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Adhesion of microwave-plasma-treated fluoropolymers to thermoset vinylester

Authors

  • M. S. Hedenqvist,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
    • Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
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  • A. Merveille,

    1. Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
    Current affiliation:
    1. Ledepp–Arcelor, 17 Avenue des Tilleuls, BP 11, 571 191 Florange Cedex, France
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  • K. Odelius,

    1. Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
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  • A.-C. Albertsson,

    1. Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
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  • G. Bergman

    1. Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
    Current affiliation:
    1. Swedish Corrosion Institute, Kräftriket 23A, S-10405 Stockholm, Sweden
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Abstract

Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) and a fluoroethylene copolymer were surface treated with a 2.45-GHz microwave plasma to enhance their adhesion to a vinylester thermoset. The plasmas were generated with an inert gas (Ar) and with reactive gases (H2, O2, and N2). The lap-joint shear stress was measured on fluoropolymer samples glued with the vinylester. In general, the stress at failure increased with increasing plasma-energy dose. The H2 plasma yielded the best adhesion, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that it yielded the highest degree of defluorination of the fluoropolymer surface. The defluorination efficiency declined in the order H2, Ar, O2, and N2. Contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the surface roughness of the fluoropolymer depended on the rate of achieving the target energy dose. High power led to a smoother surface, probably because of a greater increase in temperature and partial melting. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 98: 838–842, 2005

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