Viscoelastic behavior of concentrated oil solutions of sulfonated polymers. V. Effect of metal stearate plasticizers

Authors

  • P. K. Agarwal,

    1. Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Corporate Research, Route 22 East, Clinton Township, Annandale, New Jersey 08801
    Current affiliation:
    1. Exxon Chemicals International Inc., Nieuwe Nijverheildslaan 2, B-1920 Machelen, Belgium
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  • D. G. Peiffer,

    1. Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Corporate Research, Route 22 East, Clinton Township, Annandale, New Jersey 08801
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  • R. T. Garner,

    1. Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Corporate Research, Route 22 East, Clinton Township, Annandale, New Jersey 08801
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  • R. D. Lundberg

    1. Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Corporate Research, Route 22 East, Clinton Township, Annandale, New Jersey 08801
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    • Exxon Chemical Company, 1900 East Linden Avenue, Linden, NJ 02036.


Abstract

Linear viscoelastic studies of concentrated blend solutions of metal neutralized sulfonated elastomers and low molecular weight metal stearate plasticizers are presented. The data of the magnesium and zinc salts of sulfonated EPDM polymer solutions in 100 N oil solvent as a function of magnesium and zinc stearate polar plasticizers show that addition of the latter species into the ionomeric elastomer solutions enhances their low temperature relaxation spectrum. The changes in properties are directly related to the enhancement of ionic interactions and filler effects of the plasticizers. At high temperatures, the zinc stearate molecules behave more as a conventional plasticizer. For ionomeric associating polymers, the phenomenon appears to be quite general in nature. The enhancement in properties is found to be a function of the counterion structure on the ionomer and stearate. In the case of these solution blends, the studies confirm that an ion-exchange process can occur, especially at high temperatures, resulting in the counterion on the stearate moieties “exchanging” ionic sites on the ionomer. Apparently, this process proceeds quite slowly at low temperatures. However, it is clear from these measurements that the incorporation of metal stearates into the ionomeric solution changes the network structure at both low and high temperatures.

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