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Particle size and distribution of biodegradable poly-D,L-lactide-co-poly(ethylene glycol) block polymer nanoparticles prepared by nanoprecipitation

Authors

  • Jie Ren,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Nano and Bio-Polymeric Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, People's Republic of China
    • Institute of Nano and Bio-Polymeric Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, People's Republic of China
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  • Haiyan Hong,

    1. Institute of Nano and Bio-Polymeric Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, People's Republic of China
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  • Jinxing Song,

    1. Institute of Nano and Bio-Polymeric Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, People's Republic of China
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  • Tianbin Ren

    1. Institute of Nano and Bio-Polymeric Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, People's Republic of China
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Abstract

A biodegradable block copolymer, poly-D,L-lactide (PLA)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), was prepared by the ring-opening polymerization of lactide with stannous caprylate [Sn(Oct2)] as a catalyst; then, the PLA–PEG copolymer was made into nanoparticles by nanoprecipitation under different conditions. The average molecular weight and structure of PLA–PEG were detected by 1H-NMR and gel permeation chromatography. The sizes and distributions of the nanoparticles were investigated with a laser particle-size analyzer. The morphologies of the nanoparticles were examined by transmission electron microscopy. The effects of the solvent–nonsolvent system, operation conditions, and dosage of span-80 on the sizes and distributions of the nanoparticles are discussed. The results show that acetone–water was a suitable solvent–nonsolvent system and the volume ratio of the nonsolvent phase to the solvent phase (O/W) (v/v), the concentration of PLA–PEG in the solvent phase, and the dosage of span-80 had important effects on the particle sizes and distributions. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 98: 1884–1890, 2005

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