Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 55 Issue 7

February 12, 2016

Volume 55, Issue 7

Pages 2275–2599

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Combining Metabolic Engineering and Electrocatalysis: Application to the Production of Polyamides from Sugar (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2016) (page 2275)

      Miguel Suastegui, John E. Matthiesen, Dr. Jack M. Carraher, Dr. Nacu Hernandez, Natalia Rodriguez Quiroz, Dr. Adam Okerlund, Prof. Dr. Eric W. Cochran, Prof. Dr. Zengyi Shao and Prof. Dr. Jean-Philippe Tessonnier

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201600369

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      Innovative pathways for the production of biorenewable chemicals from sugars are generated by streamlining bio- and chemical catalysis. In their Communication on page 2368 ff., Z. Shao, J.-P. Tessonnier, et al. describe the electrocatalytic hydrogenation of muconic acid that had been produced from glucose using metabolically engineered yeast to 3-hexenedioic acid in the presence of all cells and biogenic impurities. The hydrogenation product was employed as a monomer for the synthesis of unsaturated nylon-6,6.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Inversion of the Supramolecular Chirality of Nanofibrous Structures through Co-Assembly with Achiral Molecules (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2016) (page 2276)

      Guo-Feng Liu, Dr. Ling-Yun Zhu, Wei Ji, Prof. Chuan-Liang Feng and Prof. Zhi-Xiang Wei

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511879

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      Helical and twisted nanostructures with controllable chirality have recently attracted much attention. In their Communication on page 2411 ff., C. L. Feng and co-workers show how the supramolecular chirality of nanofibrous structures can be inverted with achiral molecules through the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. This study also provides a method to explore the functions of chiral nanostructures in environments where chiral and achiral molecules are in close proximity.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Zintl Clusters as Wet-Chemical Precursors for Germanium Nanomorphologies with Tunable Composition (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2016) (page 2601)

      Manuel M. Bentlohner, Dr. Markus Waibel, Patrick Zeller, Dr. Kuhu Sarkar, Prof. Dr. Peter Müller-Buschbaum, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Dina Fattakhova-Rohlfing and Prof. Dr. Thomas F. Fässler

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201600368

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      Nanostructured Group 14 semiconductors attract significant attention because of a broad range of potential applications. In their Communication on page 2441 ff., T. Fässler, D. Fattakhova-Rohlfing et al. describe a general and controllable fabrication method for Ge nanomorphologies with tunable composition using the controlled reaction of [Ge9]4− Zintl clusters to a solid germanium phase. The image was designed by Christoph Hohmann, Nanosystems Initiative Munich.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Direct Detection of Supramolecular Reaction Centers in the Methanol-to-Olefins Conversion over Zeolite H-ZSM-5 by 13C–27Al Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 7/2016) (page 2602)

      Dr. Chao Wang, Dr. Qiang Wang, Prof. Jun Xu, Dr. Guodong Qi, Pan Gao, Weiyu Wang, Yunyun Zou, Dr. Ningdong Feng, Dr. Xiaolong Liu and Prof. Feng Deng

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511880

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      Mechanistic understanding of hydrocarbon-pool (HP) chemistry in the methanol-to-olefins conversion over zeolites is challenging. In their Communication on page 2507 ff., F. Deng, J. Xu, and co-workers report the direct detection of supramolecular reaction centers, composed of organic hydrocarbon-pool species and the inorganic zeolite framework, by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The interaction/proximity between the hydrocarbon-pool species and the Brønsted acid/base sites of the zeolite determines the reactivity of the hydrocarbon-pool species.

  2. Frontispieces

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    1. Frontispiece: Mass Determination of Entire Amyloid Fibrils by Using Mass Spectrometry

      Dr. Tristan Doussineau, Dr. Carole Mathevon, Dr. Lucie Altamura, Dr. Charlotte Vendrely, Dr. Philippe Dugourd, Dr. Vincent Forge and Dr. Rodolphe Antoine

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201680761

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      Proteins In their Communication on page 2340 ff., V. Forge, R. Antoine, and co-workers report on the use of charge-detection mass spectrometry for the characterization of amyloid fibrils. This method can be used to monitor protein aggregation in real time.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
  5. Author Profiles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    1. Yixin Lu (page 2300)

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201508283

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      “My favorite food is lobster. My favorite place on earth is The Maldives ...” This and more about Yixin Lu can be found on page 2300.

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
  7. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    1. Photocatalysis

      A Chiral Metal Photocatalyst Architecture for Highly Enantioselective Photoreactions (pages 2304–2306)

      Adrian G. Amador and Prof. Tehshik P. Yoon

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511443

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      A light in dark places: The discovery of catalysts that can both promote photochemical reactions and control their stereochemistry has been regarded as a central challenge in photochemical synthesis for several decades. The discovery of chiral-at-metal complexes that seem particularly successful in this context is an exciting new development that may provide a general solution to this long-standing problem.

  8. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    1. Photocatalysis

      Imidazolium Ionic Liquids, Imidazolylidene Heterocyclic Carbenes, and Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks for CO2 Capture and Photochemical Reduction (pages 2308–2320)

      Sibo Wang and Prof. Xinchen Wang

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201507145

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      Around the block: Imidazolate building blocks can be utilized in three different ways for the adsorption, activation, and photoreduction of CO2: as components of ionic liquids, N-heterocyclic carbenes, or zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (see picture). The recent developments and existing shortcomings of imidazolate motifs for CO2 utilization, with focus on CO2 photoreduction catalysis, are summarized.

  9. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    1. Silicon Nanocrystals

      Silicon Nanocrystals and Silicon-Polymer Hybrids: Synthesis, Surface Engineering, and Applications (pages 2322–2339)

      Dr. Mita Dasog, Julian Kehrle, Prof. Dr. Bernhard Rieger and Prof. Dr. Jonathan G. C. Veinot

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201506065

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      The grand old newcomer: Silicon may be the “grand old semiconductor”, however, it is a relative newcomer to the field of quantum dots. Silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) are emerging as a promising, non-toxic, and greener alternative to Group II–VI and III–V quantum dots. This Review highlights how surface chemistry can be used to engineer properties of Si-NCs and adapt them towards modern applications, such as sensors, photovoltaics, and light-emitting diodes.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Frontispieces
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Author Profiles
    7. News
    8. Highlights
    9. Minireviews
    10. Reviews
    11. Communications
    1. Proteins | Very Important Paper

      Mass Determination of Entire Amyloid Fibrils by Using Mass Spectrometry (pages 2340–2344)

      Dr. Tristan Doussineau, Dr. Carole Mathevon, Dr. Lucie Altamura, Dr. Charlotte Vendrely, Dr. Philippe Dugourd, Dr. Vincent Forge and Dr. Rodolphe Antoine

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201508995

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      Mass media: The high aspect ratio of amyloid fibrils and the presence of some polymorphism mean that these self-assembled protein structures are difficult to characterize and basic information such as their mass is unknown. Charge-detection mass spectrometry can be used to provide such information in a straightforward manner, and thus monitor protein aggregation in real time.

    2. Conducting Textile

      Semiconducting Fabrics by In Situ Topochemical Synthesis of Polydiacetylene: A New Dimension to the Use of Organogels (pages 2345–2349)

      Baiju P. Krishnan, Dr. Somnath Mukherjee, Dr. Pacheri M. Aneesh, Dr. Manoj A. G. Namboothiry and Prof. Dr. Kana M. Sureshan

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201507475

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      A diyne-functionalized sugar gelator was synthesized that, upon self-assembly, preorganizes the diyne motifs for photochemical polymerization to polydiacetylene. This was exploited to make semiconducting fabrics by in situ polymerization to PDA. While the diyne motif forms the conducting PDA, the carbohydrate motif anchors the monomer, and thus the polymer, to the fabric through hydrogen bonds.

    3. Electrocatalysis

      A Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Water (pages 2350–2355)

      Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schöfberger, Dipl.-Ing. Felix Faschinger, Samir Chattopadhyay, Snehadri Bhakta, Biswajit Mondal, Prof. Dr. Johannes A. A. W. Elemans, Prof. Dr. Stefan Müllegger, M. Sc. Stefano Tebi, Prof. Dr. Reinhold Koch, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Florian Klappenberger, Dipl.-Chem. Mateusz Paszkiewicz, Prof. Dr. Johannes V. Barth, Dr. Eva Rauls, Hazem Aldahhak, Prof. Dr. Wolf Gero Schmidt and Prof. Dr. Abhishek Dey

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201508404

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      Leading a double life: A manganese corrole complex has been shown to serve as a bifunctional catalyst for the electrocatalytic generation of dioxygen and reduction of dioxygen in aqueous solution. The complex oxidizes hydroxide ions to molecular oxygen through a four-electron process in weak to moderate alkaline conditions and reduces O2 in a two-electron process to hydrogen peroxide.

    4. Antibody Mimetics

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      iBodies: Modular Synthetic Antibody Mimetics Based on Hydrophilic Polymers Decorated with Functional Moieties (pages 2356–2360)

      Dr. Pavel Šácha, Tomáš Knedlík, Dr. Jiří Schimer, Dr. Jan Tykvart, Jan Parolek, Václav Navrátil, Petra Dvořáková, Dr. František Sedlák, Prof. Karel Ulbrich, Dr. Jiří Strohalm, Dr. Pavel Majer, Dr. Vladimír Šubr and Dr. Jan Konvalinka

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201508642

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      I spy with my little i: iBodies are antibody mimetics consisting of an HPMA copolymer decorated with low-molecular-weight compounds that function as targeting ligands (blue), affinity anchors (green), and imaging probes (yellow). These iBodies can be used for enzyme inhibition; protein isolation, immobilization, or quantification; and live-cell imaging.

    5. Glycoproteins

      Optimal Synthetic Glycosylation of a Therapeutic Antibody (pages 2361–2367)

      Dr. Thomas B. Parsons, Dr. Weston B. Struwe, Dr. Joseph Gault, Keisuke Yamamoto, Thomas A. Taylor, Ritu Raj, Kim Wals, Prof. Shabaz Mohammed, Prof. Carol V. Robinson, Prof. Justin L. P. Benesch and Prof. Benjamin G. Davis

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201508723

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      You're the one that I want: The “blockbuster” antibody Herceptin was accessed with natural glycosylation through chemoenzymatic construction coupled with MS of the intact antibody (see picture). Herceptin was obtained with high purity (>90 %) when nonspecific, non-enzymatic reactions (glycation) revealed by precise MS analysis were minimized. Glycosylation with unnatural sugars bearing tags also enabled the site-selective attachment of cargo.

    6. Biorefinery

      Combining Metabolic Engineering and Electrocatalysis: Application to the Production of Polyamides from Sugar (pages 2368–2373)

      Miguel Suastegui, John E. Matthiesen, Dr. Jack M. Carraher, Dr. Nacu Hernandez, Natalia Rodriguez Quiroz, Dr. Adam Okerlund, Prof. Dr. Eric W. Cochran, Prof. Dr. Zengyi Shao and Prof. Dr. Jean-Philippe Tessonnier

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509653

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      A metabolically engineered yeast strain was used to convert glucose into the platform molecule muconic acid, which was further electrocatalytically hydrogenated to 3-hexenedioic acid directly in the fermentation broth. Bio-based unsaturated nylon-6,6 was then obtained by polymerization of 3-hexenedioic acid with hexamethylenediamine.

    7. Cage Compounds

      The Regioselectivity of Bingel–Hirsch Cycloadditions on Isolated Pentagon Rule Endohedral Metallofullerenes (pages 2374–2377)

      Dr. Marc Garcia-Borràs, Dr. Maira R. Cerón, Dr. Sílvia Osuna, Dr. Marta Izquierdo, Dr. Josep M. Luis, Prof. Dr. Luis Echegoyen and Prof. Dr. Miquel Solà

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509057

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      The Bingel–Hirsch (BH) addition of diethylbromomalonate to all non-equivalent bonds of Sc3N@D3h-C78 was studied using DFT calculations. A set of rules, the predictive aromaticity criteria (PAC), is proposed to identify the most reactive bonds of endohedral metallofullerenes. The PAC predictions are consistent with computational and experimental data, indicating their generality.

    8. Self-Assembly

      Construction of Insulin 18-mer Nanoassemblies Driven by Coordination to Iron(II) and Zinc(II) Ions at Distinct Sites (pages 2378–2381)

      Dr. Henrik K. Munch, Jesper Nygaard, Dr. Niels Johan Christensen, Dr. Christian Engelbrekt, Mads Østergaard, Dr. Trine Porsgaard, Dr. Thomas Hoeg-Jensen, Prof. Dr. Jingdong Zhang, Prof. Dr. Lise Arleth, Prof. Dr. Peter W. Thulstrup and Prof. Dr. Knud J. Jensen

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509088

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      Careful planning: Well-defined insulin 18-mer nanoassemblies formed by metal-ion-mediated self-assembly (SA) of a modified human insulin molecule (HI) have been synthesized. Attachment of an abiotic 2,2′-bipyridine ligand (red oval) to each HI (black triangle) enabled ZnII-binding hexamers to SA into trimers of hexamers driven by coordination to a FeII ion. ZnII=green sphere; FeII=blue sphere.

    9. Supramolecular Chemistry

      Spontaneous Capture of Carbohydrate Guests through Folding and Zipping of Self-Assembled Ribbons (pages 2382–2386)

      Bowen Shen, Ying He, Dr. Yongju Kim, Yanqiu Wang and Prof. Myongsoo Lee

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509190

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      Ribbon zipping: A planar ribbon assembly is folded into closed tubules in response to fructose addition. The folding and then zipping of the flat ribbons is accompanied by spontaneous capture of the fructose molecules inside the tubular cavities, creating new opportunities for 2D structures to capture specific biomolecules.

    10. Optically Active Materials

      Record Multiphoton Absorption Cross-Sections by Dendrimer Organometalation (pages 2387–2391)

      Dr. Peter V. Simpson, Laurance A. Watson, Dr. Adam Barlow, Dr. Genmiao Wang, Prof. Marie P. Cifuentes and Prof. Mark G. Humphrey

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509223

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      A significant increase in two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-section σ2 (blue) at biologically important wavelengths, and the appearance of large 3PA (red) and record 4PA (green) cross-sections in the telecommunications region, is achieved by incorporation of ruthenium alkynyl units into a dendritic structure. Spectra are scaled along x axis as indicated.

    11. Synergistic Catalysis

      Synergistic Rhodium/Phosphoric Acid Catalysis for the Enantioselective Addition of Oxonium Ylides to ortho-Quinone Methides (pages 2392–2396)

      Dr. Santosh Kumar Alamsetti, M. Sc. Matthias Spanka and Prof. Dr. Christoph Schneider

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509247

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      Hand in hand: A rhodium-catalyzed diazo ester decomposition with subsequent oxonium ylide formation and a phosphoric acid-catalyzed generation of an ortho-quinone methide from an ortho-hydroxy benzhydryl alcohol were efficiently coupled to furnish highly substituted and densely functionalized chromans with three contiguous chiral centers in one synthetic step and with generally good yields and excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities (PA=phosphoric acid).

    12. Reactive Oxygen Species

      Reactive Oxygen Species Play an Important Role in the Bactericidal Activity of Quinolone Antibiotics (pages 2397–2400)

      Jithesh Kottur and Dr. Deepak T. Nair

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509340

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      Double peril: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) oxidize the nucleotide pool and PolIV can incorporate the oxidized nucleotides into DNA. Structural and biochemical studies coupled with in vivo assays show that selective elimination of the ability of PolIV to incorporate 8oxodGTP results in improved survival of bacteria in the presence of antibiotics. These results indicate that the formation of ROS contributes substantially to the bactericidal activity of antibiotics.

    13. Microporous Materials

      A Computational and Experimental Approach Linking Disorder, High-Pressure Behavior, and Mechanical Properties in UiO Frameworks (pages 2401–2405)

      Claire L. Hobday, Ross J. Marshall, Colin F. Murphie, Jorge Sotelo, Tom Richards, Dr. David R. Allan, Prof. Tina Düren, Dr. François-Xavier Coudert, Dr. Ross S. Forgan, Dr. Carole A. Morrison, Dr. Stephen A. Moggach and Dr. Thomas D. Bennett

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509352

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      Bowed but unbroken: Two Zr-MOFs of the UiO family are reported. By including flexible azobenzene-based linkers into the frameworks, the lattices were shown to an exhibit moderate increase in flexibility, along with a dramatic increase in mechanical stability. These results may help design MOFs for useful industrial applications.

    14. Metal–Metal Interactions

      Metal–Metal Interactions in Heterobimetallic Complexes with Dinucleating Redox-Active Ligands (pages 2406–2410)

      Daniël L. J. Broere, Dieuwertje K. Modder, Eva Blokker, Dr. Maxime A. Siegler and Dr. ir. Jarl Ivar van der Vlugt

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509412

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      Aurophilic nickelaburger: Selective P coordination of a redox-active PNO ligand to AuI followed by homoleptic metalation of the NO pocket with NiII affords a unique trinuclear Au–Ni–Au complex. A corresponding cationic dinuclear Au–Ni analogue with a stronger d8–d10 interaction is also reported. However, only the trinuclear complex in its doubly reduced state facilitates electrocatalytic C−X bond activation of alkyl halides.

    15. Helical Structures

      Inversion of the Supramolecular Chirality of Nanofibrous Structures through Co-Assembly with Achiral Molecules (pages 2411–2415)

      Guo-Feng Liu, Dr. Ling-Yun Zhu, Wei Ji, Prof. Chuan-Liang Feng and Prof. Zhi-Xiang Wei

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510140

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      The chirality inversion of helical nanofibers was triggered by achiral bis(pyridinyl) derivatives through co-assembly with phenylalanine-based enantiomers. This process is mainly mediated by the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which may induce stereoselective interactions and different reorientations.

    16. Antitumor Agents

      Structurally Defined αMHC-II Nanobody–Drug Conjugates: A Therapeutic and Imaging System for B-Cell Lymphoma (pages 2416–2420)

      Dr. Tao Fang, Dr. Joao N. Duarte, Jingjing Ling, Zeyang Li, Jonathan S. Guzman and Prof. Dr. Hidde L. Ploegh

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509432

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      Small yet mighty: The development of antibody–drug conjugates has been advanced by the combination of nanobodies and sortase-mediated protein modification. The small format of nanobodies allows quick in vivo target validation and leads to low systemic toxicity. The flexibility of sortase-mediated reactions enables switching between imaging and therapy activities in a quantitative and defined manner.

    17. pH Nanosensors

      Dimerization of Organic Dyes on Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles for Ratiometric pH Sensing (pages 2421–2424)

      Shasha Sun, Xuhui Ning, Greg Zhang, Yen-Chung Wang, Chuanqi Peng and Prof. Dr. Jie Zheng

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509515

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      More than its parts: Dimerization of pH-insensitive fluorophores on ultrasmall luminescent gold nanoparticles creates a highly sensitive ratiometric probe of local pH. This conjugation process can also extend the range of pH-sensitive dyes, allowing for tunable sensing features.

    18. Oxygen Evolution Reaction

      A Mononuclear CoII Coordination Complex Locked in a Confined Space and Acting as an Electrochemical Water-Oxidation Catalyst: A “Ship-in-a-Bottle” Approach (pages 2425–2430)

      Paulami Manna, Dr. Joyashish Debgupta, Dr. Suranjana Bose and Prof. Samar K. Das

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509643

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      Cat in a bottle: Efficient and sustained electrochemical oxidation of water to molecular oxygen has been achieved by a mononuclear CoII complex entrapped, like a ship in a bottle, inside the void space of a three-dimensional metal–organic host. The catalyst operates best at pH 13 with a catalytic turnover frequency as high as 0.05 s−1 for oxygen evolution.

    19. Bacterial Detection | Hot Paper

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      A Catalytic DNA Activated by a Specific Strain of Bacterial Pathogen (pages 2431–2434)

      Dr. Zhifa Shen, Dr. Zaisheng Wu, Dingran Chang, Wenqing Zhang, Dr. Kha Tram, Prof. Dr. Christine Lee, Prof. Dr. Peter Kim, Prof. Dr. Bruno J. Salena and Prof. Dr. Yingfu Li

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510125

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      A DNA molecule that is picky: A method has been established for developing catalytic DNA probes that recognize a targeted infectious strain of a specific bacterium without cross-reactivities to non-pathogenic strains of the same species.

    20. Sensors | Hot Paper

      Recognition and Sensing of Creatinine (pages 2435–2440)

      Dr. Tomàs Guinovart, Daniel Hernández-Alonso, Dr. Louis Adriaenssens, Dr. Pascal Blondeau, Dr. Marta Martínez-Belmonte, Prof. F. Xavier Rius, Dr. Francisco J. Andrade and Prof. Pablo Ballester

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510136

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      Creatinine quantification: A monophosphonate-bridge calix[4]pyrrole cavitand traps creatinine and the creatininium cation in its deep and polar aromatic cavity. The receptor offers complementary hydrogen-bonding sites to the polar functional groups of the guest. Its use as an ionophore enhances the analytical performance of ion-selective electrodes and enables the determination of creatinine levels in biological samples.

    21. Zintl Clusters

      Zintl Clusters as Wet-Chemical Precursors for Germanium Nanomorphologies with Tunable Composition (pages 2441–2445)

      Manuel M. Bentlohner, Dr. Markus Waibel, Patrick Zeller, Dr. Kuhu Sarkar, Prof. Dr. Peter Müller-Buschbaum, Priv.-Doz. Dr. Dina Fattakhova-Rohlfing and Prof. Dr. Thomas F. Fässler

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201508246

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      Inverse opals from Zintl clusters: Like a bees wax germanium forms a honeycomb structure around template beads. The controlled reaction of [Ge9]4− Zintl anions to a solid germanium phase is presented and used for a general and controllable fabrication method for Ge nanomorphologies with tunable composition. This method is used for the fabrication of undoped and P-doped inverse opal-structured Ge films.

    22. Protein NMR

      Solid-State NMR of PEGylated Proteins (pages 2446–2449)

      Dr. Enrico Ravera, Silvia Ciambellotti, Dr. Linda Cerofolini, Dr. Tommaso Martelli, Dr. Tatiana Kozyreva, Dr. Caterina Bernacchioni, Stefano Giuntini, Prof. Marco Fragai, Prof. Paola Turano and Prof. Claudio Luchinat

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510148

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      PEGging down proteins: PEGylated proteins are an elusive target for structure elucidation since they are usually too large for solution NMR and tend not to crystallize. Pelleted PEGylated proteins were demonstrated to yield high-resolution spectra that are suitable for structural characterization and allow the tracking of minor structural changes as a result of PEGylation.

    23. Biaryls

      Metal Free Bi(hetero)aryl Synthesis: A Benzyne Truce–Smiles Rearrangement (pages 2450–2453)

      Catherine M. Holden, Dr. Shariar M. A. Sohel and Prof. Michael F. Greaney

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510236

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      All smiles: Metal-free biaryl synthesis is achieved by adding benzyne to arylsulfonamides. A Smiles rearrangement enables C−C bond formation, thus accessing a variety of functionalized biaryls under mild reaction conditions.

    24. Proteomics

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      Single-Cell Mass Spectrometry for Discovery Proteomics: Quantifying Translational Cell Heterogeneity in the 16-Cell Frog (Xenopus) Embryo (pages 2454–2458)

      Camille Lombard-Banek, Prof. Sally A. Moody and Prof. Peter Nemes

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510411

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      Back to the beginning: the cell. The encoded proteome offers basic insight into normal development. Capillary electrophoresis, electrospray ionization, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and bottom-up proteomics were integrated to enable the identification of 1709 proteins in single embryonic Xenopus cells. Quantification of hundreds of proteins revealed translational differences between cells that give rise to different tissues during development.

    25. Giant Surfactants

      Molecular-Curvature-Induced Spontaneous Formation of Curved and Concentric Lamellae through Nucleation (pages 2459–2463)

      Dr. Xue-Hui Dong, Bo Ni, Mingjun Huang, Dr. Chih-Hao Hsu, Ruobing Bai, Prof. Dr. Wen-Bin Zhang, Prof. Dr. An-Chang Shi and Prof. Dr. Stephen Z. D. Cheng

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510524

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      Ever-increasing circles: The spontaneous formation of curved/concentric lamellae was observed in the self-assembly of giant surfactants (see picture; scale bar: 100 nm). This behavior is induced by the molecular curvature originating from the asymmetrical sizes of the head and tail blocks and the rectangular shape of the molecular interface.

    26. Upconversion | Very Important Paper

      Filtration Shell Mediated Power Density Independent Orthogonal Excitations–Emissions Upconversion Luminescence (pages 2464–2469)

      Dr. Xiaomin Li, Zhenzhen Guo, Tiancong Zhao, Yang Lu, Lei Zhou, Prof. Dongyuan Zhao and Prof. Fan Zhang

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510609

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      A different light: Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles (NPs) with a filtration shell that separates two different luminescence processes and prevents them from interfering with each other are prepared. The filtration effects allow the core-multishell upconversion NPs to show power density independent orthogonal excitations-emissions luminescence and be used in anti-counterfeiting and imaging-guided combined therapy.

    27. Solvatochromism

      Conformational Switching of π-Conjugated Junctions from Merocyanine to Cyanine States by Solvent Polarity (pages 2470–2473)

      Alhama Arjona-Esteban, Dr. Matthias Stolte and Prof. Dr. Frank Würthner

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510620

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      Solvent-dependent conformational switch: A bifurcated π-scaffold exhibits a conformational switch between a DA merocyanine-like and a zwitterionic DAD cyanine-like structure upon increasing solvent polarity, which is accompanied by an absorption maximum shift of Δλ≈160 nm from the visible (ca. 585 nm) to the near infrared region (ca. 750 nm). Both conformations were characterized by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    28. Supercooled Water

      Apparent First-Order Liquid–Liquid Transition with Pre-transition Density Anomaly, in Water-Rich Ideal Solutions (pages 2474–2477)

      Zuofeng Zhao and Prof. C. Austen Angell

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510717

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      Heat capacities of an aqueous non-ideal salt solution (11.4 mol % LiCl) and an ideal salt solution (14.4 mol % hydrazinium trifluoroacetate) were measured and compared in the temperature range of water anomalies. Is the Cp “spike” the elusive liquid–liquid transition?

    29. Organocatalysis

      Organocatalytic Strategy for the Enantioselective Cycloaddition to Trisubstituted Nitroolefins to Create Spirocyclohexene-Oxetane Scaffolds (pages 2478–2482)

      Dr. Alicia Monleón, Dr. Florian Glaus, Stefania Vergura and Prof. Dr. Karl Anker Jørgensen

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510731

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      Challenging the crowds: The enantioselective cycloaddition reaction of α,β,β-trisubstituted nitroolefins with 2,4-dienals mediated by trienamine catalysis affords highly functionalized spirocyclohexene-oxetanes containing two tetrasubstituted carbon atoms in high yields (up to 86 %) and enantioselectivities (up to 98 % ee).

    30. Fullerenes

      Selective Multiamination of C70 Leading to Curved π Systems with 60, 58, 56, and 50 π Electrons (pages 2483–2487)

      Yanbang Li, Dan Xu and Prof. Dr. Liangbing Gan

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510872

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      Throw a curve: Secondary aliphatic amines add to [70]fullerene in the presence of NFSI (N-fluorobenzenesulfonimide) to form cyclopentadienyl-type adducts. The addition occurs at the pole pentagon and was confirmed by X-ray analysis. Further contraction of the π system took place at the other pole pentagon and led to curved π systems, including the 50 π electron Vögtle belt.

    31. Electrocatalysis

      Strong-Coupled Cobalt Borate Nanosheets/Graphene Hybrid as Electrocatalyst for Water Oxidation Under Both Alkaline and Neutral Conditions (pages 2488–2492)

      Pengzuo Chen, Kun Xu, Tianpei Zhou, Yun Tong, Junchi Wu, Han Cheng, Xiuli Lu, Hui Ding, Prof. Changzheng Wu and Prof. Yi Xie

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511032

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      Amorphous Co-based borate ultrathin nanosheets/graphene hybrid was prepared by a room-temperature chemical approach and investigated as an OER electrocatalyst. This Co-Bi NS/G hybrid electrocatalyst showed high OER catalytic activity and superior stability in both alkaline and neutral solutions.

    32. Natural Product Synthesis

      Unified Total Synthesis of 3-epi-Ryanodol, Cinnzeylanol, Cinncassiols A and B, and Structural Revision of Natural Ryanodol and Cinnacasol (pages 2493–2497)

      Masaki Koshimizu, Dr. Masanori Nagatomo and Prof. Dr. Masayuki Inoue

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511116

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      Ryanodane diterpenoids have an extremely complex fused ring system with distinct positions and orientations of the oxygen-based functionalities. Reported is the unified total syntheses of four diterpenoids, 3-epi-ryanodol, cinnzeylanol, and cinncassiols B and A, from a common pentacycle. This work also served to revise the proposed structures of natural ryanodol and cinnacasol to be those of 3-epi-ryanodol and cinncassiol A, respectively.

    33. Total Synthesis | Hot Paper

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Tandem Allylboration–Prins Reaction for the Rapid Construction of Substituted Tetrahydropyrans: Application to the Total Synthesis of (−)-Clavosolide A (pages 2498–2502)

      Dr. Alba Millán, James R. Smith, Jack L.-Y. Chen and Prof. Dr. Varinder K. Aggarwal

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511140

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      Growing complexity: A highly efficient and diasteroselective three-component allylboration–Prins reaction serves to construct the highly functionalised THP-ring of (−)-clavosolide A from simple starting materials. An early stage diasteroselective glycosidation and a late stage lithiation–borylation are used to complete the synthesis of this complex natural product in just 13 steps from ethanol in 14 % overall yield.

    34. Colloidal Crystals | Hot Paper

      Electroresponsive Structurally Colored Materials: A Combination of Structural and Electrochromic Effects (pages 2503–2506)

      Tomoya Kuno, Dr. Yoshimasa Matsumura, Dr. Koji Nakabayashi and Prof. Dr. Mahito Atobe

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511191

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      Coat of many colors: Ordered arrays of polyaniline@poly(methyl methacrylate) core–shell nanoparticles act as electroresponsive structurally colored materials. The colors, which range from greenish-yellow to light-blue, depend on the size of the nanoparticles, and can also be varied by the application of a voltage.

    35. Zeolite Catalysts

      Direct Detection of Supramolecular Reaction Centers in the Methanol-to-Olefins Conversion over Zeolite H-ZSM-5 by 13C–27Al Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy (pages 2507–2511)

      Dr. Chao Wang, Dr. Qiang Wang, Prof. Jun Xu, Dr. Guodong Qi, Pan Gao, Weiyu Wang, Yunyun Zou, Dr. Ningdong Feng, Dr. Xiaolong Liu and Prof. Feng Deng

      Article first published online: 6 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510920

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      Pooled resources: The formation of supramolecular reaction centers composed of organic hydrocarbon-pool (HP) species and a zeolite framework is shown by 13C–27Al double-resonance solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The distance between 13C atoms (HP species) and 27Al atoms (zeolite) determines the reactivity of the HP species in the methanol-to-olefins conversion over H-ZSM-5 zeolite.

    36. Biocatalysis

      Myoglobin-Catalyzed Olefination of Aldehydes (pages 2512–2516)

      Dr. Vikas Tyagi and Prof. Dr. Rudi Fasan

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201508817

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      A whale of an olefination: Engineered variants of sperm whale myoglobin can serve as biocatalysts for the conversion of aldehydes and α-diazo esters into the corresponding α,β-unsaturated esters. This transformation proceeds with high catalytic efficiency and high E diastereoselectivity and could be applied to a variety of different aldehyde substrates and α-diazoesters.

    37. Electrocatalysis

      Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction at a Bio-inspired Mononuclear Copper Phenolato Complex Immobilized on a Carbon Nanotube Electrode (pages 2517–2520)

      Solène Gentil, Doti Serre, Dr. Christian Philouze, Dr. Michael Holzinger, Prof. Fabrice Thomas and Dr. Alan Le Goff

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509593

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      From enzyme to nanotube: A carbon-nanotube-supported copper phenolato complex for biomimetic oxygen reduction was synthesized. The immobilized complex exhibits a 4 H+/4 e electrocatalytic activity and may guide the development of future catalysts.

    38. Ion Conductors

      Single Lithium-Ion Conducting Polymer Electrolytes Based on a Super-Delocalized Polyanion (pages 2521–2525)

      Qiang Ma, Heng Zhang, Chongwang Zhou, Liping Zheng, Pengfei Cheng, Prof. Jin Nie, Prof. Wenfang Feng, Prof. Yong-Sheng Hu, Prof. Hong Li, Prof. Xuejie Huang, Prof. Liquan Chen, Prof. Michel Armand and Prof. Zhibin Zhou

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509299

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      A super-delocalized polyanion is used for a single lithium-ion conducting polymer electrolyte. The neat LiPSsTFSI ionomer displays a low glass-transition temperature (44.3 °C), and its blended polymer electrolyte of the LiPSsTFSI/PEO exhibits a high Li-ion transference number (tLi+=0.91) and high ionic conductivities of individual Li+ cations, which are comparable to those for the classic ambipolar LiTFSI/PEO SPEs above 70 °C (the melting point).

    39. Homogeneous Catalysis

      Palladium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Allylic Alkylations with Toluene Derivatives as Pronucleophiles (pages 2526–2530)

      Dr. Jianyou Mao, Dr. Jiadi Zhang, Hui Jiang, Dr. Ana Bellomo, Mengnan Zhang, Zidong Gao, Dr. Spencer D. Dreher and Prof. Patrick J. Walsh

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509917

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      A softer touch: Coordination of the tricarbonylchromium group to toluene derivatives not only facilitates deprotonation with lithium silylamide base, but convinces the resulting benzylic organolithium to reconsider its hardened ways and participate in palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation reactions with high enantioselectivity.

    40. Cross-Coupling

      Use of a “Catalytic” Cosolvent, N,N-Dimethyl Octanamide, Allows the Flow Synthesis of Imatinib with no Solvent Switch (pages 2531–2535)

      Jeffrey C. Yang, Dawen Niu, Bram P. Karsten, Fabio Lima and Prof. Dr. Stephen L. Buchwald

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509922

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      Going with the flow: A general flow method developed for C−N cross-coupling using N,N-dimethyloctanamide as a catalytic cosolvent was integrated into a two-step sequence which converted phenols into biarylamines via either triflates or tosylates. It was applied to a three-step synthesis of imatinib, the API of Gleevec, in good yield without the need of solvent switches.

    41. Synthetic Methods

      Carbocyclic Amino Ketones by Bredt's Rule-Arrested Kulinkovich–de Meijere Reaction (pages 2536–2539)

      Paul B. Finn, Brenden P. Derstine and Prof. Scott McN. Sieburth

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201509983

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      Frustrated by Bredt's rule: An inability to consummate a Kulinkovich–de Meijere cyclopropanation that would involve a bridgehead double bond transforms the reaction into a transannular cyclization of an unsaturated lactam yielding an amino ketone product with potential for alkaloid synthesis.

    42. Heterocycles

      Stereoselective Synthesis of Polycycles Containing an Aziridine Group: Intramolecular aza-Diels–Alder Reactions of Unactivated 2H-Azirines with Unactivated Dienes (pages 2540–2544)

      Dr. Hua-Dong Xu, Hao Zhou, Ying-Peng Pan, Xin-Tao Ren, Hao Wu, Mei Han, Run-Ze Han and Dr. Mei-Hua Shen

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510096

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      Cycling through: 5-6-3 and 6-6-3 tricycles, as well as more complex polycycles having a fused aziridine ring were constructed through an unprecedented intramolecular aza-Diels–Alder reaction of 2H-azirine with high stereoselectivity. The use of vinyl azide as the in situ azirine precursor precludes difficulties encountered in the direct handling of the corresponding azirine.

    43. Nanoparticle Catalysis

      Quantifying the Electrocatalytic Turnover of Vitamin B12-Mediated Dehalogenation on Single Soft Nanoparticles (pages 2545–2549)

      Dr. Wei Cheng and Prof. Dr. Richard G. Compton

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510394

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      Nano-impacting B12: The electrocatalytic dehalogenation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by single soft nanoparticles in the form of Vitamin B12-containing droplets is reported. The turnover number of the catalytic reaction was quantified at the single soft nanoparticle level. The kinetic data shows that the binding of TCE with the electro-reduced vitamin in the CoI oxidation state is chemically reversible.

    44. Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry

      A Potent Glucose–Platinum Conjugate Exploits Glucose Transporters and Preferentially Accumulates in Cancer Cells (pages 2550–2554)

      Dr. Malay Patra, Dr. Timothy C. Johnstone, Dr. Kogularamanan Suntharalingam and Prof. Stephen J. Lippard

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510551

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      Glucose–platinum conjugates for targeted delivery: A rationally designed potent glucose–platinum conjugate exploits glucose transporters, which are widely overexpressed in cancers, for internalization and selectively accumulates in and annihilates cancer cells.

    45. Chlorosulfolipids

      Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Bromo- and Fluorodanicalipin A (pages 2555–2558)

      Stefan Fischer, Nikolas Huwyler, Dr. Susanne Wolfrum and Prof. Dr. Erick M. Carreira

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510608

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      Halologs: The syntheses of bromo- and fluorodanicalipin A are reported and the ground-state conformation was determined by J-based configuration analysis (see scheme, R=H). A preliminary comparative study of their toxicology suggests that the adverse effect arises from the lipophilicity of the halogens which counterbalance the polar C14 sulfate.

    46. Synthetic Methods

      Practical Direct α-Arylation of Cyclopentanones by Palladium/Enamine Cooperative Catalysis (pages 2559–2563)

      Yan Xu, Tianshun Su, Zhongxing Huang and Prof. Dr. Guangbin Dong

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510638

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      Be direct: A direct α-C−H arylation of normal cyclopentanones with aryl bromides, enabled by palladium/amine cooperative catalysis, features an exceptionally high selectivity for monoarylation, use of readily available starting materials, good scalability, and broad functional-group tolerance.

    47. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Azulenesulfonium Salts: Accessible, Stable, and Versatile Reagents for Cross-Coupling (pages 2564–2568)

      Paul Cowper, Yu Jin, Michael D. Turton, Dr. Gabriele Kociok-Köhn and Dr. Simon E. Lewis

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510666

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      Az u like it! Azulenesulfonium salts, which can be synthesized in one step from the corresponding azulenes, acted as pseudohalide electrophilic cross-coupling reagents in Suzuki–Miyaura reactions with a variety of aryl and heteroaryl boronic acids (see scheme). The sulfonium salts possess several advantages over azulenyl halides in terms of their ease of preparation and purification, as well as their superior stability.

    48. Alkaloid Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of (±)-Alstoscholarisine A (pages 2569–2572)

      Prof. Dr. Filip Bihelovic and Prof. Dr. Zorana Ferjancic

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510777

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      A change of mind: The first total synthesis of the neuroactive indole alkaloid (±)-alstoscholarisine A is reported. The key step of the concise synthesis is an efficient domino sequence that was used to assemble the 2,8-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane core through the formation of two C−N bonds and one C−C bond in a single step.

    49. Inostamycin A

      The Total Synthesis of Inostamycin A (pages 2573–2576)

      Guangri Yu, Prof. Dr. Byunghyuck Jung, Prof. Dr. Hee-Seung Lee and Prof. Dr. Sung Ho Kang

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510852

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      The total synthesis of inostamycin A sodium salt was completed through a stereoselective and efficient aldol condensation of aldehyde A with the lithium enolate of ethyl ketone B. The two quaternary carbons at C20 and C16 of B were installed by diastereoselective addition reactions of the transmetalated species from iodides to ketones.

    50. Total Synthesis

      Total Synthesis of Isodaphlongamine H: A Possible Biogenetic Conundrum (pages 2577–2581)

      Dr. Amit Kumar Chattopadhyay, Vu Linh Ly, Dr. Shashidhar Jakkepally, Dr. Gilles Berger and Prof. Dr. Stephen Hanessian

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510861

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      The missing link? A concise and highly convergent total synthesis of isodaphlongamine H was accomplished in 24 linear steps. The molecule exhibited promising inhibitory activity against a panel of human cancer cell lines. PCC=pyridinium chlorochromate.

    51. Electrochromism

      Assembly of an Axially Chiral Dynamic Redox System with a Perfluorobiphenyl Skeleton into Dumbbell- or Tripod-type Electron Donors (pages 2582–2586)

      Hitomi Tamaoki, Dr. Ryo Katoono, Prof. Dr. Kenshu Fujiwara and Prof. Dr. Takanori Suzuki

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201510935

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      Attachment of fluorine atoms endows a biphenyl-based dynamic redox donor with the multi-input/multi-output response properties. The SNAr reaction at the F atom enabled construction of the optically pure dyad and triad electron donors, which undergo multielectron-oxidation to tetra- and hexacationic dyes, respectively, and exhibit electrochiroptical responses.

    52. Heterocycle Synthesis

      Rapid Access to 2-Methylene Tetrahydrofurans and γ-Lactones: A Tandem Four-Step Process (pages 2587–2591)

      Renxiao Liang, Dr. Kai Chen, Qiaohui Zhang, Jiantao Zhang, Prof. Dr. Huanfeng Jiang and Prof. Dr. Shifa Zhu

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511133

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      Four in one: A one-pot tandem process (see scheme; EWG=electron-withdrawing group) has been developed for the efficient synthesis of indanone-fused 2-methylene tetrahydrofurans from enynals and propynols. Two rings and four bonds were generated with 100 % atom economy and high step efficiency. The resulting tetrahydrofurans were oxidized into α-methylene γ-lactones, which are important substructures in natural and bioactive compounds.

    53. Ionic Self-Assembly

      Polyoxometalate-Driven Self-Assembly of Short Peptides into Multivalent Nanofibers with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity (pages 2592–2595)

      Jingfang Li, Zhijun Chen, Mengcheng Zhou, Jiangbo Jing, Prof. Wen Li, Yang Wang, Prof. Lixin Wu, Liyan Wang, Yanqiu Wang and Prof. Myongsoo Lee

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511276

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fatal attraction: Polyoxometalates were able to drive the self-assembly of short peptides into well-defined nanofibers through multivalent electrostatic attraction. The resulting fibrillar nanostructures with lysine residues concentrated on the surface showed enhanced antimicrobial activity and biological stability (see picture).

    54. Boron Peroxides

      Stable Boron Peroxides with a Subporphyrinato Ligand (pages 2596–2599)

      Dr. Eiji Tsurumaki, Jooyoung Sung, Prof. Dr. Dongho Kim and Prof. Dr. Atsuhiro Osuka

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511590

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Acid-catalyzed exchange reactions of a subporphyrinatoboron methoxide with a range of hydroperoxides have resulted in the synthesis of a series of boron peroxides with a subporphyrinato ligand. The boron peroxides are prepared in good yields and are fairly stable under ambient conditions, thus allowing their isolation and full characterization as the first examples of structurally authenticated neutral and acyclic boron peroxides.

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