Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 53 Issue 8

February 17, 2014

Volume 53, Issue 8

Pages 2005–2249

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Electron Transfer in a Supramolecular Associate of a Fullerene Fragment (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2014) (page 2005)

      María Gallego, Joaquín Calbo, Dr. Juan Aragó, Rafael M. Krick Calderon, Fernando H. Liquido, Takahiro Iwamoto, Allison K. Greene, Edward A. Jackson, Dr. Emilio M. Pérez, Prof. Dr. Enrique Ortí, Prof. Dr. Dirk M. Guldi, Prof. Dr. Lawrence T. Scott and Prof. Dr. Nazario Martín

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400662

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two bowl-shaped molecules of complementary electronic character, a donor truxene derivative and an acceptor hemifullerene, have been found to form heteromolecular dimers in solution with binding constants on the order of 103M-1, as described by E. Ortí, D. M. Guldi, L. T. Scott, N. Martín, et al. in their Communication on page 2170 ff. This is the first time that a fullerene fragment has been found to mimic the behavior of C60 as an electron acceptor.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Regulation of the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock by Electrochemically Controlled Extracellular Electron Transfer (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2014) (page 2006)

      Yue Lu, Koichi Nishio, Shoichi Matsuda, Yuki Toshima, Dr. Hiroshi Ito, Prof. Dr. Tomohiro Konno, Prof. Dr. Kazuhiko Ishihara, Dr. Souichiro Kato, Prof. Dr. Kazuhito Hashimoto and Prof. Dr. Shuji Nakanishi

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400665

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The circadian rhythm of cyanobacteria can be regulated by electrochemically controlled extracellular electron transfer (EC-EET) using a transmembrane biocompatible electron mediator, as shown by K. Hashimoto, S. Nakanishi, et al. in their Communication on page 2208 ff. The endogenous cyanobacterial circadian clock was successfully entrained through periodically modulated EC-EET emulating the natural light/dark cycle, even under constant illumination.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Crystal Engineering of Dual Channel p/n Organic Semiconductors by Complementary Hydrogen Bonding (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2014) (page 2251)

      Dr. Hayden T. Black and Prof. Dmitrii F. Perepichka

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400664

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dual channel organic semiconductors prepared by coassembly of donor and acceptor constituents are described by H. T. Black and D. F. Perepichka in their Communication on page 2138 ff. Complementary hydrogen bonding between p-type dipyrrolopyridine and n-type naphthalenediimide derivatives allowed for precise control over the molecular packing in the cocrystals, which combine the charge-transport characteristics of both components.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Radical Cyclization/ipso-1,4-Aryl Migration Cascade: Asymmetric Synthesis of 3,3-Difluoro-2-propanoylbicyclo[3.3.0]octanes (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 8/2014) (page 2252)

      Watcharaporn Thaharn, Dr. Darunee Soorukram, Dr. Chutima Kuhakarn, Dr. Patoomratana Tuchinda, Prof. Dr. Vichai Reutrakul and Prof. Dr. Manat Pohmakotr

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201400658

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel method for the asymmetric synthesis of 3,3-difluoro-2-propanoylbicyclo[3.3.0]octanes is described by M. Pohmakotr et al. in their Communication on page 2212 ff. The reaction proceeds through a cascade process that involves an unprecedented stereoselective intramolecular radical cyclization and an ipso-1,4-aryl migration of cyclopentene derivatives that contain a PhSCF2 moiety. This method should be useful for the synthesis of other related chiral bicyclo[3.3.0]octanes.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  5. Author Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Alexander Eychmüller (page 2028)

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308509

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “My biggest motivation is curiosity. The most exciting thing about my research is not knowing what comes next. …” This and more about Alexander Eychmüller can be found on page 2028.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
  7. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Crucible of Science. The Story of the Cori Laboratory. By John H. Exton. (pages 2031–2032)

      Eberhard Hofmann

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309782

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oxford University Press, 2013. 226 pp., hardcover, $ 49.95.—ISBN 978-0199861071

  8. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Hydroamination

      Copper-Catalyzed Regio- and Enantioselective Hydroamination of Alkenes with Hydroxylamines (pages 2034–2036)

      Dr. Kevin D. Hesp

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309262

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adding value: The catalytic hydroamination of alkenes with amines holds promise to rapidly deliver value-added chiral amines from simple and accessible starting materials. The use of mild, Cu-catalyzed electrophilic amination strategies for the regioselective preparation of both linear and chiral branched amines is highlighted.

  9. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Noncovalent Interactions

      Supramolecular Assemblies by Charge-Transfer Interactions between Donor and Acceptor Chromophores (pages 2038–2054)

      Anindita Das and Dr. Suhrit Ghosh

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307756

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Riot of color: Alternate stacking of aromatic donor and acceptor building blocks by complementary and directional charge-transfer interactions produce versatile supramolecularly assembled materials including micelles, vesicles, nanotubes, fibrillar gels, folded polymers, cross-linked networks, and liquid-crystalline phases.

  10. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Diels–Alder Reactions of Quinones

      Quinones as Dienophiles in the Diels–Alder Reaction: History and Applications in Total Synthesis (pages 2056–2077)

      Dr. Christopher C. Nawrat and Prof. Dr. Christopher J. Moody

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201305908

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Master of six-membered rings: The reaction of a quinone (dienophile) with a diene was described by Diels and Alder in 1928. This Review gives an overview of the application of this reaction as a pivotal step in the total synthesis of natural products and other complex molecules.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Corrigendum
    5. News
    6. Author Profile
    7. News
    8. Book Review
    9. Highlight
    10. Minireview
    11. Review
    12. Communications
    1. Rhodopsin Dynamics

      Characterization of the Simultaneous Decay Kinetics of Metarhodopsin States II and III in Rhodopsin by Solution-State NMR Spectroscopy (pages 2078–2084)

      Dr. Jochen Stehle, Dr. Robert Silvers, Dr. Karla Werner, Deep Chatterjee, Dr. Santosh Gande, Frank Scholz, Arpana Dutta, Prof. Dr. Josef Wachtveitl, Prof. Dr. Judith Klein-Seetharaman and Prof. Dr. Harald Schwalbe

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309581

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let there be light! Time-resolved liquid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the kinetics of the light-activation process of the mammalian visual dim-light photoreceptor rhodopsin. The data reveal two parallel processes occurring subsequent to rhodopsin activation. The metarhodopsin states II and III emerge in parallel in a relative ratio of approximately 3:1.

    2. Photocatalysis

      Mechanistic Insights into the Interface-Directed Transformation of Thiols into Disulfides and Molecular Hydrogen by Visible-Light Irradiation of Quantum Dots (pages 2085–2089)

      Xu-Bing Li, Zhi-Jun Li, Yu-Ji Gao, Qing-Yuan Meng, Shan Yu, Prof. Dr. Richard G. Weiss, Prof. Dr. Chen-Ho Tung and Prof. Dr. Li-Zhu Wu

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310249

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On the dot: A clean and efficient catalytic method for the preparation of disulfides from a variety of thiols in the absence of sacrificial reagents or external oxidants is described. Irradiation of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) with visible light results in good to excellent yields of the disulfides and equivalent amounts of H2. Mechanistic studies provide evidence for the formation of QD-bound RS. and H. radicals as reaction intermediates.

    3. Photochromism

      Quantitative Photoswitching in Bis(dithiazole)ethene Enables Modulation of Light for Encoding Optical Signals (pages 2090–2094)

      Yue Wu, Prof. Yongshu Xie, Qiong Zhang, Prof. He Tian, Prof. Weihong Zhu and Prof. Alexander D. Q. Li

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309915

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molecular photoswitches: A bis(dithiazole)ethane-based compound can be photoswitched between its ring-open and ring-closed states quantitatively with excellent fatigue resistance and high thermal stability. The quantitative reversibility allows the photoswitching light to control other light travelling through the photoswitchable medium, a phenomenon of transferring information encoded in one light ray to others.

    4. Biosensors

      A Double-Imprinted Diffraction-Grating Sensor Based on a Virus-Responsive Super-Aptamer Hydrogel Derived from an Impure Extract (pages 2095–2098)

      Wei Bai and Prof. David A. Spivak

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309462

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Eye see it: A strategy for the naked-eye detection of target compounds by using shrink-responsive hydrogels is presented. A “double imprinting” method was used, in which a virus-bioimprinted hydrogel is further micromolded into a diffraction-grating sensor by using imprint-lithography techniques. The bioimprinting was performed with an impure extract, which eliminates the need for a pure template.

    5. Lithium Batteries

      Ambient Lithium–SO2 Batteries with Ionic Liquids as Electrolytes (pages 2099–2103)

      Dr. Huabin Xing, Dr. Chen Liao, Dr. Qiwei Yang, Dr. Gabriel M. Veith, Dr. Bingkun Guo, Dr. Xiao-Guang Sun, Prof. Qilong Ren, Prof. Yong-Sheng Hu and Prof. Sheng Dai

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309539

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel ambient Li-SO2 battery was developed through the introduction of ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes with tailored basicities to capture SO2 by a reversible chemical absorption (see picture). By tuning the interactions of ILs with SO2, a high energy density and good discharge performance with operating voltages above 2.8 V were obtained.

    6. Self-Sorting

      Zn2+-Regulated Self-Sorting and Mixing of Phosphates and Carboxylates on the Surface of Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles (pages 2104–2109)

      Cristian Pezzato, Prof. Dr. Paolo Scrimin and Prof. Dr. Leonard J. Prins

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309747

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Order versus chaos: A mixture of phosphate- and carboxylate-containing molecules spontaneously separated into the two components on the surface of two different nanoparticles in the presence of Zn2+. The self-sorting process could be reversed by the addition of a scavenger ligand for the Zn2+ ions (see picture).

    7. Optogenetics

      A Photocleavable Masked Nuclear-Receptor Ligand Enables Temporal Control of C. elegans Development (pages 2110–2113)

      M. Sc. Joshua C. Judkins, Dr. Parag Mahanti, Jacob B. Hoffman, Isaiah Yim, Prof. Dr. Adam Antebi and Prof. Dr. Frank C. Schroeder

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307465

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Life goes by in a flash: Photocleavable amides of recently identified C. elegans steroids that bind to a vitamin D receptor homologue enable precise temporal control of worm development and lifespan. The synthetic amide-masked receptor ligands are biocompatible and are retained in the worm in their inactive forms for many days.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Corrigendum: A Photocleavable Masked Nuclear-Receptor Ligand Enables Temporal Control of C. elegans Development

      Vol. 53, Issue 20, 4994, Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2014

    8. Molecular Ferroelectrics

      An Order–Disorder Ferroelectric Host–Guest Inclusion Compound (pages 2114–2118)

      Dr. Yi Zhang, Dr. Heng-Yun Ye, Dr. Da-Wei Fu and Prof. Ren-Gen Xiong

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307690

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The host–guest inclusion compound [2,6-diisopropylanilinium([18]crown-6)](ClO4) (see picture, C blue/pink, N dark blue, O red, Cl green) exhibits a paraelectric–ferroelectric phase transition at 132 K. The origin of the ferroelectricity is attributed to order–disorder transitions of the host [18]crown-6 and ClO4 ion rather than the rotation of the guest cation, in contrast to other rotational host–guest inclusion ferroelectrics.

    9. Optoelectronic Materials

      Highly Efficient Near-Infrared Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on a Butterfly-Shaped Donor–Acceptor Chromophore with Strong Solid-State Fluorescence and a Large Proportion of Radiative Excitons (pages 2119–2123)

      Liang Yao, Shitong Zhang, Rong Wang, Dr. Weijun Li, Dr. Fangzhong Shen, Prof. Bing Yang and Prof. Yuguang Ma

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308486

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Exceeding the limit: An organic light-emitting diode (OLED) based on a butterfly-shaped near-infrared donor–acceptor chromophore (see structure) with efficient solid-state and aggregation-induced emission behavior showed a high external quantum efficiency of 1.54 %. Its radiative exciton ratio of 48 % greatly surpassed the limit of 25 % in conventional fluorescent OLEDs.

    10. Chiral Gels

      Solvent-Driven Chiral-Interaction Reversion for Organogel Formation (pages 2124–2129)

      Prof. Dr. Guangyan Qing, Xingxing Shan, Wenrui Chen, Ziyu Lv, Peng Xiong and Prof. Dr. Taolei Sun

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308554

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Get smart: A system for gel formation in which the solvent not only provides a medium but also determines the nature of the stereoselective interaction between a gelator and a chiral guest provides important insight into the assembly of chiral gelators. The solvent-driven preferential complexation of one or another chiral guest (see picture) enables the design of organogels with new “smart” features for various applications.

    11. In Vivo NMR Spectroscopy

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Real-Time Monitoring of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase Activity in Living Bacterial Cells by 1H NMR Spectroscopy (pages 2130–2133)

      Dr. Junhe Ma, Dr. Sarah McLeod, Kathleen MacCormack, Shubha Sriram, Ning Gao, Dr. Alexander L. Breeze and Dr. Jun Hu

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308636

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spying on superbugs: The hydrolysis of the antibiotic meropenem by Escherichia coli cells carrying the gene for New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase (NDM-1), which confers antibiotic resistance, was monitored by NMR spectroscopy in real time. IC50 values for NDM-1 inhibitors were assessed in vivo. Spermine, a porin inhibitor, was shown to reduce the rate of meropenem degradation in living cells, although in vitro, the inhibitory effect of spermine is minimal.

    12. Asymmetric Synthesis

      An Enantioselective Inverse-Electron-Demand Imino Diels–Alder Reaction (pages 2134–2137)

      M. Sc. Vincent Eschenbrenner-Lux, Dipl.-Biol. Philipp Küchler, Dr. Slava Ziegler, Dr. Kamal Kumar and Prof. Herbert Waldmann

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309022

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Inverse demand! The first enantioselective inverse electron-demand imino Diels–Alder reaction involving electron-poor dienes has been developed and used to generate a natural product inspired compound collection which revealed a highly potent modulator of mitosis.

    13. Organic Semiconductors

      Crystal Engineering of Dual Channel p/n Organic Semiconductors by Complementary Hydrogen Bonding (pages 2138–2142)

      Dr. Hayden T. Black and Prof. Dmitrii F. Perepichka

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310902

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A complementary pair: Complementary hydrogen bonding has been used to control the solid-state arrangement of donor/acceptor components in crystalline p/n heterojunctions (see picture). The self-assembly process by hydrogen bonding modulates the charge-transfer interactions between the donor and acceptor, makes possible precise control over the heterojunction structure, and leads to a combination of charge-transport properties of the individual components.

    14. Reversible C[BOND]C Bond Formation

      Reversible Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Photochemical Formation and Thermal Cleavage of a Cyclobutane Ring (pages 2143–2146)

      Dr. Goutam Kumar Kole, Dr. Tatsuhiro Kojima, Prof. Dr. Masaki Kawano and Prof. Dr. Jagadese J. Vittal

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201306746

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      You can be recycled, Mr. Bond! The influence of crystal packing on the retention of single-crystal nature during cyclobutane formation and cleavage was investigated. The polymorph formed at high temperature retains its single-crystal (SC) nature during reversible photochemical formation and thermal cleavage in a SCSC manner, whereas the polymorph obtained at room temperature does not.

    15. Blue Phosphorescent Organic LEDs

      Using an Organic Molecule with Low Triplet Energy as a Host in a Highly Efficient Blue Electrophosphorescent Device (pages 2147–2151)

      Cong Fan, Liping Zhu, Tengxiao Liu, Bei Jiang, Prof. Dongge Ma, Prof. Jingui Qin and Prof. Chuluo Yang

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A host material with low triplet energy (2.71 eV) was designed by integrating diarylamine and diphenylphosphine oxide into a biphenyl skeleton. Highly efficient organic LEDs that are based on the blue phosphor FIr6, with a maximum current efficiency of 37 cd A−1 and power efficiency of 40 Lm W−1, were achieved by using this host material.

    16. Energy Storage

      Single-Layered Ultrasmall Nanoplates of MoS2 Embedded in Carbon Nanofibers with Excellent Electrochemical Performance for Lithium and Sodium Storage (pages 2152–2156)

      Dr. Changbao Zhu, Dr. Xiaoke Mu, Prof. Peter A. van Aken, Prof. Yan Yu and Prof. Joachim Maier

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308354

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-layered ultrasmall nanoplates (thickness ca. 0.4 nm and lateral dimension ca. 4.0 nm) of MoS2 embedded in thin carbon nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning followed by heat treatment. The high rate performance and cycling stability for both lithium and sodium storage is remarkable and also fundamentally exciting as the conversion reactions are expected to become reversible for such isolated nanodots.

    17. Heterobimetallic Complexes

      Unusual Hafnium–Pyridylamido/ERn Heterobimetallic Adducts (ERn=ZnR2 or AlR3) (pages 2157–2161)

      Dr. Luca Rocchigiani, Prof. Vincenzo Busico, Dr. Antonello Pastore, Prof. Dr. Giovanni Talarico and Prof. Dr. Alceo Macchioni

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308370

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pass the alkyl: NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations provide compelling evidence for the formation of heterobimetallic [{N,N}HfMe(μ-R)(μ-Caryl)ERn−1][B(C6F5)4] adducts when industrially relevant Symyx/Dow HfIV–pyridylamido catalysts for (coordinative chain transfer) olefin polymerization interact with ERn (E=Al or Zn, R=alkyl group).

    18. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Atom-Economic, Regiodivergent, and Stereoselective Coupling of Imidazole Derivatives with Terminal Allenes (pages 2162–2165)

      Kun Xu, Niels Thieme and Prof. Dr. Bernhard Breit

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Taking control: New Rh- and Pd-catalyzed regiodivergent and stereoselective intermolecular coupling reactions of imidazole derivatives with monosubstituted allenes are reported. Using a RhI/Josiphos system, perfect regioselectivities and high enantiomeric excess were obtained, while a PdII/dppf system gave the linear products with high regioselectivities and high E/Z selectivities. dppf=1,1′-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene, Josiphos=(R)-1-[(SP)-2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ferrocenyl]ethyldialkylphosphine.

    19. Supramolecular Self-Assembly

      Photoresponsive Hybrid Raspberry-Like Colloids Based on Cucurbit[8]uril Host–Guest Interactions (pages 2166–2169)

      Yang Lan, Yuchao Wu, Dr. Athan Karas and Prof. Oren A. Scherman

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309204

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reversible assembly of colloids: Hybrid raspberry-like colloids prepared by employing cucurbit[8]uril as a supramolecular linker to assemble functional polymeric nanoparticles onto silica microspheres can be disassembled and reassembled in an efficient and controllable manner (see picture). This supramolecular self-assembly method makes possible the preparation of colloids with sophisticated structures and properties.

    20. Fullerene Fragments

      Electron Transfer in a Supramolecular Associate of a Fullerene Fragment (pages 2170–2175)

      María Gallego, Joaquín Calbo, Dr. Juan Aragó, Rafael M. Krick Calderon, Fernando H. Liquido, Takahiro Iwamoto, Allison K. Greene, Edward A. Jackson, Dr. Emilio M. Pérez, Prof. Dr. Enrique Ortí, Prof. Dr. Dirk M. Guldi, Prof. Dr. Lawrence T. Scott and Prof. Dr. Nazario Martín

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309672

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bowl meets bowl: The association of a fullerene fragment, hemifullerene C30H12, with an electron-donating bowl-shaped tetrathiafulvalene derivative (truxTTF) has been investigated. Electron transfer from truxTTF to C30H12 to form the fully charge-separated species takes place upon irradiation of the associate with light, constituting the first example in which a fullerene fragment mimics the electron-accepting behavior of the fullerenes within a supramolecular complex.

    21. Intermetallic Phases

      Building Nanocomposite Magnets by Coating a Hard Magnetic Core with a Soft Magnetic Shell (pages 2176–2180)

      Fei Liu, Jinghan Zhu, Wenlong Yang, Yunhe Dong, Prof. Yanglong Hou, Chenzhen Zhang, Han Yin and Prof. Shouheng Sun

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309723

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Exchange-coupled nanoparticles: A general protocol is reported for the synthesis of exchange-coupled nanoparticles composed of hard magnetic face-centered tetragonal FePt as the core and soft magnetic Co (or Ni, Fe2C) as the shell. These core/shell nanoparticles show shell-thickness-dependent magnetic properties (see picture; H=applied field, M=magnetization).

    22. C[BOND]H Arylation

      Ascorbic Acid as an Initiator for the Direct C[BOND]H Arylation of (Hetero)arenes with Anilines Nitrosated In Situ (pages 2181–2185)

      Dr. Fernando Pinacho Crisóstomo, Dr. Tomás Martín and Dr. Romen Carrillo

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309761

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vitamin C oupling: A catalytic amount of ascorbic acid acted as a radical initiator in a metal-free direct C[BOND]H arylation of arenes and heteroarenes with anilines (see scheme; Boc=tert-butoxycarbonyl). The reaction requires no heating or irradiation, is operationally simple, and constitutes a greener approach to arylation.

    23. Synthetic Methods

      Iron(II)-Catalyzed Direct Cyanation of Arenes with Aryl(cyano)iodonium Triflates (pages 2186–2189)

      Zhibin Shu, Wenzhi Ji, Xi Wang, Yujing Zhou, Prof. Dr. Yan Zhang and Prof. Dr. Jianbo Wang

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309791

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Direct facile cyanation today! A direct cyanation of aryl C[BOND]H bonds with 3,5-di(trifluoromethyl)phenyl(cyano)iodonium triflate (DFCT) under FeII catalysis was successfully applied to a wide range of aromatic substrates, including polycyclic structures and heteroaromatic compounds (see scheme). The reaction proceeded efficiently under mild conditions.

    24. Synthetic Biology

      Proximity-Enabled Protein Crosslinking through Genetically Encoding Haloalkane Unnatural Amino Acids (pages 2190–2193)

      Dr. Zheng Xiang, Dr. Vanessa K. Lacey, Dr. Haiyan Ren, Dr. Jing Xu, David J. Burban, Prof. Dr. Patricia A. Jennings and Prof. Dr. Lei Wang

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308794

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Building bridges: By expanding the genetic code, a series of haloalkane unnatural amino acids (Uaas) were incorporated into proteins at specific sites. These Uaas only form a covalent thioether bond with cysteine when the two residues are in proximity. This strategy of proximity-enabled protein crosslinking (PEPC) provides diversity and flexibility in covalent bond formation for protein research and protein engineering.

    25. Asymmetric Catalysis

      Hydrogenative Dearomatization of Pyridine and an Asymmetric Aza-Friedel–Crafts Alkylation Sequence (pages 2194–2197)

      Shuo-Guo Wang and Prof. Dr. Shu-Li You

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309876

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The highly efficient synthesis of enantiomerically enriched substituted piperidines in good to excellent yields and enantioselectivity has been realized by using the title reaction, which is catalyzed by the chiral phosphoric acid (CPA) (R)-1.

    26. Protein Modifications

      Irreversible Site-Specific Hydrazinolysis of Proteins by Use of Sortase (pages 2198–2202)

      Yi-Ming Li, Yi-Tong Li, Man Pan, Xiu-Qi Kong, Yi-Chao Huang, Prof. Zhang-Yong Hong and Prof. Lei Liu

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Takes all sort(ase)s: Sortase A mediated hydrazinolysis reactions of proteins with hydrazine or its derivatives were developed as an efficient process for the production of recombinant protein hydrazides. This reaction provides an alternative approach for the semichemical synthesis as well as C-terminal modification of proteins.

    27. C[BOND]H Amidation

      Iridium-Catalyzed Direct C[BOND]H Amidation with Weakly Coordinating Carbonyl Directing Groups under Mild Conditions (pages 2203–2207)

      Jinwoo Kim and Prof. Dr. Sukbok Chang

      Version of Record online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310544

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mild and direct: The iridium-catalyzed direct C[BOND]H amidation of weakly coordinating substrates, particularly of those with ester and ketone groups, under very mild conditions has been developed. With the aid of a combined use of acetic acid and lithium carbonate as additives, the reaction proceeded with high efficiency. Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl.

    28. Circadian Rhythm

      Regulation of the Cyanobacterial Circadian Clock by Electrochemically Controlled Extracellular Electron Transfer (pages 2208–2211)

      Yue Lu, Koichi Nishio, Shoichi Matsuda, Yuki Toshima, Dr. Hiroshi Ito, Prof. Dr. Tomohiro Konno, Prof. Dr. Kazuhiko Ishihara, Dr. Souichiro Kato, Prof. Dr. Kazuhito Hashimoto and Prof. Dr. Shuji Nakanishi

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309560

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let's do the time warp again: Electrochemically controlled extracellular electron transfer can regulate the circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus under constant light intensity through periodic modification of the intracellular redox state. This method could potentially allow for direct or indirect regulation of the biological clock across a range of species.

    29. Synthetic Methods

      Radical Cyclization/ipso-1,4-Aryl Migration Cascade: Asymmetric Synthesis of 3,3-Difluoro-2-propanoylbicyclo[3.3.0]octanes (pages 2212–2215)

      Watcharaporn Thaharn, Dr. Darunee Soorukram, Dr. Chutima Kuhakarn, Dr. Patoomratana Tuchinda, Prof. Dr. Vichai Reutrakul and Prof. Dr. Manat Pohmakotr

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310747

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rad cascades: The title reaction of the compounds 2, which are readily obtained by fluoride-catalyzed nucleophilic addition of PhSCF2TMS to the chiral ketocyclopentenes 1, was found to provide novel access to the asymmetric synthesis of the 3,3-difluoro-2-propanoylbicyclo[3.3.0]octanes 3. AIBN=2,2′-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile), TBAF=tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride, THF=tetrahydrofuran, TMS=trimethylsilyl.

    30. Heavier Double Bonds

      From Disilene (Si[DOUBLE BOND]Si) to Phosphasilene (Si[DOUBLE BOND]P) and Phosphacumulene (P[DOUBLE BOND]C[DOUBLE BOND]N) (pages 2216–2220)

      Philipp Willmes, Dr. Michael J. Cowley, Marco Hartmann, Dr. Michael Zimmer, Dr. Volker Huch and Prof. Dr. David Scheschkewitz

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308525

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By-product free conversion of double bonds between heavier elements occurs by the sequential shifting of amino substituents (NR2; see picture, blue) from phosphorus to the adjacent silicon atoms. The spontaneous isomerization of the plausibly transient phosphinodisilenes (Tip=2,4,6-iPr3C6H2) affords phosphasilenes, one of which is transformed upon addition of an isonitrile into a 1-aza-3-phosphaallene.

    31. Thiol Oxidation

      Flavoenzyme-Catalyzed Formation of Disulfide Bonds in Natural Products (pages 2221–2224)

      Dr. Daniel H. Scharf, Prof. Dr. Michael Groll, Dr. Andreas Habel, Dr. Thorsten Heinekamp, Prof. Dr. Christian Hertweck, Prof. Dr. Axel A. Brakhage and Dr. Eva M. Huber

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309302

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Whiff of sulfur: Disulfide bonds are essential for the bioactivity of natural products such as gliotoxin, a virulence factor of the human pathogen A. fumigatus, the antibiotic holomycin (S. clavuligerus), and the anticancer drug romidepsin (C. violaceum). Structural and biochemical analyses of the thiol oxidases GliT, HlmI, and DepH identify a common reaction mechanism but with different substrate tolerance.

    32. Fluoride Sensing

      Test-Strip-Based Fluorometric Detection of Fluoride in Aqueous Media with a BODIPY-Linked Hydrogen-Bonding Receptor (pages 2225–2229)

      Dr. Pichandi Ashokkumar, Dr. Hardy Weißhoff, Dr. Werner Kraus and Dr. Knut Rurack

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201307848

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dip and detect: BODIPY dyes with strong hydrogen-bond-donating amidothiourea receptors can detect fluoride in organic–aqueous media. The probe embedded in a nitrocellulose test strip enables a quantitative detection of fluoride in pure aqueous medium by using a simple lateral-flow fluorescence reader.

    33. Lasso Peptides

      Xanthomonins I–III: A New Class of Lasso Peptides with a Seven-Residue Macrolactam Ring (pages 2230–2234)

      Julian D. Hegemann, Marcel Zimmermann, Shaozhou Zhu, Dr. Holger Steuber, Dr. Klaus Harms, Dr. Xiulan Xie and Prof. Dr. Mohamed A. Marahiel

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309267

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lowering the bar: Xanthomonins I–III are the first examples of lasso peptides that feature macrolactam rings with seven residues. The structures of xanthomonins I and II (see picture) are described, together with a thorough mutational analysis that revealed the smallest amino acid residue that can still act as a plug to maintain a thermally stable lasso fold in this new class of lasso peptides.

    34. Herbicides

      Pseudilins: Halogenated, Allosteric Inhibitors of the Non-Mevalonate Pathway Enzyme IspD (pages 2235–2239)

      Andrea Kunfermann, Dr. Matthias Witschel, Dr. Boris Illarionov, Dr. René Martin, Dr. Matthias Rottmann, Dr. H. Wolfgang Höffken, Dr. Michael Seet, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Eisenreich, Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Knölker, Prof. Dr. Markus Fischer, Prof. Dr. Adelbert Bacher, Prof. Dr. Michael Groll and Prof. Dr. François Diederich

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309557

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Halogenated natural alkaloids: Nowadays, many organisms develop resistances against known antiinfectives or herbicides. Therefore, new chemical entities as well as new targets are in the focus of current research. Pseudilins, highly halogenated marine natural products, inhibit the third enzyme of the non-mevalonate pathway (IspD) by an allosteric mode of action by using halogen bonding and metal ion coordination. Pseudilins thus show herbicidal and antiplasmodial activity.

    35. Alkylideneboryl Complexes

      A B–C Double Bond Unit Coordinated to Platinum: An Alkylideneboryl Ligand that Is Isoelectronic to Neutral Aminoborylene Ligands (pages 2240–2244)

      Johannes Brand, Prof. Dr. Holger Braunschweig, Florian Hupp, Dr. Ashwini K. Phukan, Dr. Krzysztof Radacki and Dr. Sakya S. Sen

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201310557

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The oxidative addition of an alkyldibromoborane to a zerovalent platinum complex with subsequent elimination of the bromosilane at room temperature leads to the first terminally coordinated transition metal alkylideneboryl complex. The trans bromide ligand can be exchanged for a methyl group through salt metathesis (see scheme). DFT calculations revealed that like imino- and oxoboryl ligands, the alkylideneboryl ligand is an excellent σ-donor and displays a strong trans influence.

    36. In Vivo Protein Labeling

      Minimal Tags for Rapid Dual-Color Live-Cell Labeling and Super-Resolution Microscopy (pages 2245–2249)

      Dr. Ivana Nikić, Dr. Tilman Plass, Dr. Oliver Schraidt, Dr. Jędrzej Szymański, Dr. John A. G. Briggs, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Carsten Schultz and Dr. Edward A. Lemke

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201309847

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two small, photostable fluorophores can be introduced at defined positions in proteins in living mammalian cells. Modified inverse-electron-demand Diels–Alder reactions between unnatural amino acids and tetrazine dye conjugates permitted dual-color labeling. Populations of the insulin receptor and virus-like particles were visualized by super-resolution microscopy.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION