Advertisement

Generation of antifouling layers on stainless steel surfaces by plasma-enhanced crosslinking of polyethylene glycol

Authors

  • Baiyan Dong,

    1. Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    2. Department of Food Microbiology and Toxicology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    3. Food Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sorin Manolache,

    1. Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Eileen B. Somers,

    1. Food Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Amy C. Lee Wong,

    1. Department of Food Microbiology and Toxicology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    2. Food Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ferencz S. Denes

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    2. Food Research Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    3. Department of Biological Systems Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    • Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) structures were deposited onto stainless steel (SS) surfaces by spin coating and argon radio frequency (RF)-plasma mediated crosslinking. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) indicated the presence of [BOND]CH2[BOND]CH2[BOND]O[BOND] structure and C[BOND]C[BOND]C linkage, as a result of the plasma crosslinking, on PEG-modified SS surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated complete deposition, and water contact angle analysis revealed higher hydrophilicity on PEG-modified surfaces compared to unmodified SS surfaces. Surface morphology and roughness analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed smoother SS surfaces after PEG modification. The evaluation of antifouling ability of the PEG-modified SS surfaces was carried out. Compared to the unmodified SS, PEG-modified surfaces showed about 81–96% decrease in Listeria monocytogenes attachment and biofilm formation (p < 0.05). This cold plasma mediated PEG crosslinking provided a promising technique to reduce bacterial contamination on surfaces encountered in food-processing environments. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 97: 485–497, 2005

Ancillary