The physical mechanism for the production of hydrophilic polymer microparticles from aqueous suspensions

Authors

  • Alec B. Scranton,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
    Current affiliation:
    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, M. I. T., Cambridge, MA 02139
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  • Antonios G. Mikos,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
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  • Lisa C. Scranton,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
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  • Nikolaos A. Peppas

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
    • School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907
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Abstract

A previously reported method of producing spherical, hydrophilic microparticles by aqueous suspension polymerization is experimentally investigated. The phase separation is the result of a salting-out phenomenon. Characteristics of the salting-out effect between the monomer and suspending phase of aqueous NaCl solution are studied. The size and shape of the produced particles are characterized. It is concluded that the mechanism of polymerization is actually a combination of suspension and solution polymerization, and that the water content in the monomer phase is low enough to produce structurally homogeneous particles.

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