Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 53 Issue 5

January 27, 2014

Volume 53, Issue 5

Pages 1169–1447

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Identification of Living Legionella pneumophila Using Species-Specific Metabolic Lipopolysaccharide Labeling (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 5/2014) (page 1169)

      Dr. Jordi Mas Pons, Dr. Audrey Dumont, Grégory Sautejeau, Dr. Emilie Fugier, Dr. Aurélie Baron, Dr. Sam Dukan and Dr. Boris Vauzeilles

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Legionella pneumophila is a deadly pathogen that was discovered after an outbreak in 1976 at the convention of the American Legion in Philadelphia. In their Communication on page 1275 ff., S. Dukan, B. Vauzeilles, and co-workers describe a simple strategy to detect and identify living Legionella pneumophila by metabolic incorporation of a modified carbohydrate into their lipopolysaccharides, followed by further conjugation using click chemistry. Picture of Dr. Feely: CDC/Stafford Smith. Cover artwork: David Garino.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: [ReF6]2−: A Robust Module for the Design of Molecule-Based Magnetic Materials (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 5/2014) (page 1170)

      Kasper S. Pedersen, Marc Sigrist, Mikkel A. Sørensen, Dr. Anne-Laure Barra, Dr. Thomas Weyhermüller, Dr. Stergios Piligkos, Dr. Christian Aa. Thuesen, Morten G. Vinum, Hannu Mutka, Dr. Høgni Weihe, Dr. Rodolphe Clérac and Prof. Dr. Jesper Bendix

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310970

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A robust building block for magnetic systems is found as a result of a new high-yield synthesis of the [ReF6]2– ion. K. S. Pedersen, R. Clérac, J. Bendix, and co-workers report in their Communication on page 1351 ff. that on incorporating the [ReF6]2– in a NiII–ReIV 1D coordination polymer, the fluoride mediates significant magnetic couplings. The ferromagnetic Ni[BOND]F[BOND]Re interaction found (+11 cm–1) dwarfs the values obtained in related cyanide-bridged systems.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Patternable Large-Scale Molybdenium Disulfide Atomic Layers Grown by Gold-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 5/2014) (page 1449)

      Intek Song, Chibeom Park, Misun Hong, Jaeyoon Baik, Hyun-Joon Shin and Hee Cheul Choi

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Patternable growth of large-scale MoS2 atomic layers is presented by H. C. Choi et al. in their Communication on page 1266 ff. The picture shows the analogy between the growth of MoS2 and a moth. Losing CO ligands, Mo atoms roam like a caterpillar. They soon form a surface alloy, hiding from the outside like in a cocoon. Upon exposure to H2S, they then come to the surface, as does a moth.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Size-Dependent Phase Transformation of Catalytically Active Nanoparticles Captured In Situ (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 5/2014) (page 1450)

      Dr. Nico Fischer, Brett Clapham, Dr. Theresa Feltes, Prof. Dr. Eric van Steen and Prof. Dr. Michael Claeys

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201311154

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Uncovering the size-dependent properties of a working catalyst requires a combination of designer catalyst preparation and novel characterization. In their Communication on page 1342 ff., M. Claeys et al. present a trifecta of catalyst synthesis with two unique reaction chambers that respectively characterize a catalyst's magnetic and diffraction properties and where a long-debated size-dependent deactivation of a cobalt catalyst during Fischer–Tropsch synthesis is exposed.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  3. Flashback

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. 50 Years Ago ... (page 1184)

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310367

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Teck-Peng Loh (page 1194)

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307948

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “My biggest motivation is to be the best in whatever I do. I lose track of time when I start brainstorming for a new idea. …” This and more about Teck-Peng Loh can be found on page 1194.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Gold Nanoparticles for Physics, Chemistry, and Biology. Edited by Catherine Louis and Olivier Pluchery. (page 1197)

      Prashant K. Jain

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309807

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Imperial College Press, London, 2012. 395 pp., hardcover, £ 65.00.—ISBN 978-1848168060

  8. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Protein Engineering

      Protein Engineering from “Scratch” Is Maturing (pages 1200–1202)

      Jun. Prof. Matthias Höhne and Prof. Uwe T. Bornscheuer

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309591

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Precisely tuning the active site by protein engineering has led to the development of a highly efficient Kemp eliminase (see structure with substrate in the binding pocket). The starting protein scaffold with only low activity originated from computational design, as no natural enzyme with this activity was known. This is a breakthrough in protein design, as novel catalytic activities are now in reach that match those of natural enzymes.

    2. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Diaminocyclopropenylidene Organocatalysts: Beyond N-Heterocyclic Carbenes (pages 1203–1205)

      Prof. Stephen J. Connon

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309256

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cyclopropenylidene carbenes have been found to be efficient catalysts for the intermolecular Stetter reaction between aromatic aldehydes and α,β-unsaturated ketones. In this transformation, the cyclopropenylidene proved superior to more traditional thiazolium- and triazolium-derived carbenes. Preparation and evaluation of a chiral analogue have also been reported.

    3. Stereoinversion

      Tertiary Alcohols as Substrates for SN2-Like Stereoinversion (pages 1206–1207)

      M. Sc. Andreas F. B. Räder and Prof. Dr. Konrad Tiefenbacher

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308803

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rewrite the textbooks! The stereospecific bimolecular substitution reaction (SN2) is usually limited to primary and secondary electrophiles. The Shenvi group has developed a method in which tertiary alcohol substrates are converted into isocyanides with configurational inversion. Intriguingly, tertiary hydroxy groups react selectively in the presence of unprotected primary and secondary hydroxy groups.

  9. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Natural Products

      The Witkop Cyclization: A Photoinduced C[BOND]H Activation of the Indole System (pages 1208–1217)

      Dipl.-Ing. Philipp J. Gritsch, M. Sc. Christian Leitner, M. Sc. Magnus Pfaffenbach and Dr. Tanja Gaich

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307391

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To wit: The title reaction resembles a photoinduced electron-transfer process, and allows the direct formation of medium-sized lactams by C[BOND]H activation of the indole nucleus. Therefore it is a versatile tool for the construction of polycyclic indole alkaloid scaffolds.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Enantiomer Separation

      Processes To Separate Enantiomers (pages 1218–1250)

      Prof. Heike Lorenz and Prof. Andreas Seidel-Morgenstern

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201302823

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crystallization, chromatography, or both? Processes for the separation of enantiomers are discussed, with a focus on enantioselective crystallization and preparative chromatography, both individually and combined. The application of the phase diagrams and the incorporation of racemization steps are also considered.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Flashback
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlights
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Upconversion Nano-Bioprobe

      Lanthanide-Doped LiLuF4 Upconversion Nanoprobes for the Detection of Disease Biomarkers (pages 1252–1257)

      Ping Huang, Dr. Wei Zheng, Shanyong Zhou, Dr. Datao Tu, Dr. Zhuo Chen, Dr. Haomiao Zhu, Renfu Li, En Ma, Prof. Mingdong Huang and Prof. Xueyuan Chen

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309503

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A small but sensitive biosensor: Successive injection of shell precursors enabled the synthesis of novel and highly emissive LiLuF4:Ln3+ core/shell upconversion nanoparticles that were effective as sensitive upconversion luminescent probes for the detection of β-hCG (an important disease marker). The nanoprobes were also used successfully in proof-of-concept computed tomography and upconversion luminescence dual-mode bioimaging.

    2. C-Glycosylation

      Synthesis of the Pluramycins 1: Two Designed Anthrones as Enabling Platforms for Flexible Bis-C-Glycosylation (pages 1258–1261)

      Dr. Kei Kitamura, Dr. Yoshio Ando, Prof. Dr. Takashi Matsumoto and Prof. Dr. Keisuke Suzuki

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The stage is set… The two anthrones 1 and 2 enabled bis-C-glycosylation (see scheme; Tf=trifluoromethanesulfonyl) to provide advanced platforms for the synthesis of the pluramycin class of antitumor antibiotics. These two efficient methods overcome the challenge of the regio- and stereoselective installation of two different C-glycosides.

    3. Natural Products Synthesis

      Synthesis of the Pluramycins 2: Total Synthesis and Structure Assignment of Saptomycin B (pages 1262–1265)

      Dr. Kei Kitamura, Yoshihiko Maezawa, Dr. Yoshio Ando, Prof. Dr. Takenori Kusumi, Prof. Dr. Takashi Matsumoto and Prof. Dr. Keisuke Suzuki

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      … for a speedy synthesis: In a brief, highly convergent total synthesis of saptomycin B, the target compound was efficiently assembled from the four building blocks 14 (see scheme; Bn=benzyl) by exploiting anthrone 2 as a platform. A member of the pluramycin class of antibiotics, saptomycin B was obtained in 10 steps and 15 % overall yield.

    4. 2D Nanomaterials

      Patternable Large-Scale Molybdenium Disulfide Atomic Layers Grown by Gold-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (pages 1266–1269)

      Intek Song, Chibeom Park, Misun Hong, Jaeyoon Baik, Hyun-Joon Shin and Hee Cheul Choi

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309474

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      When a gold surface reacts with vaporized [Mo(CO)6] at 300 °C, a surface alloy forms, which in turn becomes an ideal large-scale atom-thick Mo reservoir. When this alloy further reacts with H2S, atomic layers of MoS2 are specifically formed on Au, which can be isolated by means of etching.

    5. Dye Aggregates in Water

      Hierarchical Growth of Fluorescent Dye Aggregates in Water by Fusion of Segmented Nanostructures (pages 1270–1274)

      Dr. Xin Zhang, Daniel Görl, Dr. Vladimir Stepanenko and Prof. Dr. Frank Würthner

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308963

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Seeing is believing: Amphiphilic perylene bisimide aggregates were visualized by transmission electron microscopy and the self-assembly of dye aggregates from small nanorods to large nanoribbons in water was observed on the molecular level. The fluorescence properties of these dye aggregates were enhanced for the higher order nanostructures.

    6. Carbohydrates

      Identification of Living Legionella pneumophila Using Species-Specific Metabolic Lipopolysaccharide Labeling (pages 1275–1278)

      Dr. Jordi Mas Pons, Dr. Audrey Dumont, Grégory Sautejeau, Dr. Emilie Fugier, Dr. Aurélie Baron, Dr. Sam Dukan and Dr. Boris Vauzeilles

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309072

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tracking a killer: Almost 40 years after its first identified outbreak in Philadelphia, Legionella pneumophila remains difficult to track. Metabolic lipopolysaccharide labeling with a specific monosaccharide allows detection and identification of living representatives of this dangerous pathogen. Notably other Legionella species are not labeled using this method.

    7. Synthetic Methods

      Through-Bond/Through-Space Anion Relay Chemistry Exploiting Vinylepoxides as Bifunctional Linchpins (pages 1279–1282)

      Dr. Ming Z. Chen, Dr. Osvaldo Gutierrez and Dr. Amos B. Smith III

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309270

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anion relay chemistry: The design, synthesis, and validation of three vinylepoxide linchpins for through-bond/through-space anion relay chemistry (ARC) have been achieved. For negative charge migration, this class of bifunctional linchpins employs through-bond ARC by an SN2′ reaction, followed by through-space ARC exploiting a 1,4-Brook rearrangement (HMPA=hexamethylphosphoramide, TMS=trimethylsilyl).

    8. Conformation Analysis

      CH–π and CF–π Interactions Lead to Structural Changes of N-Heterocyclic Carbene Palladium Complexes (pages 1283–1287)

      Xiangya Xu, Benjamin Pooi, Prof. Dr. Hajime Hirao and Prof. Dr. Soon Hyeok Hong

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309371

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Doing the twist: The roles of CH–π and CF–π interactions in determining the structure of the title complexes were studied. The CH–π interactions led to the cis-anti isomers in 1-aryl-3-isopropylimidazol-2-ylidene-based complexes, while CF–π interactions led to the exclusive formation of the cis-syn isomer of diiodobis(3-isopropyl-1-pentafluorophenylimidazol-2-ylidene)palladium(II). C gray, N violet, Pd turquoise, F yellow, I purple.

    9. B6 ring building blocks

      Hexagonal Bipyramidal [Ta2B6]−/0 Clusters: B6 Rings as Structural Motifs (pages 1288–1292)

      Wei-Li Li, Lu Xie, Tian Jian, Dr. Constantin Romanescu, Prof. Dr. Xin Huang and Prof. Dr. Lai-Sheng Wang

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309469

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      B ring it on: Photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical investigations show that the [Ta2B6]−/0 clusters have bipyramidal structures with a planar B6 ring capped by two Ta atoms (see picture, Ta blue, B orange). These gaseous clusters have similar structures to motifs in solid materials suggesting that new boron structural motifs may be discovered by studying boride clusters.

    10. Class III Delocalization

      Class III Delocalization in a Cyanide-Bridged Trimetallic Mixed-Valence Complex (pages 1293–1296)

      German E. Pieslinger, Dr. Pablo Alborés, Dr. Leonardo D. Slep and Dr. Luis M. Baraldo

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A class upgrade: The presence of a set of 4-dimethylaminopyrine (dmap) ligands in the linear mixed-valence complex trans-[Ru(dmap)4{(μ-CN)Ru(py)4Cl}2]3+ (py=pyridine) results in a complex with a symmetrical class III delocalized ground state, according to its IR and NIR spectra. The predicted spectra from (TD)DFT calculations are in close agreement with the experimental data, thus supporting the assignment.

    11. Vectorial Displacement

      Translocation of Platinum Anticancer Drugs by Human Copper ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B (pages 1297–1301)

      Dr. Francesco Tadini-Buoninsegni, Dr. Gianluca Bartolommei, Prof. Maria Rosa Moncelli, Prof. Giuseppe Inesi, Angela Galliani, Dr. Marilù Sinisi, Dr. Maurizio Losacco, Prof. Giovanni Natile and Prof. Fabio Arnesano

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307718

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Charge measurements, in the presence of cisplatin or oxaliplatin, on COS-1 microsomes enriched with Cu-ATPases, show vectorial displacement of a charged Pt species upon ATP addition. Co-administration of a Pt drug and Cu inhibits charge translocation. ESI-MS and NMR experiments demonstrate formation of monodentate Pt drug adducts, that evolve into stable and unreactive chelate adducts with CXXC motifs.

    12. Fluorescent Probes

      Sensing Acetylcholine and Anticholinesterase Compounds (pages 1302–1305)

      Alberto Schena and Prof. Kai Johnsson

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307754

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A semisynthetic fluorescence-based probe (ACh-SNIFIT) for the direct, real-time detection of acetylcholine and anticholinesterase compounds such as drugs and nerve agents is introduced. The probe possesses good sensitivity, tunable detection range, and can be selectively targeted to cell surfaces, thereby making it an attractive tool for applications in analytical chemistry and quantitative biology.

    13. Protein Ligation

      An Atypical Naturally Split Intein Engineered for Highly Efficient Protein Labeling (pages 1306–1310)

      M. Sc. Ilka V. Thiel, Dr. Gerrit Volkmann, Prof. Shmuel Pietrokovski and Prof. Henning D. Mootz

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307969

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Supernatural splicing: The first naturally occurring, atypically split intein was identified and characterized. The short N-terminal fragment of the AceL-TerL intein consists of only 25 amino acids and was therefore amenable to chemical synthesis. Mutants with up to 50-fold improved splicing rates were obtained by directed protein evolution and showed unprecedented utility for labeling diverse proteins by semisynthetic protein trans-splicing.

    14. Plasma Membrane Organization

      High-Fidelity Protein Targeting into Membrane Lipid Microdomains in Living Cells (pages 1311–1315)

      Oliver Beutel, Dr. Jörg Nikolaus, Oliver Birkholz, Dr. Changjiang You, Prof. Dr. Thomas Schmidt, Prof. Dr. Andreas Herrmann and Prof. Dr. Jacob Piehler

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306328

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rapid rafting: Lipid analogues with multivalent chelator head groups allow the tethering of proteins to membrane liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered lipid phases. His-tagged proteins can thus be stably and specifically targeted into lipid microdomains within the plasma membrane of living cells.

    15. DNA Nanotechnology

      Crystallization of DNA-Capped Gold Nanoparticles in High-Concentration, Divalent Salt Environments (pages 1316–1319)

      Dr. Shawn J. Tan, Jason S. Kahn, Thomas L. Derrien, Dr. Michael J. Campolongo, Mervin Zhao, Dr. Detlef-M. Smilgies and Prof. Dan Luo

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307113

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DNA hybridization: Parallel small-angle X-ray scattering (parSAXS; DLS=dynamic light scattering) shows that two-dimensional DNA–gold nanoparticle crystals can be obtained at extremely high salt concentrations using a non-base-pairing DNA model ligand. The interparticle spacings in the crystals can be engineered and further tuned by ligand length and ionic strength.

    16. Molten Globules

      The RING Domain of the Scaffold Protein Ste5 Adopts a Molten Globular Character with High Thermal and Chemical Stability (pages 1320–1323)

      Michal J. Walczak, Dr. Brighton Samatanga, Dr. Frank van Drogen, Prof. Dr. Matthias Peter, Dr. Ilian Jelesarov and Prof. Dr. Gerhard Wider

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306702

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Infusible molten globule: Biophysical experiments show that the RING-H2 domain of the yeast scaffold protein Ste5 exhibits a molten globule fold of high stability. Upon binding of the physiological Gβ/γ ligand, this domain adopts a better-defined globular structure that provides novel insights into the mechanism of recruiting binding partners, which may well be a feature of other RING domains.

    17. Electrochemistry

      High-Power Electrochemical Energy Storage System Employing Stable Radical Pseudocapacitors (pages 1324–1328)

      Hitoshi Maruyama, Dr. Hideyuki Nakano, Dr. Masaaki Nakamoto and Prof. Dr. Akira Sekiguchi

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308302

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Radical batteries: A lithium-free energy storage system using stable radicals of the heavy Group 14 elements as the anode and graphite as the cathode has been designed (see picture) that delivers a larger energy density than the dual carbon cell and electrochemical capacitor. This energy storage system employing stable-radical pseudocapacitors showed remarkable cycle stability without significant loss of power density.

    18. Solar Cells

      Sb2Se3-Sensitized Inorganic–Organic Heterojunction Solar Cells Fabricated Using a Single-Source Precursor (pages 1329–1333)

      Dr. Yong Chan Choi, Dr. Tarak Nath Mandal, Woon Seok Yang, Dr. Yong Hui Lee, Prof. Sang Hyuk Im, Dr. Jun Hong Noh and Prof. Sang Il Seok

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308331

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sb2Se3 as a light sensitizer: Sb2Se3 was deposited on mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) by a simple solution-based method that employs a single-source precursor. A solar cell that is based on Sb2Se3 as the light sensitizer exhibited outstanding light harvesting that covered the near-IR region with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of approximately 3.2 % (IPCE=incident photon to current efficiency).

    19. Natural Product Purification

      Use of a Phosphonate Methyltransferase in the Identification of the Fosfazinomycin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster (pages 1334–1337)

      Dr. Jiangtao Gao, Dr. Kou-San Ju, Xiaomin Yu, Dr. Juan E. Velásquez, Subha Mukherjee, Dr. Jaeheon Lee, Dr. Changming Zhao, Dr. Bradley S. Evans, Dr. James R. Doroghazi, Prof. William W. Metcalf and Prof. Wilfred A. van der Donk

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308363

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catching fosfazinomycin: The phosphonate methyltransferase DhpI was used with a mixture of unlabeled and labeled S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) to purify phosphonates from crude spent medium. Its use to locate the fosfazinomycin biosynthetic gene cluster is demonstrated.

    20. Ionic Hydrides

      Well-Defined, Nanometer-Sized LiH Cluster Compounds Stabilized by Pyrazolate Ligands (pages 1338–1341)

      Dr. Andreas Stasch

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308935

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Masterpieces of cubism: A series of pyrazolate-stabilized LiH clusters have been prepared in hydrocarbon solution in a bottom-up approach and structurally characterized. The clusters are based on the cubic lattice cutout structures A and B (see picture), consist of up to 37 Li+ ions and 26 H ligands, and can contain significantly more hydride than pyrazolate ligands.

    21. Heterogeneous Catalysis

      Size-Dependent Phase Transformation of Catalytically Active Nanoparticles Captured In Situ (pages 1342–1345)

      Dr. Nico Fischer, Brett Clapham, Dr. Theresa Feltes, Prof. Dr. Eric van Steen and Prof. Dr. Michael Claeys

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306899

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Size does matter: Using magnetometry and X-ray diffraction in combination with novel designed reaction chambers (see picture), the size-dependent oxidation of an industrially relevant cobalt Fischer–Tropsch catalyst is revealed under working conditions.

    22. Fluorophore Design

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Rational Perturbation of the Fluorescence Quantum Yield in Emission-Tunable and Predictable Fluorophores (Seoul-Fluors) by a Facile Synthetic Method Involving C[BOND]H Activation (pages 1346–1350)

      Eun Joung Choi, Dr. Eunha Kim, Youngjun Lee, Ala Jo and Prof. Seung Bum Park

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308826

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It's all in the design: Seoul-Fluors with predictable photophysical properties, including a fluorescent reactive-oxygen-species sensor that was not previously accessible, were synthesized efficiently by coinage-metal-catalyzed intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and subsequent palladium-mediated C[BOND]H activation (see scheme). The quantum yield of the products could be controlled systematically by altering the electronic nature of the substituents.

    23. Magnetic Modules

      [ReF6]2−: A Robust Module for the Design of Molecule-Based Magnetic Materials (pages 1351–1354)

      Kasper S. Pedersen, Marc Sigrist, Mikkel A. Sørensen, Dr. Anne-Laure Barra, Dr. Thomas Weyhermüller, Dr. Stergios Piligkos, Dr. Christian Aa. Thuesen, Morten G. Vinum, Hannu Mutka, Dr. Høgni Weihe, Dr. Rodolphe Clérac and Prof. Dr. Jesper Bendix

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309981

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluoride gaining weight: An axial perturbation of the octahedral [ReF6]2− ion gives rise to a strong magnetic anisotropy and slow relaxation of the magnetization. The robust character of [ReF6]2− facilitates its use as a structure-directing magnetic building block for extended systems. The 1D coordination polymers [M(viz)4(ReF6)] (viz=1-vinylimidazole, M=Zn, Ni) are prepared and have pronounced magnetic interactions through the fluoride bridges.

    24. Zeolites

      Post-Synthesis Treatment gives Highly Stable Siliceous Zeolites through the Isomorphous Substitution of Silicon for Germanium in Germanosilicates (pages 1355–1359)

      Hao Xu, Jin-gang Jiang, Boting Yang, Lin Zhang, Prof. Mingyuan He and Prof. Peng Wu

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306527

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A straight swap: The pores and crystalline structures of germanosilicates can be stabilized by treating as-synthesized samples under acidic conditions. The resulting substitution of Ge by Si gives highly siliceous zeolites, analogous to the germanosilicates, but highly stable against harsh acid treatment and calcination.

    25. Quasi All-Silica Zeolite Obtained by Isomorphous Degermanation of an As-Made Germanium-Containing Precursor (pages 1360–1363)

      Laurence Burel, Dr. Nataliia Kasian and Dr. Alain Tuel

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306744

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ge out: Treating ITQ-22 precursors with concentrated HCl removes templating molecules from the pores and extracts most of the Ge species from the framework. The degermanation does not modify the framework topology, and the resulting Ge-free [Si]-ITQ-22 is highly mesoporous, stable, and the possibility to incorporate aluminum makes it potentially interesting in acid catalysis.

    26. Synthetic Methods

      Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed ortho Alkenylation of N-Phenoxyacetamides with N-Tosylhydrazones or Diazoesters through C[BOND]H Activation (pages 1364–1367)

      Fangdong Hu, Ying Xia, Fei Ye, Zhenxing Liu, Prof. Dr. Chen Ma, Prof. Dr. Yan Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jianbo Wang

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309650

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The coupling reaction of N-phenoxyacetamides with N-tosylhydrazones or diazoesters proceeds through RhIII-catalyzed C[BOND]H bond activation. ortho-Alkenyl phenols are obtained in good yields and with excellent regio- and stereoselectivity.

    27. Nickel(III) Complexes

      A Tetracoordinated Phosphasalen Nickel(III) Complex (pages 1368–1372)

      Dr. Thi-Phuong-Anh Cao, Dr. Grégory Nocton, Dr. Louis Ricard, Dr. Xavier F. Le Goff and Dr. Audrey Auffrant

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309222

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      P=N does not equal C=N: A rare tetracoordinated NiIII complex is obtained in the one-electron oxidation of a nickel(II) complex containing a novel phosphasalen ligand. The metal center as the oxidation site, and not the ligand as is the case for nickel salen complexes, is demonstrated by various techniques such as X-ray diffraction, EPR spectrocopy, and DFT calculations (see picture).

    28. Helical Structures

      Inversion of Supramolecular Helicity in Oligo-p-phenylene-Based Supramolecular Polymers: Influence of Molecular Atropisomerism (pages 1373–1377)

      Fátima Aparicio, Belén Nieto-Ortega, Francisco Nájera, Francisco J. Ramírez, Juan T. López Navarrete, Juan Casado and Luis Sánchez

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309172

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Twist of fate: The helical organization of oligo-p-phenylene-based organogelators has been investigated spectroscopically. Whilst OPPs 2 and 3 self-assemble into left-handed helices, an inversion of the supramolecular helicity of 1 occurs depending on the formation conditions because of the atropisomerism of the biphenyl central unit.

    29. Hydrogen Production

      Highly Efficient Platinum Group Metal Free Based Membrane-Electrode Assembly for Anion Exchange Membrane Water Electrolysis (pages 1378–1381)

      Dr. Claudiu C. Pavel, Franco Cecconi, Dr. Chiara Emiliani, Serena Santiccioli, Dr. Adriana Scaffidi, Stefano Catanorchi and Dr. Massimiliano Comotti

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308099

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Relieving the precious of work: An alkaline membrane water electrolysis system containing low-cost transition-metal catalysts and an anion exchange membrane has a cell potential of 1.81 V at 470 mA cm−2 and 328 K in K2CO3, similar to that with platinum-group-metal catalysts. This system is durable and very efficient during transitory regimes allowing production of hydrogen from renewable sources.

    30. Alzheimer’s Disease

      Attenuation of the Aggregation and Neurotoxicity of Amyloid-β Peptides by Catalytic Photooxygenation (pages 1382–1385)

      Dr. Atsuhiko Taniguchi, Dr. Daisuke Sasaki, Azusa Shiohara, Prof. Takeshi Iwatsubo, Dr. Taisuke Tomita, Dr. Youhei Sohma and Prof. Motomu Kanai

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light makes right: Riboflavin-catalyzed photooxygenation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) 1–42 occurred in well-defined positions under physiologically relevant conditions. Selective, cell-compatible photooxygenation of Aβ1–42 by the flavin catalyst attached to an Aβ-binding peptide markedly decreased aggregation and neurotoxicity of Aβ; the native Aβ was even switched from a pathogen to an aggregation inhibitor.

    31. Chiroptical Effects

      Large Solvation Effect in the Optical Rotatory Dispersion of Norbornenone (pages 1386–1389)

      Priyanka Lahiri, Prof. Kenneth B. Wiberg, Prof. Patrick H. Vaccaro, Dr. Marco Caricato and Prof. T. Daniel Crawford

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306339

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solvation and dispersive optical activity: The particularly large specific optical rotation of (1R,4R)-norbornenone has been probed under solvated and isolated (vapor-phase) conditions. The pronounced influence that solvent degrees of freedom exert upon intrinsic chiroptical properties could therefore be documented.

    32. Iridium Catalysis

      Selective Catalytic Transfer Dehydrogenation of Alkanes and Heterocycles by an Iridium Pincer Complex (pages 1390–1394)

      Wubing Yao, Yuxuan Zhang, Xiangqing Jia and Prof. Dr. Zheng Huang

      Version of Record online: 2 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306559

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      With just a pinch of iridium: A new PSCOP-pincer Ir complex exhibits unprecedented activity for the catalytic transfer dehydrogenation of cyclic and linear alkanes. The system effects regioselective dehydrogenation of linear alkanes to α-olefins under rather mild conditions. The Ir complex can be used in the selective catalytic dehydrogenation of a wide range of O- and N-heterocycles.

    33. Natural Product Synthesis

      Stereocontrolled Syntheses of Tetralone- and Naphthyl-Type Lignans by a One-Pot Oxidative [3,3] Rearrangement/Friedel–Crafts Arylation (pages 1395–1398)

      Jordan C. T. Reddel, Kelly E. Lutz, Abdallah B. Diagne and Prof. Regan J. Thomson

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307659

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cascade process: A two-step three-component cascade process that consists of an oxidative [3,3] sigmatropic rearrangement and a Friedel–Crafts arylation has been developed. This stereoselective fragment-coupling cascade sequence provides benzhydryl-type products that are versatile intermediates for the stereocontrolled synthesis of lignan natural products. Tf=trifluoromethylsulfonyl, TFA=trifluoroacetic acid.

    34. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Catalytic Enantioselective Amination of Alcohols by the Use of Borrowing Hydrogen Methodology: Cooperative Catalysis by Iridium and a Chiral Phosphoric Acid (pages 1399–1403)

      Dr. Yao Zhang, Ching-Si Lim, Derek Sui Boon Sim, Hui-Jie Pan and Prof. Yu Zhao

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307789

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Donation to a good cause: A wide range of chiral amines were obtained in high yield with good enantioselectivity by the catalytic amination of alcohols without the use of an external reductant (the alcohol substrate served as the H2 donor; see scheme). Cooperative catalysis by an iridium complex and a chiral phosphoric acid proved key to the high reactivity and selectivity of this system.

    35. Graphene Composites

      Metal Oxide-Coated Three-Dimensional Graphene Prepared by the Use of Metal–Organic Frameworks as Precursors (pages 1404–1409)

      Xiehong Cao, Bing Zheng, Xianhong Rui, Wenhui Shi, Prof. Qingyu Yan and Prof. Hua Zhang

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexible method, flexible materials: In a simple method for the preparation of metal-oxide-coated 3D graphene composites, metal–organic frameworks that served as precursors of the metal oxides were synthesized on 3D graphene networks (3DGNs), and the metal oxide/3DGN composites were then obtained by a two-step annealing process. ZnO/3DGN and Fe2O3/3DGN (see picture) were tested successfully in a photocatalytic reaction and a lithium-ion battery.

    36. Synthetic Methods

      Enantioselective Copper-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Propargylic Alkylation of Propargyl β-Ketoesters with a Chiral Ketimine P,N,N-Ligand (pages 1410–1414)

      Fu-Lin Zhu, Yuan Zou, De-Yang Zhang, Ya-Hui Wang, Xin-Hu Hu, Song Chen, Prof. Dr. Jie Xu and Prof. Dr. Xiang-Ping Hu

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309182

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Treatment of propargyl β-ketoesters with a catalyst, prepared in situ from [Cu(CH3CN)4]BF4 and a newly developed chiral tridentate ketimine P,N,N-ligand under mild reaction conditions, generates β-ethynyl ketones in good yields and with high enantioselectivities. Pregeneration of ketone enolates is not required and thus the reaction represents the first enantioselective copper-catalyzed decarboxylative propargylic alkylation.

    37. Electrode Materials

      Reversible Self-Assembly of Terpyridine-Functionalized Graphene Oxide for Energy Conversion (pages 1415–1419)

      Shungang Song, Dr. Yuhua Xue, Prof. Lianfang Feng, Hany Elbatal, Dr. Pingshan Wang, Dr. Charles N. Moorefield, Prof. George R. Newkome and Prof. Liming Dai

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309641

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Held together by (cleavable) iron chains: Terpyridine-functionalized graphene oxide was prepared for self-assembly into 3D architectures with various metal ions (see picture; EDTA=ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid). The assemblies showed significantly improved electroactivities for energy conversion and storage, in particular as electrode materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), photocurrent generation, and supercapacitance.

    38. Multicomponent Reactions

      Highly Efficient Four-Component Synthesis of 4(3H)-Quinazolinones: Palladium-Catalyzed Carbonylative Coupling Reactions (pages 1420–1424)

      Dr. Lin He, Haoquan Li, Dr. Helfried Neumann, Prof. Dr. Matthias Beller and Dr. Xiao-Feng Wu

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308756

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On all fours: A palladium-catalyzed four-component carbonylative coupling system for the synthesis of the title compounds in a concise and convergent fashion has been developed (see scheme). Notably, the process tolerates the presence of various reactive functional groups and is very selective for quinazolinones. The method was used in the successful synthesis of the precursor for the bioactive dihydrorutaempine.

    39. Chiral Alkyllithium Compounds

      Diastereoselective Synthesis of Open-Chain Secondary Alkyllithium Compounds and Trapping Reactions with Electrophiles (pages 1425–1429)

      Dr. Guillaume Dagousset, Kohei Moriya, Rasmus Mose, Dr. Guillaume Berionni, Prof. Dr. Konstantin Karaghiosoff and Prof. Dr. Paul Knochel

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308679

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stereocontrol in acyclic systems: A practical stereoretentive iodine–lithium exchange served in the first general preparation of functionalized stereodefined acyclic secondary nonstabilized lithium reagents from the corresponding diastereomerically pure syn and anti alkyl iodides. Quenching with a range of electrophiles provides stereospecific access to both syn and anti acyclic alkyl derivatives with excellent diastereoselectivities (up to d.r.=97:3).

    40. Heterocycle Functionalization

      Full Functionalization of the Imidazole Scaffold by Selective Metalation and Sulfoxide/Magnesium Exchange (pages 1430–1434)

      Christoph Sämann, Estibaliz Coya and Prof. Dr. Paul Knochel

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309217

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The successive regioselective functionalization of the imidazole scaffold can be realized by direct metalation with TMPMgCl⋅LiCl and TMP2Zn⋅2 MgCl⋅2 LiCl as well as by a sulfoxide/magnesium exchange triggered by iPrMgCl⋅LiCl (see scheme, An=4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylphenyl). The corresponding Mg and Zn intermediates have been quenched with a broad range of electrophiles, for example, aryl, alkenyl and allylic halides, acid chlorides, and aldehydes.

    41. Organosuperbases

      Very Strong Organosuperbases Formed by Combining Imidazole and Guanidine Bases: Synthesis, Structure, and Basicity (pages 1435–1438)

      Dr. Katarina Vazdar, Dr. Roman Kunetskiy, M. Sc. Jaan Saame, M. Sc. Karl Kaupmees, Prof. Dr. Ivo Leito and Dr. Ullrich Jahn

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307212

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Think BIG: Probably the strongest organic non-phosphorus superbases, having pKα values of 26.1–29.3 in THF, are synthesized by combining imidazole and guanidine structural motifs to give N,N′-bis(imidazolyl)guanidine bases (termed BIG bases). Their basicity was determined in solution by UV/Vis spectroscopy and in the gas phase by computational methods. The innovative design opens possibilities for the broader application of organosuperbases.

    42. Biocatalysis

      Enzymatic Conversion of Flavonoids using Bacterial Chalcone Isomerase and Enoate Reductase (pages 1439–1442)

      Dipl.-Biol. Mechthild Gall, Dipl.-Biochem. Maren Thomsen, Dipl.-Biochem. Christin Peters, Dr. Ioannis V. Pavlidis, M. Sc. Patrick Jonczyk, M. Sc. Philipp P. Grünert, Dr. Sascha Beutel, Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheper, Egon Gross, Dr. Michael Backes, Dr. Torsten Geißler, Dr. Jakob P. Ley, Dr. Jens-Michael Hilmer, Dr. Gerhard Krammer, Dr. Gottfried J. Palm, Prof. Dr. Winfried Hinrichs and Prof. Dr. Uwe T. Bornscheuer

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306952

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The biocatalytic metabolic pathway for the degradation of flavonoids of Eubacterium ramulus was identified. A chalcone isomerase and an enoate reductase were successfully cloned, subsequently expressed in E. coli, and used under aerobic conditions, although E. ramulus is a strictly anaerobic bacterium. The engineered E. coli strain that expresses both enzymes was used for the conversion of several flavanones.

    43. Nanoreactor

      A Chaperonin as Protein Nanoreactor for Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization (pages 1443–1447)

      Kasper Renggli, Martin G. Nussbaumer, Raphael Urbani, Prof. Dr. Thomas Pfohl and Prof. Dr. Nico Bruns

      Version of Record online: 20 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306798

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Made in a protein: The group II chaperonin thermosome (THS) from the archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum is used as protein nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization. A copper catalyst was entrapped into the THS. The confined space within the nanoreactor favorably influences the polymerization of N-isopropyl acrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION