Experimental investigations of polypropylene and poly(vinyl chloride) composites filled with plerospheres

Authors

  • Mingzhu Wang,

    1. Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Zhigang Shen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China
    • Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chujiang Cai,

    1. Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shulin Ma,

    1. Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yushan Xing

    1. Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Plerospheres, defined here as superfine spherical particles (0.5–5 μm) separated from fly ash (rather than as other solid spherical particles, as some have used the term), are separated from coal fly ash but are dramatically different from it. Plerospheres can be used as polymer fillers to improve the properties of composites. With plerospheres used as fillers for polypropylene (PP) and unplasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (UPVC), the effects of the filler content, the particle sizes of the plerospheres, and the coupling agent on the composite properties were studied. The particle sizes of the plerospheres were 2 and 5 μm. The results suggested that the notched impact properties both at a normal temperature and a low temperature and the tensile and flexural properties of plerosphere/PP increased significantly when the content was increased from 0 to 30 wt % and further increased with the addition of a coupling agent. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the thermal properties of the plerosphere/PP composite improved. The surface characteristics and morphology of the impact fracture surface were examined in detail with scanning electron microscopy. The rheological performance of plerosphere/UPVC pipe composites obviously improved; the plasticizing time was shortened, and the maximum torque was reduced. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 92: 126–131, 2004

Ancillary