Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 53 Issue 23

June 2, 2014

Volume 53, Issue 23

Pages 5713–6006

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Single Crystals Popping Under UV Light: A Photosalient Effect Triggered by a [2+2] Cycloaddition Reaction (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 23/2014) (page 5713)

      Raghavender Medishetty, Dr. Ahmad Husain, Zhaozhi Bai, Tomče Runčevski, Prof. Dr. Robert E. Dinnebier, Prof. Dr. Panče Naumov and Prof. Dr. Jagadese J. Vittal

      Version of Record online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201403852

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The self-propulsion of single crystals of three Zn(II) complexes under UV light is described by P. Naumov, J. J. Vittal et al. in their Communication on page 5907 ff. This visually impressive dynamic behavior is a consequence of the accumulation and sudden release of strain created by crystal expansion following the formation of 1D coordination polymers by a [2+2] cycloaddition reaction. Understanding this effect, which is mechanistically analogous to the bursting of popcorn in a hot pan, may help in the design of new light-driven mechanical actuators.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: A Synergistic Capture Strategy for Enhanced Detection and Elimination of Bacteria (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 23/2014) (page 5714)

      Dr. Yong-Qiang Li, Bowen Zhu, Dr. Yuangang Li, Wan Ru Leow, Rubayn Goh, Dr. Bing Ma, Prof. Eileen Fong, Dr. Mark Tang and Prof. Xiaodong Chen

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201401147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Efficient bacterial capture was achieved through a method based on the synergistic effect of surface nanotopography and surface chemistry on bacterial attachment. In their Communication on page 5837 ff., X. Chen and co-workers show that packed silicon nanowires functionalized with bacteria-binding molecules show enhanced capture efficiency compared to surface-modified flat silicon and enable highly sensitive detection and efficient elimination of bacterial pathogens.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Bio-Inspired Photonic-Crystal Microchip for Fluorescent Ultratrace Detection (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 23/2014) (page 6007)

      Dr. Jue Hou, Dr. Huacheng Zhang, Dr. Qiang Yang, Prof. Dr. Mingzhu Li, Prof. Dr. Yanlin Song and Prof. Dr. Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201401132

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A photonic-crystal microchip with a hydrophilic–hydrophobic micropattern, which was inspired by the fog-collecting structure on the back of the Stenocara beetle, was fabricated by inkjet printing. In their Communication on page 5791 ff., M. Li, Y. Song, et al. show that the photonic-crystal microchip can enrich a highly diluted analyte by wettability differences and enhance the fluorescence by the stopband effect of the photonic crystal.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Molecular Ionization from Carbon Nanotube Paper (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 23/2014) (page 6008)

      Rahul Narayanan, Depanjan Sarkar, Prof. R. Graham Cooks and Prof. Thalappil Pradeep

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201401148

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A piece of paper that is impregnated with multi-walled or single-walled carbon nanotubes generates ions from diverse analytes at voltages as low as 3 V, as T. Pradeep et al. show in their Communication on page 5936 ff. This miniaturized ion source is held in front of a mass-spectrometer inlet to collect the mass spectrum. Common pesticides from the surface of an orange, active molecules from tablets, and a variety of analytes, such as amino acids, can been characterized.

  2. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Frontispiece: Aza[6]helicene Platinum Complexes: Chirality Control of cis–trans Isomerism

      Daniele Mendola, Dr. Nidal Saleh, Dr. Nicolas Vanthuyne, Prof. Christian Roussel, Dr. Loïc Toupet, Dr. Franca Castiglione, Prof. Tullio Caronna, Prof. Andrea Mele and Dr. Jeanne Crassous

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201482371

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In their Communication on page 5786 ff., J. Crassous and co-workers show how cistrans isomerism in [PtIICl2(4-aza[6]helicene)PPh3] is controlled by the racemic and enantiopure forms of the 4-aza[6]helicene ligand.

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Metal–Organic Frameworks—The New Jack of All Trades for (Inorganic) Chemists (pages 5716–5717)

      Prof. Dr. Roland A. Fischer

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201402580

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “… Today, the research contexts in which the work on MOFs are, or will be placed, are enormously diverse and multilingual, and the technical backgrounds and motives of those involved develop equally as diversely, sometimes with a very distant reference to the original. Therefore, distinctions and care in the use of scientific language and expression are important. …” Read more in the Editorial by Roland A. Fischer.

  4. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
  5. Flashback

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. 50 Years Ago ... (page 5728)

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201404978

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. Copper-Mediated Cross-Coupling Reactions. Edited by Gwilherm Evano and Nicolas Blanchard. (pages 5738–5739)

      Frederic W. Patureau and Lukas J. Gooßen

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201403795

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2013. 840 pp., hardcover, € 156.00.—ISBN 978-1118060452

  8. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. Insung S. Choi (page 5740)

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310974

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “I admire those who do what they really want to do. I advise my students to read as many research articles as possible and get a big picture …” This and more about Insung S. Choi can be found on page 5740.

  9. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
  10. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. Kenneth Wade (19322014) (pages 5742–5743)

      Prof. Dr. Catherine E. Housecroft

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201404227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  11. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. Cycloaddition

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The Hexadehydro-Diels–Alder Reaction: A New Chapter in Aryne Chemistry (pages 5746–5749)

      Catherine Holden (née Hall) and Prof. Michael F. Greaney

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201402405

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arynes are now accessible through the [4+2] Diels–Alder cycloaddition of triynes, a process that captures all atoms of the starting material in the aryne product. The atom economy and reagent-free conditions provide a new dimension to aryne chemistry and should enable exciting developments in the study and application of arynes in synthesis.

  12. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. Drug Discovery

      Accessing New Chemical Entities through Microfluidic Systems (pages 5750–5758)

      Dr. Tiago Rodrigues, Dr. Petra Schneider and Prof. Dr. Gisbert Schneider

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400988

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Go with the flow: Continuous flow reactors are increasingly used in synthetic organic chemistry. This enabling technology to access innovative chemotypes and efficiently explore chemical space in an automated manner is being adapted for chemical biology and drug discovery research. This Minireview describes the current status of this technique and provides an overview of key recent milestones.

  13. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. Natural Products

      Saxitoxin (pages 5760–5784)

      Arun P. Thottumkara, Dr. William H. Parsons and Prof. J. Du Bois

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308235

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      … and the waters that were in the river were turned to blood. And the fish that were in the river died (Exodus 7:20-21). Its pharmacological effects having been documented since antiquity, saxitoxin holds a venerable place in the annals of natural product science. An account of both the chemistry and chemical biology of this most fascinating natural product is presented.

  14. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispiece
    4. Editorial
    5. Graphical Abstract
    6. Flashback
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Author Profile
    10. News
    11. Obituary
    12. Highlight
    13. Minireview
    14. Review
    15. Communications
    1. Chirality in Complexes

      Aza[6]helicene Platinum Complexes: Chirality Control of cis–trans Isomerism (pages 5786–5790)

      Daniele Mendola, Dr. Nidal Saleh, Dr. Nicolas Vanthuyne, Prof. Christian Roussel, Dr. Loïc Toupet, Dr. Franca Castiglione, Prof. Tullio Caronna, Prof. Andrea Mele and Dr. Jeanne Crassous

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201401004

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Controlled by the ligand: The cis and trans isomerism in the complex [PtIICl2(4-aza[6]helicene)PPh3] is unexpectedly controlled by the racemic and enantiopure forms of the starting 4-aza[6]helicene ligand.

    2. Photonic Crystals

      Bio-Inspired Photonic-Crystal Microchip for Fluorescent Ultratrace Detection (pages 5791–5795)

      Dr. Jue Hou, Dr. Huacheng Zhang, Dr. Qiang Yang, Prof. Dr. Mingzhu Li, Prof. Dr. Yanlin Song and Prof. Dr. Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400686

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultratrace detection: Inspired by the fog-collecting structure on the back of the Stenocara beetle, a photonic-crystal (PC) microchip with a hydrophilic–hydrophobic micropattern was fabricated by inkjet printing. This PC microchip can enrich an analyte by wettability differences and enhance the fluorescence by the PC stop band effect (see picture).

    3. Natural Products

      Suffrutines A and B: A Pair of Z/E Isomeric Indolizidine Alkaloids from the Roots of Flueggea suffruticosa (pages 5796–5799)

      Zhen-Long Wu, Dr. Bing-Xin Zhao, Dr. Xiao-Jun Huang, Gen-Yun Tang, Dr. Lei Shi, Prof. Dr. Ren-Wang Jiang, Xin Liu, Dr. Ying Wang and Prof. Dr. Wen-Cai Ye

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The discovery of a pair of novel indolizidine alkaloids, having a unique and highly conjugated C20 backbone, from the roots of Flueggea suffruticosa adds a new class to the indolizidine alkaloid family. Furthermore, they were shown to be Z/E isomers, interconvertible by light, and the trans,trans form exhibits potent activity for regulating the morphology of Neuro-2a cells.

    4. Heterocycles

      On-Top π-Stacking of Quasiplanar Molecules in Hole-Transporting Materials: Inducing Anisotropic Carrier Mobility in Amorphous Films (pages 5800–5804)

      Prof. Dr. Atsushi Wakamiya, Hidetaka Nishimura, Dr. Tatsuya Fukushima, Furitsu Suzuki, Dr. Akinori Saeki, Prof. Dr. Shu Seki, Dr. Itaru Osaka, Prof. Dr. Takahiro Sasamori, Dr. Michihisa Murata, Prof. Dr. Yasujiro Murata and Prof. Dr. Hironori Kaji

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400068

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Taking charge: Dimers of partially oxygen-bridged triarylamines that form on-top π-stacking aggregates in the crystalline state were shown to induce high levels of anisotropic charge transport in the direction of the π-stacking. Surprisingly, these compounds retained some of the face-on π-stacking even in vacuum-deposited amorphous films, thus facilitating an out-of-plane carrier mobility.

    5. Synthetic Methods

      In Situ Synthesis of Alkenyl Tetrazines for Highly Fluorogenic Bioorthogonal Live-Cell Imaging Probes (pages 5805–5809)

      Dr. Haoxing Wu, Dr. Jun Yang, Dr. Jolita Šečkutė and Prof. Neal K. Devaraj

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stitching probes together: The in situ synthesis of (E)-3-substituted 6-alkenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine derivatives through an elimination–Heck cascade reaction is reported. 24 examples of π-conjugated tetrazine derivatives are provided, including conjugated fluorescent probes that show drastic fluorescent turn-on when reacted with dienophiles. Their suitability for live-cell imaging is demonstrated. TCO=trans-cyclooctene.

    6. Gold Medicine

      A Binuclear Gold(I) Complex with Mixed Bridging Diphosphine and Bis(N-Heterocyclic Carbene) Ligands Shows Favorable Thiol Reactivity and Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis In Vivo (pages 5810–5814)

      Taotao Zou, Dr. Ching Tung Lum, Dr. Chun-Nam Lok, Dr. Wai-Pong To, Dr. Kam-Hung Low and Prof. Dr. Chi-Ming Che

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400142

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It′s in the blood: A binuclear gold(I) complex 1-PF6 is stable towards blood thiols and is a tight-binding inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). In vivo antitumor studies show 81 % inhibition of tumor growth in mice with HeLa xenografts and 62 % inhibition of highly aggressive mouse B16-F10 melanoma.

    7. Drug Delivery

      Enhanced Anticancer Efficacy by ATP-Mediated Liposomal Drug Delivery (pages 5815–5820)

      Dr. Ran Mo, Tianyue Jiang and Prof. Dr. Zhen Gu

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400268

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “Energy molecule” as a trigger: A co-delivery system consisting of both a fusogenic liposome encapsulating ATP-responsive elements and a small-molecule drug along with a liposome containing ATP was developed for ATP-triggered drug release mediated by the liposomal fusion. Directly delivering extrinsic ATP can promote the drug release from the fusogenic liposome in the acidic intracellular compartments upon pH-sensitive membrane fusion.

    8. Bioimaging | Hot Paper

      DNA Nanoflowers for Multiplexed Cellular Imaging and Traceable Targeted Drug Delivery (pages 5821–5826)

      Rong Hu, Prof. Xiaobing Zhang, Dr. Zilong Zhao, Dr. Guizhi Zhu, Dr. Tao Chen, Ting Fu and Prof. Weihong Tan

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400323

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colorful technique: A facile approach for making aptamer-conjugated FRET nanoflowers (NFs) by rolling circle replication for single-excitation multiplexed imaging and traceable targeted drug delivery was reported. NF assembly is independent of template sequences, avoiding the complicated design of DNA base-pairing in conventional nanostructure assembly.

    9. Stimulated Raman Scattering

      Live-Cell Stimulated Raman Scattering Imaging of Alkyne-Tagged Biomolecules (pages 5827–5831)

      Senlian Hong, Tao Chen, Yuntao Zhu, Ang Li, Prof. Yanyi Huang and Prof. Xing Chen

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400328

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Raman imaging: In addition to the clickable chemical reactivity, alkynes possess a unique Raman scattering within the Raman-silent region of a cell (see picture). Coupling this spectroscopic signature with Raman microscopy yields a new imaging modality beyond fluorescence and label-free microscopies.

    10. Small-Molecule Binding

      Scorpionate-Type Coordination in MFU-4l Metal–Organic Frameworks: Small-Molecule Binding and Activation upon the Thermally Activated Formation of Open Metal Sites (pages 5832–5836)

      Dmytro Denysenko, Dr. Maciej Grzywa, Dr. Jelena Jelic, Prof. Dr. Karsten Reuter and Prof. Dr. Dirk Volkmer

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310004

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On again, off again: Coordinatively unsaturated metal centers, such as zinc(II) hydride and copper(I), were generated within the MFU-4l structure (see picture). CuI-MFU-4l showed reversible chemisorption of O2, N2, and H2 with isosteric heats of adsorption of 32–53 kJ mol−1. The demonstrated hydride transfer to electrophiles and strong binding of small gas molecules indicate the potential of these metal–organic frameworks as catalytic materials.

    11. Nanotechnology

      A Synergistic Capture Strategy for Enhanced Detection and Elimination of Bacteria (pages 5837–5841)

      Dr. Yong-Qiang Li, Bowen Zhu, Dr. Yuangang Li, Wan Ru Leow, Rubayn Goh, Dr. Bing Ma, Prof. Eileen Fong, Dr. Mark Tang and Prof. Xiaodong Chen

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310135

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stuck fast: A strategy for efficient bacterial capture was developed based on the synergistic effect of surface nanotopography and surface chemistry on bacterial attachment. Packed silicon nanowires were functionalized with bacteria-binding molecules. The capture efficiency of the resultant substrate was greatly enhanced compared to surface-modified flat silicon, thus enabling highly sensitive detection and efficient elimination of bacterial pathogens.

    12. Metal–Organic Frameworks

      Azobenzene-Functionalized Metal–Organic Polyhedra for the Optically Responsive Capture and Release of Guest Molecules (pages 5842–5846)

      Dr. Jinhee Park, Dr. Lin-Bing Sun, Ying-Pin Chen, Zachary Perry and Prof. Dr. Hong-Cai Zhou

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lock in the guests, later set them free: Stimuli-responsive metal–organic polyhedra (srMOPs) functionalized with azobenzene showed UV-light-induced isomerization from insoluble srMOPs substituted with trans-azobenzene to soluble srMOPs with cis-azobenzene units; irradiation with blue light reversed this process (see picture). Guest molecules were trapped upon cis-to-trans and released upon trans-to-cis isomerization of the azobenzene units.

    13. Conjugated Materials

      Dithiolodithiole as a Building Block for Conjugated Materials (pages 5847–5851)

      Dr. Derek J. Schipper, Lionel C. H. Moh, Dr. Peter Müller and Prof. Dr. Timothy M. Swager

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310290

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A series of compounds containing the dithiolodithiole (C4S4) heterocycle has been synthesized and characterized. The properties of C4S4-based compounds are readily tunable by variation of substituents. C4S4 derivatives exhibit complimentary optical and electronic properties to the similar and widely used thiophene analogues.

    14. Photocathodes

      Aqueous-Solution Route to Zinc Telluride Films for Application to CO2 Reduction (pages 5852–5857)

      Dr. Ji-Wook Jang, Dr. Seungho Cho, Dr. Ganesan Magesh, Youn Jeong Jang, Dr. Jae Young Kim, Won Yong Kim, Prof. Jeong Kon Seo, Prof. Sungjee Kim, Prof. Kun-Hong Lee and Prof. Jae Sung Lee

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310461

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High performance without sacrifice: Zinc-blende zinc telluride (ZnTe) was directly formed on a Zn/ZnO-nanowire substrate by a simple dissolution–recrystallization mechanism without a surfactant. The ZnTe electrode was applied as a photocathode for CO2 reduction (see picture) and showed efficient and stable CO formation at −0.2–−0.7 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) without a sacrificial reagent.

    15. Titanium Traps

      Mapping of the Photoinduced Electron Traps in TiO2 by Picosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (pages 5858–5862)

      Dr. M. Hannelore Rittmann-Frank, Dr. Chris J. Milne, Dr. Jochen Rittmann, Dr. Marco Reinhard, Dr. Thomas J. Penfold and Prof. Majed Chergui

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310522

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electrons in the trap: Picosecond Ti K-edge and Ru L3-edge X-ray absorption spectra of photoexcited bare and dye-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) showed that electrons are trapped deep in the defect-rich surface shell of bare anatase TiO2, whereas injection from the dye on both anatase and amorphous NPs leads to surface trapping (see picture). In bare amorphous TiO2, trapping occurs at preexisting defects within the NP.

    16. Organic Microlasers

      Whispering-Gallery-Mode Microlaser Based on Self-Assembled Organic Single-Crystalline Hexagonal Microdisks (pages 5863–5867)

      Xuedong Wang, Dr. Qing Liao, Qinghua Kong, Yi Zhang, Zhenzhen Xu, Xiaomei Lu and Prof. Hongbing Fu

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310659

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organic microlasers: Organic hexagonal microdisks were fabricated by a facile solution self-assembly method. Whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) laser action was observed in these organic hexagonal microdisks (see picture). These microdisks contribute to the miniaturization of laser sources and integration of photonic devices.

    17. Zeolite Structures

      A Germanosilicate Structure with 11×11×12-Ring Channels Solved by Electron Crystallography (pages 5868–5871)

      Wei Hua, Hong Chen, Dr. Zheng-Bao Yu, Prof. Xiaodong Zou, Prof. Jianhua Lin and Prof. Junliang Sun

      Version of Record online: 9 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309766

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A stable germanosilicate with 3D 11×11×12 ring channels, PKU-16 (see picture), was synthesized with a simple organic structure-directing agent. Nanosized PKU-16 was structurally characterized by the new rotation electron diffraction methods. The structure of PKU-16 is related with zeolite β polymorph C by rotating half of the 4-rings in the double mtw units.

    18. Bioorthogonal Click Chemistry | Very Important Paper

      Copper-Chelating Azides for Efficient Click Conjugation Reactions in Complex Media (pages 5872–5876)

      Valentina Bevilacqua, Dr. Mathias King, Dr. Manon Chaumontet, Marc Nothisen, Sandra Gabillet, David Buisson, Céline Puente, Dr. Alain Wagner and Dr. Frédéric Taran

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310671

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chelating azides were designed to form clickable copper complexes for efficient ligation with alkynes in complex biological media. Among a series of azides that bear nitrogen heterocycles, a bis(triazole) azide allowed ultra-fast click reactions with alkynes within seconds under diluted conditions. The reactivity and stability of this copper complex enabled efficient click reactions inside living cells.

    19. Synthetic Methods

      A Biomimetic Catalytic Aerobic Functionalization of Phenols (pages 5877–5881)

      Kenneth Virgel N. Esguerra, Dr. Yacoub Fall and Prof. Jean-Philip Lumb

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311103

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The direct approach: Polyfunctional aromatic rings have been generated by direct functionalization of C[BOND]H bonds to C[BOND]O, C[BOND]N, and C[BOND]S bonds at the sole expense of reducing O2 to H2O. The method hinges on a regio- and chemoselective, copper-catalyzed aerobic oxygenation of phenols to provide ortho-quinones (see scheme), thus mimicking the ubiquitous biosynthetic pathway of melanogenesis.

    20. Charge-Transfer Nanostructures

      Biocatalytic Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Charge-Transfer Nanostructures Based on n-Type Semiconductor-Appended Peptides (pages 5882–5887)

      Dr. Siva Krishna Mohan Nalluri, Cristina Berdugo, Dr. Nadeem Javid, Dr. Pim W. J. M. Frederix and Prof. Rein V. Ulijn

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311158

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Built through biocatalysis: 1D chiral charge-transfer nanofibers were fabricated through the biocatalytic self-assembly of naphthalenediimide amino acid/dipeptide conjugate acceptors and dialkoxy/hydroxy naphthalene donors. In the obtained aqueous hydrogels, the charge-transfer-induced gel-sol-gel transformation led to major morphological changes.

    21. Carbocations

      Structural Isomerization of the Gas-Phase 2-Norbornyl Cation Revealed with Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry (pages 5888–5891)

      Jonathan D. Mosley, Dr. Justin W. Young, Dr. Jay Agarwal, Prof. Henry F. Schaefer III, Prof. Paul v. R. Schleyer and Prof. Michael A. Duncan

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311326

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The most famous carbocation is the 2-norbornyl cation, C7H11+. Although its structure in the condensed phase is known (see scheme, left) there is no direct evidence for its gas-phase structure. IR spectroscopy of C7H11+ shows that 2-norbornyl can rearrange into the 1,3-dimethylcyclopentenyl cation. This ion is the global minimum on the C7H11+ potential energy surface, a fact that has escaped previous theoretical analyses.

    22. Sodium Batteries | Hot Paper

      All Organic Sodium-Ion Batteries with Na4C8H2O6 (pages 5892–5896)

      Dr. Shiwen Wang, Dr. Lijiang Wang, Dr. Zhiqiang Zhu, Zhe Hu, Dr. Qing Zhao and Prof. Dr. Jun Chen

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400032

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      More salt, please: Organic tetrasodium salts of 2,5-dihydroxyterephthalic acid (Na4DHTPA) can reversibly react with two Na+ ions at 1.6–2.8 V and 0.1–1.8 V, respectively. This material can be used to build a symmetrical all-organic rocking-chair cell with an average voltage of 1.8 V and an energy density of about 65 Wh kg−1.

    23. Protein Nanopores

      Control of the Conductance of Engineered Protein Nanopores through Concerted Loop Motions (pages 5897–5902)

      Dr. Tiandi Zhuang and Prof. Lukas K. Tamm

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400400

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Loop-the-loop: The OmpG nanopore was engineered to keep each of its seven loops immobilized through dodecylation and anchoring in the membrane. Electrophysiological and NMR experiments were used to characterize each of the pinned loop mutations. Pinning loop 6 generates a constitutively open pore useful for further nanopore engineering and loops 1 and 5 form a scaffold that controls further loop motion on the nanosecond to millisecond timescales.

    24. Computational Design

      Computational Ligand Design for the Reductive Elimination of ArCF3 from a Small Bite Angle PdII Complex: Remarkable Effect of a Perfluoroalkyl Phosphine (pages 5903–5906)

      Dr. Mads C. Nielsen, Dr. Karl. J. Bonney and Prof. Dr. Franziska Schoenebeck

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400837

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Theory meets practice: Computational studies have been used to design a ligand that triggers reactions that are not self-evident and may upon first inspection contrast the generally accepted trends. This study led to the synthesis of a {PdII(Ph)(CF3)} complex containing a bidentate trifluoromethylphosphine ligand with a small bite angle that demonstrates high reactivity towards the reductive elimination of PhCF3.

    25. Solid State Reactivity | Hot Paper

      Single Crystals Popping Under UV Light: A Photosalient Effect Triggered by a [2+2] Cycloaddition Reaction (pages 5907–5911)

      Raghavender Medishetty, Dr. Ahmad Husain, Zhaozhi Bai, Tomče Runčevski, Prof. Dr. Robert E. Dinnebier, Prof. Dr. Panče Naumov and Prof. Dr. Jagadese J. Vittal

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201402040

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dancing crystals under UV light: The single crystals of three metal complexes burst under UV light like popcorn. The results demonstrate that solid-state [2+2] photocycloaddition reactions can be utilized for conversion of light into mechanical motion.

    26. Synthetic Methods

      Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of 8-Oxabicyclooctanes by Intermolecular [5+2] Pyrylium Cycloadditions (pages 5912–5916)

      Michael R. Witten and Prof. Dr. Eric N. Jacobsen

      Version of Record online: 29 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201402834

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A dual thiourea catalyst system enables the title reaction to be carried out to form useful chiral building blocks that can participate in a series of complexity-generating transformations to achieve varied molecular architectures.

    27. Photoelectrochemistry | Hot Paper

      Formation of Mesoporous Heterostructured BiVO4/Bi2S3 Hollow Discoids with Enhanced Photoactivity (pages 5917–5921)

      Xuehui Gao, Hao Bin Wu, Lingxia Zheng, Prof. Yijun Zhong, Prof. Yong Hu and Prof. Xiong Wen (David) Lou

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201403611

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Unique features: Uniform heterostructured BiVO4/Bi2S3 hollow discoids with mesoporous shell are synthesized by a facile anion exchange reaction of BiVO4 discoids in aqueous Na2S solution. Because of their heterostructured nature they exhibit significantly enhanced photocurrent response and photocatalytic activity for reduction of CrVI under visible-light illumination.

    28. Heterocycles

      A Protic Ionic Liquid Catalyzes CO2 Conversion at Atmospheric Pressure and Room Temperature: Synthesis of Quinazoline-2,4(1H,3H)-diones (pages 5922–5925)

      Dr. Yanfei Zhao, Bo Yu, Dr. Zhenzhen Yang, Dr. Hongye Zhang, Leiduan Hao, Xiang Gao and Prof. Zhimin Liu

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400521

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No pressure: The reaction of CO2 with various 2-aminobenzonitriles was achieved at atmospheric pressure and room temperature by using the bifunctional protic ionic liquid [HDBU+][TFE], thus producing the title compounds in excellent yields. The ionic liquid serves as both the catalyst and solvent, and activates both CO2 and the substrates simultaneously. DBU=1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene, TFE=trifluoroethanol.

    29. Iron–Oxo Species | Hot Paper

      Formation of High-Valent Iron–Oxo Species in Superoxide Reductase: Characterization by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (pages 5926–5930)

      Dr. Florence Bonnot, Dr. Emilie Tremey, Dr. David von Stetten, Dr. Stéphanie Rat, Dr. Simon Duval, Dr. Philippe Carpentier, Dr. Martin Clemancey, Dr. Alain Desbois and Dr. Vincent Nivière

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400356

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Superoxide reductase (SOR) was used as a model system to study the mechanism of the formation of high-valent iron–oxo species in metalloenzymes. The residues Lys48 and Ile118 in the second coordination sphere tightly control the evolution and the cleavage of the O[BOND]O bond of the ferric iron hydroperoxide intermediate that is formed in the SOR active site.

    30. Mass Spectrometry

      On-Line Reaction Monitoring and Mechanistic Studies by Mass Spectrometry: Negishi Cross-Coupling, Hydrogenolysis, and Reductive Amination (pages 5931–5935)

      Xin Yan, Ewa Sokol, Dr. Xin Li, Guangtao Li, Dr. Shiqing Xu and Prof. R. Graham Cooks

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310493

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fast and simple: A reaction monitoring system based on inductive ESI mass spectrometry provides a fast and simple way to monitor chemical reactions, including air-/moisture-sensitive reactions, continuously. It also provides information on solution-phase organic reaction mechanisms as shown by the observation of short-lived intermediates in Pd/C-catalyzed hydrogenolysis and several intermediates in Negishi cross-coupling reactions.

    31. Mass Spectrometry | Very Important Paper

      Molecular Ionization from Carbon Nanotube Paper (pages 5936–5940)

      Rahul Narayanan, Depanjan Sarkar, Prof. R. Graham Cooks and Prof. Thalappil Pradeep

      Version of Record online: 18 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Low voltage: A carbon-nanotube-impregnated paper can be used to generate ions from organic molecules at potentials as low as 3 V. Common pesticides from the surface of an orange, ingredients of tablets, and a variety of analytes, such as amino acids, were characterized by this method.

    32. Catalyst Characterization

      Quantification of Zinc Atoms in a Surface Alloy on Copper in an Industrial-Type Methanol Synthesis Catalyst (pages 5941–5945)

      Sebastian Kuld, Christian Conradsen, Dr. Poul Georg Moses, Prof. Ib Chorkendorff and Dr. Jens Sehested

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311073

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal–oxide interactions play an important role in surface chemistry. Investigations of the industrial methanol synthesis catalyst Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 under reducing conditions provide a quantification of the amount of metallic zinc in the copper surface. The developed method offers new insight into the Cu–ZnO synergy in this catalyst system and can be used for the study of similar systems.

    33. Reactive Intermediates

      Nucleophilic Reactivity of a Copper(II)–Superoxide Complex (pages 5946–5950)

      Paolo Pirovano, Adriana M. Magherusan, Ciara McGlynn, Andrew Ure, Amy Lynes and Dr. Aidan R. McDonald

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311152

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nucleophilic superoxide: A copper(II)-superoxide complex has been found to be a highly reactive nucleophile. The complex reacts readily with certain electrophiles and is capable of the nucleophilic deformylation of electron-rich aldehydes (Baeyer–Villiger oxidation). These observations provide experimental support for the postulated nucleophilic reactivity of metal-superoxide intermediates in the catalytic cycles of certain nonheme iron enzymes.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: Nucleophilic Reactivity of a Copper(II)–Superoxide Complex

      Vol. 53, Issue 45, 12004, Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2014

    34. Desymmetrization

      The Use of Silyl Ketene Acetals and Enol Ethers in the Catalytic Enantioselective Alkylative Ring Opening of Oxa/Aza Bicyclic Alkenes (pages 5951–5954)

      Lei Zhang, Christine M. Le and Prof. Dr. Mark Lautens

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400218

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All purpose strain relief: Employing silyl ketene acetals and enol ethers as a diverse class of nucleophiles enabled the development of a general, mild, and functional group tolerant method for the alkylative asymmetric ring opening of strained and less-strained oxa/azabicyclic alkenes.

    35. Fluorination

      Silver-Catalyzed Oxidative Activation of Benzylic C[BOND]H Bonds for the Synthesis of Difluoromethylated Arenes (pages 5955–5958)

      Peng Xu, Shuo Guo, Liyan Wang and Prof. Dr. Pingping Tang

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400225

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Selectfluor serves as the fluorine source and AgNO3 as the catalyst in the oxidative activation of benzylic C[BOND]H bonds. This method was developed to transform methylated arenes with various functional groups into difluoromethylated arenes. The reaction is operationally simple and amenable to gram-scale synthesis.

    36. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Vinyl Dihydropyrans and Dihydrooxazines: Cyclizations of Catalytic Ruthenium Carbenes Derived from Alkynals and Alkynones (pages 5959–5963)

      Fermín Cambeiro, Dr. Susana López, Dr. Jesús A. Varela and Prof. Carlos Saá

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400675

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Setting a trap: A novel synthesis of 2-vinyldihydropyrans and dihydro-1,4-oxazines (morpholine derivatives) from alkynals and alkynones has been developed. The cyclizations require a mild generation of catalytic ruthenium carbenes from terminal alkynes and (trimethylsilyl)diazomethane followed by trapping with carbonyl nucleophiles.

    37. Heterocycles

      Stereospecific Formal [3+2] Dipolar Cycloaddition of Cyclopropanes with Nitrosoarenes: An Approach to Isoxazolidines (pages 5964–5968)

      Shyamal Chakrabarty, Dr. Indranil Chatterjee, Birgit Wibbeling, Dr. Constantin Gabriel Daniliuc and Prof. Dr. Armido Studer

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400885

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stereospecific and regioselective: The MgBr2-catalyzed formal [3+2] cycloaddition of donor–acceptor-activated cyclopropanes with nitrosoarenes offers a novel approach to structurally diverse isoxazolidines. The reactions, which are experimentally easy to conduct, occur with complete stereospecificity and perfect control of regioselectivity.

    38. Green Chemistry

      Introducing Deep Eutectic Solvents to Polar Organometallic Chemistry: Chemoselective Addition of Organolithium and Grignard Reagents to Ketones in Air (pages 5969–5973)

      Cristian Vidal, Dr. Joaquín García-Álvarez, Dr. Alberto Hernán-Gómez, Dr. Alan R. Kennedy and Prof. Eva Hevia

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400889

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Turning lithium green: A new protocol for the selective addition of Grignard and organolithium reagents to ketones in green, biorenewable, and deep eutectic solvents (DESs) is reported. The protocol establishes a bridge between main-group organometallic compounds and green solvents (ChCl=choline chloride; see picture). The DESs are superior reaction media for highly polar organometallic compounds.

    39. Synthetic Methods

      Palladium-Catalyzed Heck-Type Cross-Couplings of Unactivated Alkyl Iodides (pages 5974–5977)

      Caitlin M. McMahon and Prof. Erik J. Alexanian

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311323

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Success with palladium: A variety of unactivated alkyl iodides, including those with hydrogen atoms in the β position, were successfully coupled with different alkenes in Pd-catalyzed Heck-type reactions. The mild catalytic conditions enable the formation of intermolecular C[BOND]C bonds, with applications to substrates that contain base- or nucleophile-sensitive functionality.

    40. Iron–Sulfur Clusters

      Low-Spin Pseudotetrahedral Iron(I) Sites in Fe2(μ-S) Complexes (pages 5978–5981)

      John S. Anderson and Prof. Jonas C. Peters

      Version of Record online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201401018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new spin on FeI:FeI centers: A unique series of diiron [(L3Fe)2(μ-S)] complexes were isolated and characterized in the low-valent oxidation states FeII[BOND]S[BOND]FeII, FeII[BOND]S[BOND]FeI, and FeI[BOND]S[BOND]FeI as nearly isostructural but electronically distinct species. Structural, magnetic, and spectroscopic studies indicated a transition of the pseudotetrahedral iron centers to low-spin S=1/2 states upon reduction from FeII to FeI (see scheme).

    41. Antitumor Agents

      Organotin(IV)-Loaded Mesoporous Silica as a Biocompatible Strategy in Cancer Treatment (pages 5982–5987)

      Mirna Z. Bulatović, Dr. Danijela Maksimović-Ivanić, Christian Bensing, Prof. Santiago Gómez-Ruiz, Prof. Dirk Steinborn, Dr. Harry Schmidt, Dr. Marija Mojić, Prof. Aleksandra Korać, Igor Golić, Dr. Damian Pérez-Quintanilla, Dr. Miljana Momčilović, Dr. Sanja Mijatović and Prof. Goran N. Kaluđerović

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400763

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      More than packaging: When a nanostructured material is loaded with an organotin(IV) compound, the efficacy of the anticancer drug is amplified dramatically. The loaded nanomaterial almost completely abolished tumor growth in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. The reversion of the cancer cells to the normal phenotype is highly compatible with the surrounding tissue and presents a very safe mechanism for fighting cancer.

    42. Spin Crossover | Very Important Paper

      How Does a Coordinated Radical Ligand Affect the Spin Crossover Properties in an Octahedral Iron(II) Complex? (pages 5988–5992)

      Markus Schmitz, Manuel Seibel, Dr. Harald Kelm, Dr. Serhiy Demeshko, Prof. Dr. Franc Meyer and Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Krüger

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310484

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Redox-controlled changes in a coordinated ligand have been demonstrated to lead to a temperature-induced spin crossover in an octahedral iron(II) complex. The influence of the resulting coordinated π-radical on the spin crossover properties of the octahedral iron(II) ion is discussed. The structural and electronic differences between both oxidation states of the redox couple are presented.

    43. Umpolung

      Flexible Stereoselective Functionalizations of Ketones through Umpolung with Hypervalent Iodine Reagents (pages 5993–5997)

      Dr. Pushpak Mizar and Prof. Dr. Thomas Wirth

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400405

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A Nu approach: An efficient α-functionalization of ketones with a range of simple and useful nucleophiles is possible by using hypervalent iodine reagents (see scheme; Nu′ can be the Nu itself or a protected form of this nucleophile group).

    44. Interfaces in Catalysis

      A Case of Strong Metal–Support Interactions: Combining Advanced Microscopy and Model Systems to Elucidate the Atomic Structure of Interfaces (pages 5998–6001)

      Dr. Marc G. Willinger, Dr. Wei Zhang, Dr. Oleksandr Bondarchuk, Dr. Shamil Shaikhutdinov, Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Freund and Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400290

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A symbiosis of advanced scanning probe and electron microscopy and a well-defined model system may provide a detailed picture of interfaces on nanostructured catalytic systems. This was demonstrated for Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide thin films, which undergo encapsulation by supporting oxide as a result of strong metal–support interactions (see picture).

    45. Recognition of Nucleobases

      Programmable and Highly Resolved In Vitro Detection of 5-Methylcytosine by TALEs (pages 6002–6006)

      M. Sc. Grzegorz Kubik, M. Sc. Moritz J. Schmidt, M. Sc. Johanna E. Penner and Dr. Daniel Summerer

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400436

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      TALEored sensors for epigenetics: DNA-binding proteins that discriminate between cytosine and 5-methylcytosine (C, red) are important analytical tools in epigenetics. Programmable transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) were used to control DNA replication in response to single C positions in user-defined sequences. These studies reveal a significantly stronger C discrimination of TALEs in vitro than previously observed.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION