lactate–Ammonia Complex Observed by Matrix-Isolation Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2013) (page 2128)

      Dr. Christian Merten and Prof. Dr. Yunjie Xu

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300343

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      Chirality transfer from chiral to achiral molecules can occur through hydrogen-bonding interactions. In their Communication on page 2073 ff., Y. Xu and C. Merten use matrix-isolation vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy to measure the spectral signatures of chirality transfer from methyl lactate to ammonia, data which cannot be obtained in solution owing to the immediate protonation of ammonia (graphic by W. Jäger).

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
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      Editorial: Chemistry in Sweden—A Midsummer Night’s Dream? (pages 1844–1845)

      Prof. Christina Moberg

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208608

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      “...From an international perspective, Swedens research expenditure is high at 3.4% of the gross domestic product (GDP), compared to the average of 3.0% within the OECD countries. However, merely 24% of the funding in Sweden comes from the government...” Read more in the Editorial by Christina Moberg.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Graphical Abstract: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2013 (pages 1847–1860)

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201390004

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Günter Mayer (page 1870)

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207225

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      “My favorite time of day is the night. My favorite book is anything by Helmut Krausser …” This and more about Günter Mayer can be found on page 1870.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Mass Spectrometry Handbook. Wiley Series on Pharmaceutical Science and Biotechnology—Practices, Applications, and Methods. Edited by Mike S. Lee. (pages 1872–1873)

      Francesco De Angelis

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208029

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      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2012. 1368 pp., hardcover, € 159.60.—ISBN 978-0470536735

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Riboswitches

      New Insights into Gene Regulation—High-Resolution Structures of Cobalamin Riboswitches (pages 1874–1877)

      Dr. Marie F. Soulière, Mag. Andrea Haller, Mag. Tobias Santner and Prof. Dr. Ronald Micura

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208167

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      The complex class of cobalamin-sensitive riboswitches use a “kissing loop” to regulate gene expression. The molecular details of the recognition and folding mode of this riboswitch have been revealed by recent X-ray structures. These insights, together with the identification of RNA polymerase pause sites during transcription, have resulted in a more complete understanding of the response mechanism. AdoCbl=adenosylcobalamin.

    2. C[BOND]H Arylation

      Nickel-Catalyzed Decarbonylative C[BOND]H Coupling Reactions: A Strategy for Preparing Bis(heteroaryl) Backbones (pages 1878–1880)

      Dr. Arkaitz Correa, Dr. Josep Cornella and Dr. Ruben Martin

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208843

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      Activation à la carte: The direct arylation of heteroarenes was accomplished by employing aromatic esters as effective coupling partners under nickel catalysis (see scheme; Z=O, S). The key process implies an unconventional and unprecedent Ni-catalyzed decarbonylative coupling utilizing cost-efficient nickel catalysts.

  9. Minireview

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Energy Storage

      Nanostructured Electrodes for High-Performance Pseudocapacitors (pages 1882–1889)

      Dr. Qi Lu, Prof. Dr. Jingguang G. Chen and Prof.Dr. John Q Xiao

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203201

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      Three key parameters determine the performance of nanostructured electrodes for pseudocapacitor applications: pore structure, conductivity, and crystallinity. These parameters determine the utilization of electrode materials, especially at high power densities. Future progress can be seen in developing techniques that can simultaneously tailor those parameters and also be able to facilitate electrode production at large scales.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Synthetic Methods

      Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Allylic Alcohols and Derivatives and their Applications in Organic Synthesis (pages 1890–1932)

      Dr. Alexandre Lumbroso, Dr. Michael L. Cooke and Prof. Dr. Bernhard Breit

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201204579

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      Highly versatile: Allylic alcohols represent an important class of chiral building blocks for organic synthesis. This Review addresses the plethora of methods developed for the catalytic asymmetric synthesis of enantioenriched allylic alcohols and their many applications in further synthesis, including of natural products.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Bio-Nanomaterials

      Gold Nanorods: Controlling Their Surface Chemistry and Complete Detoxification by a Two-Step Place Exchange (pages 1934–1938)

      Calum Kinnear, Dr. Hervé Dietsch, Dr. Martin J. D. Clift, Carola Endes, Prof. Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser and Prof. Alke Petri-Fink

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208568

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      Surface functionalization: Complete detoxification of gold nanorods was achieved by manipulating the position in the stability map between surface-adsorbing polyethylene glycol (PEG) and destabilizing ethanol (see picture). This robust procedure complements studies related to the effects of shape when contemplating the nanoparticle–cell interaction.

    2. Ring-Closing Metathesis

      Molybdenum-Based Complexes with Two Aryloxides and a Pentafluoroimido Ligand: Catalysts for Efficient Z-Selective Synthesis of a Macrocyclic Trisubstituted Alkene by Ring-Closing Metathesis (pages 1939–1943)

      Dr. Chenbo Wang, Dr. Fredrik Haeffner, Prof. Richard R. Schrock and Prof. Amir H. Hoveyda

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209180

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      Olefin metathesis catalysts for controlling the formation of trisubstituted macrocyclic Z alkenes have been developed. The most effective complexes are Mo alkylidenes with a pentafluorophenylimido group and two large aryloxide ligands. The macrocyclic lactone precursor to anticancer agents epothilones B and D is obtained in 73 % yield and 91 % Z selectivity in less than 6 hours at room temperature.

    3. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Solvent-Dependent Host–Guest Chemistry of an Fe8L12 Cubic Capsule (pages 1944–1948)

      Colm Browne, Simon Brenet, Dr. Jack K. Clegg and Dr. Jonathan R. Nitschke

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208740

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      Cubes: The rational design of a simple set of organic subcomponents led to the formation of a M8L1216+ cubic capsule upon their self-assembly with FeII ions. By altering the length of alkyl chains on these subcomponents, the solubility of the assembled structures was greatly increased in apolar solvents, such as cyclohexane, and the structures displayed solvent-dependent host–guest interactions.

    4. Heterometallic Complexes

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      Directed Synthesis of {Mn18Cu6} Heterometallic Complexes (pages 1949–1952)

      Dr. Victoria A. Milway, Dr. Floriana Tuna, Andrew R. Farrell, Laura E. Sharp, Prof. Simon Parsons and Dr. Mark Murrie

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208781

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      A two-step method for the directed synthesis of high-nuclearity MnIII-MnII-CuII heterometallic transition metal complexes is described. The synthesis starts from a preformed copper(II) complex to trap an inner hexacapped cuboctahedral manganese oxide core.

    5. Membrane Protein Activation

      Transmembrane Protein Activation Refined by Site-Specific Hydration Dynamics (pages 1953–1958)

      Sunyia Hussain, Dr. John M. Franck and Prof. Songi Han

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206147

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      Proteins on film: The Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization method resolves hydration dynamics to an unprecedented level of detail for a transmembrane protein surface. The heterogeneous hydration landscape of proteorhodopsin rearranges upon photoactivation (see picture), thus providing an insight into how water contributes to protein function even for biological systems embedded in a hydrophobic membrane.

    6. Protein Stability

      Engineering Enzyme Stability and Resistance to an Organic Cosolvent by Modification of Residues in the Access Tunnel (pages 1959–1963)

      Dr. Tana Koudelakova, Dr. Radka Chaloupkova, Dr. Jan Brezovsky, Dr. Zbynek Prokop, Dr. Eva Sebestova, Dr. Martin Hesseler, Dr. Morteza Khabiri, Maryia Plevaka, Daryna Kulik, Dr. Ivana Kuta Smatanova, Dr. Pavlina Rezacova, Dr. Rudiger Ettrich, Prof. Uwe T. Bornscheuer and Prof. Jiri Damborsky

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206708

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      Mutations targeting as few as four residues lining the access tunnel extended the half-life of an enzyme in 40 % dimethyl sulfoxide from minutes to weeks and increased its melting temperature by 19 °C. Protein crystallography and molecular dynamics revealed that the tunnel residue packing is a key determinant of protein stability and the active-site accessibility for cosolvent molecules (red dots).

    7. Sodium-Ion Batteries

      A Superior Low-Cost Cathode for a Na-Ion Battery (pages 1964–1967)

      Long Wang, Yuhao Lu, Jue Liu, Maowen Xu, Jinguang Cheng, Dawei Zhang and Prof. John B. Goodenough

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206854

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      Sodium manganese hexacyanoferrates (NMHFCs) synthesized in aqueous solution at room temperature show high reversible capacity and outstanding rate capability as cathodes for a rechargeable sodium-ion battery (SIB). Earth-abundant elements and a low-cost synthesis route make these NMHFCs promising cathodes for SIBs, independent of natural lithium sources.

    8. Supramolecular Helices

      Assembly of Helicene-Capped N,P,N,P,N-Helicands within CuI Helicates: Impacting Chiroptical Properties by Ligand–Ligand Charge Transfer (pages 1968–1972)

      Dr. Volodimir Vreshch, Mehdi El Sayed Moussa, Dr. Brigitte Nohra, Dr. Monika Srebro, Dr. Nicolas Vanthuyne, Prof. Christian Roussel, Prof. Jochen Autschbach, Dr. Jeanne Crassous, Dr. Christophe Lescop and Prof. Régis Réau

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207251

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      Combining helicate and helicene chemistry: Pentadentate phosphole-pyridine helicands (see scheme) coordinated to CuI or AgI centers afford configurationally stable double-stranded helicates bearing multiple bridging-phosphane coordination modes. Similarly enantiomerically pure helicene-grafted helicands afford enantiopure helicates.

    9. Molecular Dynamics

      Self-Assembled Water Molecules as a Functional Valve for a High-Pressure Nanocontainer (pages 1973–1976)

      H. Y. Chen, D. Y. Sun, X. G. Gong and Zhi-Feng Liu

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207463

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      Carbon nanotubes: The end section of a carbon nanotube, cut by acid treatment, contains hydrophilic oxygen groups, around which water molecules can assemble to block the entry of the tube. Hydrogen of pressures up to 10 000 bar can be locked inside the tube by such an “aqueous valve” (see picture).

    10. Surface Chemistry

      Coverage-Induced Hydrogen Transfer on ZnO Surfaces: From Ideal to Real Systems (pages 1977–1981)

      Dr. Heshmat Noei, Dr. Federico Gallino, Lanying Jin, Dr. Jianli Zhao, Prof. Dr. Cristiana Di Valentin and Dr. Yuemin Wang

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207566

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      Deprotonating a base: High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and ultrahigh-vacuum infrared spectroscopy have been used to determine that high surface coverage can induce proton transfer from adsorbed ammonia to surface oxygen atoms on both single crystals and nanoparticles of ZnO (see picture; Zn blue sticks, O red, N blue spheres, H yellow). These observations are supported by DFT calculations.

    11. Composite Materials

      Size-Dependent Structural Distortions in One-Dimensional Nanostructures (pages 1982–1985)

      Dr. Michael D. Anderson, Prof. Colby L. Heideman, Dr. Qiyin Lin, Dr. Mary Smeller, Dr. Robert Kokenyesi, Dr. Andrew A. Herzing, Dr. Ian M. Anderson, Prof. Douglas A. Keszler, Dr. Paul Zschack and Prof. David C. Johnson

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207825

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      Inorganic nanocrystals: The structures of the compounds [(PbSe)1.00]m(MoSe2)n and [(PbSe)0.99]m(WSe2)n (m1 and n≤5) were investigated using X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy, which revealed a pairing distortion of the PbSe component that is dependent on m, the thickness of the PbSe layers, but independent of n, the thickness of the dichalcogenide.

    12. Hydrophobic Gels

      Facile Synthesis of Marshmallow-like Macroporous Gels Usable under Harsh Conditions for the Separation of Oil and Water (pages 1986–1989)

      Gen Hayase, Dr. Kazuyoshi Kanamori, Dr. Masashi Fukuchi, Prof. Hironori Kaji and Prof. Kazuki Nakanishi

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207969

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      Soaking up s'more: Marshmallow-like flexible gels synthesized from organoalkoxysilanes by a facile process show superior oil/water separation properties. The gels are superhydrophobic and can be used to remove organic compounds from water through absorption; they can then be recovered by squeezing them out of the gel, as if it were a sponge. The gel retains flexibility over a wide temperature range, even in liquid nitrogen (see photo).

    13. Structure Elucidation

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Refined Distances Between Paramagnetic Centers of a Multi-Copper Nitrite Reductase Determined by Pulsed EPR (iDEER) Spectroscopy (pages 1990–1993)

      Dr. Jessica H. van Wonderen, Dorota N. Kostrz, Prof. Christopher Dennison and Dr. Fraser MacMillan

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208166

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      A new pulse sequence: The distances between copper sites of the homotrimeric Cu-containing nitrite reductase were determined by EPR spectroscopy (see picture). By exploiting the differences in the electron spin relaxation of the Cu ions, a filtering technique allows the selective removal of distances from a complex distance distribution. This filter technique combined with the PELDOR experiment promises to be useful for distance mapping by EPR spectroscopy.

    14. Microfluidic Assembly

      Continuous Multistep Microfluidic Assisted Assembly of Fluorescent, Plasmonic, and Magnetic Nanostructures (pages 1994–1997)

      Dr. Natalia Hassan, Prof. Valérie Cabuil and Dr. Ali Abou-Hassan

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208324

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      Lab-on-a-particle: Fluorescent, plasmonic, and magnetic SiO2*-Au-γ-Fe2O3 nanostructures were assembled under continuous flow using two microfluidic devices (μR1 and μR2) connected in series. After assembling the SiO2*-Au nanostructures by electrostatic interactions, γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were attached to the structures (see picture).

    15. Self-Assembly

      Aggregation-Driven Reversible Formation of Conjugated Polymers in Water (pages 1998–2001)

      Dainius Janeliunas, Dr. Patrick van Rijn, Dr. Job Boekhoven, Dr. Christophe B. Minkenberg, Prof. Dr. Jan H. van Esch and Dr. Rienk Eelkema

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209004

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      Come together: Self-assembly can drive the formation of conjugated imine polymers in water, and stabilization of otherwise unstable imine bonds is used to obtain fully π-conjugated, responsive dynamic covalent polyimines in aqueous environments. Both the optical properties and the aggregate morphology can be tuned by varying the aromatic monomers.

    16. Hydrogenases

      The Structural Plasticity of the Proximal [4Fe3S] Cluster is Responsible for the O2 Tolerance of Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenases (pages 2002–2006)

      Dr. Jean-Marie Mouesca, Dr. Juan C. Fontecilla-Camps and Dr. Patricia Amara

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209063

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      The main difference between O2-sensitive and O2-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenases is the plasticity of the proximal [4Fe3S] cluster in the latter hydrogenase (see scheme). Deprotonation of a conserved glutamate residue initiates the movement of the iron atom, resulting in its binding to the amide nitrogen atom of one of the two supernumerary cysteine ligands and superoxidation of the proximal cluster.

    17. Nanomaterials

      Two-Way Nanopore Sensing of Sequence-Specific Oligonucleotides and Small-Molecule Targets in Complex Matrices Using Integrated DNA Supersandwich Structures (pages 2007–2011)

      Nannan Liu, Yanan Jiang, Yahong Zhou, Prof. Fan Xia, Dr. Wei Guo and Prof. Lei Jiang

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209162

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      Pore me another one: Sub-nanomolar sequence-specific DNA detection and sub-micromolar small-molecule (ATP) detection was shown by way of self-assembly and disassembly of DNA superstructures within solid-state nanopores (see scheme). These DNA structures provide a built-in amplification mechanism to increase the signal strength and sensitivity. This sensor was also shown to work within complex mixtures, such as mammalian serum.

    18. Molecular Beacons

      DNA Micelle Flares for Intracellular mRNA Imaging and Gene Therapy (pages 2012–2016)

      Tao Chen, Cuichen Sam Wu, Elizabeth Jimenez, Prof. Dr. Zhi Zhu, Joshua G. Dajac, Dr. Mingxu You, Da Han, Prof. Dr. Xiaobing Zhang and Prof. Dr. Weihong Tan

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209440

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      Lighting the way with DNA: Molecular beacon micelle flares (MBMFs), based on self-assembly of diacyllipid–molecular-beacon conjugates (L-MBs; see figure), have been developed for combined mRNA detection and gene therapy. These MBMFs were shown to inhibit a model gene in vitro and decrease the viability of cancer cells in culture.

    19. Electron Transfer

      Charge Dynamics in A Donor–Acceptor Covalent Organic Framework with Periodically Ordered Bicontinuous Heterojunctions (pages 2017–2021)

      Shangbin Jin, Xuesong Ding, Xiao Feng, Mustafa Supur, Dr. Ko Furukawa, Seiya Takahashi, Dr. Matthew Addicoat, Prof. Dr. Mohamed E. El-Khouly, Prof. Dr. Toshikazu Nakamura, Prof. Dr. Stephan Irle, Prof. Dr. Shunichi Fukuzumi, Dr. Atsushi Nagai and Prof. Dr. Donglin Jiang

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209513

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      Light works: Mechanistic insights into the photochemical events and charge dynamics of a donor–acceptor covalent organic framework were given by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy and time-resolved electron spin resonance spectroscopy (see picture). The organic framework triggers ultrafast electron transfer and enables long-distance charge delocalization and exceptional long-term charge separation.

    20. Nanotechnology

      High-Yield Synthesis of Silver Nanoclusters Protected by DNA Monomers and DFT Prediction of their Photoluminescence Properties (pages 2022–2026)

      Xuan Yang, Linfeng Gan, Lei Han, Prof. Erkang Wang and Prof. Jin Wang

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205929

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      Basic evidence is provided for the benefits of using cytosine-rich DNA strands as scaffolds for fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The DFT-calculated fluorescence spectra of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) protected by DNA monomers (dC, dA, dT, and dG) were in good agreement with the experimentally obtained spectra (see picture), showing that only the use of cytosine-rich DNA strands as scaffolds gives fluorescent nanoclusters.

    21. Synthetic Methods

      Complex Bioactive Alkaloid-Type Polycycles through Efficient Catalytic Asymmetric Multicomponent Aza-Diels–Alder Reaction of Indoles with Oxetane as Directing Group (pages 2027–2031)

      Zhilong Chen, Beilei Wang, Zhaobin Wang, Prof. Dr. Guangyu Zhu and Prof. Dr. Jianwei Sun

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206481

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      Starting from three achiral compounds, the title reaction provides rapid access to a variety of molecules that contain indoline, tetrahydroquinoline, and tetrahydroisoquinoline moieties (see scheme). The process features the efficient formation of multiple new bonds and chiral centers, excellent stereoselectivity, oxetane desymmetrization, and easy product purification through filtration.

    22. Synthetic Methodology

      Lewis Acid Catalyzed Formal Intramolecular [3+2] Cross-Cycloaddition of Cyclopropane 1,1-Diesters with Alkenes: General and Efficient Strategy for Construction of Bridged [n.2.1] Carbocyclic Skeletons (pages 2032–2037)

      Dr. Wenju Zhu, Jie Fang, Yong Liu, Jun Ren and Prof. Zhongwen Wang

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206484

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      Carbon bridges: The title reaction has been successfully developed, and applied to the total synthesis of the tetracyclic diterpenoids phyllocladanol and phyllocladene. The method provides an efficient, general, and conceptually new strategy for the construction of structurally complex and diverse [n.2.1] carbocyclic skeletons (see scheme).

    23. Microporous Materials

      Enhancement of Activity and Selectivity in Acid-Catalyzed Reactions by Dealuminated Hierarchical Zeolites (pages 2038–2041)

      Dr. Petr Sazama, Prof. Dr. Zdenek Sobalik, Dr. Jiri Dedecek, Dr. Ivo Jakubec, Prof. Dr. Vasile Parvulescu, Dr. Zdenek Bastl, Dr. Jiri Rathousky and Dr. Hana Jirglova

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201206557

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      Shape-selective reactions: Highly selective catalysts are obtained by alkaline and subsequent acid leaching of conventionally prepared zeolites. Active sites that are located in the shape-selective environment of micropores and accessible through mesopores (see picture) provide high selectivity and activity in acid-catalyzed reactions.

    24. Main-Group Elements

      2,2-Bipyridine Complexes of Antimony: Sequential Fluoride Ion Abstraction from SbF3 by Exploiting the Fluoride Ion Affinity of Me3Si+ (pages 2042–2045)

      Saurabh S. Chitnis, Prof. Neil Burford and Dr. Michael J. Ferguson

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207529

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      Gas driven: A high-yield approach to sequential fluoride ion abstraction from SbF3 in the presence of 2,2′-bipyridine gives a series of complexes containing [SbF2]+, [SbF]2+, and [Sb]3+ (see figure) acceptors. The thermodynamically favorable rapid elimination of gaseous Me3SiF provides a potentially general approach to enhance the Lewis acidity and coordination chemistry of p-block centers.

    25. Asymmetric Synthesis

      Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Isoquinolinium Salts Catalyzed by Chiral Iridium Complexes: Direct Synthesis for Optically Active 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinolines (pages 2046–2050)

      Atsuhiro Iimuro, Kenta Yamaji, Dr. Sathaiah Kandula, Takuto Nagano, Dr. Yusuke Kita and Prof. Dr. Kazushi Mashima

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207748

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The salt makes the difference: In the presence of a chiral iridium catalyst, 1- and 3-substituted as well as 1,3-disubstituted isoquinolinium salts can be hydrogenated, giving the corresponding 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines in high enantiomeric excess after a basic workup (see scheme). This protocol is applicable to the synthesis of the prescription drug solifenacin.

    26. Carbon Materials

      Assembly and Magnetic Bistability of Mn3O4 Nanoparticles Encapsulated in Hollow Carbon Nanofibers (pages 2051–2054)

      Maria del Carmen Gimenez-Lopez, Alessandro La Torre, Dr. Michael W. Fay, Prof. Dr. Paul D. Brown and Prof. Dr. Andrei N. Khlobystov

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207855

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Effects of confinement: Magnetic nanoparticles are encapsulated within hollow carbon nanofibers. The density and orientation of the guest Mn3O4 nanoparticles depend crucially on the internal structure of the host carbon nanocontainer, which enables tuning functional magnetic properties of the composite material.

    27. Ferroelectric Materials

      Light-Induced Ferroelectricity in Bioinspired Self-Assembled Diphenylalanine Nanotubes/Microtubes (pages 2055–2059)

      Zhixing Gan, Prof. Xinglong Wu, Xiaobin Zhu and Jiancang Shen

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207992

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spontaneous polarization reversal: Saturated polarization–electric field loops with a concave region were obtained from diphenylalanine peptide microtubes (FF PMTs) by combining the action of light during the hysteresis loop measurements (see picture; Ec=coercive field). The existence of ferroelectricity in FF peptide nanostructures was shown experimentally. The ferroelectricity of the FF PMTs is expected to extend their applications to biomedicine and microelectronics.

    28. Synthetic Methods

      Se-Phenyl Prop-2-eneselenoate: An Ethylene Equivalent for Diels–Alder Reactions (pages 2060–2062)

      Prof. Michael E. Jung, Felix Perez, Dr. Collin F. Regan, Dr. Sung Wook Yi and Dr. Quentin Perron

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208294

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reactive: Se-phenyl prop-2-eneselenoate (phenyl selenoacrylate) 2, readily prepared from acryloyl chloride, is a very reactive dienophile in Diels–Alder reactions, and more reactive than acrylates. Its cycloadducts 3 with many dienes 1 can be easily reduced to the hydrocarbons 4 under radical conditions. This process works even in cases where there is an adjacent group that can be easily eliminated, e.g., an allylic ether.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Se-Phenyl Prop-2-eneselenoate: An Ethylene Equivalent for Diels–Alder Reactions

      Vol. 52, Issue 46, 11963, Article first published online: 8 NOV 2013

    29. C[BOND]H Activation

      Rhodium(I)-Catalyzed Redox-Economic Cross-Coupling of Carboxylic Acids with Arenes Directed by N-Containing Groups (pages 2063–2067)

      Fei Pan, Zhi-Quan Lei, Hui Wang, Hu Li, Prof. Dr. Jian Sun and Prof. Dr. Zhang-Jie Shi

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208362

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Marked absent: The pseudo-oxidative decarboxylative coupling of carboxylic acids and arenes using rhodium(I) in the absence of an oxidant is described. The study offers a new convenient method for the construction of Cmath image[BOND]Cmath image/Cmath image bonds.

    30. Photochromism

      Azobenzene Photoswitches for Staudinger–Bertozzi Ligation (pages 2068–2072)

      Dr. Wiktor Szymański, Dr. Bian Wu, Claudia Poloni, Prof. Dr. Dick B. Janssen and Prof. Dr. Ben L. Feringa

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208596

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Click to switch: A novel family of azobenzenes containing residues needed for aqueous Staudinger–Bertozzi ligation to azides was designed (see scheme). The resulting photochromes show stable and reversible switching behavior in water, with a photostationary state (PSS) of up to 95:5 cis/trans. Applications in model systems include the modification of azide-bearing surfaces and proteins.

    31. Chirality Transfer

      Chirality Transfer in a Methyl Lactate–Ammonia Complex Observed by Matrix-Isolation Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy (pages 2073–2076)

      Dr. Christian Merten and Prof. Dr. Yunjie Xu

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208685

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hand-me-down chirality: Chirality transfer from methyl lactate to ammonia has been investigated and the mirror-imaged vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of a pair of enantiomers of a flexible chiral molecular complex are presented. The distinct VCD spectral pattern provides decisive evidence for the existence of two dominant and subtly different conformers of the complex.

    32. Electrochemistry

      Anodic Formation of Self-Organized Cobalt Oxide Nanoporous Layers (pages 2077–2081)

      Dr. Chong-Yong Lee, Kiyoung Lee and Prof. Dr. Patrik Schmuki

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208793

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoporous materials: High-aspect-ratio, ordered porous Co3O4 layers were formed by self-organizing anodization of a cobalt substrate and subsequent annealing. The key for successful formation of such layers is to sufficiently suppress competing oxygen evolution during anodization. The aligned Co3O4 channel layers behave as a highly efficient water oxidation catalyst (see picture).

    33. C[BOND]H Functionalization

      Metal-Free Cross-Dehydrogenative Coupling of Heterocycles with Aldehydes (pages 2082–2086)

      Dr. Kiran Matcha and Dr. Andrey P. Antonchick

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208851

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A range of heterocyclic compounds were synthesized by a novel, metal-free cross-dehydrogenative coupling between heterocycles and aldehydes under mild reaction conditions that are not sensitive to moisture. The products are formed smoothly and regioselectively at room temperature by a hypervalent iodine mediated transformation. This method has a broad substrate scope and was used in the highly efficient, one-step synthesis of natural products.

    34. Natural Product Synthesis

      Total Syntheses of Lactonamycin and Lactonamycin Z with Late-Stage A-Ring Formation and Glycosylation (pages 2087–2091)

      Satoshi Adachi, Kana Watanabe, Yusuke Iwata, Shunsuke Kameda, Yoshihito Miyaoka, Masao Onozuka, Ryo Mitsui, Prof. Dr. Yoko Saikawa and Prof. Dr. Masaya Nakata

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209205

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The highly oxygenated polyketide antibiotics, lactonamycin and lactonamycin Z were synthesized. The BCDEF ring system was constructed by a cycloaddition and a palladium-catalyzed cyclization and a Bischler–Napieralski-type cyclization was used for the formation of the A ring. The glycosylation of the aglycon with the appropriate sugar gave lactonamycin and lactonamycin Z.

    35. Difluoromethylation

      Synthesis of Difluoromethyl Ethers with Difluoromethyltriflate (pages 2092–2095)

      Patrick S. Fier and Prof. John F. Hartwig

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209250

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      The difluoromethylation of phenols with a simple, non-ozone-depleting reagent is described. The reaction occurs within minutes at room temperature with exceptional functional-group tolerance, which makes possible tandem processes for the conversion of arylboronic acids, aryl halides, and arenes to difluoromethyl ethers.

    36. Synthetic Methods

      Ketene Three-Component Reaction: A Metal-Free Multicomponent Approach to Stereodefined Captodative Olefins (pages 2096–2099)

      Dr. Andrea Basso, Prof. Luca Banfi, Dipl.-Chem. Silvia Garbarino and Prof. Renata Riva

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209399

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three in the spotlight: Irradiation promotes a general, three-component reaction between diazoketones, carboxylic acids, and isocyanides. The highly functionalized captodative olefin products of this reaction are versatile synthons for organic synthesis.

    37. Terpene Biosynthesis

      A Detailed View of 2-Methylisoborneol Biosynthesis (pages 2100–2104)

      Nelson L. Brock, Srinivasa R. Ravella, Prof. Dr. Stefan Schulz and Dr. Jeroen S. Dickschat

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209173

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Odor of earth: Several homomonoterpenes were identified in actinomycetes that produce 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB, see scheme, which is responsible for an earthy odor in drinking water). Their occurrence clarifies the 2-MIB pathway, because they are derived from cationic intermediates that are otherwise difficult to detect. A highly sensitive method using feeding experiments with 13C-labeled precursors gives detailed insights into 2-MIB biosynthesis.

    38. Biradicaloids

      An Arsenic–Nitrogen Biradicaloid: Synthesis, Properties, and Reactivity (pages 2105–2108)

      Dr. Serhiy Demeshko, Christian Godemann, René Kuzora, Prof. Dr. Axel Schulz and Dr. Alexander Villinger

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208360

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      As you like it: The first reported four-membered heterocycle [As(μ-NTer)]2, which can be referred to as a high-temperature stable biradicaloid, is formed, when a bulky substituent, such as the terphenyl group, prevents dimerization. Addition reactions of elemental sulfur and selenium (see scheme) as well as the double bond of CS2 demonstrate that [As(μ-NTer)]2 has radical-type behavior.

    39. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Nitrogen-Doped sp2-Hybridized Carbon as a Superior Catalyst for Selective Oxidation (pages 2109–2113)

      Yongjun Gao, Dr. Gang Hu, Dr. Jun Zhong, Prof. Dr. Zujin Shi, Yuanshuai Zhu, Prof. Dr. Dang Sheng Su, Prof. Dr. Jianguo Wang, Prof. Dr. Xinhe Bao and Prof. Dr. Ding Ma

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207918

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thanks to nitrogen introduced into the layered carbon framework of graphite, the chemical reactivity of the carbon atoms was increased. N-doped graphitic catalysts generate reactive oxygen species and display excellent activity for hydrocarbon activation even at room temperature.

    40. Surface Catalysis

      The Role of Palladium Dynamics in the Surface Catalysis of Coupling Reactions (pages 2114–2117)

      Dr. Lidong Shao, Dr. Bingsen Zhang, Dr. Wei Zhang, Dr. Sung You Hong, Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl and Dr. Dang Sheng Su

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207362

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      More than scratching the surface: The mechanism by which supported Pd nanoparticles (PdNPs) catalyze cross-coupling reactions is the subject of debate. The changes in supported PdNPs during coupling reactions are studied by exploiting modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as support materials. After catalysis, CNTs with scratched walls and PdNPs with surface crystalline distortions were discovered, offering insights into the catalytic mechanism.

    41. Biosynthesis

      Structures of Fluoro, Amino, and Thiol Inhibitors Bound to the [Fe4S4] Protein IspH (pages 2118–2121)

      Dr. Ingrid Span, Dr. Ke Wang, Dr. Weixue Wang, Prof. Dr. Johann Jauch, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Wolfgang Eisenreich, Prof. Dr. Adelbert Bacher, Prof. Dr. Eric Oldfield and Prof. Dr. Michael Groll

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201208469

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The iron–sulfur protein IspH catalyzes a key step in isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria and malaria parasites. Crystal structures of IspH complexed with three substrate analogues reveal their mode of binding and suggest new routes to inhibitor design.

    42. Magnetic Zintl Phases

      Field-Induced Inversion of the Magnetoresistive Effect in the Zintl Phase Eu5+xMg18−xSi13 (x=2.2) (pages 2122–2125)

      Adam Slabon, Dipl.-Ing. Christian Mensing, Dr. Christof Kubata, Dr. Eduardo Cuervo-Reyes and Prof. Dr. Reinhard Nesper

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201209036

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Watch the signs! The new Zintl phase Eu5+xMg18−xSi13 (x=2.2) displays a negative as well as a positive magnetoresistive effect depending on the temperature. The maximal value of the magnetoresistivity of 92 % occurs at 100 K and 9 T (see plot).

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