Get access

Coefficient of friction reduction of ethylene-co-acrylic acid film: Effects of grafted 12-aminododecanamide and solvent exposure

Authors

  • Ning Luo,

    1. Center for Advanced Engineering Fibers and Films and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Amol V. Janorkar,

    1. Center for Advanced Engineering Fibers and Films and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Douglas E. Hirt,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Advanced Engineering Fibers and Films and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 USA
    • Center for Advanced Engineering Fibers and Films and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Scott M. Husson,

    1. Center for Advanced Engineering Fibers and Films and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dwight W. Schwark

    1. Cryovac Division of Sealed Air Corporation, Duncan, South Carolina 29334 USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The effect of covalently bound 12-aminododecanamide on the surface coefficient of friction (COF) of ethylene–acrylic acid copolymer (EAA) films was investigated. The reaction involved grafting 12-aminododecanoic acid to the inherent carboxylic acid groups on the film, followed by amidation of the grafted amino acid. Conversion of film carboxylic acid groups to primary amide groups was also conducted to compare the impact of direct surface amidation. Subsequent measurements showed that both surface amidation schemes reduced the kinetic COF from 0.30 to 0.15 ∼ 0.18. Repetitive COF testing revealed that amide-modified EAA films maintained low COF values that were independent of the number of COF test runs. However, control experiments showed that COF values also depended greatly on simply exposing film to the various reaction solvents, which increased surface roughness. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 97: 2242–2248, 2005

Ancillary