Surface oxidation of cis–trans polybutadiene

Authors

  • L. Smith,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
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  • C. Doyle,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
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  • D. E. Gregonis,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
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  • J. D. Andrade

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
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Abstract

Uncrosslinked cis–trans polybutadiene films were prepared on ultraclean glass microscope slides by uniform dipping. The samples were stored in different environments prior to evaluation of surface oxidation by dynamic contact angle using the Wilhelmy plate method and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Storage conditions evaluated were: (1) laboratory air at 20°C and 30% relative humidity; (2) vacuum at 0.1 torr; (3) distilled water equilibrated with air; and (4) degassed distilled water. XPS and contact angle analysis indicate that samples exposed to air undergo significant surface oxidation within 8 h. Exposure of polybutadiene to air-equilibrated water results in slower oxidation. Samples stored in degassed water demonstrated less surface oxidation. Vacuum-stored samples demonstrated the least surface oxidation. Dynamic contact angle measurements demonstrated that receding contact angles are more sensitive to changes in surface oxidation than are advancing contact angles, as expected. Changes in surface wetting characteristics are readily observed after only 1 h in laboratory air, although XPS analysis does not show evidence of oxidation within 4 h of air storage.

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